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The evening telegraph. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, July 11, 1868, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAlL EVENING TELEGRAPHPHILADELPHIA, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1868.
SPIRIT OF THE rRESS.
KDITt'RIAIi OPIMONB OP THB . LEA.D1SO JOCRNALH
peON CCKLaNt TOPICS COMPILBD EVERY
BAT FOB THR SVFNISO TfcLKGBAFH.
Inr1y Conventions nntl their Presidential
CnmUi'ates.
From the N. T. Jieralit.
The perplexities of the Democracy at Tam
xnaDT Hall in the nomination of tlieir Presi
dential candidate naturally draw our attention
to the cliques aud combinations, the trading
and log rolliufft u0' tl)e 'dances and aooidenta
rblcU In inobt cases have determined the
nominations of these President-making con
ventions, and ePiedaly under the Demo
cratic two-thirds rule.' Let us look back a
little, and we shall Bee in this Democratic
Convention of liNiS there is nothing extraor
dinary in its proceedings or results. It is
only the old f-tory of 1811 aud and '5lJ
over again, with certain variations adapted to
the time.
The lines of division between the old Re
publican and Federal parties having entirely
disappeared with the dissolution of the Fede
ral party, there was in 1824 a beautiful scrub
race for the Presidency between Jackson,
Adams, Crawford, and Clay. Jaukson oaiue
out first from the people, bat lacking a ma
jority vote of the electoral colleges the election
was thrown into the House of Kepresentatives,
wht'D, by a coalition between the friends of
dams aud Clay, Adams was elected. Against
thi3 coalition, denounced by John Randolph a3
"a coalition of tbe l'uritan and blackleg," the
Jackson party rallied at once around their
favorite for another trial before the people,
and in 1S2S, by a sort of popular spontaneous
combustion, he defeated Adams bo signally as
to make "Old Hickory," as the head of the
new Democratic party, its candidate in ad
vance for another term. Thus with the assem
bling of the nominating party convention of
there was no dillicnlty about its ticket
(Jackson and Van liuren); lor the popularity
of Jackson had settled his nomination, and his
Will was accepted as the law in reference to
Lis associate on the ticket. So it was with Van
liuren's nomination and election as l'resideut
in l!?3ii, and with his nomination for a second
term in l-40. But in lS-k) the financial disas
ters of Van liuren's administration had turned
the popular tide against him, and so, even as
the anointed successor of Jackson, he met with
a crushing defeat.
The 'friends of Vau Barer), still pressing hi3
claims for a second term, came forward with a
decided majority of the Conven'.iou iu his be
half in 184-1. Here the previously unsus
pected power and dillioulties aud doubts of the
J emocratio two-thirds rule began to be felt.
Van Daren, by a little over one third of the
Convention, was tbus cast aside, and l'olk,
never dreamed of before, was lioally nomi
nated as a compromise for the campaign. The
New York Democracy supports l'olk with a
Sort of understanding that Van Bureu was
to have another trial in 14, and so, when by
the Southern 6laveholding oligarchy in that
Convention Cass was nomiuated, Van liuren,
assisted by Salmon P. Chase, of Ohio, and
Other powerful Democratic free-soilers, took
the field as a third party candidate on his in
dependent free-soil Uull'alo platform. Thus,
in cutting Cass out of the vote of New York,
and defeating him, "Little Van" had full satis
faction againut the regular Democratic Con
vention and the Southern oligarchy, which had
juggled him twice out of tue regular Demo
cratic line of succession.
In 1852, as much of a surprise to the party
as was Polk, poor Pierce, over the heads of a
baker's dozen of old stagers, became the
Democratic nominee; in 185 ij, on the strength
of an alibi on the unpopular Kansas-Nebraska
bill (having been absent in Euglaud at the
time of its passage), Buchanan, after thirty
year3 of active engineering, secured the prize
under certain Bkilful manipulations of the
Slaveholding interests of the South by the
Pennsylvania delegation. Tbis two-thirds
rule, in faot, was the instrument whereby the
Southern slaveholders dictated the candidates
of the Democracy from and after the defeat In
1840 of Van Buren down to Buchanan. But
in 1800, at Charleston, the Douglas demo
cracy of the West Set their faces resolutely
against the Southern oligarchy, and we know
What has followed.
