OCR Interpretation


The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, December 31, 1866, FOURTH EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025925/1866-12-31/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

TI1E NEW YOEK TRESS.
icrtORiAL opinions of the leading
JOURNALS UPON CURRENT TOPICS.
COM PI LID XVKRr PAY FOR iVtiNIt-O TKtEOKAPH.
A Pltllalclihla Thompson.
fm the Iribune.
We believe It was Douplaa Jcrrold who defined
a conservative as a man who wouldn't look at
th new moon out of respect to tho old moon.
It is of the game class that a great orator savs:
"They can neither be convinced nor converted
60clety can only hope they may die." Speci
mens of this class prcai-nt themselves, from time
to time, to the public view, noticeable only be
cauee they are standing still while the re?tof
t'je world moves on. The laet who has attrnctoil
our attention is Mr. Justice Thompson, of Phila
delphia. We observe that, like the original
07?n?r of "Mrs Toodl"s'" door-plate, he spell
his name with a p. Whether he has been dis
tinguished by any other trait of character we do
not k now. lie no appears upou the sceuo, spcll
ia;r his name with a p, and keepirg "niggers''
out of the stieet ctrs in the Quaker
City. If Mr. Juttice Thompson lnve a mis
sion, this would appear to be it. The railway
corporations are kuepina: up an obstinate war
aaavnt one large cla-s of tae public of the,
public in order ro serve wtiose interests corpora
tions aic permitted to exist. They have been
well served by tlioir aent-,; ty drivers and con
ductors whose bratul contempt lor the rights of
nes;ro passengers almost equals that of the
ollicers of the corporations. Still, public opi
n ion Is a hard thin to tight aguiiint, and tne
corporations became in need 01 some further
assistance tliau tnat which drivers and conduc
tors could rcr.der. They were able to reinforce
themselves with Mr. Justice Thompbou. As a
it utter of policy, we think they uiad a mi 'take,
lor tbepuohc, tiuding tne corporaiion morals
judicially deieuded, may like the bench a little
iesH, and I he corporation not any better.
Aunie Foster and Mary Johnson are two
colored women not alleged to be otherwise than
ik-ccnt in appearance and of decorous behavior.
TUty sought admission in'o one of the cars of
the Philadelphia and Gray's Ferry Passenger
Ru.il way Company, were received 'without ob
jection, and ptid ihetr laro to the conductor.
TUey gave hnu tiiteen eeuts, and received no
change, whence w may in er that the conduc
tor was aware jl the.r color, and thought it safe
to steal a cent fioua "niggers." When tie
had the money sine in his pocket, he ordered
tliem out of the car. It does not appear in
evidence whethi-r tne regulations of the com
pany direct their conductors lirst to rob and
ilieu to maltreat their negro passengers: but,
we presume, in any ca.e a zealous otlicer is per
mitted, or pei haps expected, to exercise a wide
discretion as to ti e deuree and kind of outra-re
he inflicts. Or the one cent extra may be
demanded by tuo company as compensa
tion for the trouble which thee negroes
ot,caion by being bla.k, and requiring to be
put off. The sum ceriainly cannot be considered
large, if we con ider the very dirty character of
the work done. When the colored women
upou the frivolous pretext that they were enti
tled to the ride lor wtrcb. their money had been
accepted refusi d to leave ihe car, the conductor
stopped it; threatened his passengers with vio
lence; then went on, and refused to let them
teave the car when they desired; then kicked
them off Bhoine, in his violeut wrath, a
quickness and variety of invention which must
have been highly pleasing to bis employers.
Genius ot so delica'e a quality ought not to be
neglected; the conductor surely deserves to be
made a director. But tho company, as com
panies will, beiravs ingra mule, and, upon
being sued, inierpo-es as a delens-e that the
conductor had exceeded his instructions. If
we may be pardoned tne expression, the cor
poration "eoes back ' on its too lauhful servant.
Mr. 8. 0. Fry. its Fresiden', admits that their
rules require' the exclusion ol colored people,
but allows it to be intiiiiNled ihat be objects
m a formal wav, and for the purposes of this
trial to being made responsible for the manner
iu which the conductor carried out his instruc
tions. Mr. Justice Thompson needed not even
this hint to spur his zeal, lie snaps up the
plaintiffs' counsel with the following bit ot what
he calls law: "Unless you can sUoiv that the
company bad a reauMion directing the driver
aa i conductor to tiMltreat the Diasenccrs, this
testimony would not bn proper.'' We cannot
imagine what broader invitation could be given
to these negro-hating corporations and. '.heir
employes. Everybody kuovs how surey
the spirit of the company's managers peue
tratcs its lower ollicers. If Mr. Fry and
his directors don't want negroes to
rilki in their cars, they may find it
ililficult to pievent them by a mere prohibition,
but they will tind it easy if they can add to that
an unrestrained ue of (orce. To encouiaire
violence in l heir conductors they need not en
join it in term ; they have only to cause It to be
understood that oil'euses ugaiust aeeroes will be
favorably, or even leniently, rcgarld ut hea.l
iiuurt?r.. In other words, fuey need only issue
just such an order as this company dul Issue;
their conductors will perfecily understand that
it is meant to coverall outrages, and a conve- i
nient judge will bo found to hold up the letter !
of the oi der as a defense to all actions at la .
