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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, April 04, 1866, FOURTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAILY EVENING TELEGRAPH. PHILADELPHIA, WEDNESDAY, APML 4, 18GG.
LITElt ATUKE.
Mr. (Jeorge II. Bokor,- ot thW city, has
had tho honor of having a etattiotte made from
one of hia poems, by Mr. Samuel Conkey, a
jouur sculptor of New York. The poem In ques
tion, entitled "la the Wilderness," commemo
rates an incident of tho bnltle in that dreadful
, locality on the 7th of May. 18(11 the story of a
wounded hoy who, after lying: all nlaht un
tented on the Held, wa? (Uncovered In the morn
ing creeping around and picking violet:
"So, lout in thought, scarce conscious ol the deed,
Culling the violets, hern and there ke crept
Slowly ahl slowly lor his wound would bleed;
And the sweet flowers themselves half smllod, half
wept, "
To be thus fathered in
By hands so pale and thin,
Bv It n pom tremblinir as they neatly laid
Stem upon stem, and bound them in a braid."
, The Executive Committee of the Dramatic
Collcgp have awarded the prize of one hundred
pounds, left by tho late T. P. Cook, the famous
actor of sailor part', for the beet nationul drama,
to Mr. A. It. Slous, a member of the English
Stock Exchange. The title of his drama, which
h) soon to be produced, is True to the Core.
A new journal has recently been started In
Paris in the interest of tho Great Exhibition of
next year. One of its objects is to give pub
licity to ollicial documents beuring on the exhi
bition, and information useful to exhibitors;
another, to establish a general international
agency wheieby the journal will be in constant
correspondence with commissioners, commit
tees, and other bidies delegated to the exhibi
tion from foreign countries. It is in direct rela
tion with the Imperial Commission, which may
be reached through its columns. One of its
features will be a scries ot biographical sketches
of the principal manufacturers aud inventors
whose works are to be in the exhibition, of
which descriptions will be given while the ex
hibition is in progress, toaelher with reports
of the different Juries and their awards. Agents
lor this paper Le Monileur de T Exposition Uni.
tersi'lle de lbC7 are about to be appointed in
oui principal cities.
The publication ol hi3 translation of Homer
lat year by Lord Derby caused his political
opponent, Mr. Gladitone, to ahaudou a transla
tion of the same poet, upon which he had been
engaged for years. He has since changed his
determination, we now learn, and in due time
another English Homer will appear, bearing on
its title-page us translator the name of the Chan
cellor of the Exchequer.
The original manuscript of numboldt'3
"Cosmos" wa recently presented to tho Em
peror Napoleon by M. Buschmnnn, Royal Libra
rian and member of tlie Berlin Scientific Aca
demy, who was employed by Humboldt to write
out tho woik from his rough notes, which were
so often corrected and enlarged that a complete
and clean copy was neoessr.ry for the printer,
each sheet being literally covered by the
cramped and frequently illegible writing ot the
' old 8atant. M. Buschmann carefully preserved
the manuscripts, which make five large quarto
volumes. The Emperor was pleased to accept
them, we are told so pleased, indeed, that ho
gave M. Buschmann the medal of the Legion of
Honor.
Messrs. Hurd & Houehton have in prepara
tion two books which, if well done, will be valu
able contributions to the ever-increasing library
Of Shakcspeariana "The Authorship of Shake'
' speare," by Nathaniel Holmes, one of the judges
f the Supremo Court of Missouri, and "Shake-
epaare's Delineation of Insanity, Imbecility, and
Suicide," by Dr. O. A. Kelloge, Assistant Physi
clan of the Utica Insane Asylum. The writer of
tho first adopts what may be called the Baconian
Ikiory of the Shakespeare problem. Judge
Holmes is a believer in Miss Delia Bacon, who
wa- a believer In Lord Bacon, to the extent that
it was he, and not Williaai Shakespeare, who
jrrote Shakespeare's plays.
Mr. George Jesse has in the press "He-
searches into the History of the British Dog,
from Ancient Laws, Charters, and Historical
Rjcords, with Original Anecdotes from the
PjpU aud frose Writers of Mediteval and
Modern Times."
"Cutubert Eede" (the Hev. Mr. Bradley) is
about to publish, in two volumes, "Matins and
Muttons."
Mr. Andrew Halliday has a new volume
neatly ready, tne titio ot .wiiich suggests a
a memory of the late Washington Irving, viz.,
"Sunnyside Papers."
Louis, ex-King of Bavaria, is said to be at
Nice revising the manuscript of a new volume
of poems.
King John, of Suxony, has lately published
the tbiid aud last part of his translation ot
Dante's "Diviua Commcdia."
Mips Isa Craig, who came into notice as a
poetess by taking the prize lor a Burns ode for
his. one hundredth birthday, is said to bo the
editor of the Argosy, which we have reason to
belive is edited by Mr. Charles Iteadc.
M. Lacrolx, who made his mark as a pub,
Usher by the sum which he paid tor M. Hugo's
"Les Miserables," and the success which he
secured tor it, was lately sentenced to a tine of
$300 aud a year's imprisonment for publishing a
posthumous work of M. Proudhon's, which
consisted of skeptical notes on the Evangelists.
A new periodical has recently appeared in
England, bearing the imprint of Messrs. Strahan
& Co. Its title is The Contemporary Review,
and its object to present the best thought of the
time, particularly in its relation to and in its
discussions ol serious theological questions. Its
editor is understood to be Dean Alford.
Mr, W. II. Russell has another new novel on
the eve of publication "The Adventures of Dr,
Brady; or, The City and the Camp."
