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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, January 21, 1867, FOURTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAILY I ; VI KING TELEGRAPH. niTLADELrillA MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 18G7
the kew yor.K ruEs.
EDITORIAL OrlNTOXS OF THE LnADiNti
J0URSAL3 UPON CUKRKSI TOl'ICS.
CCVrltKD KVKI'.T BAY POR tVl'MSO TI-.I.B'IKAI'H.
The liCitiiu of the Cilfcls,
From the Nation.
Xh one tliiutr which wns evi.l:'tit UitoiirIioiiI
the war, whatever iiii;'li he doubtful or indis
tinct, wns tbe tlc'.ciMiiutit.oii of the Northern
people to prosfi ve the I'ni'Ci. There wns a pre at
JohI of tlisi'.u.-iaioi) cti nlniopl every other point,
but there never was niiy room for Jipoiisston on
this. The one UiiiiR which U now plain is that
the Northern people are determined that there
shall no longer be any such tump ns political
inequality on Amcricaa soil, that nil men shall
be equal before the law, and that no legal bar
rier fhall stand between any man and any of the
prizes of life. About the cause of this determi
nation and about itd wisdom and about the
means u?ed for carrying it out, there may be a
pood deal of ' difference ot opinion; about its
cxMencc we believe there is none, There
are people who say 'hat the ue.sro ought not
to he the equal of the white man before the
law, and tuere are others who ?ay that
it he is it will ruin the country; but
tin re are none who deny that the majority
are determined to have him so. and the
pieater the number ol obstacles thrown in the
way ol the ratitication of this desire, the
fiercer it seems to burn. It would not be pos
sible to point out a single act, either of the
feouth or ot tue De.nueiatie party at the Nnri.li,
coaimitt'.d since LeeS surrender with tlio view
ot Liudeiinir or deiuyiiitr or discrediunir the
movement lor equality, which has uot had the
ellect of streipfxttieiiui!; and accelerating it. The
President clinic out ot the war armed with
almost absolute power, and in possession of
enormous patronape, and at the head of a party
which lour years ot bloody strophe had fami
liarized wiih executive usurpation. His defec
tion, one would have said, would have scattered
his party like sheep. It only made it liercertind
more compact. Some of its most rlite:l and in
liuen'iiil. members, who had borne ilie heat and
burden ot the day, ndlowed hi" e xample, and
were i-imply overwhelmed by execrations and
dclixiice. 1'he .South bus been emboldened by
the countenance of ths President and of the
Northern Democrats into charmiriij its attitude
from that of a vanquished eneuiv into that of a
power treating "n rquul terms, "ami has found,
in spite ol the larireuess of the Northern mino
rity, that there was even less to hope from
rehistaucc than from submission. The trade,
the commerce, and the manulactures of the
busiest enmniuuity in the world are terribly
embarrassed by the prolongation f the politi
ral disquietude, and yet no man dares to rai-e
his voice in favor of the ?liahtest lowering of
the terms of settlement. In fact, hardlv a
month in ses that somethins? is not added to
make l'a in bitterer and less easy to swallow.
The men w ho during the past year have been
rising in influence are not the moderate, but
the exueiiie men, and the sentiments which are
now niost loudly cheered at public meetings are
those which suir.uest the most desperate reme
dies. In short, after waiting a year and a half
for the North to cool, it has only grown hotter
and hotter.'
Oup-ht not "Conservatives" by this time to be
satistied that the measures ihey have been
opposing are noc the result of hasty, halt-Hedged
impulses, but of a ripened judgment and deter
mined wt;.l? If the events of the last eighteen
months do not prove this, in the name of coni
Biou sense what will prove it? We think that a
man needs to bp neither prophet nor sage to feel
hatistied now that if the ijouth and the demo
cracy persist much longer in their opposition to
the policy of the Northern majority, we shall
find ourselves thrust violently upon a static of
the strutrjle which will be distinctly and unmis
takably revolutionary, and over which the uatiou
will hardly pass without serious damag? to some
of the most valued and still most revered fea
tures ot the (ioverniuent. The sicrns of this are
no.v so abundant that only a blind man can
fail to perceive them, and we chanre those
who continue their sen?eless opposition to
the popular will with responsibility of all
the mischief, be it great or small, which
may result from the resort of the
majority to extra-leual courses. The South and
the Democratic party are led by men who pro-
fess to be statemen, 'and who talk aud write as I
ii iiicv uau rcuu u a urv. uul iiiev uru hi Tiny n p
:mi. i. .. .1 11.:... i ... . 1. ii '
African "rain-makers." There is nothing of
which they profess to be so well satistied as of
radical unscrupulousness and disregard of con
stitutional ooliirations, and yet thev act as if
every radical held constitutional obligations to
be absolutely sacretl. Fur instance, when they
got the Executive on their side, they pawed and
ucitrhed fearfully, and shook the second article
ot the Constitution in everybody's face, as if the
question was now settled. When they tottnd
that the radicals were nothing daunted by this,
and that they were disposed, it necessary, to cot
rid ot Mr. Johnson by impeachment, these same
conservatives called the Supreme Court to tneir
aid, and havintr got a decision acaint military
commissions, they are twirling their thumbs
complacently, aud assuring the world that it is
all over, and that the radicals must now submit !
