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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, April 23, 1866, THIRD EDITION, Image 4

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(Evening Mcpnl
Is published every afternoon Sundays excepted)
at No. 108 S. Ihird street. Price, Three Cent
J'er Copy (Dmible Sheet), or Eighteen Cents Per
Wek, payable to Gie Carrier, and mailed to
tfnbscribers out of Vie city at Nine Dollars Per
Annum ; One Dollar and Fifty Cents for Two
Months, invariably in advance for tli period
ordered.
lo insure the Insertion of Advertisements in all
of our Editions, they must be forwarded to our
office not later tlian 10 o'clock each Morning.
MONDAY, APRIL 23. 1860.
Ate German-American Citizens Less
Moral Than rhelr Neighbors ?
A statement has boenmade by a contempo
rary, in connection with the late Deabing
tragedy, which Is calculated, In our opinion,
to do the greatest injustice to a class ol Amer
ican society for whom we have the h'ghest
respect. Our neighbor assorts that the great
majority of the murders committed in this
country are perpetrated by German emigrants,
and deduces the broad conclusion that the
Germans as a people are more addicted to
homicide than any other of the nations of
Europe ; that, in fact, the instincts ol' the race
are naturally bad, and the taking of human
life is but the corollary to their metaphyslca '
faith and early training. For any American
editor to quietly sit down, and pass judgment
upon a largo and respectable class of his
fellow-citizens, giving them a character at once
infamous and inapproprIate,exhibits an absence
ot both Intelligence and conscience which
surprlsos us. For one man to accuse a popu
lation of thousands of a natural tendency to
murder, and include within his sweeping
assertion hundreds of thousands of the most
honest, industrious, and peaceable of our citi
zens, is the assumption of a judicial character
which we hardly expected any private person
would aspire to. Without, however, any pro
positions from which to draw this conclusion,
we are told that the prevalence of crime is
due to the introduction of the German ele
ment into our society.
Having always had a desire to see justice
accorded to all, it is only natural that we ask
evidence to warrant such a sentence. True,
we are told that of the murders committed in
our city a larger proportion have been per
petrated by Germans than any other people.
And what does this prove ? That out of the
dozen leading homicides which have horrified
our community, say fifty per cent, are done
by natives of Germany, and ol all the murders
of which the authors are unknown.it is in
ferred that a like proportion were performed
by this malisrned people. Because within the
circumscribed sphere of our observation a
slight preponderance ol crimes ara justly laid
at the door o( a certain nation, have we any
right to conclude that the great body of that
people are less moral than their neighbors ?
Should the crimes of half-a-dozen villains
involve an honest and peaceable class of
society In their odium ? We think that tha rea
son why such a large proportion of criminals
are Germans, is found in the fact that of late
years It has been the policy of the Governments
ot Prussia and Austria especially, and probably
of their smaller neighbors, to release convicts
from prison provided they promise to emi
grate to America. The recent resolution
passed by Congress protesting against so
barbarous a course, was especially directed to
the Germanic States, and proves that the cus
tom was general. Peobbt was identified by
an acquaintance of his who had known him in
Europe, as coming from the neighborhood of
the celebrated penitentiary at Theingen. It
such is the practice, need we be surprised that
the greatest criminals of the Old World should
continue tbeir misdeeds in the New ? We be
ieve that, if full data of the nationality of
the leading murderers were prepared,it would
be found that the number of Germans was
no larger in proportion to the current of
emigration, than that of any other European
n.tlon; that, in fact, the Italians would
rather exceed tbeir northern neighbors.
The German-American population in
Pennsylvania is immense. It docs not
coalesce and merge into the native element,
but is so extensive that its influence as a dis-,
tinct society is perceptible in all our political
contests. The support of three German papers
in Philadelphia, whese circulation will com
pare favorably with that of any of their Eng
lish contemporaries, is evidence of the extent of
this class of cur community. In the interior of
the State whole counties are populated en
tirely by them. A mingling of their native
tongue is the language in vogue, and through
out all the western part of our Commonwealth
we find the German to be the controlling
element ; yet we hear of no excess of crime
in those localities. We are not shocked with
any nuuibiT of great offenses; in fact, there
appears to be even less atrocious murders than
in other parts of the land; and if the national
character of the German was, as our con
temporary states, so addicted to vicious deedst
surely we would Bse evidence ot it in those
places where they predominate.
The truth is, on the contrary, that the
German temperament is the very reverie of
what is asserted. It is sociable, jovial, warm
hearted, and honest, overflowing with hospi
tality, plain, simple, and quiet. There Is no
nation more bound together, and none
wherein a stranger is more warmly received .
The best evidence of their good feeling Is the
existence of so many German societies. The
Old and the Young Mennroehor, the Scenger
bund, and a number of minor associations,
are all in active life. Picnics, parties, balls,
feuppers, masquerades, and all of the social
gatherings, are continually held under their
management, and the love for their father
land is kept burning by constant eontact
with each other. Real friendship exist, aud
at their numerous ussembliugs, It is proof of
THE DAILY. EVENING TELEGIUril. PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY,
the natural warmth of the German heart
that not many disturbances occur. t What
other foreign people could hold so many, and
yet commit so faw breaches of the peace?
