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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, June 19, 1866, FOURTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DA1L1 EVENING TELEGRAPH. PHILADELPHIA, TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1866.
THE HEW YORK PRESS.
EDITORIAL OPINIONS OF THE LEADING
JOURNALS UPON CURRENT TOPICS.
COMMMCD ITKBY SAT VOtt KVEMHQ TKLEORAFII.
Gold, 101.
f the Tribune.
The epcclo exported on freight from this port
and Boston within the last five weeks sums up
as fallows:
Week endlnc May 10 98,768,205
WtKk ending May 2i 11.314 .840
Week endinr Jane 2 . 6 873,279
Weckendine- JnneO 6,B3fi,800
Week ending Jane 10 6,153 199
Total, five weks 938,979,912
None will doubt that our total export of cold
and silver lor these Hvo weeks has exceeded our
Imports by at least forty millions of dollars.
During these weeks ihe nieniium on gold has
worked steauily upward from 29 to 64, which
was the closing rate last evening.
This ne Involves dearer bread for the labo
rer's children, scantier or shabbier clothing for
the farmer's wile and daughters. It reduces by
nearly a quarter tbe actual compensation of
every man in the United titates who Is at work
by the year or month at a nxed salury or rate
of wages. It involves more brokerage and stock
gambling, with lees wheat growing and pork
packing. Already it is cheaper for our publish
ers to have their books printed in London than
at home; very soon, orders will eo out to Lon
don and Paris lor the made-up clothing of our
jamilies. llow long this can go on without
Involving tisln general bankrupcy, we will not
eay: but the end is inevitable.
"Increase the tariff," say thousands; an1 wa
heartily agree with them. Increase the tariff
promptly and beavily, so as to stop the importa
tion ot million on millions' worth of metals and
fabrics, knickknaclcs and gewgaws, that we
should either make at home or do without. If
tbe duty on every article which we can make at
home that Is. every one which could be mado
hero with as littlo' labor as elsewhere were
doubled this day, it would be a blessed thing for
our country and every port of it.
But it is Idle to stop lenks in one side of the
ship and leave a chasm or rilt in the othr. We
must contract our currency contract it sharply
and lamely or protection will prove of no avail.
The blindness or madness on this point ot the
Pennsylvanians in Congress passes all bounds of
credibility. We cannot comprehend them, and
lave given up the attempt.
Gentlemen In Conere.is ! most of you will ere
long meet tbe laborers for wages at the polls.
If you think 60 or 70 per cent, premium on gold,
with inevitably corresponding prices for tood
and clothing, will commend vou to their favor,
you are wouilly in error. We entreat you not
to leave Washington without giving the Secre
tary ot the Treasury all the power to contract
anu to fund that he will accept. You cannot
afford to leave matters as they aie; and what is
of far more consequence the country cannot
afford it. Be wise in time 1
War In Europe Its Eflect Upon This
Counti y.
From the Times.
Of course, those who talked of the efficacy of
a Congress as an agency for averting the threat
ened hostilities, assail the course of Austria in
refusing to be a party to its deliberations.
Having affirmed the value of diplomacy as a
peacemaker bet ween nations prepared for war,
they are bound to condemn tbe power whose
decision leaves no visible alternative but a resort
to arms. And yet these complainants against
Austria beg the whole question. They assume
the probability ol peace as the reult of a Con
ference, and on this hypothesis construct their
argument. But suppose the probability to lie in
the opposite direction what then? Suppose,
as may t airly be supposed, than an assemblage
of diplomatists at Paris, now, ended as did
the Conterence which eat in London on the
Danish question, and as every Conference held
in similar circumstauces has ended, during tho
lifetime of the present generation what then
becomes of the obstinacy, tbe guilr, tbe mad
ness of Austria? Does not her refusal to parti
cipate in a proceeding which, judged by modern
example, could hardly be otherwise than futile,
assume th aspect ot wisdom and dignity ? For,
if there i3 to be war, the sooner it comes the
better tor Austria. Iler preparations are in ad
vance of Prussia, and vastly more complete than
those of Italy; to that delay would mure to the
advantage ot her aniaeonists. Besides, her
finances, already reputed bankrupt, cannot bear
up indefinitely uiidcr an unproductive strain;
she must light soon or disarm, and to her, just
now. the (ormer would be tue preferable event.
Her forces may not be able to advance further
into Italy without provokiue French lnterier
ence, but as against Prussia there need be no
such restraint. ,
J?rom another point of view the policy of
Au stria is reasonable enough. Of what possible
avail can be a Congress unless the basis of dis
cussion be settled beforehand ? Austria asked
not only that it should be settled, but that it
should be settled on a principle applicable alike
to each of the powers preparing for war. As
explained by Mr. Gladstone in the House of
Commons, Austria' required an assurance that
"all the powers which were to take part in tbe
protected conference should bo ready to re
nounce the pursuit of any special or particular
interest to the detriment of the general tran
quility;" not an extravagant request surely, or
one to which the promoters of a Conference
really intended to promote general as opposed
to local or dynastic interest would be likely to
object. The lact that the condition thus pro
posed has led to the abandonment of tbe project,
u prima faoia evidenoe of its sinister origin.