and all this in the same breath m which, they j
preach upon radical contempt for law. '
Now, if there is any lesson whteh history -teaches
clearly, it is that there never has existed, ;
and there never is likely to exist, a nation which
will allow constitutions or forms of any kind ou
paper to stand between it and such a change iu i
lis policy as it deems necessary to its safety. I
That the popular safety is the highest 1 iw is not
a mere saw ot the publicists, it is a truth which 1
every man in a free community has buried iu
his heart. There is nothing iu which political j
sagacity is better displayed, whether in astates
niau or in a party, than in the direction of the
signs which ludicate that the nation has reached
the point at which it begins to consider whether
it will blindly adhere to constitutional forms
aud perish, or disregard them and live. The wise
politician whether in a monarchy, dinarchy,
or democracy is he who knows when re
sistance to the poDulur will has cone far
enough, and, wheu i he proper niomeut
has come, turns his attention to tindiug
out the best mode ol carrying it out without vio
lating the letter of the law. ' There are a thou
sand signs that we have reached this point here,
aud that people are fast, thanks to Mr. Johnson
and the South, getting n.to a state of mmd in
which constitutional forms will count tor very
little. One of these, and not the least Impor
tant, Is the way in which the recent decision of
tue Supreme Court, as well as its dictum, has
been received. The Court is made the object of
the most violent abuse, aud the agreement of
the judues on a point of law ot. uuusual clear
ness is denounced unspariugiy as a "judicial
conspiracy," and movements are even talked
of lor putting the judges on their trial for
it. All this is, of course, very wild and ab
surd talk; but there is behind it a senti
ment which is neither wild nor absurd, and
that Is, that the questiou of reconstruction is
a question too momentous, too wide in
its range, and affecting too vitally the destiny
of the nation, to allow of iu being submitted to
any court of law or decided upon any technical
rules of Interpretation, In other wordB, it is
essentially a political question, and political
questions nations and uot courts must solve,
fio people in the world ever has no people, it
is tafe to suy, ever will agree to live in danaer
of its own dissolution as a political community,
or permit the perpetuation in its Government
of principles which it deems immoral or un
- sound, because nine judges think it ought to do
so. It may be legally properthat it should, but
It would be louically and morally absurd.
how, political equality, the absence of all
distinctions based ou birth or color, haviug
been determined upon as the basis of the Na
tional Government, and the fixity aud sin
cerity of this determination having beou
thoroughly tested, the part of true statesman
ship is to inaugurate the new regime under
constitutional forms, and with n HHl" depart- I
ore trom loti'lty as possible. Equality may be j
until.' tup bnnib ' our political system iti iper
lectly leaal w ay, di.d wrhout dointr any out- j
ward diiuiML'e cither t the indepf noV'ilr" ol the
S'ntesor to the indcpi ndence ol tne Supreiii"
Court. What the South tctrs from the imposi
tion ot the new Mile bv Ooi.irress is the estub
h LriKiit ofa rrecedeut win .h niipht lea I to tlio ,
inincsition hcreaiter of various otiier cmidl- 1
Units by a victorious him jnri'V. Hut there is no '
political hnff:o that is not a choice ot evils; no
matter w ht.t we do, whether the uiiicii.lineiit be
accepted or rejected, whether Impartial sti'fraire ,
be -i:i hlii-bed or ii"t, tlte majority will still" ,
rule. The que.-tion is not whetliT it Is to be
allow id to rule this has len decided but ,
wh'dneril .'hall rule in good temper, under i
coiist'tntiniinl fortes, and with Its irtditioav.l
i-c-ptct lor law s:tll Intact, or rule exa--pereted,
alter having been driven t. extreme-', and
ff'iccd to lall back on its superior physical
force for the defense of its policy. The plan of
resistance to the majority w hich the South is
now trying has been 'twice tried, and on
much the same "founds that is, that it was
liiideitiken for the protection of "indefeasible '
riehts" once by the Stuarts and once by the
Potirbons. In both ca-es the minority lost part
their heads and part their property, and the
Constitution was swept away altoeether.
Charles I and his adherents, and l,ouis XVI and '
his adherents, were determined to "save their '
honor," and "to hold firm t the outlet;" "not
to let in the narrow end of the wedge;" "to
show the woihi of w hat stuff Veiilleineit' wet e .
made;" "to live the right? of the nioiiarchv ;"
"10 save the nat'ou from a parcel ot fanatics:"
just as Ihe equally crazy "Conservatives'1 in this !
countiy now are and the result was that tiie
majority at lust tost temper and made short j
work of them and tneir rights.
All the-e are ti ings which most people as yet '
shrink from saying, although they are present
to the minds ol nine out ot ten ot the intelli
gent men of the community. The lookout is :
not a pleasant one. It is rendered every day
fiuikcr and datker by such performances as the '
Democratic Convention at Hartford, and tlio
steady and almost asinine stupidity with which '
the Sbutheru Legislatures to on manufacturing
their cheap defiance. There is no more danger
that these people will have their own wav in
the matter of reconstruction, than there is that ,
the United States will be annexed to Canada
and pass again under the British crown; but !
there is danger that they may continue their
opposition long enough to lead to the smashing
up of soni" of the paper deienses behind which
they are now hiding their loolifh head.-.
The Itrfrnrtory Southern Stntrx, Con
gress nuil the Al mlulxtrnllou.
From the Herald.