Alexander Strahan (London and New York)
has in preparation the "Lives of Indian Offl
cers," forming a biographical history of the civil
and military services of India, by John W,
Kaye, author of "The Llfo of Lord Metcalfe:"
"The Prospects and Resources ol America, as'
certained during a vhjit to the State in the
autumn of 1865," by Sir Morton Peto, Bart. M,
P.: "Reminiscences of a Highland Parish," by
Herman aici.eoa; -Travels in the Sclavonic
Provinces of Turkey in Europe," by G. Mulr
aiaciteuzie ana a. p. Irby, with illustrations;
ana -uosas ae isspana, or bpatn and the Span
iards," by the author of "Flemish Interiors "
two volumes, illustrated.
There is a comic paper In Melbourne, Aus
tralia, Issued weekly, under the title of the Mel
bourne Punch. Its contributors have Just pub-
jisnea a comic book ol travel, entitled, "The Ad-
ventures of Captain Achilles von Humboldt
Blow hard, being a Trip to Wood's Point, showing
lUa. uimiiii uuveiiiT inreu upon me roau.
, .. ' n""-u oiwuuuu iiia mining re
rhotographji ot French Celebrities.
A correspondent of tho Nation writes that a
few jears ago, while In Paris, he amused himself
by studying tue lace ol diHtinirulshed French
men, chiefly authors nnd artist?, whose photo
graphs were exhibited in tne shop windows of
the Boulevards. Some of iiis descriptions are
as lollows :
Alexander Dumas, Pftir. A face whose fea
tures have an uninistaKable basis of the negro
in them. Bnld, bright, jovial, somewhat coarse,
and decidedly earthy. Indications ot a touzli
epidermis and a strong constitution. Plenty ot
self-esteem and vanity. r
Victor Hugo. A niaciillleent head the brow
piled up square and compact, whero all the In
tellectual organs seem well and evenly de
veloped. Immense-ldenlity. above 'which "the
moral iaculties arch the head into a woll-
roanded dome. The hair crpy and cut close to
the head. Eyes not largo, Put deep and intense
with a sol t tire. Large cars. Noso in harmony
with the ret ot the luce, which inclines to
squareness. Mouth full ol determination, yet
expressive ot teellne;. Thick moustache and
very short prey beard. i
IjAmartinh. as complete a contrast to mo last
as can well be. A burn but rotrcatins ' brow.
Vain, supercilious eyes. Nose long and pointed.
juohtii rigid, yet weak. - ho ocara or moustache.
JvLF.a Janin. A large head and face, lull of
joviality and bontiomte suggestive of a portly
person anu a me oi intellectual ease.
Thiers. A head and figure which perfectly
recalls the English Punch or. rather, a cross
between Punch and a Yankee clergyman. Face
very compact, snort grey hair; no De.ird.
Wcurs spectacles, throuorh which he looks in
tensely seuatorial and dtgniticd.
UnzoT. Very ola ana verv grave. A large,
intellectual blow. Thin gray hair. Eyes not
blight; the muscles beneath them swollen and
bttcgy. Thin, tixed mouth. No beard.
TiiEoruiLE Oautier. A face Indicative of an
intellect rather disposed than not to make a
pillow ot its accompanying indolent tempera
ment. Large, heavy features. Affected sloven
liness. Seems as it he required a Btrong stimu
lant to set him going, but as it capable of much
intellectual power.
JVHoiiELET. A lace oi an old man, Dcnovoicnt,
serene, and intellectual, out not revealing any
other special trait.
r.pnoND About. xoung, heartv, lovlat, wittv.
Good, handsome eyes. Looks as it' he would
eoou get acquainted with vou, and do the best
of company.
Eugene Pelletan. Au intense and serious
face, bent downward in thought. Black, pierc-
ms eyes, omcK nuir, and tines Pluck beard.
Madame Gkokuk Sand. Loui? oval lace: luree
dark eyes wih drooping lids. Face expressing
n combination ot a dreamv. voluptuous tempera
ment great benevolence, and intellectual eeuius.
Gc stave JJonE. Km her handsome; dark grey
eyes, lull oi unmistakable genius; a good head;
mouth and chin indicating urmnesd and perse
verance. Femcien David. Vou would take him tor a
full-blooded Scotch man. Inclined to liAldness;
his long thin hair looped over his head. Full,
earnest eyes, ana tun nps.
Jean i.eon (jKhomk. a thin, saturnine
face;
look;
rather hieh check bones; a proud, sad
moiiBtache, but no beard.
Gustave Courbet. A Droud, common lace,
with hich chfek bones; thick, long hair and
beard; has a bold, conceited look.
J. li. J. uohot. A simple, honest, pleasant
face, c'.cun shaved; a coarsely shaned mouth;
die burly name: not the least trace ot the poetic
about him. though his French admirers claim
this quality tbr.his pictures.
Kosa Uonheub. A tuce not expressive ot
trenuis. Features somewhat hard and nxed. Ex
pression bright but unsympathetic.
J. Li. k. fliEissoNiER. J tic neau is so much in
clined forward, and the eyes cast downward, that
nothing can be aivinea ot nis character ana ge-
nins. His figure is small.
H ale VY. The last lace in the world you would
take for a musical artist. You might take him
lor the most dogmatic of doctors, whether of
law or physic, xou are puzzlea to conceive
how any music could ever have issued from a
man with such a lace as that
Rossini. The veteran composer has crown
old. His features do not express what they
should. The full, dark oyes, however, still seem
to flash with sparkling melody.
uockop. a good, souu, musical iace; gooa.
liltrh head.
Auber. Has tho nervous musical tempera
ment chiefly Indicated about the brow.
THE NEW YORK PEESS.
Editorial Opinions of the Leading
Journals Upon the Most I moor t
ant Topics of the Hour.
COSiriLED EVERT DAY FOE EVENING TELEGRAPH.
The Senate and the President A Compro
mise Demanded by the Country.
From the Times.