What other nation could have picnics with
out quarrels, and wild dances without dis
turbanceo r
In fict, the accusation of our neighbor has
no foundation whatever in truth. It Is a slan
der on one ol the best classes ot our commu
nity. We can see no cause which can excuse
the injustice done, when an editor assails a
whole nationality became a native of that
country commits a great crime. In the pre
sent case It is even doubtful whether the mur
derer is a German, but whether he is or is not
is a small matter. The whole course of German-American
society goes to prove that if a
dozen Probsts were to appear, and each
commit as great an offense, it could not injure
the residents In our midst. They have proven
their hoLest and peaceful disposition by years
of faithful citizenship, and no slandors of
journals can injure their character or attach
any opprobrium to the Germau-American
name.
Settlements Under the Homestead Law.
The returns from our Western land offices for
the last few months show a remarkably active
and increasing movement in the disposal, of
the public lands. We are glad to believe that
the greater part ot this is due to actual settle
ments under the Homestead law. There are
some reasons why this should be so. The
Homestead .act was passed early in the ad
ministration of President Lincoln". The
four years of terrible and exhausting war
which ensued effectually checked for the
time the westward flow of emigration. The
hardy sons of toil were called off from their
accustomed peaceful march towards the
setting sun, and became the pioneers of free
dom's great host in the contest with slavery
and rebellion. The physical part of that con
flict being now over, the westward march is
once again taken up. and we behold Its first
fruits in the increased disposal of the public
lands.
We are thus really for the first time begin
ning to behold the results of tlie homestead
policy. That those results will be in the
highest degree beneficial to the entire coun
try we have no doubt. It "is probable that
the era of gigantic land speculations in the
West belongs now pretty much to the past.
Its evil effects, however, will last for genera
tions, and-will be a perpetual monument to
the folly which 'so long, in the shape of pro
slavery Democracy ruled in our national
councils. Had the homestead policy been
inaugurated thirty years ago, the curse of
land monopoly would not now rest upon so
many of the fairest portions of the West. In
stead of vast tracts of unimproved land,
owned by non-residents, and retarding set
tlement, dividing communities, and hinder
ing the establishment ot schools and churches,
producing nothing and waiting for the "rise"
said rise being nothing more than the
enhanced value of these idle lands from
the hard toil and persevering industry
of the actual set tler we should have beheld a
land of small farms, compact settlements,
good roads, convenient schools, and well-
sustained ehurches. Three-fourths of all the
trials and difficulties of pioneer life in the
West are due to land monopoly. The West
has grown with astonishing rapidity, and its
developments of material resources are, in
some respects, almost marvellous; but it
would have been lar richer, greater, and more
powerful, had no foot of Government land
ever been sold to a speculator.
Under the Homestead law, each man who
avails himself of its provisions becomes an
actual settler. He has 160 acres of land free
of all cost, except the nominal lee of some ten
dollars. At the end of five years of cultiva
tion he gets his deed from the Government.
There are thousands and tens of thousands
of men paying bigh rents In our cities, and
barely able to support their families, without
laying up a penny for old age or a rainy day,
who might infinitely better Jhelr condition,
and soon become the independent proprietors
of their own homes, by summoning up cour
age to strike for the West, and take up farms
nnder this beneficent act. There are millions
ot acres there still unoccupied, and as good
land as the sun ever shone upon.
. The Disease among Cattle in Panama.
We are Inclined to believe that the disease
which is reported to have broken out among
the cattle in Panama, and which it is feared
may the fatal rinderpest ol the Eastern Con
tinent, is, after all, nothing more than a kind
of murrain that prevails, more or less exten
sively, every year in the Southwest, and that
sometimes assumes the form of a very fatal
epidemic. It is known in the West under
the name of the Upanish or Texas feeer, and
is deemed contagious. During the summer
of 1800 an exceedingly hot and dry season
this epidemic prevailed among the cattle
in Kansas, carrying them off by thousands.
It was popularly supposed to have been
introduced by droves of cattle passing
through the Territory from Texas; and
after the experience of a lew seasons, this
idea of its origin became so general that
stringent statutes were passed by the Legisla
ture of Kansas, forbidding, under heavy
'penalties, the driving of cattle through any of
the Inhabited portions ot the State, during the
warm months, either from Texas, Arkansas,
or the Indian Territory. These precautions
proved effectual, and of late years we have
heard no complaints of the disease frAin that
or other States.
This Spanish fever has many of the charac
teristlcs ascribed to the rinderpest, and If not
the same disease, Is of the same general char
acter. It seems to originate upon the vst
plains of Texas and Central America, snd
probably prevails ttere, Jo, greatgc or
malignity at all times. In Panama it may
have taken on a partlcalarly fatal form, and
thus induced the belief that it is the genuine
rinderpest which is causing such havoc among
the cattle in England.
Sanitary Measures.
Tito following communication in worthy of the
consideration of all our citizons Just at this time.