We will not do Mr. Justice Thompson tie
Injustice to suppose he believes his opinion to i
be law. It is a maxim that a man Is presume 1
to intend the consequences ol his own aets. It ;
a another that n who tasteus on the letter of a
written instrument sticks in the out.-ide of its
meaning. No company dara defy public
op' u ion by directing that negroes be r mi'..' lily
ejected from their c.f9. But Mr. Justice TU'Jmp-.-oii
declares that unless they do this iu plain
language, they are exempt from responsibility
rorthe acts of those who are acting in the spirit
of their instructions. He knows better, or if he
do"s not know better, he "hould give place on
the bench to somebody wbo docs. Upon his
ruling the plaiutiil's were driven out of court,
not tuiuh Ipbs rudely and not any less unjustly
tdan they weio driven out of the car by the
conductor whom Mr. Justice Thompson recog
nize as his fellow-servant in the interests of
the conipanv.
Between the conductor, who U n rtniil opr.
vant, and the Judge, who we presume to be a
volunteer aereut, of tho company, we prefer
the conductor, and deem his the less discredit
able olliee iu this wholly dlsgiaceful business.
Judge Thompson goes out of his way to say
that the agitation lor the rights of the colored
people is "most unlnrtunate," and "can do no
good;" that "until recently the colored people
have been livinu in Philadelphia mo.-t comfort
uIy," with much other stale talk of that lend.
They will live some a hut more comfortably
when this unfortunate agitation shall have
secured to them justice from the bench and
piotection from public opinion. That time
caniiot be far off, and when it comes, the worst
enemy of Mr. Justice Thompson will scarcely
be cruel enough to remind him of uis present
ducit-ion. '
Trie Coudttlou of the Coiintrt- Order
At(ttlut Auarcli-,
From the Herald.
Ia all great revolutions, rapidly developed,
Dext to the dangers of a direct defeat are the
dangers of success. The confu&lon which fol
lows a vio!ent overthrow ot anold and long
continued pol tlcal system necessarily results iu
a violent clashing ot parties and factions, ideas
an4 theories of reconstruction, against which
t'.te only remedy lies in a fixed purpose with the
party In power, and in steadily working for Us
accomplishment. The opposite course, of too
much haste and too much of bloody repression,
diverted the tjrst French Revolution from a
tepi blje ol "libertv, equality , aud fraternity''
t the stringent military desjo'istn of Napoleon
THS DAILY feVENiyq TELEGRAPH. PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, DECEMBER 31, 18GG.
Onr danger, however. In pursu'ng the same
methods of reconstruction, is not so much the
despotism of France as the anarchy of Mexico;
but Mill, as with r ranee, our peril Is in the
JllCObiLS. ,
The advanced pioneer of our Jacobin reform
ers is Wendell Phillips. He belong to the
Crogressive school of Dauton, Marat, and Ko
espierre. He believes iu the short cut of tae
irmlloiine. He can see no way to the success
of the repub'.ic but that which leads over the
politically dead body ot i'rendent Johnson.
lie must be brought to the guillotine of im- j
peachment, or tho liberties of the country are j
gone. Here we have something of the rabid j
fanaticism an 1 savage personal animosities !
w hich marked the recon itruclon policy of the j
French Jacobins. Nor is I'biiips witb.mil a con
siderable body oi supnorlers at his back. His I
programme Is echoed by an extensive taction, '
and lias its advocates among the leaders of our ,
national assembly. Such, too, is the conflict
between Nortnern fanatics and Southern tire- ,
and-brtrnstome agitatois of the old secession I
trioe, that it is difficult to conjecture when we i
shall reach the cud of all this clamor and con
I us ion.
The late Southern Rebelliou wa the result of
a thirty years' agitation of the slavery question
between (southern propagandists and Northern
Abolitionists bet wccj the State Hmhts South
ern Confederacy leaders of South Carolina and '
Virginia on the" one side, and of the Northern
emancipation and disunion agitators of Massa
chusetts and New Englan I ou tho other. If ,
Barnwell Hlictt and IkuryA. Wise preached
disunion to maintain slavery, Llovd Gitrison
aud Phillips denounced the Cun.-titutlon as "a ,
league wiih death and a covenant with bell," in '
their crusade aealust slavery. If, under the
laws of South Oroliun. iree colored citizens of i
Massachusetts, in violation of the Constitution,
were clapped in jail on touching at Charleston j
to keep tbem from contact with thu slaves of
the city, Southern masters in pursuit of their
fugitive slaves were, iu violation of the Ciusii- '
tution, arrested in the North by persona!
liberty bill.-; if suspected Yankee commercial
travellers were taried and feathered in Vieks
burg, Soutucrn slave-hunters were hooted
through tho streets of Boston. All this culmi
nated in the late Rebellion. The aggressive
blow came from slavery, and slavery has beeu
destroyed as tLe armed euemy of the Union.
A tuird party the great Virion party of the !
war, the party of Lincoln, Grant, and Farragut
has stepped in and settled this disuuion ap.ita- !
lion on ihe slavery question. We have had
enough from the Puritan fanatics of Massiehu- '
setts, and enough lrom the State rights and
secession anarchists of Soutn Carolina. The I
intermediate ideas of the great Northern Cen-
tral States, from the Hudson to the Mississippi,
and the great dominant parly which they com
mand, must no w shape our national policy and i
the destinies of the country. South Carolina !
and Virginia have bad the'r day of power, Mas
sachusetts and New England have bad their day,
and New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana,
and Idinois must now speak the voice of the ;
Government. The war has eiven a new inter- i
preta;ion to the Constitution; it is embodied in ,
the pending amendments, and it will surely be ;
carried through. j
It the Republican party follow the lead of
Philli,s and Butler in the Impeacliment ot the
President, the party will be broken up; if the
Northern Dcmocmcy continue to fo'low the
teachings of tho fcouthern fire-eating revolu
tionists, they will never rise again from the dis- i
roal swamp in which tDev now lie floundering, j
Order is on the 6idc of the amendment nuiust :
anarchy, and the Union, law, aud order will '
prevail. The President's policy is defeated, his I
impeachment is not demanded, and as a need- j
less outrage it would only result in mischief.