The closeness of the vote in Connecticut on
Monday, as well as the pause in the proceedings
of tho Senate, surely combine to suggest that
moderate concession and a reasonable degree of
conciliation are required to avert the difficulty
between Congress and the Executive. The cause
of the poseponeir.ent of debate on the veto is
favorable to the calm reflection which must pre
cede reconciliation. The death of Senator Foot
should call forth something more worthy of his
character than stereotyped eulogy and formal
regrets; and what is more befitting the occasion
than the exercise of the kind, forbeanng spirit
which won for him universal respect and an
influence which men of more brilliant parts
have failed to acquire V
If the life of the deceased Senator teach aught
worthy of being remembered by his associates,
it is that there should bo no divorce between
principle and courtesy; that adheronco to one's
own convictions is compatible with the fullest
respect for tho convictions of others; that to
accomplish practical results in statesmanship,
as in ordinary life, there must be a reciprocal
yielding up ot points not essential to the main
V: ... ...' C . 1 LVaI ..... . J u i 1 . . .
uuicti iu vivw. ooiuiuou luui was iu iuubu
respects an exemplar that may be profitably
studied by some whom he has left. Never a
trimmer or waveier in politics, he fouud it
not necessaiy to justify his patriotism by im
pugning the patriotism of others. Difference
ol opinion, whether in reference to enda or
means, was not held by him to bo a reason lor
imputing dishonesty. He had so little ot the
Pharisee in his nature, that he was never
tempted to rise in his place in the Senate
Chamber and thank God that ho was purer,
better, wiser than his neighbors. He did not
contound insolence with integrity, intolerance
with consistency, nor savaeo obstinacy with
adherence to principle. And most devoutly Is
it to be desired that in all these feature of his
character he may be imitated by those who are
most loud in their prdlessions of love and
veneration towards his memory.
v The temper of such an one as Senator Foot
will bo pre-eminently salutary and useful when
action upon the veto is invoked. Disguise It
as we may, the contest which is threatened is
pregnant with contingencies that cannot be
contemplated without anxiety. More depends
upon the manner in which the subject shall be
approached than upon the mere fact of its dis
posal. Tho veto may be sustained without ne
cessarily entailing a final rupture between the
President and any considerable proportion of
the Republican party; or it may bo overridden
without exhibiting members of that party in
the llgh of assailants or enemies of the Presi
dent But these results are possible only on
the supposition that Senators enter upou the
discussion with a proper regard lor the rights,
and a proper respect tor the opinions and feel
ings of the writer of the message under con
siderstiou. '
If thev would avert difficulty unattended with
danger, they should muke up their mluds to deal
with the document belore them on Its merits; to
remember thnt the President has transmitted it
in the performance of a constitutional duty, and
to lndee oi'its obleqtions and areuments soberly
and civilly. Abuso of Andrew Johnson will not
prove that the Civil Richts bill is either politic
or constitutional. Threatening or bragtradoclo
ill not overthrow his loulc. or convict him of
trespassinsr bejond his province. His argument
mttitt be met with argument. His allegations of
iincoiiptitutionahtv must be remitted by proofs
that his rendering of constitutional provisions
is at variance with that of acknowledged
authorities. ' '
A discussion of this kind will be seemly and In
order, and will reconcile tlia country to the de
cision, be It what it may. Any other ft.vlo ot de
bate will convert the semblance f a breach into
! a formidable reality ; and while convincing the
country that the President Is light and the oppo
sition to him wroutr, will necessitate and lUBtify
the use of all the means placed at his command,
under the letter of tho Constitution, for the pro
tection of his position.
There mieht be some excuse for a trial of
strength, irrespectlv0 of consequences, if the
purposes of tho Presldt were shown to be at.
variance with the ostensible object of the
measure he has vetoed. But this plea is not
available. If tho Civil Rights bill be a bill to
protect tho Civil rights of the freodmen, and
nothing more, its aim is in accord with the
viows and alms of the President. His rejection
ot the measure applies, not to the object as thus
understood, but to the agencies to Da created
and the means to bo employed for its accom
plishment. To assume, then, that so far as this
end is concerned, concert of action between
Congress and the President is impossible, Is to
insult the capacity ot th former, or to attribute
to the latter a want of sincerity. The country
will not sustain a charge ot this kind against
the President, until he refuse to siirn a bill
divested of the extraneous and unconstitutional
characteristics to which he has obiected. And
an unwillingness on the part ol Congress to en
deavor to care for the freedmT. by a iresort to
less obnoxious machinery; or the assertion of a
less obnoxious authority, than is covered by tho
vetoed bill, will generate the idear that tho
wellBre ot the emancipated slave Is a mere
pretext for the furtherance of some unavowed
purpose.
Instead of using the debate on the veto as an
opportunity for intensifvlns the diflerenc be
tween the President and the majority in Con
gress, we would lam hope that it will be made
the groundwork of a oommomise which shall
restore cordial harmony to the two branches of
tne tiovernmem. A compromise there must be.
sooner or Inter, or a dead-lock will be inevitable.
I he nnauclul and business interests ot the couti
try are suffering from leeislatlve neglect. To pre
cipitate a crisis now, as between uonjrress and
the President, will bo to prolong the uncertainty
which has already operated disastrously upon
every material interest, and at no distmt dav
to produce n crisis to which even politicians
cannot pretend to oeinniuerent.
The country calls for practical legislation
Before thi.s can be had, however, there must be
concessions touchiuir questions of which the
trcpdmcn are made the scanecoat. Why not
make the t'ivil Rights bill the beginning of the
wort oi compromiser
The Finality Impottnnt Proclamation ot
the President The Southern States Re
stored.
from the lltratd.