Every one tihould nso all possible means of p re
yen Hon, in view of the possible spread ot the
pestilence:
OnOt.ERA ADD LAOKR BltBR,
To (tie Editor of the Evening Telegraph?
There is a laot oonucoiod w th tbe cues of otioloia
repotted as bavins; oecirrcd on board the stoamer
England, at Halifax and the ateamor Virginia now
at quaiantinp, at Aew York, woioh commnnds it o t
with arUiu aiin Honiice to laiee number of our
oitizo. s. W e roier to the vstly er- aiei prevaenop
ol the disoase and tho mortality among tho t.ermans
than anion it the Irish or English uaisomrors. the
0rmana, It n vvoll Known, are great drinkers ot
laser bter, aii'laiwe are ensured, on the best
medical authoiiiv, that indu'arnoe in this bovorane
has a strong tondenov to promoln mrrliry the in
lorence is a leirititnnte one, that habitual drinker .t oi
laaer bcor are far m re likclv to hcoonie 'lie no inn
ol cholera than those who abstain from it. Adm t
tier that pure Jagoi if harmless beverajre wnen
used modcrat ly, under ordinary oiroamttanoes,
auch is lar from being tho cise at this time wuen
there Is so marked a leuuonof to diarrhoea, ana
when, in addition io much that is said B1 pure
laaer is little less than downright poison. Weoora
mond these incts to the serious attention of all who
oesire to avert an attack ot the pestilenos with whion
we are now tbrefttoiied. Abstinence trom all ler
mcnted liquors is au almo't absolute command on
the part ot phviclans who have (riven the suojoot of
cholera their attentive conidration: and ttiie ab
stinence is more ia' ticularly tmoortanr where muoh
vegetable ood ia used. "An ounce of prevention is
worth a pound ol euro," and a little "li-.ioiil il on
the part oi those who habitually, even though mode
ratoly, indulge in ibe ue ot tormented liquors, miv
not omr save thorn irom an attack of cholera, but
also aid in preventing its introduction into our
midst. "
PROTECTION OF EMIGRANTS.
Ltftrr from Ueurl Sbermitu.
James Wright, Secretary of State of Iowa,
has received the tolJowinsr important letter from
General Sherman, relative to tbe protection
which will be extended to emigrants ou the
Plains the present season:
Hkadquabtkks Military Division of tub
Misbjshippi, bT. .Louis, Mo., April 7, 186. Uou
James Wriirht, becremrv ot .State, Das Aloinea.
Dear Mir: Yours of April 4, with the preamble and
resolutions of your Loxislatuie touching military
pioiection of envgrauts bound tor Montaua and
ldai o, is received. ihe subject has reoeived our
earnest aiieMiou, and I believe it the eui'graut
will re iraaonably prudent, they can oass wun
all t-atot. to their des inaiiou. So peoole are
better aware than vou of Iowa ot tue laut
that our lobular army is very small to cover
the vast area of our oou trv, aud that we
will commit a silly ana looiish mistake if wo
attempt too much. The emigrants will do a
very tool' nil thinI if tliey persist in going by Nio-bra-a,
when 1 toil jou we cannot unuerUke
to puard that road 'his eur; but if they will
go to Omaha, to Forts Kearney, MePtiurjou
ii nd Laramie and tiieuce by Fort Keuo. they
wul find a well-suordcd road all the way. We wi 1
also attempt to muko a new road, pretty well
guarded, by tlie But Cheyenne, north of the Black
Hills, to Powder river, iutoidcctni; the oi lier road
n ar the head waters ot the Ycltowst me. . Aud
tin the) niore. Ve propose to guard as well as no,
nible'iho Missouri river rouU. Ibis tone makos
three roads to Montana, convenient to our Iowa
emigrants, and this is ulj ?e can or should
at'empt Indeed, if em aunts wil disrgard our
iublilied plans by cliooaiiiit intermediate rout3s,
they not only shall have no protcctioi, until we
fin a it lUe.y to produce Indian hostility and colli
sions, we may intorfore.
Jn oruer to afford the best possible protection to
the emigration ot this ye-r, we have made the region
ot Moni aim, and the rentes ieadnir thereto, a seDU
rale military department, of which Uenerai VV.
Ccoree Cooke is tne commnndei, and he will, in a
few uaj s, go to Omaha, the better to trlve tiose in
terests' his personal and ollicial attention. I am,
ith great respect, W. T. Sukrman,
Major-General Commanding.
LEGAL INTELLIGENCE.
Court of Qnnrter Sessions Allison, 1'. J
A greater part of this morning was taken up in form
ing a new jury, i here wore lilty-two persons tor
tho jury, and thirty-four applied for exouse. There
were only iourtcen legal excuses given. Three,
although not having strictly legal exouscs, had such
strong pitas that the Judge said that be would not
compel them by a tine to stay. The Judge said that
sickness, age, or bervice as a juror within a certain
period would be If ga' excuses, but that business was
not; and as most of the pleas profferod were of in
convenience in Lusiness.the Judge compelled most of
them io remain at Court.