So much for these 'President-making con
Tentions of the Democracy under their two
thirds rule. The old Whig party and the
Republican party, under their majority rale,
down to 18G0, were not subjected to such terri
ble conflicts as the Democrats in their nomi
nating conventions; but they were still largely
controlled by the chapter of accidents. In
lb?6 the Whigs were cut up into a scrub race
against Van Buren, the results of which
showed that upon one candidate they might
have beaten him. In 1840 expediency dictated
the nomination of General Harrison, when
they might have elected Clay; in 1844 they
nominated Clay with great enthusiasm, only
to have him defeated by an abolition
defection in New York; in 184S, when
there was another chance for Clay, they fell
back upon General Taylor, a military chieftain
whose election was as profitless to the party as
that of Harrison; in 1852 they nomiuated
General Scott, another military chieftain, and
in that canvass the old Whig party died from
too much abolition. In 1854 por Pierce's
repeal of the Missouri Compromise (the
Kansas-Nebraska bill) opened the liood
gates of a Northern reaction against slavery,
and in 185U Fremont, the Republican
nominee on the Van J!urn free-soil platform
of J84H, would in all probability have been
elected but ior the indnpendent opposition
Know-Nothing ticket of Fillmore (a disap
pointed Whig) and the indillerence of tbe
Seward clique. In 1SU0 Seward was adroitly
cut out of the Republican nouiiuation, aud
Lincoln, as unexpectedly as Polk or Pierce,
became the nominee of his party, aud, as it
proved, the very man for a crisis more formi
dable to contemplate and more difficult, deli
cate, aud dangerous than any other crisis in
American history since the Declaration of
Independence.
Since the time of General Jackson our
Presidents, going through the form of an
election by the people, have really been
chosen by thene nominating party conventions,
on one side or the other; and these party
nominations have been effected by a few trad
ing managers at a venture, or from mere con
siderations of electioneering expediency, ex
cept in the two nominations of Clay and in
the B-oond nomination of Lincoln. Hence,
from these juggling conventions, the corrup
tion of American politics and politicians, in
and out of power. They have brought upon
us all the disasters of the bloodiest civil war
in human history, and they will aga'm bring
us into tbe most serious troubles uulusa we
find aud adopt some better method of 1' resident-making
than the system of these trading
party conventions.
Urant versus Seymour,
From the iV. 1". Times,
Horatio Seymour is a very Democratic
"match" for General Grant. The services of
the one to the country form a very pungent
comparison with those of the other. Tiie
Littery of one aud the other during the last
eight yara constitutes a very instructive sub-
ject of contemplation for patriotio oltizena at
this time. 1
For this generation at ba?t, the merits of a
public man will be adjudged principally by
what be did for the salvation of the Union
and the cause of Freedom during that tre
mendous crisis when treason attempted their
overthrow.
This standard of judgment is a perfectly
fair one. For, if the rebellion had been al
lowed to succeed, we should not only have
lotl the freedom and unity, v.hiou are our
country's glory and honor, but we would have
been started on the road to ruin and au irony,
and would soon have beeu left without any
country at all.
What Grant did for the Union, every mrm
snd woman, every boy aud girl, every North
erner and Suutliern'r,erery foreigner and Ame
rican knows. How promptly he took th field
in the humblest capacity at the outbreak of
war how, advancing in position, he won for
us the first victory of the war how he marched
from one triumph to another till the whole
Mif jiissippi Valley was restored to our ll ig
how, rising to the supreme command of the
army, beorgauized victory iuVirgiuia, till lioally
not a Rebel could be found on the territory of
the republic everybody who loves the Uuiou
and is proud of his country will forever grate
hilly remember. And it is also well remem
bered how, subsequently, by his wise counsels
and temperate disposition, he laborel to re
concile the sections that had been embittered
against each other, to secure clemency for the
cocijuered, and to repair the breaches of war.
He diplayed the genius of a statesman in the
policy he suggested, and exhibited the capa
city of a fir.-it-rate administrator in the carry
ing ont of the measures which he originated.
The endowments of the man seenied to fit him
equally for peace and for war; and lie proved
himself as competent to take the initiative as
to be the executor.
While performing these great services, and
bending all his energies and intellect to this
tremendous work, what was Horatio Sey
mour doiDg for his country, for his Govern
ment, and for the salvation of the
Union ? Was he exerting his pow
ers of mind and position in their be
half ? Or was he acting in such a way as
to encourage the enemy, to discourage our
army and people, and to throw the weight of
the F.tupire State on the bide of the disiiuion
its ? Who needs to be told that will recall
his condemuable messages to the Legislature
and speeches in this city aud elsewhere?