The President has tittinily celebrated the first
'anniversary of the fall of Richmond by the pub
lication of a proclamation officially announcing
tho Rebellion at an eud, peace restored, the
State Governments again reconstructed and in
working order, and the General Government
firmly in power throughout the entire Union.
The great purpose and object of the w ar was
the preservation of the Union. To doubt this
was till lately but little less than treason; aud
manv who from time to time ventured to declare
that the object ot the war was the conquest and
destruction ot certain States were lor no other
reason classed as lecble friends, if not positive
foes of the country. Indeed, the declaration
that the war was one of oppression, subjuga
tion, and conquest was tue st aple ot those who op
posed the war and Impuucd our motives, whether
In the South, in England, or in the Rebel press
of our Northern cities. All the country can
remember well the supreme scorn and indigna
tion with wnicu tne orators ot tue ncpubiican
party denied the declarations ot tue enemy
Each vied with the other in the endeavor to
give more forcible expression to the great pur
pose of the people that the war was to maintain
the Union, and to show that if the war should
involve the abolition of slavery it would be only
as an incident, and not as a primary object.
We were even reproached by Earl Russell with a
want of this purpose against slavery.
Congress, in sympathy with the people, went
to the limit of the language to give emphasis to
the declaration that the war was a war lor the
Union. Just alter the battle ot Bull Run it
adopted a resolution in which were these words:
"In this national emergency Congress, ban
ishing all feeling ot mere passion and resent
ment, will recollect only its duty to the whole
country ; that this war is not prosecuted upon
our part in any spirit of oppression, nor lor any
purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor tor the
purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the
rights or established institutions of those States,
hut to dclend and maintain the supremacy of
the Constitution nd all laws made in pursuance
thereof, and to preserve tho Union, with all tho
dignity, equality, and rights of the several
States unimpaired ; that as soon as these objects
are accomplished the war oupht to cease."
Nothing could be more emphatic or positive
than this.
But there was one representative who believed
that even this did not go tar enough as to the
pteservation of the States, and who therefore
desired to go further. This whs Thaddcus Ste
vens, of Pennsylvania. On December 4. ltiii'2,
that gentleman offered in Congress resolutions
declaring that "the Union must be and remain
one and indivisible forever;" and also that "if
any person in the employment of the United
States.in either the legislative or executve branch
should propose to make peace, or should advise
the acceptance of any such proposition on any
other basis than the integrity and entire unity
ot the United (States and their Territories as they
existed at the time of the Rebellion, he will be
guilty of a high crime."
Such was the position at that time of Con
press, of the country, and of the Republican
party, then in sympathy with the people and ex
pressing tho popular wdl. At that time Con
gress, the President, and the pesple were asked
to acknowledge that the abolition of slavery was
the object of the war, and they repudiated the
thought. Congress was asked to declare that
the States which rebelled had forfeited their ex
istence as States. Mr. Conway, of Kansas,
offered a resolution declaring "that the Ameri
can Union consists of those States which are
now IotrI to thp Forlorn! Constitution." It wnw
tabled by one hundred and thirty-two VOtOS
.Dir. cenway uunseii being the only person who
voted in its iavor. By the light of these facts it
is readily seen that the now dominant faction In
Congress which claims to ba the Republican
party, the Union party, the party that carried
the country through the war, is not that party
at all. Thaddeus Stevens is jiow rampant for
Congress to commit what, as a Republicau, he
declared would be a high crime. Congress now
dally assumes that the Concessional declara
tion of Ibtil was a gigantic falsity, and acts on
that very negation of the States which is voted
down as outrageous.
The President alone adheres to and maintains
the great national principles and policy ot the
party that carried (he country through the war.
Abandoned by Congress, he has, pursued to their
logical conclusions, without reference to that
body, the principles enunciated in the resolu
tions quoted above and iu his proclamation of
peace and union. All the States have now,
since the nullification of the ordinance of seces
sion by the Texas Convention, done all that lay
in their power towards once more taking their
proper position in the Union. It ouly remained
tor the president to do the rest on behalf of the
country. His clear duty was to pronounce their
complete restoration, and this he has promptly,
boldly, aud unreservedly doue. He has done
this entirely without reeard to the present
course of Congre-s, nnd really in delauce of It.
Tho Constitution. - the repeated declarations of
Ihe part to which be oeshis position.' the
voice of the whole peoplp, marked out this lino
of ci-nduct with unmistakable distinctness, and
loll him no option. i , ;
The Bankrupt Bill.
f rom the Tribune.
We hoi I that tho State has no moral right to
fetter peimancntly the energies ind discourage
the hopes of its ciil.cus who may have bopu
onco unfortunate in business. We deny tbat it
is either politic or just to mortgage the futuro
earning ol a debtor who, being unable to pay
his creditors in full, has honestly surrendered
his whole property, aud whose assets boar , a
reasonable proportion to his obligations. We
affirm that to hold the sword of the law over
such a man's head indefinitely Is a wronir to
him, no benefit to his creditor, and a serious
injury to society In general. Hence we lielieve
in a bankrupt law, and we earnestly hope the
House will Mr. Jenekes' bill.
We must presume the Uouso has examined
ihis measure, yet we hear ot no serious objec
tion to any part of it. The bill Is not rejected
because ot its imperfection, but because of its
perfection. It was before the last Conaress in
substantially the same shape as at present, and
was subjected to thp closest criticism. Last
Tuesday the House went through it, section bv
section, and its enemies could only object that
it was too well drawn. Indeed, the main fea
tures und principles of the bill are not experi
mental nor theoretical, but have stood the test
ol experience in several States, and are lirmly
established by repeated judicial decisions. Mr.
Jenekes bus framed his bill upon the model of
the Massachusetts Insolvent Laws, which have
grow n into a system through the Urtace of many
Tears, and are Generally considered by the pro
fession the bert existing In this country, or in
Kufthmd. Those who oppose the billl do so on
uneral principles. They do not waut any
Bankrupt law.