Inconsequence of tne time occupied thus, there
was only one case before the jury up to this
writing.
John Bosknrville was convicted ot tbe laroeny of
shoes and boots to the value of $323, the property
ol J. jb. Ballard. Ou the night of the 2d of April,
about 9 o'clock, tbe prtva e watchman of that
neighborhood saw the light put out at Mr. Ballard's
store, on Eighth and Filbert, and saw a man enter.
He waited a few moments, and then walked into the
store, and lighted a match.
In a corner he saw Boskerville in a stooping posi
tion ; Boskeivllie ran at the door, rushed against it,
and finally got out, and ran up Filbert street; the
private watchman kept his eye on the fugitive, aud
nabbed him as he was again running down Filoert ;
m the corner where Boskerville was first seen was
found a bag, with a pair of gentleman's gaiters,
and a pair of boots. The goods were found In great
contunion, and 826 worth missing. None ot the pro-
Iierty was found upon the person of tne defendant;
tut it seems that he was an aider and abettor of
others engaged in the larceny.
I District Court, No. 1 President, Judge
hharswood. This morning the two phonographic
reporters, Messrs. Joseph J. Gilbert and F i'odrick,
appointed by the Court under, and in acoordanoa
with tbe provisions of the Aot of Assembly passed at
tbe late session ot the Legislature, providing for a
reporter lor each or the District Courts, were sworn
iu, and entered upon the discharge of their duties.
But one case was tried this morning, and on that
a non suit was entered by tbe Court.
District Court No: SS- Jndtrc Hare. Josnnh
W. Souder ana William h. Garrett, tradiug as J.
W. bonder & Co., vs. Ebenezer James. Au aotion
on a hook account, to winch no dulenae was offered.
veroict tor pia'nun ior zin bo.
The Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank vs. Kilor &
Safl'ord. Au action on a promissory note. On trial.
Th dramatic authors of Paris aro nttnmnt-
ina to organize a publishing house which will
brum out ther works aud leave them someproiit.
every bide to break down the present most
uniust &y3tem of publishers, who really are vam
ii im- yicLO ecun. uuuiis lire neii ff milXlfi on
pires, while tho dramatic authors tue but the
coip&es which supply blood.
The Cincinnati Gazette ot Thursdav savs:
"Exchange it. in cant' supply ai ever, and
balances have to be adjusted by 'the remission of
cturency. it seems prooauic that, excepting
ihe wool crop, there is very little butdIus nro-
duce in the Went to ehanee this condition of
truae. iteports irom New lorn go to hov that
tbe steady shipments ot currency are making
money exuteuiiiiiiy pieniy."
A Mr. rlonr.v Hayman has published in
Englaud a new ti amdut'ion of the hm six books
oi tne "uays?ev." A critic Hays:
"Mr. Hayman's essays on the personages of Homer
snow mm io aavantuge as a onrio oi lUoai oharao
t rs. the Dest ot them is piobubly tnat on l'allm
Athene, wnom he describes at a charaoter in Lhe
I lot oi Dotn 'ine iiiaa aua -l ne Odyssey,' ino.
parable irom their texture, and similar in it mi.
tiontothe dramatic element to that of 'Meplnato
iili0.es' in the hrst part of Vault. 'Her character,'
he mvs, l is without touderness or 'ie of auv sort; it
never owns obllgatiou i it never frela nain nr nnim.
tiou; it is pitiless, with no gross appetite even that
oi sacnuoo, conventionally necessary to a god, is
minimized iu it its activity la busv and rentier; ps
partisanship uuscrupulous; its policy astute and
dikorimination prolound. It is ktenlv satirical,
crafty, bantering; whispering bast motives of tbe
good not afraid to spea i evil of dignitaries, beating
down the strong, mocking tbe weak, and exoltinir
in her own easy superiority over them ; heartless as
regards true and tender afloeiion, yet staunoli to a
comrude, toucuea oy a sense ot liking tor its like, of
admira'ion for its own faculties refloated, of truth
to its I arty, ready to prompt and book its friend
througu every nazara tue aiviuny ot human so
ciety, in short, a closer Impersonation of 'tne world1
than any Christian (not to uvuliou liou.th.ou) poet
lia. cu. . v.l.,t,if.Ari "
FINANCE AND COMMERCE
Ofpicr or tub Evening Tki boraph, I
Monday, April 23. 1800.
Tbe Stock Market was moderately activo this
morning, and prices were t?ady. Government
bonds were firmly held. 5-20) sold at 105; 106
was bid for 6s of 18H1; 101 j for T-ZOa; and 93 for
1040s. City loens have again advanced. Tho new
Issue sold at 83(94, au advnnce oi 1; and old
do. at BBii, no change.
Railroad shares continue the most active on
the list. 4400 shares of Philadelphia aud Erin
sold at from 34 to 842, closing at the former
rate, no change; 2000 shares of Catawissa pre
ferred at 32232J, the lat'er rate an advance of ,
Pennsylvania Railroad in a small way at 66J, no
change; Little Schuylkill at 31, an advance of 1;
Reading at 52J, no change; and North Pennsyl
vania at 38, a decline ol 1; 119 was bid for Cain,
den and Amboy; Glj for Norrintown; 65 for
Minehlll; 61 for Lehigh Valley ; ,2H lor Elmira
common, and 41 for preferred do. .