The policy of the amendrLC it must be carried ,
out, because it is the will of the lojal States, '
and the great Union party of the war. It Is ;
their decree, and it must be obeyed.
The Condition of Trade How Relief
May be Obtained.
From the Timet. !
According to a Western journal, corae of our
merchants aro resorting to a questionable
method of escaping from the prevailing de-
prcBslon. ''At present," the statement Is, the !
entire Northwest is overrun by drummers, or
commercial travellers, for Eastern houses, whOf e j
only desire seems to be to get orders and fill
them, regardless of the ability of those who
order the goods to pay their bills at maturity."
Twelve months ago, a similar warning cane ;
lrom the South. Then, as now, a certain de
scription of Eastern bouses sought opportunities j
lor expansion. They sold ireely on credit, and
a veiy lare proportion ot the goods they seut
remains to this day uupaul tor aiid unsold. Our
weak traders sutler in consequence, the incon- ,
veuiences ot the existing Uulluess being argra- .
vr.ted by the unpromiciug aspect of Southern :
indebtedness. In these circuui-tnuces, it does
seem the height of folly to extend the credit i
system to tho West, pregnant as it is with signs i
of coming disas .er. " '
Judging ot the West by its own reports,
euough is apparent to prove tho necessity of
extreme caution. Take the Chicago Tri'juae
as a witness and a more completeut witness tho
West could not tttrnish. In its review ot last
week's tiausuctions the Tribune says:
"There is no improvement in ihe wholesale
trade ot the city, aod from every quarter there
is but one response 'dull.' In the coinnry :
business is very slow. The interior dealers are ,
selling little; the farmers are not paying up,
and in numeious parts of tho country we hear
ot lailures. Merchants in arrears aud unable to i
pay are making assignnicnts, and in some in
stances fraudulent transfers of property have
been made."
What more ominous state of thiue could we
have? The farmers not rettliug their store ac
counts, the storekeepers seilintr Utile and pay
ing something t:ear to nothing; the Incipient
symptoms of tho trickery an I fraud winch in
the West pivsitgo the coium? of tight times.
Surely these are circuin-t.nices not lavorableo
ihe future of the Eastern merchants who no if
open Western credits. Chicago merchants, as a
class, are not over-prudent; they ure usually a
llitle more willing than most nieu, t risk tho
chances of trade; but even tbey tind the curtail
ment of credit esen'lal to safety. "The mer
chants find collections all over the interior slow,"'
is the report ol the Hemiblican, "aud they are
generally refusing to till bills on long credits."
It is at such a moment that Eastern firms send
"drummers" westward to lighten stocks, and
give an air of lite to business by sales on time.
A more imprudent step could hardly be imagined.
The reports from theSmth show little pros
pect of improvement in that quarier. I u fact,
none can be reasonably expected untd the
pend ng political complications be satisfactorily
disposed of. "The movements in both moneyed
and commercial circ es,'' remarks the New Or
leans Junes, "devclope something ot an uneasi
ness, which can only be accounted for from the
unsettled position ot the country." An increased
desire tor advauecs ou the next season's crop Is
spoken or among other slgniticaut tokens;
while "owners of money are becoming very sen
sitive aud shy." Discouraging as it is, this is a
favorable tpecimen ot tho ver-ious current at
the South. Tho ceueial condition of affairs
there precludes tuo possibility of remittances
for goods supplied lrom the North, or the growth
of a demand lor further supplies.
Westward and Southward everjthiug points
to the necessity of more than common prudence
on the part of Eastern merchants aud manu
facturers. The ti nes are dull here, undoubt
edly. The volume of general business is com
paratively light. The flush usually incident to
the season has not shown itsell this year.
Manufacturers discover that the demand on
which they calculated has suddenly subsided,
and that the enormous profits to which they
have become accustomed will not be realized
during the passing period. The presence in our
cities of a large amount of unemployed or only
partially employed labor, must tell upou gene
i si business as ceitaiuly as it reveals stagna
tion In ceitain branches of industry. Turn
which way you will, then, facts exist which
establish the paramount importance of avoiding
risky ventures, and ret using resolutely to extend
the credit system. Even now it is the source of
our most formidable weakness and anviety.
Ther may be nothln?, to iuMify im
mediate f prehension. Certainly there is nothing
to warrant noisy alarm. But throughout the
North, as at New Orleans, causes of uneasiness
arc in operation, and these should induce the
exercise of tboutmoBt caution tn every branch
ol trade and Industry. The cloud now visible
may be no biirger than a man's hand; but it Is
the hirblnger of a state of tninas hlch calls for
sleepless circumspection on all side?.
Tho diffusion of these causes of uneasiness
over the entire country should prevent any
attempt to obtain relief by tariff legislation. If
a particular industry suffered while all around
enjoyed a full measure of prosperity, an appeal
for au exceptional increase ol duty might not be
unreasonable. But since all begin to feci the
pinch more or less severely, it were absurd and
unjust to seek relict by building a Chinese wall
round certain manufacturers. The 'ordinary
complaint of the day is, that there is too little
trade not too much; so that Instead of inter
posing obstacles to commerce lor the benefit of
this manu'arturer or that, the common sense
plan would scm to be to seek, bv revision of
taxation or in some other way, to lessen the dif
ficulties of trade and industry In general.