But we believe nay, we are sure the country
dees want a bankrupt law, and that tho measure
is not less populsr with tho creditor class than
with the deotor class. Business men as a ride
know their own Interests. They know that a
man who has tailed, hus tho lite crushed out of
him by a condition of the law which permits a
creditor to pounce on the first thousand dollars
that bis debtor struggling up again in the world
can make. Whereas, if you give tha. debtor a
legal release, you set Wm on his fee, you en
courr.ee him to start airesh, you enable him to
acQiiirothe means eventually to nay thoc very
debts the legal existence ot which would have
prevented his making tho effort. You give com
fort to his lumily: you add wealth to society.
In the wreck and prostration of business inter
ests which the last live years have witnessed,
there ure hundreds of thousands wai'lntr the
passuge of this Bankrupt bill as the signal of
tueir emancipation.
Their property is gone; their creditors will pet
nothlns if ttie bill doesn't puss; they cannot be
any w orse off if you pass a doen such laws. Tho
Chombeis of Commerce of New York, of Boston,
and many other cities, representing the creditor
class, have recognized this by their approval ol
the bill In question. Tho House may well abide
by the judament. of the only class which can
ever theoretically be deemed opposed to the
measure.
The majority against the bill last Wednesday
was small, the vote being .r9 to 7U. A motion to
lay on the table, a motion to reconsider, by
w hich its enemies hoped to kill It finally, was
immediately alter lost by 59 to C8, and the
subject was postponed till April 4. We trust
no Irlend of the bill will fail to be present when
it again comes up.
A Little Stoiy with a Little Moral.
From the Daily News.
There is a story extant, written In most ex
cellcnt French, concerning the father of the
present Bey ot Tunis, which, while it indicates
a barbarous condition of society, and a serious
disregard of human life under the Crescent,
still bears with it a moral that cannot escape
the reflecting mind. This morose ruler, it is
said, was once waited upon by the Admiral
commanding the French fleet in the Meditcr
ranean Sea, who paid him a visit of cere
mony, accompanied by the chiet officers
of his squadron. In au anto-chambor of the
palace, a lunctionary of state met them and
with profound salums informed the Admiral
that his Royal Highness would shortly irive
them audience, and beirtred that the visitors
would pardon his absence for a short time, as
he was engaged at that moment in squaring
accounts w ith one ot his ministers.
Tho Admiral, in response to this, declared hi3
wuilnenesB to await his sublime aiaiesty's con
vemence. In so doing, both he and his officers
were struck with the mysterious sounds which
emanated (torn behind the velvet curtains which
led into the grand audience chamber. What
ever mmlit be the uey s method ot settling up
wuh his relractory Minister, it was evident that
that official, or somebody else, was faring badly
uurinc the operation, nut lor tne improbability
of the thing, It would have appeared that that
aaiunct to Government was subjected to tho
rudest tieatment in the way of blows and all
manner ot objurgations.
After a while, however, a deathly silence
supervened to the noise ot struggling behind
the curtain, the drapery was drawn to either
side, aud the Admiral and his suite appeared
belore the Bey, who, seated on his throne,
seemed trom his flushed countenance and his
angry frown to have undergone no little excite
ment. When the expressions of compliment
were got through with, and the Bey had grown
a little calmer, a slave in attendance was ordered
to remove the cloak trom something lying at
the loot of the throne.
The order was obeyed, and his Sublime
Mightiness, directing the attention of his visitors
to it, remarked: "That carrion, an hour ago,
was my Minister ot War. At the time ot your
airival 1 was engaged in settling auairs with
him. Last week I indicated a certain change in
military affairs as tho best, in my judgment, for
Tunis; ana tne man whose carrass is belore vou.
notwithstanding the fact that he is supposed to
assist u?v Government, advocated, and as for as
be could, carried out exactly a dillerent policy,
For that reason, and f or the good of this peorlo
I hse been compelled to satisfy justice by
applying the bastinado ana the oowsinng to
him. I have ouly to add that I gave him his
choice between a cup of poisoned cotfeo or
Btrar sling, and he chose tho latter; and you
will perceive that everything that could bo
done, consistently with honor, was done in his
case."
As we havo before remarked, this little inci
dent in the Bey's htstory, while it has its dark
shades, has also Its gleams of light. While we
would naturally deprecate so sudden and ab
rupt a conclusion of an official or ministerial
career even, for example, in the case of Mr.
Stanton it Is not to be denied that the prompt
ness with which this half-barbarous Prince dis
possessed himself of an incubus upon his ad
ministration, and an obstacle to his authority, is
much to be commended. And we cannot close
the narrative of this brief story without de
claring that it carries with It a most excellent
moral for Christian rulers, and, among them
shall we say if Mr. Johnson.
Prospect of a Great War.
From the World.
The last steamer from Europe brings news full
of interest. Prussia and Austria are exchanging
hostile notes, mustering armies on their respec.
tive frontiers, and the next steamer may bring
us "the clash of resouuding arms." There is,
consequently, excitement on the stock exchanges
of Europe; tho funds are falling; and a, pause
has been given to speculative enterprises.
The cause of this quarrel is no mystery. It
relates to the disposition of the Duchies of
Schleswlg and Holstein, which were won by the
combined German armies from Denmark. Aus
tria is w illing to divide the spoils, to make the
l
Duchies an independent power, or even lo give
I'rusia the lion h share, includlnir the harbor of
Kiel i but Prussia insts's upon annexing both
tne Duchies to her own dominions, and will
mnkfno concessions to either Austria or the
fjerrosii Confederation. ' ' j
Should Von Bismarck Miceeed in this daring
but dishonest scheme, it will make Prussia the
master ot Germany, and degrade Austria to the
position of a third-rate power. Should a war
break out between these two powers it would
almost inevltnbly Involve the ret ot Europe.