It implies either that the Conference would be
at liberty to revise everything, which means to
unsettle everything, or that Prussia and Italy
were to be permitted to seek a "territorial aug
mentation of power", with no possibility of
assigning to Austria an equivalent. While, then,
the traditional policy of Austria can have few
admirers on a republican continent, let us be so
larjust as to admit tne seeming equity ol the
ground upon which her statesmen stand in rela
tion to the proposed Conference. They may
have incurred the immediate responsibility of
precipitating war, but only the superficial
observer can be deceived bv the hollow laraen
tatidis in which the pro-Prussian press are
indulging on the subject. Austria will indeed
have responsibility to bear, but at least it must
be shared to the fullest extent by Prussia.
Removed from all but remote danger of being
drasged into the conflict, Kugland is inclined to
calculate only the chances In their relation to
trade and finance. Whether the expectation
that pood instead of evil will accrue, since tho
existing uncertainty will be terminated, is cer
tainly open to denote. Tho influences at work
are too many and too deeply seated to encou
rage a very sanguine feeling, though after all
there may be business sagacity in a suggestion
which implies the absence of any very formi
dable source of financial difficulty.
And on this side ol tbe Atlantic what mav be
looked for as a consequence of the war which,
to all human lurigment, is inevitable? Tempo
rary inconvenience there may bu a necessity
lor caution there unquestionably is; but as yet
in 10 uuiituiL w uw nuYuung imeiy to produce
extended difficulty. There mmr lm a alight-
drain tor gold; amidst the panic which almost
always accompanies, me outbreak of hostilities.
there may be damage to the European value of
our securities; there may be a possible return of
vuu.iimg .UUUUW IIV1U VJ, I 111 d 1 1 y . WHOlC a
disposition to hoard will soon be visible. But
these are probabilities which should occasion
nothing like alarm. Any depreciation of onr
AAflint IPS imrnorl mill in mnM.ai.(T - J .it.
" . MO - nuu will
be followed by a rebound when the first flush
of alarm shall have passed away. And for other
incouveniences or even losses we shall have
solid comiiensatiou in the impetus which war
cannot fail to give to emigration litherward. At
the same time, it is clear that much deoendti
Vpon the course taken by those whose doings
influence transactions, whether in goods, gold,
or stocks. This Is not a time for blinl and
lecklesa speculation. aDd he who would at thii
moment promote it is doing his utinnst to
hasten anil intensity disaster. The conservatism
which should control our politics is in times Uk9
lhee needed most urgently In our exchanges,
our marts, and in the arranements of every
business man. With prudence, we shall w.tness
the conflict from afar not only uninjured, but
ultimately benefited. But all depends upon
prudence.
The European Question In a Revolution,
ary i'omt o View.
From the IltraM.
The cause of republicanism In Europe has un
questionably much to gain from the war which
is now impending. . Its progress bad been im
peded by a variety of influences, among which
tbe most prominent were the success of Napo
leon's foreign ani,dotnea!lc policy, and tho Re
bellion In this country.. With the blunders,
however) committed by the Emperor In connec
tion with Mexico, and the triumph of. our Gov
ernment over the dangers by which it wa9
availed, the hopes of the European republicans
began to revive. In the results of the one they
touud ground tor the belief that the popular
prestige of Napoleon had become weakened,
while in the other they obtained a practical de
monstration ot the foice and value of the princi
ples to which they attach their faith.
Unquestionably the magnificent spectacle of
courage, hopefulness, and resolution preented
by the American people throughout the late
struggle ewon them many admirers outside ot
the republican ranks, but without success it
would nave tailed to have gained them as con
verts, in proportion to the magnitude of that
success ha been the Ptlect of the reaction.
Those wbo were partisans ot monarchical terms,
as offering the only sure guarantees of stability,
have bad their faith soasen, while those who
were wavering between tne two syptems have
frankly gone over to the republican. What.
therefore, at one time seemed destined to dis
courage and suspend the progress ol democratic
Ideas in Europe has. In reality, given them an
impetus which a quarter ot a century of quiet
working would have failed to impart to them.
In tbe war which is about to commence, re
publicanism hn'ds fresh grounds for hopeiulness
and reioicinsr. With suicidal blindness the Gov
ernments which are its most formidable ob
stacles are rushing on to their destruction. The
magnitude ot their armaments, so far Irora being
a source of discouragement, is, m reality, that
on which the Euiopean democracy places most
dependence lor tne success ol its aspirations.
Its lenders know that so long as the theory of
the balance of power is adhered to nnd main
tained, there will be but littlo chance for the
success ol their schemes. Let it be disturbed or
broken up, and they will begin to make their
power lelt. Already we see in Italy and in
Hungary tbe republican element appealed to for
support. Let the European democrats only bo
true to the cause, and refuse to allow themselves
to be mado use of by distressed despotisms, and
they will by-and-by'have the game in their own
bauds.
During the war their attitude should be one
simply of preparation and watchtuluesr. It is
when the period ot exhaustion sets in alter a
prolonged and desperate struggle that they can
best attain their ei.ds. All the Uovernments of
Europe, constitutional as well as despotic, are
rrembling at the prospect that awaits them.