Not that any patcut is available by which the
country may bo saved from the penalties of
over production and over trading. No action
ot Conpress ought to or can avert the conse
quence of departures fiom the sound laws of
linauce and trade. But something may bo done
towards lightening the burdens, under which
the community sutlers; and this is what should
be doue to mitigate the pressure wliich gradu
ally prows severe
Simply to increase certain Ctis'oins duties
wonld be to injure the whole community lor
the benefit ot a small part, It would be adding
to the taxation of all lor the aggrandizement of
a lew. By reducing taxation, however, all inav
be benefited: while by admitting rawmaterials
Iree ot duty, the interests cf manufacturers may
be better served than by prohibitory duties on
competing goods. In the tiee admission of raw
products we sre the best possible help to strug
gling manufacturers, coupled with a cheapen
ing of goods of which consumers stuud iu
urgent need.
Without supposing, then, that the preseut
depression of trade and industry admits of direct
retiel from anytning that ('0IlCle8 may enact,
the tact is clear that much advantage would,
iudirectly, accrue from a revision ot the internal
revenue system, with a view to the removal of
existing irrcBiilanties and discrepancies, and
the largest possible reduction of existing bur
dens. The load to be carried will be heavy at
best. But by all means let all extra weights, in
the shape of injudicious taxatiou, be forthwith
removed.
In the presence of the evils which meuice
trade, and the evils which ill-provided labor
already encounters, all available means should
be devoted to the reduction of taxation. As
matters now are, the appropriation ot surplus
funds to the reduction ot the national debt oiigbt
to be a secondary consideration. Of the liquida
tion of the debt we have no tear. But let not
taxation be ket t up to pay off the debt until the
country shall have ro ovored from its inevit.xble it
reaction, and its commerce aud industry shall
nave regained a neaitay Haiti, ihe great point
now sh' iild be to shorten the bard road whicii
our people have to travel; and the best way to
accomplish this will be meanwhile to exact no
more taxes than are requisite to meet the cur
rent expenditures of, the Government. By
keeping down the amount of taxation, and so
adjusting it that it shall no lonerer discourage
enterprise or break the back of st ruga-ling in
dustry, benefits may be secured that are attain
able by no other process.
Mr. Seward mid the Withdrawal of the
t'reuch Troops from Mexico,
From the World.
The New York Courrier ties F.iots Ifnls is ot
opinion that Mr. Bijrclovv did not leave a copy
ot Mr. Seward's famous cable despatch with M.
Mouslier, but merely coaimunicatcd its sub
stance to the French Minister oi Foreign Affairs,
leaving out all that part which the Courrier re
gards as "offensive." It thus accounts for the
discrepancy exist ins between the Moniteuf a
statement unuuunclni; tUnt -aid i.iitob u
nevcr beeu received, and that of Mr. Seward's
organ here, which btates that a reply has alreadv
been received from the French (ioverument.
The fact of the matter is, ihn' if the despatch
in quettiou was ever sent, it was sent with the
distinct understamuuor that it should not be
texlually rendered to M. Mouslier.
Mr. Seward, from the beginning, ha strenu
ously endeavored to pivo bis diplomacy a
vigorous air, when in fact it was never more
than bumptious. He had less excuse for his
simulation in the matter of the removal of the
Mexican troops, because Napoleon signified to
Piesldent Johnson and Secretary Seward,
thiougb another channel than our Minister in
Fiance, his concluded determination so to re
move them, as he has been removing them,
before Mr. Seward began to aoply his pietended
pressure. That concluded detoi ruination was
announced in the Moniteur about the time that
the iiittrniediary in iuetion arrived in this
country some weeks, therefore, before Mr.
Seward stepped into bi- high-heeled shoes
talked bumptiously, and strutted before bis
countiyiiien as tne vindicator of the Mon
roe doctrine against the Emoeror of the
French. His only real difficulty has
beeu to reconcile his strutting here
with his lerl'tctly peaceable Oemeanor
over there. And the incongruity appeared very
fdainly, when, close upon the heels of the pub
ieat.o'n here of his owu despatch, declaring that
France nnmt remove her troops by successive
partial withdrawals, and that no postponement
lor military reasons, in order to a complete
withdrawal in tho tpring, could bo tolerated,
because the United Statps would have no bet
ter guarantee tor the fulfilment of that under
standing thau they had bad for the t'lillilment
ot the previous one, when close upon the heels
of that high pressure despatch, lolbwed, we
say, the hrm declaration of the Emperor that for
military reasons the withdrawal would be
postponed and accomrdiched alt at one;
and aaain, close upon the heels of
his despatch followed the very auxio.n
telrgranis of Secietury Seward, sent tnrongh
tho press over the country, that the
Emperor's reply was "perfectly satisfactory."
Everybody had reasoned logically enoiisrh that
that was the reply to Mr. Seward's bluster:
which would be exactly unsatisfactory. Beit
no! sais Mr. Seward, it is "perfectly satisfac
tory ;" and the ioeble. intellects of his admirers
are left to struggle vainly with the question
raised by himself, what guarantee the United
States now have that the French treops will all
be removed in the spring, which they did not
have that some of them would be removed in
Novembfr a plan which the Emperor has
choen to change, and to persist iu changing.
Napoleon aud IlUmark.
A correspondent of the London Globe is re
sponsible ior the following:
"In imperialist sa'ons this story is, I hear, told.