Austria's difficulty would be Italy'aopportuiiity,
nnd a dash would probably be made at Venetia.
Indeed, there are so many grave possibilities
growing out ol this war that the news by tho
next steamer will bo looked for with eager
interest.
t
SPECIAL NOTICES.
SEMINARY OF ST. CHARLES BOR
ROW to.
THE rORNF.R STONE
of tli a New SainiDiry of Bt. CbarlM Borromeo will b
Isid
On WEDNESDAY A rTF.KSOOS, April 4,
At 3 o'clock.
Adilresnfs will be mnu b
'IHKKIUHT KKW. BISHOP WOOD,
THEKhV. MIi:H Ah L O'l tlhSOIt, 8. J. -
iformrrlv KiTtor oi'thi Seminary),
THE VH.BY KKV. DR O'llAKA., V, O., .
And otliem.
Most of the Reverend Clufkr Of the Dloceaf! will ba
prenent.
IU lrnve the l'(nni-vl iinln RnMrnafl Station, rrnim
Hie tiarkct Htrert IlrlOif. on Wronrvlar Aiiernnon.
AiMIl 4. at J o'clork. mr the Fronn,1 ot the New
Mnilnnrr and wUl return to l'hi aUe.pbUi at bait
pM 4 o'clork.
Kxcur Ion Tickets, 2ScenU. Can be had at any of the
Churrlita 3 30 St
EST
CAMDEN AND AM BOY RAITROAD
AND TRANSPORT TIOW COMPANY
OKFICK, I.ohdkisTowm. March 2H. lfi.
Atmric. rine Annual MiMlnof the Hinokliolclor
ol Ihe CAMDhK AND All ISO Y KA1LKOAI) AND
IHANH'OHTATION COMPANY wlil be held at the
Conitmnv'Sbflcolil BORD1.M TOWN, on H ATI.' RII A Y.
tho htii ni April, lblft.ut 12 o'clock M., lor the election
o: nevi'ti Directors, to rrrrt for the ennln year.
a 80 t4 2S AMtihL J. UA Y Alii), Secretary.
"EX( KI.SIOR ROCK" SPUING, SARA
TOGA SPKINUS. Now York.
Tho water oi tlila verv superior spring la nneqnalM in
IUuic.dlclno.1 uuaiitleii.
A. R. LAWKKNCE CO . '
Paratoca Ri.rtngg, K. Y., and No. J BARCLAY Street,
new i or cn.r.
Kuld at wbolcnale In Phl'annlphia br
WH1TALL TATI1V A CO.,
BFLLOCK CRENSHAW,
(U .DIP. LII I. Ll.tvl - . rV
and retnlli d by the leading Druttg'ata, Hotel, and tirxt-
clara uroctro. tlOawlmrp
OFF1CR OF TI1K VAN PUSGN OIL
COMPANY. No. fi WALNUT Street.
Philadku'Iiia. March 2!) IMC.
A ntee'lrgol" the Stccklio dent ot the VAN DUES
OH. iompanY win be arid at the oitlce of the oin
pany on HON DAY. tlie ltith oi April. M6, at S o'clock
P. M.. loact on the proposition toae!! upon each htiaro
ot t'ie I ar 1 1 til Stuck ot alil ( ctupnny the Hum of KIVE
Lr M.t. uy order ot mo nonra ot Director,
1 3lHwctu4t V. it. McDOwKLL,. Hocretary.
NEW LONDON COPPER MINING
COMPANY.
TheAnnutil Meeting of Stockholders 'or Flection ot
Directors to aorve lite ensuing year, will be ueia
ON HtlDAY, APRIL, 11,
At tho Oftlce of the President
No. 417 ARC'll STREET,
At 11 A. II.
BIMOJf POKY,
43 St Secretary.
fd1" A PHYSIOLOGICAL VIEW OF MAR-
KlAt'.K ; I ontblning ue.arly 300 pages, and 130
fine Plntea and tngravlngaot the Anatouiv ot the Human
Organs In a State ot Health and Disease, with a Treatise
on Parlv Prrors, Its Deplorablo Consequences upon the
hind and Body, with the Author's 1'mnof Treatment
the only rutional and auccessiul mode ot euro, as shown
by the letort ot cases treated. A truthful adviser to the
mnrrli d. and those .contemplatlnn roarrlmre. wbo enter
tain doubts ol their pliys'.rul condition Sent free of
poetise to any address, on receipt ot 25 cunts, in stamps
or pcMai currency, oy addressing Dr. Ul tltOl-v. No.
tl V Al DI N l.ane. Albany. N. Y.
The author may be consulted upon any of the diseases
upon which his book treats either pu tuiiaVy or by mail,
nun medicines sent to any pari ot me worm. 11 u um
JUBT POBLiaHED-
liy the Physicians of the
nr.vr i oiuv aiuocuia,
the Ninetieth Edition ot their
kOUR LtCTCTRKB.
entitled
PHILOSOPHY OF MARRIAGE.
To be had free, tor tour stamps, by addressing Secretary
.new xoi'Kaiuaeum oi Anatomy.
717 ly
Nn, tun khuapwai, new ior.
mr
BATCH ELOR'S IIAIE
I THF BKST IN THE WORLD.
DYE.
Haimless reliable, inttamaneoos. The only perfect
oye. no disappointment, uo nuicuious tints, Due true
to nature, mack or itrown.
UhNUlNE IS SIGNED W1LIJAM A. BATCBELOB.
ALSO.