City Passenger Railroad sharpo are in fair de.
in and, but we hear of no sales. 71 was bid (or
Second and Third; 40 for Fifth and Sixth; 61
for Tenth and Eleventh; 19 for Thirteenth and
Fifteenth; 35 for BpruCe and Pine; 61 for Ches
tuut and Walnut; 68 for VVect Philadelphia; aud
422 for Hcstonville.
Bank ahares are unchanged. Mechanics' sold
at 29; 206 was bid tor North America; 140 for
Philadelphia; 125 for Farmers' and Mechanics';
102 for Kensington; 65 for Girard; 79 for
Western; 62J for City; 54 for Commonwealth;
C2J for Corn Exchange; aud 58 for Union.
Canal shares are less active. Schuylkill Naviga
tion preferred sold at 34 431J, the latter rate a
slight advance; 20) was bid for common do;
54 tor Lehigh Navigation; 115 tor Morris Canal
preferred;; 16 for Susquehanna Canal; 49J for
Delaware Division ; and 58 for Wyoming Val
ley Canal.
Oil shares continue very dull. Ocean sold at
8(&8.!, a decline: and Cornplnuter at 3.
The New York Tribune this morning says:
Money on call is abundant at'!5 per cent, and
bulances could not readily be loaned. The Stock
Exchange does not furnish employment for the
large sums offering on call, and still lowor rates
may be expected in tho continued absence ot an
investment demund lor lancy railways. Com
mercial paper sells at 6 J for besti and 819
lor pood.
"Sterling bills closed at 107 J for leading names
nt sixty du.ys.
"lhe business of the 8ub Treasurv was: Re
ceipts, $2,192.493'2fi lor Customs. $:)S0,0Jti; Pay
ment. $1,037, 63173 on account of Loan,
$285,000: Balance, $J7,5Sl,!i4(J,8G; (Hold Notes,
$o81,()00."
PHILADELPHIA STOCK EXCHANGE SALES TO-DAY
Reported oy De Haven & Jsro., .No. 40 8. Third streut
KIK8T BOARD
WOO Citv 6s. now.. 831 200 sh boh Nav pf... 84f
$3200 do 84J, 2u0sn do h30 84J
560 do SlJ 100 sh Ocean DoO 84
tlliOO do 94 Ji 400 sh do 8J
$100 do old 88 800 sU do b5
UK M V B D-WS O. . . . ltrj
K. J sh do 8
lOOsh do......b5 8,
2o0sh do 8,
SCQoO do 1862.. 105
4C0hh I'll & E...b30 841
600 sh
210 sh
M0 sh
1G0 sh
100 sh
600 sh
100 sh
100 sh
100 sh
KOsh
1(0 ah
500 a h
200 sh
100 sh
100 sh
100 sh
300 h
do 84j 100 sh Corn Planter.
do.,. . . .1.80 84 m sh Penn K.d bill CG;
do t6 34 18 sh do- 60
do....b30 . t-4 42 sh do 66
do b30 843 100 sh Beading 62
do 84 8)0 sh do t,30 62
do s30 84 10) sh do b30 62
do 800 84 100 sh do b80 62
do o. 84J K3sh do t.f.l 6zi
do s80 84 ' noosh Lit Hoh....b30 81
do b80 Hi 1000 sh Cacawissa pi. . 82
no ail iwi sn ao
do 84
8U3 sh ao 82
aOfh do 821
100 sh do 32
100 sh do 05 23
103shNY&M'dC... 7f
do f80 f?3
do 83?
do 33i
do b30 84
PHILAD'A GOU EXCHANGE QUorAllONN
10 A. M 126J12M 128
11 A. M 126.' I P. M 120J
Harper. Dpenkv & Co. Quote as follows : '
Buying, selling
American Gold 126 126
American Silver, s and s 120 121
American Silver Dimos aud Half Dime 112 113
Pennsylvania Currency
New York Exchange 1-20 par.
Messrs. Delia ven & Brother, No. 40 South
Third street, make the following quotations of
the rates of exchange to-day at 1 P. M. :
Buying. Selttng.
Amenuau uoiu i&nk
. 1 . , ....
127
122
11
9
8
64
81
8
American Silver, is and is 120
Compound Interest Notes:
jute, mo..,, ioj
July. 1864.
10
August, 1864....
October, 1804....
Dec, 1804.
May. 1805....
Antrnst, 18H6....
Sept., 1866....
October, 1866....
95
8
i
23
Philadelphia Trade Report.
M ok day, April 28. Tbe ram to-day has partially
suspended wharf operations, and tho transactions in
all departments are of an extremely limited char
acter. Thore is no shipping domand for Flour, and
the home consumers are purchasing in small lots,
only to supply immodiate wants. ' A few hundred
barrels were disposed of at 87&3 ? barrel for super
fine ; $S9 tor extras ;$910 60 tor Northwestern extra
family; 8lfto.ll for Pennsylvania and Ohio do. do.;
and $1215 for fancy brands, aooordlng to quality.