President Johnson's Southern policy has
turned out a failure, pro'it'.ess to the otttli,
and disastrous to his administration. He
began well cuoi gh, in taking the ground that
his measures ot reconstruction, in the absence
of Congress, were merely provisional, "and sub
ject to the approval or 'rejection ot Congress;
but directly after his annual message of De
cember, 18(ifl, he boldly liivirged to the other
road, which ha resulted in the ruin of hi- for
tunes. He was, perhaps, dazzled an i deluded
by the idea of becoming the founder of a new
party, ami, lik- Jack-on, the head of a new
dynasty, m re-establishing the old political
balance ol power held by the South on the
nucleus ot the floating elements of the North op
posed to the dominant party in Congress. In this
conception, however, he eai.inated too liabtly
the issues of the war and the public sentiment
of the North developed by a great revolution,
and counted too much on the force ot those old
political associations and dogmas, North and
South, which tne war had destroyed. His tatal
mistake was tut t;ll.ic that, excepting slavery
and the costs of their Lebetliou, the lit bel
Slates, in laicg down tneir arn.s, were rein
stated in their constitutional rights in "the
Union as it was" betore the war.
it was generally expected that the astound
ing popular majorilie- iu favor of Congress cast
by the loyal States, from the A'latuic to the
Pacific Ocean, in the elections ol last fall, on the
issue joined between Congress and the President,
would bring to Mr. .!oiinuon to a graceful sub
mission to' the will of the people. A satisfac
tory approach in this direction was antici
pated in his last annual message; but his
niessare. as it Inspired by unexpected rein
forcements, only expressed his increased faith
in his rejected policy. This placed him in the
position o the champion of the refractory
ruling politicians of the Jtcbel States an t their
Northern copperhead: allies against me loyal
States, their representatives iii Conaress, aud
their policy a3 embodied in the pending Const i-
tntumtil inni.iu niAiil mill mniHhii-ii'n 111 oil Mm
iu all the
iunvu. iiiii..xiiv-u.
late Northern elections. Xext, in the emphatic
and defiant tone in which this amendment is
rejected by tiie outside States, lrom Texas nil :
the way up to Virginia, it is manifest nut only t
that they have gicat confidence in the final sue- ;
cess ot President Johnson, hut that there is a
sort ol league or understanding among them en
rapport with the Administration.
What cau this understanding or this general
expectation be? We inter from the late
decisions of the Supreme Court, and from the
hints thrown out by some ot our Southern ex- '
changes, that the ruling Southern politicians ,
rely upon 6ome further decisions from this
Court which will amount to the complete up- .
settiDg of the pending amendment aud the ;
theory that the excluded States are not, as they
fctand, restored to all their rights as members '
of the Union. Und"r such eucourasetuents to i
adhere to the Executive, it is not surprising
that the Rebel States should stand upou their
dignity and their reserved ritrhts under the
Constitution as expounded by Calhoun and put
into practice at fort Sumter. If the Supreme
Court, then, shall next decide, in deciding the
Alabama appeal case now belore it, touching
the status of Alabama, that she is a State of the
Uniou, entitled to all the rights of a member in
lull communion, and i: President Johnson shall
accordingly proclaim this decision a iaw ot the
laud, ovemdiug the laws of Congress, and shall
proceed to execute it in fulfilment of his oath of
olfice, what can Congress do? We cannot
answer; but as to what President Johnson is
expected to do by over-contident and uureeou
strucbd Southern Rebels we have perhaps an
answer fiom Kentucky.
We refer to the suegestive telegram published
on Friday I'mm fcranktort, stating that in
the Kentucky Slate Senate, on the 17th instant,
Mr, Helm "made a loim speech in favor of a
propo-ition to raise ten regiments of Kentucky
infantry for the purpose of resistintr all aggres
sions aud to maintain the pr'ncioles of State
rights." State ritrhts ! The old story of South
Carolina. And this "Kentucky Senator desired
that these troops should at any time bo subject
to the call ol the President ol the United States."
No, when it is remembered that the Governor
of Kentucky threw back into his face the first
call ot President Lincoln tor a few regiments of
troops to assist in puitius down a rebellion
strikinu' for a Southern couiederacy, ana loos
ing at Kentucky neutrality during the war and
at the Kentucky Legislature since tho return of
peace, we cau uudeisUud this State rights pro
position. It is a movement to put Kentucky
in the vanauard of auotlier tieht for a Southern
Confederacy, or tor "the Union as it was.1
State rights, slavery, Ured Scott decision,
and all.
This skeleton outline of the Southern situation
and its Northern affiliations we believe is not
overdrawn. It is apparent, then, that Concress,
charged by the loyal States with the enforce
ment of their ulf matum to the South, must pro
ceed to de6isive measures, or that the fruits ot
the war, like the beautiful upples ot the Dead
Sea, may turn to ashes upon our lips. Can any
one suppose, then, that the movement for Presi
dent Johnson's Impeachment will uot be carried
through? No. The Republican party, all
powerful In Congress and iu the loyal States, will
remove President Johnson iu order to reach
those States. His scheme of re-establishing the
Northern Democracy on their old Southern
balance of power was started too soon. With
the restoration of the South on the ultimatum
of the North.the mission of the Republican party
will be fulfilled. This party will then be broken
up, and a scrub race iu 1872, like that ot 1824,
will probably mark the first step to a reorganl-
at ion of parties. Meniitimc the pnt in no'ver
u ill (cler .,te no stuinhlinc-blocks w hich it has
constitutional at.thoritv to remove.
What It ( oil) to PublUH n I-vicr-
trom tht Tribuni.