Regenerating Extract oi Mil.lfleurs restores, preserves
and beautifies the hair, prevents baldness. Sold by nil
UruKglsts. Factory No,81 BARCLAY St, N. Y. 33$
Ir-TJ? DINING-ROOM. F. LAKEMEYER.
m3-y CART Kit 'H Alley, would respectfully Inform the
Public lieu el ally that be lias IcitniiUnng undone to make
tins place comfortable In every respect tor the accom
modation ot guests. He hug opened a largo and com
modious Dining-Hooni in the second s'ory" Uis SIDK-
BOAKD Is iiirnlhhed with BRANDIES, WINES,
wimokx , J-tc.. r. ic. oi ri i ttitvit vnuus. 1 1
THE GREAT NEW ENGLAND RE
WEDYI-
DR. J. W. POLAND'S
WHITE PINE COMPOUND
la now offered to the afflicted throuiiliout the country
alter having been proved by the test of eleven years, la
the N ew England States, where Its merits have become
as well known as the tree irom which, In part, It derives
its vlitncs.
THE WHITE PINE COMPOUND CURES
Bore Throat, Colds, Coughs, Dtptherta, bronchitis, Spit
ting of Blood, and Pulmonary Affections generally,
It Is a Remarkable Remedy for Kidney Com
plaints, Diabetes, Difficulty ot Voiding
Urine, Bleeding from the Kidneys
and Bladder, Gravel, and
otber complaints.
Give a trial If you wonld learn the value of a good
and tried medicine. It is pleasant, safe, and sure.
Sold by druggists and dealers in medicine generally.
GEORGE W. SWETT, M. t.. Proprietor,
1 22mW13m BOSTON,- Mass.
TEAS, &o.
TEAS REDUCED TO ?1, AT INGRAM'S
X Tea Warehouse, No. 43 S. SKCOND Street.
T30A8TFI) COFFEE REDUCED TO 3d CTS
XV at INGRAM'S lea Warehouse, No. 43 8. SECOND
street.
4Qct
BEST MILD COFFEE. AT INGRAM'S
Tea Warehouse, No. 43 8. SECOND Street.
TEAS AND COFFEES AT WHOLESALE
L prices, at INGRAM'S Tea Warehouse, No, 41
SECOND Street Try them.
m REEN COFFEES
FROM 22 TO
IS CTS. A
JT pound, at INGRAM'S Tea Warehouse, No
43 S.
HI
SECOND Street Try them.
-t
DENTISTRY.
TSAIAH PRICE. DENTIST, GRADUATE OF
J. Philadelphia College of Dental Surgery, class 18A3-4,
lormerly oi w est Chester, Pa., having served three years
In the Army, lias resumed the practiee of his profession
at No. 241 N. ELEVENTH Street. Philadelphia, where
he will endeavor to itlve satisiactory attention to all who
may require his pioltssiorjal services. 11 8 i
QAS! GAS!! GAS!!!
REDUCE TOUR OAS BILLS.
Stratton's Regulator for Gas Burners,
(Patented November 81, 1866.)
It Is (matter of eonsldeiable importance to gas con
sumers generally, aud of especial Iwporetnce to all
keepers of botels and large boarding houses, to have
such gas burners as will admit of being easily and per
manently adlusUd to suit the special requirements oi
the locality "of each t because those wbo have not to pay
the bills fuel but little or no Iu teres t In economizing tbe
gns, and sometimes carelessly, or thoughtlessly, turn on
twice or thrice as much as would auswer thulr needs.
Call and esauiine, or send your orders to 1
ST Ii ATT ON CO., j
AT THE FLORENCE OFFI'JK,
No. 630 CHESNTT Street, Philada.'
Retail price, M cents each. t2mwf2rn
DEMOVED.-S. & JAMES M. FLANNAOAN
I k have removed frouiNo. 3t4 to No. UO s. DELA
WARE Avenue, I ZD lit
DRY GOODS.
S. t BKSNUT THF.V.
1&66. Spring Importation. 1800.
E. M. NEEDLES.
HAS JVBV OFEKKD
lOOtt PIECES WniTB GOODS,
In PLAI5, FANCY. ?TP.!rED PIjATD And
tlpnrea Jaconets Cambrics Nainsook , lnmlMes,
fwis, .Moll, and oihor Mm !. comprising
most complete sloek, to wt Ion the attcn lon ot
purchasers Is solicited, as they ate ot'.ered at
a larto KiJHCUON Horn last SEAMON'aV
PRICES. . . ,. . . , v. ... . .. . .
100 pieces PHIHRFD MtJKL'NS forBodlw. I
HQ pieces rigt'fS la all varieties of styles and
p rice rotn 80c to l-80. , .
800 PARIS GOFERED -KIRTa, newest styles,
ot mr own linpottation.
'iiiii..g trntavvomt'sit
()28 HOOP-SKIRT t)28
manmaciory o. vtn A lit. Il nnwt,
Above Siath Stieot, Philadelphia. ,t
Who esale and Retail.
Our assortment embraces all the tinw and desirable
M.l.i on.l .1... nl ..... I .. . V. a .. In.
Ladies, at Isscs, and Children.
I nose or hah c arewvnnr m rmti
sue duioHhy to ai.y other hkltt made, and warranted
to Vive satislaction.
. Pklns maue to order, altered and repaired. 4$
MISCELLANEOUS.
pAPER HANGINGS,
FRANCIS NEWIA-UD & SON,
No. 53 NorlU FIFTH Street.
WALL FAT EE 1,
WIS DOW SHADES,
I 28 lm
DECORATIONS. ETC.
BROTHER
w
I L E Y
IV PORT EES AND DF. ALF.R3 T
HAVANA t IOAK.i AND ME"R.CHCM PIPES. .
N. W. Cor. EIGHTH aud WALNUT Strata.
We oflcr the finest Havana Cigars at prices from 39 to
30 rer cf tit. below i be regular rates.