In Rye Flour no change to notice. Corn Meal has
declined; 600 barrels Pennsylvania sold at 48-60.
The oflerings of Wheat oontlnue very scarce, and
in the absence of tales to any extent, we quote oom-
non and fair red at $2'20C2 45; and good and oboioe
at &2-60i2 66; white ramr.s trom S2 60 to 2-U0. Rye
coinee loiward Blowly, and is in moderate request,
with sales of Pnunsylvania at 96o , and Delaware at
80o. 'J here is less inquiry for Corn, and more oiler
ina. Sales of 4000 bushels of yellow at 80s. Oits
are scarce, and in demand, with sales of 2100 bushels
at 60c. in the cars.
The market is nearly bare of Cloveraeed, and it is
in lair demand. 8inall sales are reported at t4 u) 60
tor souimou: and 4 76'6'76 fur fair and oholcu.
Timothy is very scarce. We quote at 56-25. Flax
seed sells 'owly at 2 66 it 2 60. i
Whisky moves slusruiahiy. with small sales of
Pennsylvania and relillod at $2 26&2 26; and Ohio at
12 27.
i 111 "
Philadelphia Cattle Market.
, Monday, April 23 Beef Cattle are dull this
week, and prices are 1 cent lb. lower. 1600 head
arrived and sold at the Avenue Drove Yard at from
16ial7o. for extra and ct oioe; 1415c, for fair to
Kood ; and llifi.l3o. U. lor oouimon. as to quality.
Tbe following are the particulars of the sales :
64 bead Owen Smith, Western, 14:a-i8
6 "
24 "
27 "
66 "
80 "
107 "
91
a
101) "
42 "
20 "
, 16
62 "
106 "
68 "
15 "
1 20 "
20 "
. 70 "
60 "
t'5 "
A. Christie & Bro., Chester oo , 16'uJlSJ,
A. Kennedy, Uher:er poanty, lStibk.
Jones McCiese, i;hestor county, lJlftie). .
V. JUcFillen, Lancaster county, 15:ijl6.
J. McFillen, l.ancuatcr county, 1510.
P. Hathaway, iiaucasutr county, 16 oU8. .
James S. Kirk, Lancaster oounty, 13u!l6.'
TJllmnn & Bochman, Lancaster co 1517,
Martin Fuller ft Co., Westoin, 1416i.
Mooney Smith, West, rn, 11 16.
Moouey & Brother, Lano. co.,7 j9.
H. Chain, Lancaster county, 1416
J. A. Chain & Brother, Lano oo., 142HJ.
L. Frank. Lancaster oo , 11 ?16.
Khomberg & Frank, Lancaster oo., 14.16.
Hope It Co , Chester county, 78.
(Sturm k Co., Lancaster oountv 1516.
Ji. bald win, Ouster oounty, 16,'i'l6.
D. brunon, ( braier county, l'.':il0.
B. Hood, Chosur oounty, 1", u l5J
Cbaudier k. A.v, gander. Chester oo.,ll,u l6.
KlnibHli Miller, Chester co , 14&14
are null and lowr. 2400 head sold at the
Hogs
different jur.la ajt irom 12.&13'&U the lUO pound",
net. '.'.-'
Cows are tii lo er . 200 head sold at 850J?75 for
Springer, an '1 6'W.'lO $v heud tor Milch Cows
Miet p jo l"iit cliautio. 600 head arrived and
sold at from f ';c 1t clippod, Mid. l&tio, V pound
gross tor wai,vUv?,
APRIL 23, 18(36.
r Tim is a personal In
vitation to ihe ndfir to ex
amine our new .trie, ot
nrklNO l I.OTHINO.
flinre Suit irl8 and
PlMk Hulls for n liner
halts, all pncM up to (7ft
WAN AM AKKR A BttOWW,
OAK HALL,
SOtTHkABT COKNFB
SIXTU and UAUKET RU.
C
s CHESTNUT ST.X
FAMILY SEWING-MACHINES.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
ISei the Second Page for additional Special Xoitcei
OFFICE OF TITR LEHIGH COAL
AKD KAVIUAIIOV COMPANY.
FHILADBt PBI A, Apr!l 21. 1H63
The Stated Annnal Meotlng of the Stockhelders of
this Company will be held at the Board ot i'rle
Uoonv, north slds of OHt-rtNUT Street, above Fifth,
on TUESDAY MOBKINQ. the 1st day ot May next, at
nal-past 10 o'c.ook, alter which an election will ba
held at the same place lor officers of the Company for
itie ensulnir year, 'lhe election to close at 1 P. si. of
ihe same dav,
4 23 It JAMK3 S. COX Presldnnt.