The Princess Bajoccht-Camerata, a near relative
of the Empeior of the French she beloners to
one of the Bonaparte families settled iu Italy
went a few dnys back: to visit his Majesty at
Complegne. Haviug ior some years resided In
Brittany, and takengreat interest in agricultural
pursuits, she all'etts rusticity in manners and
language; and the greetings over, she cried it
was the tirsttimo phe had seen th Emperor for
,on risr,1 hti illil Ulcoi.l. k... Jn.,nn.. I V
caut deny that he has done you ! Lord I How
he bas overreached jou 1' The exact expressions
of the venerable dame were in reality much
stronger, mure picturesque, and more trooper
like than these; but it would shock polite eyes
to translate tlicni, or to give them In the
orl&inal, because they, as Boileiu said was
sometimes the cute with Latin, bravo pro
priety." . Tolaceo The Northampton (Mass.) Gazette
says tobacco is a dull crop just now. Most ot
the tobacco raisers 1u the vicinity hive two
years' crops on baud, with no more prospect of
a ready sale for it now than there was tt year
ago. At Harlf'ird, ( ouiieet.cut, seed lent duds
lew Ihiuts at thirty rent.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
t-tff" OK. ROM'H LfcK II A3 AJMINI8
.fa . TEIUD MTKOtS OXIDK or I.AUOtCJNU
J'", 'o tlouHnl. lth prrloct intcrr for lM.r
JurRlrm. end Wrdlcul ptirpop, tnl lor nmufMtment.
lMy fliti ml. per looih lorrxlrnctlnai no chnrca lor
if Mri Minn hen artificial tccdi rc oirtr-red OlIK o. N
WI.M WAMllMU'u fcyfAUE, below JLocuit
tfventh trft mm pt)ie door. ron't be foolinh
noti h to eo -inm We and pj 'i and M lor km n. u
1 cuiilli.ue o five lustiuctious to the dental proton
IU II finwara
tW FA KM EH S' AND MECHANICS' NA-
-S' TIOSAL HANK.
. . . , I'liit.Ar.ri.rTiiA. Pccnmber T, 1SW.
The Annual Flection loi Director" ol this Hunk will
be lie d at the Ilanklnfi House on WFP N K"DAY. the
IM b lny of January net, between the hour of 10 o'clock
A.M. and i o'clock 1 H.
H W W RUSHTOS, Jr.Cajihler.
NATIONAL BANK OF THE RE
PUBLIC.
rnn.ADRi.pniA, Iecemher3S. 1S34
1 he Annual Flection lor Director will be held at Ihe
BANK1M1 IIOUsK.oiiTUEsDAY, January 8, Ido7, be
tween the hour ol 10 A. M. and 2 P. M
l'iV6 Uti J. P. MUM FORD, Cashier.
rf" KlUTHWAKK NATIONAL BANK.
m-- I nn.ADEl.pniA, December 10, ISm.
The Annual F.lectti n lor Directors whi bo be d at the
Kiinklnit h ouar, on TUKMDAY k OltMNU. January 8,
m7. betnecn i lie hours ot 10 and 12 o clock.
1. 10 niwl lit f.LAkB, Cashier.
(& MERCANTILE BENEFICIAL ASSOCI
ATIOK. 'Jbo tcitns of admission are as fol
Ion t :
Lite MciiilifiSlilp ln09
Annual Mnihcrtihli 3 CM)
lit) ance l ie.... 00
Application lor admission to membership may be
uiailo to any mnnacet.br to
WJLLIAM A. HOt.IN, Secretary,
12 12 wfm22t o. 73i MAhKh.1 .street
rif PHILADELPHIA AND READING
R A 1 1 liOAD COJU'ANY, Ofllce No 247 8.
l'Ol'ETU Btrcet.
PniLADKtrniA, December 13, 1866.
D1VIDKM) MTI !K.
The Transfer Hooks ol this Company will beclonel
on i I1 1 DAY, December 18, and reopeued on 'lUi.8'
DAY, the lMli ol .latiuinj next.
A Dividend ot HVK Irt K CKNT. bas been dec'ared
In the I're erred and Common Mock, clear ot .National
and Hiate taxes, payable In cash or common stock at
par, at the option of the holder, on and alter the Hist
liisinnt to the holder! thereof, a lin y shall stand
registered on the books ot the Company, on the 18th
instant. All paval'le at this office In l'blladelpbla.
'1 he option b to Inking stock for this dividend will
cease at the close of business hours ou Saturday, 311 ih
Uaichnet.
All orders for dividends must be witnessed and
stumped
12 14 Mt S. BKADFORD, Treasurer.
rJ" PHILADELPHIA AM) READING
- RAILROAD.
l.OLIDAY KXt'lTKSION TICKKTS,
Good lrom December ,2, iHtt. to January 2, 1867. will
be Issued at reduced lares between all Mittens on the
nialn r ad aud branches. CI. A. MCOLLs,
12 2 Hit General Superintendent.
(TTSf0 OFFICE OF THE FRANKFORD AND
w-sj1 rui i. ADKi.rni a i-assknukh bailway
COMPANY, Ho. 2463 FKAVKDMliD Road.
1'iiiLAUELi'iilA. De coiner 27, 1866.
AT persons who are i ulmcrtbtrs to or bodersol the
Capital etocko. this i ompanf. ana who havenotyet
pnlu the HUKT) Instalment of Fl VK DOLLARS per
h re then on. are herein notillea that the said Third
Instalment has been called in, aod that they are re
quired to pay the name at the above ollic , on or be.'ore
t-A'llt!(l' AY. the 12th dny of January next 1857.
My Resolution of the Hoard of Dlientors.
12 28 l2t JACOll HINDER. President.
-SJ OFFICE OF THENORTH PENNYL
csy vania railroad company, m, 407
WALNUT (street.
riiit.ADKi.rniA. December ". 1S.UR
the Ai nual Meeting of the Stockholders oi tbe Nonh
Tennsylvama Kallroad Company will be held at the
Otl.ce ol the Company. No. 4u7 WALNUT Street, l'htia
ddpiiia, on MONDAY, January 14, 18o7, at 12 o'clock
M., vi hen an election will be be.d ior a l'rosident and
tin Directors, to sei ve for the ensuing year.