Also, the edentate i
' LONE JACK" SMOKING TOBACCO,
which Is far superior to any yet brought before the
public
Motto of I.nne Jack!
"SEEK NO FURTHER. KOR NO BETTER CAN BH
JTOUND." 115 3m
QEOKGE PLOWMAN,
CAliPENTKR AND UUII.DEUJ
No. 232 CARTER Street
And No. 141 DOCK Street.
Machine Work and Mlllwrlghting promptly attended
to IBS
REVENUE STAMPS, REVENUE STAMPS
Rr VENUE STAMPS,
Of all descriptions,
Of all descriptions,
Always on hand,
Always on band,
AT FT.ORFSTE 8F.WINO MACHINE CO. '8 OKFICRL
AT FLORENCE HEWING WvCUINE CO.'S OFFICE
No,30 f'HKSNUT Street,
No. t-30CHE-NUT Street,
One door below Seventh street.
One door beiow Seventh street.
The moat liberal discount allowed
The most liberal discount allowed. 2
T7 I T L E R, WEAVER & CO.,
MAM.TACTCRERS OF
Manilla and Tarred Cordage, Cords
Twines, Etc.,
No. 23 North WATER Street, and
No. 22 North DELAWARE Avenue,
l'ltlLADELrHIA.
I DW1N H. FlTI.FR, .MlCHAEryJVKATTtR,
C'OKBAB F. CLOTB1EK. 1 14 J
JONUHENTS, TOMBS,
GRAVE-STONES, Eto.
J nut completed, a boautlinl variety of
n ALIAS MAJRELK MONUMENTS,
TOMBS, AND (JBAVE-ST0NE5.
W 111 be sold cheap for cash.
Worn ecnt to any part of the United States.
HENRY H. TARR,
MAKBLK WORKS,
124wlm Wo. 710 GBKKM Street. Philadelphia.
J C PERKINS,
LUMBER MERCHANT
Bnccessor to R. Clark, Jr.,
No. 824 CHRISTIAN STREET.
Constantly on baud a large and varied assortment
of Building Lumber. 6 24
CORN EX CHANGE
BAO MANUFACTORY.
JOHN T. BAHUV Js CO.,
No. 113 N. FRONT and No. 114 N. WATER Street,
Fnliadaiphltt.
DEALERS IN BAliS AND BAGGING
oi every description, for
Gialn, Flour, Salt. Super V hosphate of Lime, Bone
Dust, Etc.
Larue and small GUNNY BAGS canstantly on hand.
i 22 $J Also, WOOL SACKS.
John T. Bailey. Jaueb Cascadbh.
RESTAURANT
ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN.
Finest old and new ALES, at 5 cents perglass.
OOOD ONE-DIME EATING BAR.
The choicest Liquors always on hand.
No. S33 CHE8NUT 8TRUET.
3 10 Sro B EN RY BECKER, Manager.
QOTTON
AND FLAX
8IL DUCK AND CANVAS,
oi ail nuiuuera and nranas.
nt. Awnlnu, Trunk, and Watton-Cover Duck. Also,
er Manulacturtrs' Drier Felts, from one to seven
wide: l'aullns. Belting, Sail Twine, eto.
...1(1 liT lil.f.11,1 . XT e 1 i
Tent
I'ape
feet
uun, .dui ijuu, cmt 1 n iiiu, civ.
JOIIM W. V.Vl'.lHUJJ Co..
36 S
No. 103 JONES' Alley.
WILLIAM S . GRANT,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
50. 83 S. DELAWARE Aveuue, Philadelphia .
AuKKr vou
Dnprnt's Ounpowder, Uerlned Nitre, Charcoal, Eto.
W. Baker & Co 's chocolate. Cocoa, and b rout a.
Crocker Bros. A l o.'s Yellow Mt.il bliualhiug. Bolts,
and Nails. 24
ALEXANDER G. C ATT ELL & C o7,
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
MO. 26 KORTH WHARVES,
AND
NO. 27 NORTH WATFR STREET,
11I1LADEL1U1A. 3 2
A1EIAKDHB O. CATTKIL. ELIJAH O. CATTKLt,
CONTINENTAL HOTEL HAIR DRESSING,
i BATHING AND PF.RFt'M F.KY
ESTABLISHMENT.
PETER SIEGFRIED,
3 201m ' Proprietor.
MONUMENTS AND GRAVESTONES. ON
hand, a large assortment of Gravestones, of vari
ous designs, made or tlie finest Italian aud American,
Marble at the Marble Works of
A. BTEINMF.TZ,
3 87 tuth3m RIDGE Avenge, below Eleventh street.
PASSPORTS PROCURED, ACKNOWLEDGE
menu, Depositions, Affidavit to Acceunts. taken by
JOHN U. FRK'K.
Notary Public, Commissioner fbr all the States. Pension
and Priie Agent, No. 223 DOCK Street 3 24 12t
THE EYE AND EAR.
DEAFNESS AND BLINDNESS,
THROAT, LUNG. CHEST DISEASES, CA
TARRH. ASTHMA, NERVOUS AFFEC
TIONS AND DISEASES OF THE DIGES
TIVE OKUAKS. DB. VON MOttiMi.iA-
KER'8 new and unrivaled systems of treating the
above MALAD1KS with his "Al OMISKR," bss re
ceived the very highest approbation trout tlie best medi
cal nix" all SCIIOnl.-, and the INDORSEMENT of
the entire medical I'RENS. These, with Tl-811 MO
MA 1 irom and Rt.FElts.KCES to responsible C1IT
ZKNH. can be examined by all who ronulio bis profes
li ual s rvices. at hla UH'lCli and KK&lDENi E. No.
iDJl WAI M'T Blnot. jhlliu'rit

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