Staggering under a weight of debt that has
Derome intolerant to their people, the enor
mous additions that will be made to it by the
etist ot a general war will bring them into a con
dition ot hopeless bankruptcy, and in its train,
as we all know, follows revolution.
England flatters herself that she may escape
these dangers, but it is doubtful. In abdicating
her tunctions as a flrst-clis power, and refusing
to take her share in an effort to maintain the
public peace, she invites and will unquestiona
bly provoke aggression, ihe pusillanimous
course 6he is pursuing basbeen prompted by the
selfish lears ot her aristocracy. They arc abore-
hensive that any lurther addition to a debt
which keeps tbree-fourths of her population in
a condition bordering on pauperism will brine
a Dour, revolution, ana a consequent loss ot their
privileges. One woul I suppose that, moved by
such tears, they would be disposed, by a relaxa
tion of the restrictions in the elective franchise,
to conciliate, as tar as possioie, tne gooa-wai ot
the masses. With a blindness only equal to that
which is impelling the European despots into a
suicidal struggle, they retiwe to concede to the
people, whom they tear, the moderate conces
sions which they ask. It is needless for us to
dwell on the results of such an infatuated policy.
Suffice it to say that it will serve to hasten the
sacritices which they would postpone. Let
Great Britain become involved in these compli
cationsan event almost certain and her con
dition at home will be anything but secure.
With Ireland possessing the elements of a formi
dable insurrectionary organization, with the
English working classes discontented and en-
raued at the deieat ol their demands tor an ex
tension of the franchise, and with Canada calling
loudly for protection against Fenian raids, she
will not find her people disposed to put up much
longer with a system ol government wnica
neither assures respect abroad nor happiness or
security at home. Ut an the countries ot uurope
there is not one, perhaps, that is riper for revo
lution than England. She might escape It by
the prudence and generosity of her ruling
classes; but, judging from their course on the
Helorm bill and the Irish Church question, we
are lustiiied in saying that she will, in all pro
bability, take the lead in the vital political
cliangen which the approaching war is likely to
Driug aDout. ,
Jeflerson Davis.
From the World.
The treatment of Mr. Davis at Fortress Mon
roe, as detailed in the new book by the surgeon
on duty at that post, will be a topic of censure
on the other side of the Atlantic, and wherever,
on this Bide, the sentiment of humanity to
the fallen is accompanied by moral courage.
If, in this long confinement, there had been no
violation of the ordiuary decencies of a deten
tion previous to trial, there would still be Just
grounds of complaint. These were so cogently
presented by the Iribune in connection with
the question of bail, that we will make no
attempt to lortify them, deeming it more sea
sonable at present, to restrict our remarks to
the "secrets of the prison-house," unfolded in
Doctor Craven's book.
The legality of Mr. Davis' confinement is
obviously a distinct question from the legality
ol the persistent tortures inflicted on him. De
tention in custody is a means of securing a pri
soner until a court can pass upon his guilt. Any
geverny or torment noi required tor his sale-
Keeping, is not only unauthorized by law, but ia
a usurpation of the functions of the lurv and
court. It assumes hu guilt; but if guilt mav be
assumed beforehand, the trial i a mockery. It
determines ihe nature of bin punishment: but
the punishment of all crimes is tixed by the law,
it must pe aeciarea, in eacn particular case, by
the sentence of a judge, and can be inflicted
only after the sentence.
There Is only one theory on which the tor
tures inflicted on Mr. Davis can by any possi
bility be justified, and that is a theory whloh
has only a seeming application to his case. It
may be claimed, and, in point ot lact, is claimed,
thai Mr. Davis is a prisoner of war. It is not
denied that there may be caees in which pri
soners of war may be subjected to torture, under
the laws ol retaliation. If, while war is still
pendmg, wanton suffering is inflicted on pri
soners by one side, the other may retaliate in
kind as a Means of putting a stop to such bar
barity. But tbe torture of Mr. Davis for tbe
sufferings of our prisoners at Andersouville does
not come under that rule. Retaliation in war
isoltener threatened than put ia practice, the
humanity of the threatener generally revolting
against tbe execution ot his threat. It is never
inflicted as a punishmcut, but only as a means
of prevention. If our Government had fudged
, retaliation, properly, tho time for resorting to
li, was while our prisoners were In Rebel hands,
10 procure a mitigation of their misgr'.es, Ko
taliatton slter tbeir release is only so much
wanton cruelty, sinee it can have none of the
pi pventive eflect wblch alone justifies retaliation.
It is as absurd and atrocious to retaliate on
Jetlerson Davis tho sufferings of the Union
prisoners at AndersonvlUe, as it would have
been in the British Government to have tor
tured Napoleon Bonaparte for his treatment
of British prisoners. That illustrious captive
complained, and French historians have never
ceased to repeat the complaints, of the usage
he received at St. Helena. But it differed
from what Mr. Davis has experienced at
Foitreps Monroe, as a sick-cbamber , differs
Irom a pest-bouse, or as a modern excommuni
cation difleri from the Spanish Inquisition.