JST EDWIN BOOTH'S
GltAND EECFl'TION,
Till1" KVMNO aT THK VVaI.NTJT
A tew very choice seats can be ob at tied at the HOOK
8TAJ.D, COtrilMiNTAl, HOTEL, It
ELECTION NOTIOE.-TI113 ANNUAL
tnco ins of the Stockhnlders of he Oninl Pai-
senper Kollway Company, o1' the city of PM'ailo phla,
will he held at 'ho ottlee ot the 'omnanv. No 2-lfl "ourh
FI1'H 8irat PhllatlelDhlt on MOVWAY, Mav7th.
186b. between the bourn oi I) and 11 o'clock v. M., tor toe
purpose ot electing a Prtstdout and six Direct irs. to
serve tor tho ensuing year. L. J. CBANS, MecretaT.
A iU23. 1W6. 4 23 ijiT
gUMMKll HKSOltTS
ON LINE OF
Rcadlii!? Railroad and Branches.
MAAHION HOUSK, MOUNT CARBON,
Mrs. Caroline Wonder. I'ottsville P. O , Schuyiklll co.
1USCABOBA HOTEL,
Mrs. Hannah Mi'lor, Tufcsrora P. O., Schuylkill co.
MAIIAyOY CITY HOTEL,
G. W. Frost, Mahanoy City P. O., Sohuylktll oo.
WHITE HOUSE, ' '
Mrs. Susan Marsdorf, Reading P. O.
ANDALUSIA,
James S. Madeira, Reading P. O.
LIVING SPBING8 HOTEL.
' Dr. A. Smith, Werdersvllle P. O., Berks co.
80 U1H MO UNTA1N HO USE,
H. H. Manderbach, Womelsdorf P. O., Berks Co.
COLD SPBINGS HOTEL,
Lebanon oo., Charles Rocdermel, ilarrlsburg P. O.
BO YEBSTO WN SEMI NAB Y.
J. B. Henky, Boyerstown P. O., Berks co.
YELLOW SPBINGS HOTEL,
A. V. Snyder, Yellow Springs P. 0 , Chester co.
L1TIZ SPBINGS,
Samuel Lichtenthaler, Lltlz P. O., Lancaster oo.
EPHBA TA MO UNTA IN SPBINGS,
Kneedler & Feathei, Epbrata P. O., Lancaster co.
APRIL 21, 18G6. 4 233m
COURTNEY & WILLITS,
Nos. 14 and 16 S. Seventh St., Fhilada.,
MABUFACTUKERS OF "
BEAUTIFUL COTTAGE FURNITURE,
AND THE ONLY DURABLE IN THE CITY.
Also, Lining-Boom Furniture,
AND BEDDING, constantly on hand. C4 23mwf2in
TJENDER'S
COAL AND ICE DEPOT,
S. W. CORNER OF BROAD ASD CALLOWHILL
STREETS,
Offers tbe celebrated West Lehigh Coal from the
Greenwood Colliery, t tove, r.ge. and Ueator size, SI'SU)
ut at i Ml. Also, the very superior Hohuylklll Coal,
from the Keevesdule (Jollleiy, Nut size, tt Uu. All other
sizes tVW. i
All Coal warranted and taken back free of expense to
the purchaser, h not as represented. Also, the Coul 'or
feittu it nut full weight. 2 10 im
gIMOX COLTON & CLAltKE.
TO FAMILIES RESITUNG IN OK GOING TO THE
COUNTRY.
Those who wish to purchase s implies of the bft
duality of FINE GROc'EKlKH. wilt And a fuil aud
choice stock of the be t that can be Imposed or pro
cured irom the New York, Benton or Philadelphia
market, aud can be supplied with goods in package, at
wholesale prices
i Particular attention is paid to packing in the neatest
and inoft sate manner pirns b e.
. Goods delivered to an v of the depots, express offices,
or out in the country, tree of charge.
SIMOX COLTOX & CLARKE,
4 14trpj H. W. cor. BROAD and WALNUT.
(jKOVER & BAKER'S IMPROVED
SHUTTLE OR " LOCK" STITCH SEV7INQ
MACHINES. t No. 1 aod No. 9 for Tailors, Shoe
makers, Saddlers, etc. No. 730 Cliounut street
Philadelphia; Ko. 17 Murket street, Ilarrlsburg
'Qll ILDREX'S CARRIAGES,
CJJEAP AT YOST S
NEW IIOUSE-FUBNI8IIING STOKfi.
' Also. tVERYTHING NFEDED IN HOUSEKEEP
IS (i. UiOiw 4p
No. 49 N. NIVTH Street, below Arch.
A FAMILY Of FIVE OR SIX CAN
'ii! bear ot a very pleasant home a short dlntanoo In
cv'uiitrv where tiiev omii have all the comforts of a
home without the UVKMle, by addressing "W," Tele
graph ofllVy,
S
J
IJEASONS WHY T II H
AMERICAN WATCH,
MADE AT WALIHAiT, MASSACHUSETTS,
U TUB BEST.