Believing that it will inteict the renders of
The 'jrihvve to know what it costs to p-. lilidi it
we print the following figures, which are trans
scril ed from our book.:
M fcll-TS OF 1HK "TBintINK' KROM HUHSCHIPTION,
PAI.ES and advertising,
iRr.r..
Vpi:khituhkh.
rrlnlnpr Pnppr.. J35 m6 frlntltiB IWr. . etlH 1W82
lr.M.n.en, lie- Vrummun, Ht-
(iiiirliiu rriHACs.
htc
31.2-VVm! Ktc
HAT UK 1 I hMH.
I,k . ...... 800(1
46 31S-I.8
t)2f AH
inn
lUlue and Mo-
tiw ami o
lnfseB, lor Eol
1 1 rs
Coiipofttor
tentorial Ex
penned. rurrospoudcco.
News by leb
naph Hartior Now....
lullmiilim Ot
liep, SiilMrtes,.
AdvertiKliig
AiiiIIIhk, eunt
Imk. unit I ack
Inu Papcm
FoMityo
ruitiiif' and Sta-ttoiK-rv
Ml! Saitn
U. M. Tax on Ad
vertising Re
ceipt (Ins UIit
Kxpenite accou t,
fuel tiillD ii
I hitrliiiig, Gaa
Fixtures, Car
penter work
Etc., Ktc
lnftfteH uir K nl-
l.TH
04107
86,BU:1 14
R1.77' 40
49,U0'57
1.77!0t
l,lVi 94
22 S41 W
17,21il-07
73 WJ 71't'omposltorn ....
Kdiiurlal Kx-
SI.SM-flnl penoes
4 l,U73-JO Correspondence
. . Kcwa lj Xele-
22 044 701 Kraih..
l,Bi5- Ha bor Now...
rut) IhIiIiik Ol
fice, sa arlos.
AdvertlelnK....
.Mai, liii. ( omit-
10 720 7i
7,st) 18
, iiik. and rck-
OSS-HO Iiik !'nperx
6,l84!l foiiKie
l'rintinK mid Kta-
2,40310 1 tion.rv
tl jl.lbcl Sulla
O. s Tun on Ad
vertising Ke-
R.370 45 colptu,.
6 (li7 15 C.as Light
Kxpotmcaceou t,
! I n c Iu din k
Plumtiiiii;, Has
Flxrurog Oat
1 penter work,
10,371 48 Eic. Ktc
tlonitlon to
as nns r.o
11 ivlJ4
6,1 WOO
H7 tiS
10.0S2 19
6,s(ii-,',l
IS, BIO 57
Total Rb4i),107 10 .Frecdmcns
lit celptssvcrex- ,id I'nton
peiiten $170 4980 Donation to
I.UCO-PO
in ton state
Committee....
Donation to
l'nrilond Sullen-rit
1,000 00
250-00
Total 15S39
Receipts over
expenditures..
These fin tires show a larsre nrolit ou the busi
ness of 18(15, and but a small profit in 18(iG. Out
of 500y,417vsy in IStIC, the proprietors ot this
journal received only S24,2'!)T)0 the reriduo
Uavins been expended for the beneiit ot our
riadeiand adver.isers. During the year the
size ot the Iribuve vtus increased nearly one
quarttr, and in the four items of editorial, cor
rvpoiidei ei , telccrajihinsr, and eouino.-i'iou we
spent. S.-8,lil(;,;:2 more than in 180;). The.-c ex
penditures have been borne by the proprietors
ot the Jriliuite without additional cost to our
subsciibers, our rpadeis and advertisers receiv
ing the lull benefit. On some items the expenses
of the jeur 18ti(i were unusually heavy. We
pi'PMiine' that the election campuigu of last
summer and a ttumn cost this concern S2-",u()0
iu additii u to the ordinary expenses ot publica
tion. It was nu important election, ami no
labor ai.,1 no expense were spared by the Tri
bune in doing its bhtire towards ciilitrh tcninc
and coiu inciug voU-r. Our aggregate circula
tion was increased i'nri.v-one ihou.-and copies
ntirin tr the year (iiurina ami for the campaign
the traii'-kiit increase reached over otl.OUOj
and our mlvert:sii.p leccincs Increased liom
?nol.!iC(j-17 in 13(15 to Sa5!t,240-fii) in 18(1(1; in the
month ol December last r aching ,-iH,78tC7:i.
Accepting tuese figures as evidence of the public
appreciation of the Tribvne, we shall aim to
make it still more deserving the good-will of
our ii lends.
As the Irihuve owns its real estate, nothing
was paid tor rent, noi Lave we included in the
statements of receipts our income from rents,
United S ates stocks. Tribune Altnsnnc. etc. etc.,
our aim beintr merely to show to our readeis
w hat it co?ts to carry on a larire newspaper
establishment. To enable us to meet the in
creased demand for the Trilmnc, and to place us
beyond the fear ot disabling aeoideuts to our
maciinprv, we have ordered a third Hoe Light
ning P?e-s, and two new and larger enains and
boilers, having deepened our basement and
vitttlislo receive them.
Sprcinl Interests IJeforc Congress.