The general spirit In which the British Gov
ern ruenl proiesped to act may be gathered
from tbe following official directions of Lord
Batuurst: " Jn committing so import
ant a trust . to British offionrs, the
Prince Regent in sensible that it is not
necessary" (note this expression, "not
necessary," a clear Implication that the ordi
nary principles of soldierly honor sufficed to
prevent hard treatment of the prostrate; of
which examples may bo found in Grant's terms
to Lee, ISherman's to Johnston, and the whole
military Hie of General Scott), "not necessary
to impress upon them his anxious desire that no
greater measure of severity in respect to con
finement or restriction be Imposed than what
is deemed necessury lor the laithiul discharge
ot that duty which the Admiral, as well as the
Governor , of St. Helena, must ever keep In
wind the pcrtect security of General Bona
parte's person. Whatever, consistent with ton
treat object, can be allowed in the shape of in
dulgence, his Royal Llitrhntif s is conudent will
willinely be shown to the General."
If Sir Hudson Lowe did not always act in tbe
humane and considerate spirit here inculcated,
these instructions at oux show in wnat light
the British Government tliouuht it due to its
character -to appenr before the world. The
Britlsb version of his actual treatment, con
dcused by tho Tory historian, Alison, is, in the
main, true:
"But while all mtist regret that it should havo boon
necessary, under any circumstances, to act with even
summit liarsbuffu towards bo great a mui, yet Jm
tice can sue nothing to condemn in the conduct of
tho Bn lsu (jovertinout, whatever it may do as to
want ot courtesy in trio Governor of tho Is and. It
was lridisiien-aule to tho peace ot tho world to pro
vent bis escape; and tho expedition from Klba had
shown that no reliance could be placed upon either
his professions or bis treaties. Ueteunou aud secure
custody were, tliorcloro, unavoidable, and every
comlort consistent with these objects was aflbrdod
him bv the linusli Government He was allowed
trie society oi tue friends who had accompanied
him in his exile; he had books in almmiunoe to
annuo his leisure hours; cbampnpno aud burgundy
were lit uaily I everaeo : and ihe bill of tare of his
table, wbioh is niven lv Las Casa as a proot ot the
severity of the British .overnmeut, would be
thought tho hoicht ot luxury by most persons in a
stale 01 lil.crty."
The nearest resemblance (and the distance is
inhnite!) to any such personal indignity as wa9
practised upon Mr. Davis by putting him in f
irons, was the French fiction, invented by Count
Montholon, nuo repealed by Thiers, respecting
the demand tuat N'apoieon.'snoii after he went
on board the Be'lertphon, "liould surrender his
sword. The st'.py, as told by Montholon, is like
the prologue to a tragedy. Lord Keith, as the
lively imagination of Montholon represented it,
said to Napoleon in a voice stifled with emotion,
"England demands your sword." The Emperor,
with a convulsive movement, put his hand on
tbe hilt. The terrible expression of his counte
naLce was Irs only reply. His expression never
appeared more awful, more supeihuman. The
old Admiial cow red; his great figure seemed to
collapse; his head, whitpned by years, fell upon
his bieast, like that of a culprit humiliated
beiore his condemnation. The Emperor kept
his sword. The good taste ot Thiers avoids the
melodramatic tone of this description, but he
conveys the idea 'that Napoleon would have
done execution with bis sword sooner than have
surrendered it, and have sacrificed his life on
the spot, making the weapon a costly trophy to
its captors. English writers have pronounced
Montholon's story a "pure tictijn;" but the
French recital and tho English denial equally
assume that depriving the lallen warrior ot his
weapon would have been, under the circum
stances, an unwarrantable indignity; the sword
be ng worn, not as a weapon, but as a badge or
personal ornament. Compare this ttory with
the hideous scene described by Doctor Craven of
tbe brutal overoowering by soldiers and black
smiths, ot Mr. Davis' frantic resistance to be put
in irons, aud then judge between the two seta of
notions as to what is allowable in the treatment
ot such prisoiers.
Mr. Davis is regarded as less a monster, by our
people, than Napoleon was by the English dur
ing the greater part of bis career. The ma-sacre
at Jaffa, the murder ol the Duke d'blcghien, and
other atrocities charged upon Napoleon, have
nu parallel in anything ever done by Mr. Davis,
who, in the character of a belligerent, commit
ted no crimes, any further than the war itself
was a crime. His mistake, and that of his con
federates, was in supposing that the allegiance
they owned to their States was superior to the
allegiance due to the Federal Government. If
this doctrine were true, it would absolve them
from guilt. That they believed it truo nobody
doubts: and though this belief repairs no mis
chief, it should mitigate the usual condemnation
pionounced upon men who were rather deluded
than intentionally disloyal.
But when we come round to this question of
disloyalty, it is apparent that if Mr. Davis is
held as a' traitor, retaliatory torture cannot be
inflicted on him as a prisoner of war, even if
belligerency had not ended, or even if retro
spective vengeance were one ot the rights of
war. As a traitor, he has the right ot every
criminal the right to a speedy and impartial
trial, and to exemption from any punishment
but detention till alter a judicial sentence. To
pretend that the tortures and indignities in
flicted on Mr. Davi? were necessary to prevent
his escape, is preposterous. Did Stanton sup
pose a broken old man would gnaw through
massive stone walls and heavy iron grates with
his teeth, that he thought it necessary to chain
him ? The impression made by Doctor Craven's
book abroad will be most unfavorable to our
national character, and will be almost as unjust
as unfavorable, since what is discreditable in its
contents was the work of the single base mind
at the head ot the War Department.