Who needs to be told that will recall all his
babble about the impossibility of our success,
and all his assanlts upon the Government for
its actiou in behalf of the Union Who needs
to be told that will recall bis persistent and
laborious attempts to thwart tbe Government
in its efforts to raie troops in this State f Who
needs to be teld that will recall his conduct at
the time of the liots in this city, and when the
Rebel army was advaucing through Pennsyl
vania I Who needs to lie told that knows
anything of the inside history of his adminis
tration during the perilous years when he was
Governor of this State f It was a shameful
and fearful history throughout; and yet it is
as a reward for his conduct at that time that
he has been nominated as the Democratic can
didate for the Presidency.
We demand, therefore, that the American
people shall judge between Grant and Sey
mour on this issue. We demand that the
services and merits of one aud the other shall
be taken into account, and that the history of
neither shall be forgotten.
But Seymour is a "great statesman."
Statesmanship, forsooth 1 Why, Grant dis
played a higher statesmanship in his negotia
tions with Lee, in the advice he gave to the
President, in the measures he urged upon
Congress, in the policy he sought to secure for
the South, in the execution of his dutiu3, civil
and military, than Seymour ever dreamed of.
All the statesmanship that Seymour could
ever show was in the position of Governor;
and the intellectual callibre required for that
position may be measured by the mediocre
ability he displayed in the discharge of. his
duties. He fchowed nothing except that his
views were petty and contracted, tbat his
capacity was of the most common-place orier,
and tbat he could talk wnh the fluency of a
demagogue.
In putting forth such a man as a match tor
tbe great commander ot our armies, for tbe
wite, clear-headed, far-seeing, self-possessed
master and manager of affairs, we have an
other evidence of that audacity which distin
guishes the Democratic party.
Traitors iu the Camp.
from the AT. Y. Aalwn.
If anybody will consult the newspaper files
ot the Bummer and (all of Ibui), he will hud
that for six months at least before the meeting
of Congress many of the radical chiefs were iu
a state of great anxiety lest the Southern Re
presentatives should get back into their places
before conditions had been imposed ou them.
At that time negro suffrage had not Ingua to
be advocated, or, at least, was only advocated
by very few on grounds of right or justice.
Kven Wendell Phillips relied largely on the
expediency of the thing, aud one of the great
reaj-ous why negro suffrage was pronounced to
be expedient, was that the negro vote would
be needed to help the Republican prty to d-)-feudthe
public credit from the assaults which
tbe Southerners were expected to make upon it.
Senator Sumner, we remember, quoted with
horror a passage from one ot the letters
of our correspondent, who was then tra
velling iu the South, iu whijh Le reported au
interview with a young man we believe in
Virginia in which tbe young mau Haiti he
was willing to acknowledge himself whipped;
but that it anybody supposed he was going to
help to pay the cost of whipping him, that
person was we veil his language under a
paraphrase iu a very reinaikable degree mis
taken. We accoidiugly all set to work to get
the negroes enfranchised our motives, of
course, being mixed. Some were affected most
powerfully by cum con.-ideration and some by
another; Lint we presume there has hardly
been any advocate of the Congressional plau
of reconstruction who was not affected power
fully by the hope that negro suffrage would
stieiigtheu the Republican party sutli.nently
to enable it to lullil tbe natioual ohligxtious to
the persons whom the part hd induced to
lend money to carry on the war.
The negroes have been enfranchised, and
the South is nearly back into the Union. The
process of reconstruction has lasted long, aud
caused much irritation, and given rise to much
discussion. The Southerners have certaiuiy
not kept very quiet, and adversity has appi
rently deprived them of none of their old
frankness. We believe we kuow pretty well
from their own acts and declarations whit it
is that is uppermost in their minds, aud yet,
as lar as our observation has gone, nothing
worthy of note has come from any Southern
source indicating that a desire to evade or pre
vent the punctual payment of the natioual
debt is prevalent amongst the secessionist),
or, at all events, influences their political
action r forms part of their political pro
gramme. They are troubled about many
things, but apparently the best means of
cheating the publio creditor Is not one of the
things which seriously ooouries them.
Yet the publio credit is generally admitted
to be suffering more or less damage. The Re
publican party has dene all it cau to uphold
it, by formally denouncing all attacks on it ai
a ''crime," and making its defense a part of
the party platform; but somebody is attacking
it, and damaging it, too. It it not the South
erners. They say nothing about it. It is not
the negroes. As tar as they have spoken their
minds about it at all, they have given every
reason to believe that it, at leatt, ha nothing
to fear from them. It is not the Democrats.