From the Times
The class that look to Jupiter for deliverance
from difficulties which their own sagacious
energy should surmount, outlived -Esop. The
only difference is that nowadays they trust to
the tiiiiveisal eflicacy ot legislation, and pray
lor it with a singular indidcrence to the con
venicnee or w ishes of their neighbors. This is
the case with the signers of the stereotyped peti
tions in favor of an intlated currency, and the
persistent lobbyists inb.half of a prohibitory
tariff. Eoth separate their apparent and pecu
liar intercuts from the general interest which
should f.0Teinthe course of lepislal ion. Both
rely upon Congress to su-pend laws that are
superior to letrishition, and by a couple of enact
ments bnug back prosperity.
The well are of the whole people demands a
gradual but positive contract ton of the cur
rency. While the war lasted, they tolerated the
mischief of inflation with a patience betitting
iheir other sacrifices. Regarding it as one of
the neees.-ary concomitants of the struggle in
which the nation was eugaared, they submitted
without a murmur to a" remorseless rise iu
prices, and tne hardships which followed iu its
train. They were content to sutler the penalties
of an era iu which speculation usurped dominion
overtrade, aud the fluctuations ot business re
flected the vicissitddes of the battle-field. Nor
was the evil altogether devoid of compensation.
It their outlay was greater, their income was also
increased, if they paid more lor everything they
consumed, their own labor brought "to them a
laiper return. The proportion of the two forms
ofincteaie was never more than proximately
just; they were neither concurrent as to time
nor efltial as to amount, but the double move
ment son ewhat mitigated the hardship, and
partially reconciled the multitude to its en
durance. With ihe return of peace the excuses for infla
tion end. It is no lonirer justified by the exi
gencies cf the Government, or palliated by the
presence of a seemingly boundless prosperity.
The demands of legitimate trade are smaller
than they were, and the large margin of nueiu
ployed currency is available tor speculation.
Prices are artificially kept up; the ifuctuatious
lucident to speculation prevent the adjustment
of relations between the prices of labor and
commodities; and the return to a healthy con
dition of allatrs is indefinitely postponed. Hie
only available remedy for this phase of the
trouble iies In the reduction of the currency,
it should not be sweeping or spasmodic; and
being neither, It need not be ruiuously disas
trous. But the policy ol contraction should bo
nxed in a manner fatal to hopes of reversal.
The le.-umption of specie payments should be
the declared purpose of Congress that specula
tors may have timely warning, aud that the
currents of trade may steadily approach their
natural flow. r
on similar grounds, it is impossible to heed
the clamor of certain manufacturers tor prohibi
tory duties without doiug violence to the gene
ral welfare. Ihe years ot the war were years of
unprecedented prosperity to the manufacturers
who are now loudest In their cries tor lioavler
duties. Iheir profits were notoriously exces
sive. They accumulated fortunes. They enlarged
the lacihties and range of their business. All
they produced they sold at prices which well
nigh broke the back of the patient, lorni suf
fering community. The people tolerated the
high prices because the Government required
every gold dollar that could be collected lrom
customs' duf.es, and because they believed that
the buiden would not continue beyond the war.
A certain prosperity, too, prevented a very
close sciutiny of profits or a very strict estimate
of the ratio of increased prices to taxation and
labor.
But the check to manufacturing activity
which has followed the disappearance of the
all absorbing consumer, the Government, does
not conttltute a reason for leirhdatlmr money
into me purses or mauufaetuiers. They have
enjoyed i u ninndng run ot pood luck, and
shotihl be willmfT now to share the dtscoinf.irts
tt depression. They hud the double advantage
of piotective duties 'atid a limitless demand, and
should in w share with lortitude the embarrass
ment" which others have borne from the begin
ning of Hie w pr. Ihe handsoma proli's of the
past ou: hi to be remembeied iu abatement of
the losses of the present. Aud when CongCHS
is a ke.l to enact a tarifl wlili especial refer
ence to the cniii hr.tent of a few manufacturers,
it cannot, without moral citiuiuatilv, forget the
jet stronger claims of tne great ' body of the
people. wlif'H' prajer is not for the protection
v, Inch means hipb prices and hieh protils, but
for lirotcctiou agaiiut the prohibitionists.
There is, indeed, an inexplicable unwllling-
nesf on the part ot tho friends ot an iniiaie-1
currency and the petitioners for prohibitory
fai ills to ri cognize the results that must fol'ow
the tpimiunlion of the war. They would have
tlitnes go on I ore vi r eractly as tliev went dur
ing ihe excitement of the conflict. They refuse
to see that much of the material activity was
abnormal, and that the activity born of specula
tion was in the nature of things more or less
fictitious. They will not admit that with the
return of peace must come a readjustment of
finance, Industry, and business, to a degree
called for by the altered circumstances of the
country, thoughtful, intelligent men, one
might think, would appreciate the siirnilicance
of the chance, and realize the folly of attempt
ing to art est it by nets of Congress. Prudent
men might be expected, moreover, to prepare
lor the levulsicii, and thus strip it of its ter
rors, in.-tead of thonting to the Congressional
Jupiter lor assistance he cannot render. For a
lettii-alto push forward the contraction of the
cuireiicy may postpone speculative disaster,
but will assuredly intensify its perils and en
large the sp here ot its eilect. Aud though the
enactment ot prohibitory duties may tempora
rily atign cut the prod's el the few, it will so
cripple and Injure the many that the benefit
obtained by the manufacturers will be rather
appaicnt than real.
The expediency of justice could not be more
oppoitunely pressed upon Congress than now.
Tin re is neither wisuom nor equity in the cry
for legislation with the view of satisfying anil
benefiting special interest.!. Such legislation
will be illusory, if attempted, and will ulti
mately produce a reaction from which these
special interests will be the first to suffer.