The Exploded L'urorcn Congress.
from the Daily 3"eic.
The faint hopes of peace in Europe, to which
the announcement that a Conference had been
called by the neutral powers had given rise,
have been proved fallacious by the abandon
ment of the proposed Congress, owing, ostensi
bility, to the refusal of Austria to Join it unless
guarantees were given beforehand that no
power represented in it should gain any territo
rial aggrandizement through its action. Under
these circumstances it is argued that Austria is
responsible for the war that now seems inevita
bleand which possibly, at this writing, is in
progress and is charged with being the dis
turber of Europe. But the circumstances under
which the Congress was called, and the ends to
be attained, were all unfavorable to tbe future
of Austria, and hence is it that a due sense of
her dignity and a regard for her national inte
rests have led her to refuse to become a sharr
In her own degradation and a partaker in the
game of her own spoliation.
The fact is, as is shown from the beginning of
me existing controversy, commencing wun tne
Schleswig-llolstein muddle and ending with tho
apparent entry of France into tbe questions at
issue that Austria has been constantly the
victim of the political machinations of tbe
ambitious diplomats of Europe, and the pivot
on which has turned the political wheel ot for
tune. Her trouble with Prussia, a month and a
halt ago, arose lrom the expressed determination
Ot that power to annex tho Duchies of Schleswig
and Holsteln to her territory; a move to which
Austria, lor reasons ol her own, demurred. Thus
brought into antagonism wuh Prussia, a new
penl menaced ber. Availing herself of the
troubles in which Austria found herself, Italy
uitule her preparations lor sharing in the threat
ened war, and made no secret of her intention
to wrpst Venetiafrom the Austrian power. Then,
shout that time, Napoleon began to talk of the
treaties ot 181fi trcatica- whereby Venetia ac
crued to Austria and of bis "detestation" of
rLem. People saw In that declaration a threat
to join 1n the gathering of the clans that were
being marshalled for that power's overthrow,
and tpeculatlons wcie rite upon 'the fate ,ot the
Kaiser and his traditionary empire. t.. i
When, however, the crisis seemed Imminent,
and when by dint of loud talk and much confu
sion the popular mind was made confused as to
Ihe real hazards at stake, a congress to regulate
tbe troubles that threatened to end In war was
proposed by France. This Congress was to meet
foi no other purpose than to diplomatize Austria
out of every position that she had assumed, and
to delend which she has organized an army of
eight hundred thousand Wn. And now comes
in the announcement that Austria has dissolved
tbe hopes of peace by her rctusal to loin the
proffrred peace-making convention without a
warianty from tbe other parties thereto that no
power herself included shall emerge from the
Congress with a mile more of territorial ponsos
sion tban when she entered it. This decision
blocks Napoleon's game on the Rhine: compels
Victor Emanuel to suck his thumbs for Ve
ne'in; deprives Prussia of tho coveted Elbe
Duchies, and leaves the whole quarrel, with all
its weighty conclusions, subject to the final aud
riskv test of the sword.
That Austria, by her refusal to lend her coun- f
tcnance to the insulting conference that was ,
called to her dishonor, has preserved her national I
dignity, is manifest, in the catastrophe of battle
that the ambitions and avarice of her neighbors
will force upon her, she may bi so far worsted
as to shorn not only of Venetia, but of the
greater part ot her territory. She may see again
the gliiter ot French eagles In the streets of her
capital, and In the gardens of tho S.'uoenbrunu
the uniform of the'Garibaldian volunteers may
glare w'lth a strange crimsou hu. But if, even
with those disheartening results of his refusal to
be st'orn ot his inheritance, the Kaiser should
say tha' he did not sacrrice the Atistr:a i honor
to the demands ot an armeo combina'ion of
enemies, the world could not but testily to the
courage with which he dared tho essay at arms.
If, indeed, it bo true, as It is whispered, that
Russia with her eye upon tne Danubinn princi
palities and upon the Turk has tendered her
support to Austria In secret, then will there be
a greater chance that Austria will still maintain
Venetia, and that Schleswig-llolstein will choose
their own rulers after all.
A cargo of copper ingots from the mines of
Lake Supeiior has arrived at Chicago, the first
shipment, direct from the mines, that has ever
been made to that port.
SFECIAL NOTICES.
PARDEE SCIENTIFIC COURSE
IN
LA FAYETTE COLLEGE.
In Addition to the grnoTnl Coarse of Instruction in
tins liepurtirriit. designed to toy a suhstantlal basis of
kt o lcilfco nrd schoinrly culture, ntudcn s cun pursue
tliose bruDcLes which are essentially practical aud
ten nlral. vl7. i
EhClXKMUNG Civil. Topoprnphlcal. and ecVi
miitls JlM.Gnnd WETA1.1.VUGY t AHCHirMJ
'Jl HE, and tbe application ot Chemistry to AOK1CUL
11 1th ana the ARTS.