12 28 14t EDWARD AR YI8TKO.NO, Secretary.
KSfr OFFICE OF THE PHILADELPHIA
x? A1D TKKNTON MAI I.KOAD COMPANY.
l'liiLAUKi i'iiia D.eeuiinir 21, 18dS.
Ihe Annual Vee Inn ot the stockho dtri, and an
Election lor Direciors lor the ensuinK year, wet be held
at ihe Coinpnny'a office on MONDAY, tbe 14th day of
January. lhK7. at 1 oVlock P. M.
li 24mwi tl 14 J. MORS ELL, Secretary.
SUA JIOKIN COAL COMPANY.
riIIT.ADRT.pl, rA. DfeCAmlier M InKA
Tne Annual Meeting of the Htockuo derj of the
f?HA.MOK I N COaL COMPANY will be held at their
Otlice, No. 228 WALNUl Street (Itooiu Xo, 3). on
WKDNKMiAY. January I8i7, at 11 o'clock, to elect
Dirtctors or the ensuing year.
'I lio JJooki. wl I oo clot ed ou una allor tliw
zoin instant.
12 22 2Ut CHARLES B. LINDSAY. Secretary.
I lj IN1MV IU11K AM) illDULiE COAL
r lliLD RAILROAD AMD COAL COMPANY.
PuiLADKM'iiiA, December 21. IHM.
The Annual Meeting ol the Mockholuersof the above
Company will be held at their Ofllce, No 228 Va LNU f
Stiett(l:oom No. 3), on TUKSDaY, JunUHrv 8, 18ti7, at
11 o'c.ock, to elect Mrvctors lor tho ensuing year.
Din Irunsler Books will be closed on aud alter the
2U h instant.
12 22 131 C11A1XJEB R. LINDSAY, Sccrota-y.
fTv AMONO THE GOOD TIIIN03 NOW
being oliercd to an appreciative public. Is a
lnotitl ul Dress II nt icri.ent eu en's Winter Wear, pre
ptrcl ly WaUIII R'JON, latter, CHKSNUT stteet,
i.( it door to l unt OH ce. Call and see it. 12 1!) lit
fT.::.;' BATCH ELOR'S HAIR DYE
THE KKST IN IHE WOULD,
f'aimlefs reliable, instnntiineous. '1 he only perlect
I'M1. No (lieaiipoinlriient, no rluiculous tluis, but true
Iu m ime b uck or brovi u.
liJ-.MlMs. IS blUNi-D WILLIAM A. BATCUELOR.
AI..SO.
I'ri en-rating F struct oi Alillcflenrs restores.preserves,
in tl Lcuiiliiiis ti e buir. prevcnis baldness. Sold by all
Dmttisiti. Fucton No. bl HAKCLAY St., N. Y". Hi
JUST PUBLISHED
I'.y the I' hi slcinns oi the
NhW lOUK MUSEUM,
ti e Ninetieth F.uitlon oi their
FOUR LECTURES,
.entitled
l'MILOSOPHY OF" MARRIAUE,
To te had l.te. i r four stamps, b? aadrcsslng Secre
tiny New Voik Museum o Ana'omy,
e(i No. bloLROADWAY.Ncw Vork.
ROOFING.
OI.TJ SHINGLE ROOFS. PLAT Oil
S'l KKP, ( IIV KRK I) WITH til'TT.l
I'KKt II A It001'lA(4-C-I.OTIl. aud coated with
I Kit 11) (JITTA I'Kltl llA PAI.T,umklug
thun perfectly water- proof.
l.KA K V (iKAYKI, HOOFS repaired with
Gulta PerchaPalPt. and warranted for five years.
LEAKY SLATE ROOFS fumed with Liquid
Cuta Pcrcba Paint, which becomes as hard as suite
tor 1 W, t'OPPKH, XISV, and IKO.
ROOFS this ralnt is the n p'ut uUra o'a lother pro
tections. It loims a perfectly lmpervlo'is covering
completely reelati) the action ol the weutlier, aud con
stitutes a thorough protection against leuks bv run or
other ft Ite. Pllce only from one to twocenta persijuare
'"'j'lX and GRAVEL BOOF1XO done at tbe
slioiieft notice. . , , , . .
Material conslantlv on hand and for sla by the
MAMMOTH HOOFIAti tOMPASI.
lllt liLfciSS &. EVERETT,
12216m No. 304 UUEES Street.
ualiiii
hh SHINGLE ROOFS (FLAT OR STEEP) COVERED
Jlil JOHVo ENGLISH ROOKING CLOTH,
Am. icaled with LIQUIO GUI TA rtltc HA PAINT.
n.HklnEthem perf'tly water proof. LKAKT GRWEL
ROOFS repaired with Gutta Percba Paint. and;warranied
loi live jearn LK AKY SLA'I E ROOKS c ateil with lliuid
Mhlihbecoiresashirdasalate. T1N.COPPEH ZINC,
or IRON c aieil wlih Liquid Gutta Fercha at smull ex
ptnae. Cost ransinK lrom one to two cents per square
loot. Old Board or Khlnxle Kools ten cenU per square
ft ot allcomp ele Materials constantly on hand au.illol
SBleliy the PHir.ADC Ll'HIA ANI PES'HYLVASI
ROOFING COlirANY. OKORGE HOBAHT,
11 2 6m NO. 830Nortli KOUHTtl Bi-ea mi
NEW RUBBER DEPO T.
WIISON, U ACER A CO, No. 401 Cl'KSNUT
Street. hae opened a New Rubber Depot, lor the sale
of Kubber Goods of every description.