The General public may be less demonstra
tive than the principals of the lobby, but they
have rights which Congress ought not to over
look, and interests which no majority cau afford
to neglect.
They cail for a reduction in prices, which
means' a steady march iu the direction of hard
monev, aiitMor fair play in the midst of difli
culties: which means a rejection of schemes
tending to aggrandize special at the cost of
general iinerci-ts. Instead of higher turitl's,
they ask lor reduced taxation to the extent of
the hundred millions which Mr. Wells has
shown to be annually available. By providing
for this lessening of the burden, in conjunction
with a coi traction policy. Congress will do more
to promote the generul weal than by the most
iuecnious attempt to bolster no particular manu
facturers. In the one case the many will be
sacrificed; in the other, the few will share the
relied winch all will experience. That is the
oitl'f rence between monopoly and justice.
SHIRTS, FURNISHING GOODS, &6
J W. SCOTT & CO,
SKIHT MANUFACTURERS,
AND DEALERS IN
M EN'S FU UN ISHINO GOODB
Ho. 814 CHI.SK UT Street,
i'OUR DOOKSi bKLOW THE "COSTlNENTAli,
SUTtirp PHILADELPHIA.
p A T L K" T SJ lOULDEH-SEAM
SlllUT MANUFACTORY
AMD GKNTLIOIKN'8 FUUXISIIIKQ STOKE.
FEKFZCT HTTIKO 811UM8 AN1 DBA Willi
'.mule trtui n.cusurenirnt at Mry abort notice.
All ctlit'i iiiticltsot UTl.tilioSl B iM,KSvS UOODS
in lull variety
VVIJN;JU KNTIf.R & CO.,
Ill K. 7C6 CHEHJiUT 8ircet
WHISKY, BRAWDVTWINE, ETCT
JTrcm tiie Vineyards of Sonoma, Los Aiijjelos,
and "Wapa Counties, California, consijt
ing of the following :
WINE MTTKK8,
Aii.tLH A,
tllKUKV.
lllHK.
AlUfcCATt L.
CATAWBA,
CLAKET,
10 T,
B HANDY.!
CHAJiHAONE.
Thetc WIKEB nre warranted to be the pure juice Ci tiie
l rnie, uiisurimPitU by any Iu tlieniarket. ana are b iLij
rcci u u.eiuleit lor Medicinal uuil iauiily purpose.
rUK SALE iiYj
C. L. CAUFFMAN,
AGENT,
No. til Nortli FOIKTI1 Street
1 3 tl.ntuiui l'HlLADEU'UlA
QliEAT REVOLUTION
IN TUG
AViNL 1KADE OF TIIE UNITED STATES
Pure California Champagne,
aite and prepared as It done In France, troui p
CuUiornla Wine, and taklra tbe place of Impo
Champagne.
The undersigned would call tbe attention o. Wi
I'ealers Mid Hotel Keepers to the JbltowJng letter,
blelin.uj' fclvea Correct idea of the quality ot tbe
Wine
"C'omim'.ktai. Hotel, I'bilaueli iiia, Oct. 25, 1866.
"JlEBblis. liOttlifcK A CO. !
't.eiiiu u,i-u : Havinii nlveu j our California Cham
pafcue a tlioiouth tent ue tale uieasure In bu.v'iik tlia
we think it the bi at American Wine we have ever usod
We bht-11 at once place it ou oui till! ol lure.
"Y ouii. truly. J. E. K1NGSLET A CO. '
CALL and THY OVK CAL1 OUH1A CHAMPAGNE
BOUCHER & CO.,
11 21' tuthi-3ni Ho. 3o DEY Street, New York.
A. JUVKK, Albert. 7W KANSOM Su. Philadelphia.
JpRKDERlCK UALTZ & CO 'S
TIRST IMP0BTATI0N
40 GALLON PACKAGES GIN.
Just arrived and in bond, SO Packages 40 Gall E
CKLSIOR 811 EDAM GIN, which we are now
the lowest figure. We claim to bo the
FIRST IMPORTERS OF
T0RTY GALLON PACKAGES
BHKKUY AND FOKT WISE,
fole Agents also lor KIV1EKS GAEDUAT C
COGNAC.
No. 110 WALNUT Street,
, 12 im PHILADELPHIA.
Unadultkkated l i q u o ii a only
ItHIHAKU PENISTAN h
bTOIih; AND VAULTS,
No. i) OliKSNUT HTltKET
Wearly Onpoxlta the Post Gffic
PHILADELPHIA. ,
Fnmltienppl'ed Oreirs lrom the Country prcmntly
a t tpn-ifittn tlj
-IUKIJAN'8 CfcLUliKATKD TONIC ALB.
ff i his truly healthful aud nutritious beverage, now
in cue by thounaudB Invalids aud others baa etab
lihhed a iharncter lor quality ol material and purity ol
niauu'actuie which stands unrivalled. It U recoin
meuued by physicians ol thia and other places a. a fcupe
ricrioKie aud requires but a trial to convince the must
tkCDtlcal ot Its uieat u erlt To oe had, who ea e and
retail, ol P. J.J OhDAN.tf it l'LAUBtreet. iH1
FINANCIAL.
7 3-lOs,
ALL' SERIES
CONVI KTI D INTO
5-20s of 18C5, Januarv and Jul v,
WITHOUT CHARGE.
B0ND3 DELIVERED ;iMMEDIATELT.