1 bete la also afiorded an opportunity tor special study
of TKADE and t ! ii i-KCK oi J ODi KN LAN
l.L'AC.l- s and i'UILOLOUY , and of the HISTORY and
lf TITU1IONS olourcountiy.
Viot. K- B. YOTJNUM AN,
. Clerk oi the Eacalty.
Fastow, Pennsylvania A prh 4. Ib06. 6 10
A SPECIAL MEETING OF THE
Stockholders or tbe Rl OAW DAT.R Dir. rOMi
PAJ.'Y. win be l,;d at the Of) ee of the Company, No.
:'2G WALNLT Htreet, on Patnrduy, June 'U, 1866. at
12 o'clock it
6 16 3t
F.DWAED SH1PPEN, President.
EST-,
NOTICE. ON AND AFTER THE
15h inHtunt the TNITFI. RTATPH BnTl'l.
LONG BKANC11, N. J., wl 1 be open lor the reception
ol vlslturs. BENJAMIN A. SHOEMAKER,
6 8 lnr Proprietor.
BATCH ELOR'S HAIR
DYTE
11 K BEST IN THE WORLTl.
Haimless. reliable. Instantaneous, 'ibe only perfect
dvc. No alpnppolntment. no ridiculous tints, but trae
to nature, binck or brown
GEN VINE IS (IG.NEL WILLIAlf A. BATCDELOB
AL0,
Repeneratlnir Ex tiact oi At lhlfl enrs restores, preserve
Sid beautifies tlio hair, prevents badness. So d bt all
1'rutglMn. Factory No. 81 BARCLAY fct.. N. Y. 311$
E5F
JUST PUBLISI1ED
Br the PhTslclann of the
NEW YORK MUSEUM,
the Ninetieth Edition ol' tlielr
t'OUK LECTURER.
entitled
PHILOSOPHY OF MAKRI AOK.
To be had tree, tor lour stamps, by addressing Secre
tary New York Museum of Anatomv.
7 175 No. 618 BUOADWAY. New York.
DINING-ROOM.
LAKEMEYER
CA li'l h R S Allev. would reiinectiuliv Inform the
I'nbllc Kencially that be has lettnothins undonu to tnake
tins place comrortauie in every respect lor the accom
modation oi gucNts. He has opened a large and com
modious Dinliik-Itoom in the second siory. His SIUE-
BCijtttl) is iurol8icd with EIIAND1E8. WINES.
K
LEI N S
WILLOUOHBY'S,
MASON'S,
LYMAN'S,
V A T K N T
AIR-TIGHT
if
KLINES, j.
PATENT
SELF-SEALING
FRUIT JARS.
All the above Jars we
offer to our customers and
the public neoarally, with
entire confidence, at tae
1863 f:i
-J
LOWEST
Market Price.
A. J. WELDENER,
No. 38 S. SECOND Street, Philadelphia.
91m
I1UITS, NUTS
SARDINES, ETC. ETC.
Oranges and Lemons, Messina.
Paper Shell and Bordeaux Almonds,
Sardines, half anu quarter boxes.
Marseilles (. live 0U, quarts and pints.
Kcnpariel Superfine Capers.
Spanish and French Olives, In kegs anl glass.
Fngllsh Pickles Sauces, and Mustard.
American Pickles, in barrels and glass.
Tomato Catsup and Pepper Sauce, quarts and pints.
Engluih Musbtoom and Walnut Catsup.
Worcestershire and Luoknow Sauce.
Bunch, Layer, Seedless, and Valencia Raisins.
Zante and Patras Currants, and Citron.
French, Turkey, and Imperial Prunes.
OrenobleWalnuts, Pecan Nuts, and Filberts. ,
Itallun Maccaronl and Vermicelli.
Canned Peaches, Tomatoes, Lobnters, and Corn.
Also, '2C0 cases of the celebrated Virgin Oil of Alx, lm
ported by us, quarts and pints.
The richest Salad Oil received lrom France.
JOSEPH B. MJSSIER & CO.,
85 tuthlll
No. 108 South DELAWARE Avenue.
DAOEii'S WASHING MACHINE
Best in tlio City,
IT SAVES TIME, i
, SAVES EABOB, i . '
SAVKB CLOTHES.
, . EVEEY FAMILY SHOCLD-HAVX ONE.
For sale at the Furniture Store ot
Agents Wanted.
J. HAAS,
020 No T MARKET S'rojt
i
J "a t,.
i
In
I
SUMMER RESORTS.
g U M M EK. llESOllTS
I
t OH LINE, OF
Reading Railroad and Branches.
MANSION IIOUSE, MOUNT CARBON,
Mrs. Carollns Wonder, rotuville P. O., Bchnytktti eo
1USCAB0RA HOTEL,
Ura Hannah Miller, Tnfcarora P. O., Scbcrtklllco
MAI1AA0Y CITT HOTEL,
- ,A Q. W. Frost, Mahanoy City P. 0., Bohuylklll co.
WHITE HOUSE,
. Sirs. Bosan Martoorf, Reading P. O
ANDALUSIA,
Jamrs B. Madeira, Beading P. O.
LIVING SPRINGS HOTEL.