It is made on the best principle. Its frame f com
posed ot SOUD PLATEN. iiO Jaroen Interfere wltfc
the harmony of Its working, aid no SJJden shook caa
damage lis machinery Evety pitoe is made and
flnisbed by machinery (ItirU famous foe Im novsltj, aa
wel tJ foi IU effectiveness) and la ttercfore properly
matte. The watch is what ail mecban'itn should be
ACt URATE, SIMPLE, ETROKU, AMD ECUSOMI-
CAL. fxoept sonat hiyh grades, tio oostly for general
nse, foreign watches aie chiefly made br women and
boys. Such watches ar composed of several kindred
piroes, screwed and riveted together, and require eon-
sunt repairs to keep them in any kind ef order. Alt
pcrtons who have carnea "ano es." ''leplnes," and
English raUot LeveM," are perfectly well awara ot
the truth of this statement.
At the beginning ot our enterprise, mare than tea
years ago, It was our ftrat object to make a thoroughly
good low-priced watch tor tbe million, o take th p ace
of these foreign lutwosi i tons tbe reiasa ot foreign fac
torlea wb'oh were entirely unsaleable at home and
perfectly worthless everywhere.
How well we have accr. mpllshed this may bs under
stood from the fact, that Aftar so many year oi putUe
trial, wa now make MORE THAN HALF OF ALL
THE WATCHES SOLD IN THE UNITED STATES,
and that no ethers have evor given saoh cnlversal
tatltfaotlon. Wills this department of our business Is
continued with increased facilities for per.oct work, we
are at present engajed In the manuiaoture of watch
of the very -
Highest Grade Known to Chronometry,
Unequalled by anything hitherto made by ourselves.
and unsurpassed by any thing mad la tbe world, for
this purpose we have th amplest facilities. We have
erected an addition to our main bulldmgs exprei lyfor
this branch of oar business and have tilled It with the
best workmer in our servlo. New machines and ap
pliance tisre been constructed, which perform their
work with consummate delicacy and exactness. Tbe
choicest and most approved materials only are used,
and we challenge comparison oe tween this k rails of our
work and the finest Imparted chronometers. -
W do not pretend to soil our watohes for less MOMsr
than foreign watches, but w do assert, wlthont fear ot
contradiction, tbat ior tbt sakr MOMir our product is
incomparably supeilor.
All our watches, of whatever grade, ar fully war
ranted, and this warrantee is good at all tlmot against
us or our agent In all parts of th world.
CAUTION.
A a th high reputation of our watches has caused
tbem to be extensively counterfeited by foreign makers,
and sold hi this country as genuine, the public are cau
tioned to buy only ot respectable dealers. All person
selling counterfeits will be exposed and prosecuted.
ROB13INS & APPLETON,
AGENTS FOR THE AMERICAN WATCH COMPANY,
4 23 trp No. 183 BROADWAY K.T.
gALE OF
Agate, Bardiglio, and Castellina Vases
and Ornaments,
Alabaster Statuettes,
Marble Statuary,
Of the Importation of Messrs. VI VI BKCM., to take
place on
Tuesday Evening Next 21th Inst.
AT 7i O'CLOCK,
AT THK ART QALLEHY,
No. I02O CHESNUT STREET.
The collection will be arrantred for examination on
Monday afternoon.
B. SCOTT, Jr.,
4 218t AUCTION Ufe&.
s
PECIAL ATTENTION IS CALLED
TO
A GREAT WORK OF ART,
hOW ON EXHIBITION AT '
F. GABRYLEWITZ'S
PHILADELPHIA ART GALLERY,
No. 1305 CHESNUT Street,
Cammarana's Great Historical Picture
OF THE
SACKING OF ALTAMUEA,
BY CARDINAL BUFFO, IN 1799.
Fainted by order of the Italian Government.
1 he Picture will be engraved by JOHN SAUTAIN.
For a mil description oi tliis extraordinary production,
we refer to the printed details In the Gallery.
Admission to the Gal.ery, 26 cents. 4 21 In
REDDING
feather warehouse,"
I'll KI KECT,
BELOW ARCH.
Feathers Beds, Bolsters. Pit
lows' attreHes of all klnos;
Blankets, Comiortables. Coun
teriinues, white and colored
Hprfiig Bedsi Hpritig Cotst Iron
BedHteadnt Cushions, and all
other article in the line of busi
ness. AMOS niLXBORN,
No 44 North TENTH Street,
w Below Arch.
Q-ROVEIl & BAKER'S FIRST
PREMIUM ELASTIC STITCH AND LOCK
STITCH SEWING MACHINES, with latest Im
provements, No. MO Chesnut 8treet,Phi!atlelphla;
No. 17 Market street, Ilarrlsburg. 2 1 3m4p
s
rKLMG FASHIONS FOR CHILDREX.
, M. SHOEMAKER & CO.,
Nos. 4 and 6 North EIGHTH Street,
ARB NOW OPENING A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT 1
OF
CHILDREN'S CLOTHING,
IN THE LATEST PABIS STYLES,
Uniurpasted for elegance of workmanship and material.
, CI 28 mwelralp
The public are lnvlied to call and examine. f
WILLIAM 17. E0GEES,
COACH AND LIGHT CARRIAGE
BUILDER,
Nos, 1009 and 1011 CHESNUT Street,
PllILADELrUIA. itSlmi

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