Patent Coik Rubber Shoe aud Root).
1 kteni Cork Slal treses
Palent Cork ( ushlons.
latent Hnrln ltotlom.
I'aient Hfuried UuHs.
Patent Cork Ml Preservers.
Patent Cork I'ubbi-r Soles. ,,
A.so, Guns, Piotula Ladles' andGanta Skates, l'arlot
-r. ,iu I and far or IWce Ball Harlor Skating, fckatlng
lii.iv. M.aiui: Jaiki t. by ,r;!I'r-rfciiiVv.
I'll'ii u.4ht CUtsM i ! tnrca
m m am i lii
DRY GOODS.
V .
LINEN STOKE.
H'iH AI1CH STREET.
CIllUbTAIAS PKESEXTS.
Fine Table Cloths.
Fine. Napkins and Doylies.
Fine Damask Towels.
Ladies' Handkerchiefs,
Gents' Handkerchiefs,
NEW STYLES.
THE LARGEST STOCK
or
LINEN GOODS
IN Till: CITY. 17tl23lrp
PARIES & WARNER,
No. 229 North NINTH Street,
AKOVE KACF.
FA A CI GOODS FOR HOLIDAY PliEiEXTS.
lailiib' Ilcrnetltcucil Linen Ilandkrchicf, 28,31,
37 J cents, etc.
Ladies' Embroidered Hanukerchiois.
Gents' Colored Bordered Handkerchiefs, 37, CO,
G2 cents, etc.
Gents' line quality Hemstitched Handkerchiefs,
ladicV and Gents' plain Linen Uandkorchiof.-i.
Ladies' and Gents' C.'otb Gloves, all prices,
l'aris Bilk Fans, Imported Inkstands, etc.
Ladies' Companions, Morocco Satchels, eto.
Large assortment Tortemonnales, all prices.
Urocho Scarfs, 85 cents.
Dolls from auction, etc.
Misses' and Ladies' Balmorals,
All-wool and Eomet Flannels.
Best Ameiicaa Prints, 18 J conts.
Bargains in Ladies' Merino Vests, 1 87J.
Misses', Ladies' and Gents' Merino Goods.
iVRIES A WARNER,
'J'-ts; Ko. 9 Korth NINXU Street, above Kaco.
N. H Will open to-day, one caso of yanl-vrldo
BlcacUc rt Muslin, at 26 cents, same poods now selling
at vl cents. Bargains in all wool Blankets, at S4-75.
S.AV. Coruer of
ITonrtli ana AjtoU Sirs
AHE OFFERING SOME FINE GO
LOW FOIt
CUniSTMAB PRESENTS
EXPENSIVE LOXO SnA.Wl.5.
I.VONS CLOAK VKLVETS,
MAGNIFICENT SIL.ICS.
JtltHEST PLAID POPLINS.
FINEST HEPS AND POPLINS.
JI ELODEON AND PIANO COVUIIS.
ItOU ltOVAVOOLLEN SIIAVVLf.
P. S.-MERHIAIAO PRINTS, FAST
LOUS AND NEW STYLE?.
I'ltLMHM BLAKKLTS. 11 2mws
! Ho. IK t'UKUri Sticet.
Iu Autliliat Ion of Removal to
N, W. Corner ELEVEN1H and CHISXUT,
White Goods,
Laoes and Lace Good",
Hardkert kiefs, Ladies and Gents, every
variety.
i Linen Collars and Cuffs,
Veils, Scarfs, Neck lies, Etc ,
Kmbraclug Novtltlea Adapted for
I HOLIDAY PRESENTS,
AT R EDUCED PRICES.
E. M. NEEDLES
198J1H xnwanf) wtros
POO I10OI' SKIRTS. fiOQ
)ZO LATKST 8TVLE, JV8T OUT UZO
l.K l'KTIT TK 1L, for the I'rumcnade.SH ?ard8iound.
rilK HLWl'lO HUJL, lor the Draw Jug-room, 1
yards round.
Thene skins are In evert ay tho m6it denliahle that
ltd have heretolore dieted to the pubilo) also, complete
lints of Ladies', Mif' d Children's Hum and 1'rall
Hoop t-kirts lrom 2V to 4 yaids in i.lrcnmlcrcnce ot
every length, all of ' our own moke," wholesale and
letail, auu wan auted to frlvc atliifxctioil.
t'onstHDtiv on hand low-priced Kew York made Skirts,
Plain and Trail, Vt sprints, VU cent. b spiuis, fl i0
springs, tl'10; and 40 splines 1125.
skins made to older, aliered. and repaired.
Call or et-nd lor Circular ol style, sizes and price f.
Uanu aclory and Halearooms.
i.0. 08 Altt ii htreet,
12 6 3m WILLUM T. HOIKINS.
TArvBUKTON & SON,
No. 1004 CHESNUT STREET.
Mil LIN TRY GOODS.
KEAL LACS GOODS
A LiheralPuicountto theTradej CU80 Imw
1 BANKRUPT CLANRETH.-WB HAVE JUgT
J " opened about ten cane ot very fine Blankets from
a bankrupt ioc-i, at about ' what they have re
cently been sold lor. 'J iieae Blankets ara all very tine,
laiuo entirely clean and perject in everv reie.;t, are,
IchSthau ihe wool a'one in them cost. ae lower than
lor ton veara nasi, and ie the beat bargain In Blanket
In I'hll.ltlbia today. Fersona may buy w lili saiet
who will not want until next year
l,; 0. HUl MAHKET Ht
DRY GOODS.
PRICE & WOOD,
N. W. Coraer EIGHTH aud FILBERT,
HAVE JVST OrENED
100 dozen LadleV FrenoU C oth Gloves, at 60, 06,
62,6D, end 76 centi a pair. Tlio balance or an im
ported stock- winch was sold at 912 a doicn.