Dr. A. Smith, WerdenvOle P. 0., Berks co
SOUIH MOUNTAIN HOUSK,
II. H. Manderbacb, Wotnelsdorf P. 0., Berks co.
COLD SPRINGS HOTEL,
Lebanon co., Chanel Boedermel, Oarrlsbarg P. O.
BOYEUSTOWN SEMINARY.
3. B.Ucuky, Boj erstown P. 0., Berk co.
YELLO IF sr RINGS HO TEL,
B. K. Fnydrr, Yellow Springs P. O., Chester co.
L1TIZ SPRINGS,
Bamuel Llchtenthaler, LltltP O., Lancaster c
EPHRATA MOUNTAIN SPRINGS,
Alt sander 8. Featbei, F.pbrata P. 0., Lancaster co
JrniL21. 1H66. 4 233m
EXCHANGE HOTEL,
ATLANTIC CITY.
Tho subscriber, gratotiil for past favors, tondors
thanks to his patrons and the public lor the gouerous
custom given him, and ben learo to say that his
bouse is now open lor the season and roady to ro-
caive boarders, permanent and transient, on the
most modcrato terms. Ino bar will always be sop
plied w iih the choicest oi wines, liquors, and cigars,
and superior old ale. Tbe tables will be set with the
best tbe market aSords.
Flshinjr lines and tackle always on hand.
Stablo room on the promises.
All tbe comforts of a borne can always bo found at
the Exchange,
GEORGE HAYDAY,
6 14 thstu2m rKOPEIEfOR
N
ATIOKAL HOTEL
AND
EXCURSION IIOUSE,
Atlantic City, N. J.
The undersigned having leased the above favorite es
tabllsbmcnt, and having refitted and refurnished
throughout, it will be open tor the reception ot guests
on SATUKDAY June 16. 18G6.
The table will be supplied with the best the seasen
affords Including Oysters, Fish, Clarrs, etc. etc, and
none but the purett Wines, Liquors, Cigars, eto.,se
kc ted tor the Bar.
Committees of Excursions will find It the only pltce
la the city where they can be accommodated, having
the largest ball-room, and music tree of charge.
J. WILLETT,
M lm PROPRIETOR.
TTKITED STATES HOTEL
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.,
trill open for the reception of guests on
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 1866.
DODWOBTH'H BAND engaged for the season.
Tenons desiring to engage rooms will address
BllOW'N & WOEI.PPJER,
i noPHIEXOKB, ATLANTIC CITY;
Or No. 827 RICHMOND Street,
6 9 2mrp Philadelphia.
Q ONGRESS HALL,
CAPE ISLAND, N. J.,
WILLBEMAIN OTEN UNTIL OCTOBER L
There has been added to ttls popular Bouse, since last
season, the entire Ocean Iiouxe property, giving an ocean
irom ol over 12iU feet, and over Suu rooms lronungaud
in full view ol the sea.
A penect system oi sewerage and drainage has been
completed, a teatare possessed by lew hotels outside of
large cities.
'J lie appointments of the House throughout nave re
ceived a muni careful supeivislon, suggested by the ex
perience 01 oast seasons. 1 or apai tincn w, aili teas
r J. F. CAKE,
Congress Hall.
llasslcr's Brass and String Banu. fri'i tl U
THE
PI Ell IIOUSE.
PEXN, DELAWARE.
PORT
JONATHAN DKAPER, Proprietor.
The Proprietor having purchased this well-known
house, Is now prepared to receive boarders at M 00 per
week.
The lovers of good gunning and fishing can here fully
enloy that luxury.
Excellent bathing, and a magnificent beach extending
fortunes. &Mlin
rpiIE TAMMANY HOUSE,
NOHTH CAROLINA AVENUE,
NEAR THE DEPOT, ATLANTIC CITT.N. J. .
The subscriber takes pleasure in Informing his former
patrons and the pubic, that tbe above house is now
open, where he will be happy to receive all who may
lavor him wlib a call. , , ..
In connection with the Hotel, he has openod FIRST
CL Abb BILLIAHU ROOM.
ELIAS CLEAVER,
8 14 lm PEOPBIETQB.
LIGHT HOUSE COTTAGE,
Atlantic City, N. J.
JONAH WOOTTON 4 80N, PROPRIETORS,
It n w optnvr the ieann.
Ihe best location the Island, being the nearest
boUBO to the su-t. A continuation of past patronage Is
respectfully solicited. ttltSlnirp
KENTUCKY nOUSE.KENTTJCKY AVENUE,
Atluntio City, H.J.. is now open lor the recep
tion of boarders. Having one oi the flnest locations on
Ue island, and keliig nearest to the best bathing on
the bench. It offers superior Inducements to visitors to
A6l'i'6trplty" FRANCI8 QUIGLEY, Proprietor.
CONTINENTAL. HOTEL,
ly LONG BRANCH. N. J.
This new mammoth hotel, the largest In the country,
Is now open lor the seaaon Accommodatlous lor Vi6)
persons. Address SPBACUE A STORES,
6 IB lm ' Proprietors
LOST.