DE HAVErJ&BROTKER,
W8W So. 40 SMITH THIRD St.
"yiLLIAM PAINTER & CO.,
BANKERS;
No. 30 South THIRD St.
JINK,
Jl'LV, and
ACGUST
7-30s
CONVERTED INTO FIVE-TWENTIES
And tbe Difference in Karkat Price Allowed.
BONDS M.UVEHI.D IMMEDIATELY. 12 26 3m
Beatrix nt fiL &. gfacztliLieA
riKtl 7'oJ.al an. rrlLanijc, ami
tnctniizU. af! gfiacfc ami ZahL
jfLnrsLiuiii, a.fi Zxudzb. and
.unJcctx leccLLted cjl Lu.te.Lal
tclinA.
1)AYIES BliOTHURS,
No. 225 1I0CX Street,
LANKEKS AND BROKERS!
1UI AND SELL
LNITF.D STATE'S BONDS, ALL I88CES
AL'GLWT, Jt'NE, and JULY 7 3-10 NOTES.
COMPOUND INTE1U.8T NOTKS.
ALGLST 7 10 NOXfcH CONVEKTED INTO
NEW S-tiOBO DA.
Mercantile Paper and Loans on Collateials negotiated
fiock houuhtand gold on Commission. 131
c
R
U L
11.
Ot EICE LEHIGH VALLEY RAILKO AD COMPANY,
A' u . ii. ' ' .i . . ... v. . i ,
PiiiLAnELt'iiiA, tanuary, 161.
Tho stockholders of tliis Coiiipuuv are hereby notified
that they are entitled to subnet ihe at par, tor one
thure or new stock tor each live shares ol stockstand
iiiK in their rct,iective nnnies on the books ol the Com
pany on the lir.st duy ol January, 1hi7, to be paid aa
ioiIowk : 'i cn doliarii per Hhare at tbe time ot'ul
Bcrihinfi which niust be on or before the til'teenth
y oi February nt-xt and ten dollars per share on or
heiore the hltecnth davuot April, July, and (Jcobor,
1K.7. anu Jnnutuy. Pan.
iiiBifllnienta will not be allowed Interest nor dlvl
(U nu until converted into stock, which, when all the
InBialu.euts are paid, may he done by preteutation at
HiIh oilice on r.nd alter tiie fliieeuth day oi January, lHiid.
'I bote Mockliohlcr." who tail to auliscnhe witliin the
time mentioned, or iieulcct to par the several Instal
ments at er belore the time they severally tad due,
w ill lone their rli-ht to ihe new stock.
Stockholders who have less than five shares or who
have iructious O' Are shaics, may, at tbe time ol sun
scrililtiK pay for a proportiona e part of a share, tor
Thlcli scrip will beimuud: which scrip, alter the fif
teenth oav of January, 1HG8, may be converted into
stick when presented at this office in sums of titty
dollars; but tbe s. rip will not be entitled to intorostor
dividend until after conversion ln:o stock.
L. CHAJhBEKLAIN.
1 iritutbnl2t Treasurer.
COAL.
fJB V. PATRICK & CO.,
NO. S04 N. ISROAD ST.,
DEALERS IN
LEHIGH AND SCHUYLKILL COAL
HAZLET0N, MAHAN0Y, EAGLE VEIN, AND
RE-BROXEff BT0VE,
Alw i t on hand, tinder cover, and freefrom DIKT and
8 LATE. 825smwtiin
COAL! COAL! COAL!
J. A. WILSON'S
(Successor to W. L. Foulk,)
I.KIIIUII AND fsCIll'VMCICL,
FAMILY COAL YAED,
No. 1517 CALL0WHILL St., PhUa.
Attention Is called to mv HONEY BltOOK LEHIGH
and liE-1'.UOKEN SCli L YLKILL, both tup tilciaild
unsu i passed Coal.
t Coal and Preparattons best In the city 6m
FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF SAFES
EVANS & WATSON
MAKCEACTUBEB3 OF
FIRE AND BURGLAR-PROOF
SAFES
EESIG.NED FOS
Btmlt, Her cam tile, or Dwlllaglloiaa D
EstabUsbed Over 5 Teari.
Over 24,000 Safet In Use.
The only Safei with Izuride Door.
Hever Lose their Fire-Proof Qtulity
Guaranteed free from Dampaiwi.
Sold at Price Lower than otier maketi
No. 811 C11ESNUT Street.
PUlLAL'ELPHiA.
WATCHES, JEWtlRY ETC
w i'- i ii rniui tin n
W ATI lK. JKWH.KY HIM Kit WARP.. Jl
s7TATCliE3 andEWELSY KEP AIRED,
S02 Chett.tint St.Pnil-.
- Hill , , - --
CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY
AND
IiHIlAIi PUE8ENT8.
Have on liand a large and beautiful apsortn rot
W stehes .lewelrj, and Ml ver are, suitable f Curt
di Uolldav and bridal Prescnu
Particular attention solicited to oar large assortma
of Diaviouds and Watches, Gold Chains tor ladles' a
gentle d.cu'i wear. Also, Sleeve Muttons Studs, au
Seal Itttigs, in great variotv, all of the newe tstrloa.
FANCY SILVEll.WAKE,
ESPECIALLY SUITED FOB BRIDAL G1FT9.