Gents' Cloth (ilore.
I adie' and Hisses' White Cloth tilovee.
Ladies' and dents' Merino Vests and rant?,
ladies' Hemstitched Handkerohlefs.
Ladies' Embroidered Handkerchiefs.
Gents' Hemstitched and Colored Border Band,
kerchiefs.
Domestic Goods at the very lowest market prices.
Good yard wido Dleactod Muslins, 30, 23, 26, and
29 cents.
Williamsvllle, Wamsntta, and Now York Mills.
Best makes Unbleached Muslins, 5 i, 6-4, 8 i, 9-4,
and 10-4 Sheeting Muttons.
Best Uleachcd and Unbleached Canton Flannols.
All-wool and Domt Flannels.
Heavy All-wool Shaker flannels.
Yard-wide Domet Shaker Flannels, 31 and 60
cents.
Handsome Marseilles Quilts, Lancaster Quilts,
very cheap.
PRICE & WOOD.
N. W. CORNER EIGHTH AND FILBERT,
Will oren on Monday morning large lot of 1'laid
Muslins, from 81 to 60 cents; lower prioos than
tfcey have been sold at for live years. Lin on Doy.
lies, (1 ?5 per dozen. 10 21
QLOSIKU SALES OF
WIN1ER DRESS GOODS,
CLOAKING VELVETS,
CLCARING CLOTHS,
OVERCOATINGS,
BLANKETS,
SHAWLS,
CLOAKS, ETC. ETC.
To efTect a ItAI in C'LOSIKO OF STOCK, we have
dcteimimdon a UENiRAL EEDCCTION OKPBICEtl.
A the whole cf cut Htock has been purchased at the
late Auction Pa es, our disposition to reduce present
prices cfiers great Induceiceat to buyers.
CURWEN STODDART & BROTHER,
Nos. 450, 452, and 454 N. SECOND St.,
12 28 5t ABOVE WILLO W.
-jgngl SHAWL EXHIBITION
. Kf OR KlOHUl ANI FPR1NG OARDKN eT
Vt e are pie pared to show oneot the very finest stoo
ot b haw Is m this city ol even grade,
FROM $130 CP TO $SO,
Wi st of which arc auction purchases, and areunilur
regular pricis. W'einvliean examination.
Lirg and i-qua e hairley ,-hawls
1 ci'g tnd Fquare lirtcl.e Hhaw s.
Long and tquare bNck Thibet Bhaw'.S.
1 ong and H utre lllunkei hhawls.
f-ti li a fcbtw s, Breakiast l-hawls. eto. etc.
We it cq Id also invite attention to our
BLAKKETS,
Fxce,?, nt All wool l!lnnketsfor8. CIO 3m
l iner qualities at 7 H f. 10, ell, l- and all
In laci, our keneral slock Is worthy the .'tenuou at
all l.uyia of lvy Uowli who vrlaki to bay ohea-.
JOSEPH II. TIIORMLKY,
V. . COR. EIGHTH ASD BPEIWO OARDESI
T SIMPSON'S SONS.
. No. 922. PINK STRKBT No. 024
Jieaitrs In Linens, W Lite and Drew (iooils, Kujhrui
di'iits llcsirry Cloves toreets. Uandkerchleis riaia
and Hch.hu ched, Hair. Nail, looth and Piaie Knubet,
Oombs 1 tin and Fan'-v Hoaps, Henumery, Imporied
and Hon estio PuQa aud Vua Uoxea, ana an encbesa
vanetv oi Notions.
Alnajs ou hand a complete stock Lades', Oests'
and (.'hi dien's Undervests and Drawers i English and
licrman boalcry in i otton aterino, and Wool.
I lib. i raule and Di d blankets.
J (irveLles. Allendalo, Lancaster, nd Doney Comb
Quuts.
'Jabe Linena. Napkins, Towels. Plain and Colored
Boruind, Ucruiau Boll. Russia aud American Crash,
J ' i r u .
al aidvate. Welsh, and Maker Flsnnels In all grades
A mil line ol Jiunerv 1iapers of all widths at
V. SIMPSON'S SONS'.
N t. m and 21 FIDiE Htreet.
HOLIDAY GOODS.
gTHPHEN F. WHITMAN'S
IXIM1TABI.E AND
CHOICK CONFECTIONS
NOW READY
For tho Holidar Season,
Together tilth a large variety of
FANCY BOXES,
Of his own Importation, direct from Paris and
Vienna.
ALSO NEW AND BABE
Confections and Bon-Bons
Only known to this house,
Fotming at once a itch and superb assortment
Mtu to choose fo
SELECT PRESENTS,
STEPHEN F. WHITMAN,
No. 1S10 MARKET Street,
PHILADELPHIA 12 8 19t
PRESENTS.
A n Instrument to assist the Hearing to a I'e.f Friend.
Alo, ciandall sl'aunt CatU'iCUKd, superior to any
otluh in ue.
Kocgtis' and Wostenholm's POCKET KNIVK.8,
tcarl and stag hundles of heautliul fluiab Uazont,
bliops, and feciseora of tlneat qualities, at
P. MADEIItA-'S,
. CUTLER,
K. IIS South TEN1H Street, below Cheanut.
CARPETINGS.
REEVE L. KNIGHT & SON
No. 807 CHESNUT Street,
HAVE HOW OP Bit
A WELL.ASSOUTED STOCK OB
AMERICAN AND ENGLISH
OIL CLOTHS,
COCOA MATTINGS, DRUGGETS, BU0S, ETO.

xml | txt