LOST-TUR CERTIFICATE NO. 1221. is
sued by the City of Philadelphia (old) to provide
for the subscription to the PennsylVHnla Railroad Coin
imnv'f slock, tinted tteptembur ft, 1HM tor one thousand
dollars payable to John Garth Ltodgson, ot Preston,
Lancashire. Knuland, and Brey Hharp, of London. Knu
lund. trustees, hearing Interest at six per cent, pet 'an
num. Redeemable July 1 im. gatuUialBt'
SAFE FOR. SALE.
A SECOND-HAND
Parrel & Herrinsr Fire-Proof Safe
' ', FOR SALE.
APPLY AT THIS OFFICE. p
DRY GOODS.
Q A P ii . MAY .
ATLANTIC CITY,
-' , AND LONG DRANOn.
DREIFUSS & BELSINQER..
No. 49 North EIGHTH Street,
HAVE OPENED ON THE 11th INST.,
A new and desirable lot of ,
ZEPHYR KNIT SHAWLS
Suitable lor the Watering Places, including a "
splendid assortment of
WHITE GOODS.
rUCKFD MUSLIN.
8 II I BRED S1UPLIN,
SWISS MUSLIN,
PLAID NAINSOOK,
STRIPED NAINSOOK,
912 CAMBRIC NAINSOOK.
No. 1024 fHF.SNTJT STREET.
E. M. NEEDLES,
No. 1024 CUF.SNUT STREET,
OFFERS AT LOW PRICES,
2000 PIECES WHITE GOODS,
2 I Tncludlns alt varieties 'flhlrred. Pnflprt. Tnrknrt
suitable for White ltorili sand lreses 'l3
100 nieces PRINTED LINEN LAWNS. dlr. H
I'laiu. ninpru, rum aim r igured aiDLlss.
..1.1. . X. (.. ,, . I '
able styles for Iircsses. I
CIudt. Va encUnne and other Lscest Insert- 3
Hipn, LUjllllM upuiiuiiikb ni'U ntam, UanUKer pTf
1 he above are ottered lor sa e C UIIAP, and in H
great VAHIK I T.
ADLLS WOULD DO WELL TO EXAMINE.
628
II O P K r N s
HOOP-SKIRT
Manufactory. No. tU8 ARCIT street.
628
Above Mxtli street. Philadelphia.
V iH lesale and KetAl).
Our Assortment embraces all ihe new and desirable
styles and sizes ot every length and sue waist for
Laiiles, Si tapes, and ChllCrrn.
Those of "OlH O HA' MAKE" ate tuptrur In Unit
and tiurobi'i t to any other Skirts made, and warranto
to give satisfaction
hklris made to order, altered, and repaired. S 41
FINANCIAL.
JAY COOKE & CO.,
No. 114 South THIRD Street,
BANKERS
AND
DEALERS IN GOVERNMENT SECURITIES
U. 8. 6s OF 18S1.
l20s, OLD AND HEW.
10-408; CEK1IFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS,
7 SO IS OlES, 1st, 2d, and 3d Series.
COMPOUND INTEREST NOTES WANTED.
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS.
Collections
mnde. Stocks Bought and Sola on
Commission.
Special business
LADIES.
accommodations
reserved for
8 7 2m
U. S. SECURITIES
A SPECIALTY.
SMITH, RANDOLPH &
BANKERS & BROKERS,
CO.,
16 S. THIRD ST.
PHILADELPHIA.
NASSAU ST.
NEW TOliK.
STOCKS AND GOLD
BOUGHT AND SOLD ON COMMISSION;
HERE AND IN NEW YORK. t 21
RATIONAL
BAM OF THE REPUBLIC,
Nos. 809 and 811 CHESNUI Street.
(Organised under the "National Currency Act,' March
SO, 1B68.)
A regular BANK.IKQ BUSINESS transacted.
DEP081IS received upon the most liberal terms.
Especial attention given to COLLECI IOJTd. f6 1 16t
)AVIES BROTHERS,
Ho. 225 DOCK STREET,
13ANKERS AND BROKERS,
BUT AUn SELL
DSITED BTATES BONDS, 1881s, -!0s, 10 40.
UNITED STATES 7 3-10s, ALL ISSUES.
CERTIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS.
Mercantile Fsperand Loans on Collaterals negotiate
Stocks Bought and Sold on Commission. 1 Jl $
ARPER, DURNEY & CO.
BANKERS.
STOCK AND EXCHANGE BROKERS,
No. 65 8. THIRD STREET, FHEADELrfllA.
Stocks and Loans bought and sold on Commission
Dncurrent Bank Notes, Coin, Etc, bought and sold.
Special attention paid to the purchase and tale ol
Oil Stocks. Deposits received, and Interest allowed,
as por agreement. 8S 8m
rj;ilE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
HAS REMOVED
During the erection of the new Bank
building,
TO
117p
STREET
No. 05 C1JESNUT
520 S. - F I V E - T W E N T I E S.
7-308 -SEVEN-THIRTIES
WANTED.
DE 1IAVEN & BROTHER,
1 1 No. 40 S. Third Stbkkt.
ROBERT SHOEMAKER & CO.,
WHOLESALE DRICGISTS,
MANUFACTURERS.,
I ' IMPORTERS,
AND SEALERS IN
Taints, Varnishes, and Oils,
No. 201 NORTH FOURTH STREET
I IB Jul ' V. I, C0E.NEH OF RACE
ft

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