We are daf'y rerelvinK nw Roods, selected eDroI;4
ior i ne nonuav sales, our prices will lie louna an lo
tl pot loner, tliau tiie same quality can be purchaeO
e 1 s where
1 u. cha-rrs Invited to call
l'lamcmtti and all precious ftones, iTjc old Gold anil
oi ver, purclisHid or teren in exchangn. M54p
iSLS ... tKiii
VV. VV. CJASKI1JY. 1 1 '
No. V SOITII SECOND STREET
lEETl
Ofcra an entiicly uetr and most carefully sclectc.'t
stock ot
IAMERICAN AND GEKLVA WATCHES,
JEWELRY,
SILVERWARE, and FANCY ARTICLES OF EVEUY
DESCRIPTION, suitable fo
EKIDAL, OK HOLIDAY PIIKSENTS.
An examination will show my stock to be u sul
parsed bi quality and cheapness. n
Particular attention paid to repairing. 10
ISOIMIAK & LE0NACD.
WACFACTUltER3 OF
- AND
WHOLESALE AND BET AIL DEAIXS
IN
EIIut aa SHvcr-riatcd Goods,
No 704 ARCH STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
l'hose fn want ot SILVER or SILVER-PLATED
W'AKi-. Will tiUd It nilK'h tO tllPlr mlvntituno n rl.'r
cuiN'iOlO beiore making their .purcliarfx. Oar long
c . pern rre in tiie niHiiuiiictnre the ubovo kinds u.
Hi (In elibbli us to QUIT celniieiltlim
W e kiep no ooorts I ut those which ere of the FIRST!
C i.Ab-s, all .1 iur own make, and wil be sold at reduce 1
prices. j 26j
1
TfTF
Lai ge and small; sizes, playing lrom 2 to 12atrs,aud
costing from 6to 300. Our assortment comprises auo
choice melodies as
"Home, H wee t Home
"The Last Rose of Bummer.
'Auld Lang Syne. '
'f tar Spangled Banner."
'My Old Kentucky Home,"ctc. etc
Besides beautliulcelecifons from the various Opera.
Imported direct, and for sale at moderate prices, by
FARR & BROTHER,
Importers o Watches etc.,
II lltmtun Ko. 324 CHEbKt'T St., below Fourtli.
SILVER-WARE
FOB
Bill DAL PRESENTS.
G. RUSSELL & CO.,
No. 93 North SIXTH St.,
Invite attention to tlielr Choice Stock ot JlOLID
SILVER WARE, suitable lor CURISTil As and BRIDAL
PKE6ENTS. t()il6
L HE SHY II AR P E R,
lo. GSiO AKCII Street,
Slauumc'.uror and Dealer In
Watches,
Kine Jfvrelry,
Silver-Plated Ware,
AND
81 Solid Silver-Ware.
RICH JEWELRY.
JOHN BRENNAN,'
DEALER IN
DIAMONDS, FINE WATCHES, JEWELS Y,
Etc. Etc. Rtc.
9213 13 S. EIGHTH ST., PI1ILADA,
ROOFING.
B-'Vo l J.W9V. WOOFS, FLAT OR
F? J.U'V !'i 1MJ ( LOTH, and coated with
U(11D ll'I A l'.KCHA I'AIAT, making
them perlectly water-proof.
JLH.AK1T (ill AVKL HOOFS repaired with
Outta Percha Taint, and warranted lor five Tears.
I.KAKt MiATE IttlOl'S coated with Liquid
Guita Ptrcha Paint, which becomes as hard as slate.
For TIM, COPPUIt, ZINU, aud IKON
ItOOKS this Paint Is the n? plus ultra of ail other pro
tection. It lorms a perfeolv ImpeiTious oover'nii com
plete. r T fait" a the acilon of the weaiber, aud consti
tutes at thorough protection aualnnt leaks by rust or
otherw ise. Price ouly irom one to two cents pe rwjuare
toot.
'I I "V and GRAVEL ROOFIA'G done at tha
shortest notice.
Material c- nstantly an hand and for sale by the
mammoth uoofixu company.
HECK1.Es!I t K V ! It ETT,
12 21 6m No. ;t4 UKEKN Street
11 eiJI.VGLE BOOFStFLAT OK STEEP) COVERED
VllD JOH '- EKtiLlHH KUOtlhii CLOTH.
Anu coiled with LIQUID UU1 1 A rEKIA PAINT
making them petiectiy water proof . LEAKY OKaVKL
hOOErt rei.alrd wiih Ctitta I'ercha Taint andlwarranied
tir ve ySi r 1 . K A K Y S LA 'I K ItOUKU cn.tejt with Ihmld
which becomes as bard as slate. US.UOPPKK ZlNi:,
orl HO cwlli'l-iw ''ohaat small ex
pense Cost ranufnu irom oae to twoceuU per square
hot Old Board or Milniile Koofn ten cents per square
foot all cnin'etc ftiaterinls conHtantly on hand an iil'or
sMe by tl a PHILAPt Ll'lllA AN1 TV.N -HYLVA W1A
KOOVlNOt OUPAKY.. ,r GKOHGK HOKABT.
jlSain Ko. 230Korth EQUKTliHt
UNITED STATES REVENUE STAMPS.
Principal Depot, No. 301 ( II E4NUT 1-treeU
Central Depot No. It i 8 F IF'l II Street, one duor below
C'hesnut ExtablUhed -hvl.
Revenue Staiuos ot every description conjtait y on
band, lu any amount
On'eis by Mail ts promptly attended to.

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