It is true, a large portion of the Democrats
are in favor of repudiation iu a disguised form,
and Jnst now are putting this idea iu the fore
front of their battle, an I abuse the "ra-ically
bondholders" a good deal. But Hihu this Is,
after ail, rather harmless work, for two rea
fons: one is, thit the Democrats are not in
power; the other is, that they are not likely
to be. What Pendleton says on this subject
is not much heeded in the money markets of
the world, because Pendleton is well known to
be a private gentleman, and to bn likely to
remain so. ISor ore the utterances of the l'-t-mocrats
in Congress of much consequence; be
cause they a very insignificant miuority.
ho Is it, then, tbat is hlliii: the world
with alarm about the national good faith, and
delisting and disheartening everybody who
looks to the United States for the display, nit
simply of greater material prosperity, but of a
htcher moral tone than older nations? Wliv.
a knot of arch-radicals men who have b-u
the chief supporters of negro suffrage, who
have had more than most men to do with
' putting the war through," and getting peo
ple to advance money to carry it on none of
j our weak-kneed, weak-Invoked, milk-an i
water brethren, but regul.'ir "whole-souled,
r liable statesmen," "educated up" to the
highest attainable point of ardor aud euthu
eiasm "friends of mankind," too, whose per
formances, conn he iiehol t them, would kill
Anacharsis Clout z with envy. There is
Mr. Benjamin F. Butler at the had
of them; there we were going to print a list
ot the names of his followers b'it our daily
contemporaries have done it much more effec
tively than we could do it. Suffice it to say,
that amongst the nauis of those who voted
with him last week to cheat the public creditor
of the ten'h part of his interest, will be found
those of few men whose "soundness" has ever
been doubtful, or who have ever allowed
themselves to lag in the rear when any "lean
ing ahead" was to be done. Having exhaustei
nearly every extreme extent the extreme of
dishonesty, they have fallen bauk on repudia-
fr i ; ... . i -1 , . .1
mm. j iitj impraciicaoie ana unreasonable
they have begun to find intolerably stupid aud
monotonous, so they are now trying the kua-
visn in seaicu 01 a new sensatiou.
Moreover, there was an argument iu very
commou use during the war, which B-ntham
111 his ".Hook ol lallaciei" calls Jthe noct'ttr a
whs fallacy, and which consists m auegine
that what you say caunot be sound, because
certain persons known to bebalaree with
you in it. This played a very proinmeut pirt
in the argumentation of the New York I'ri
biuw, aud of all that ueculiar school of loiciciaus
of v, hich it is the head, and has beeu constantly
used by theit to refute the plainest aud most
sensible opinions upon tbe questions of
the day. There is no fallacy by which
the voice of reason is so oiieu drowned, for
it has the great recommendation of beinii
within the reach of the meanest capa-
citp. It 13 one of the hist weapons which
your thoroughbred blatherskite clinches when
he liuds himself hard pressed. During the
last three years though we are glad to see it
is rapidly losing its eil'.it it has bnen con
stantly employed to frighten timid or sensitive
men into aciuie.ceiice in all sorts of follies.
Under it any Cwppeibead or Democrat has only
to concur in your opinions, or to take up a
position befcide you, in order to cover you with
conlusiou aud destroy all confluence in you
For instance, when we were arguing against
the return of P. T. Baruum to Congress, we
were informed that uone of the reasons we
gave for desiring his defeat weie worth atten
tion, masmuch as tuey gave satisfaction to the
Copperheads ot the l'ouith Connecticut Dis
trict.
This being the accepted orthodox logic
however, we hardly expected to see proiniuut
Republicans ranging themselves with Copper
hads in the House tt Kepresentatives iu as
Faults on the public credit, aud yet that is the
spt-ctacle we now witness. It is, to say the
least, singular that in the various attacks Mr,
Butler and his followers have been making ou
the lax bill, he has had the hearty co-opera
tion ot the Democrats; but what is more sin
cular is that the same persons who did not
thiiik there was time for Mr. Schenck's tax
bill to pass, also think that the interest
on the national bonds should be taxed teu
per cent. What is most singular is, however,
that such a doctor iu the law as Mr. Butler
should now make light of the great noscitur a
socis argument as a foolish argument which
has no weight, and impudently persevere iu
his evil com ses. We trust that some of the
"organs" which admire this gentlemau, aud
consider him a pillar of the Church, will take
note ot his heresies, and put in force whatever
course of discipline may be necessary to pre
vent his giving further scandal, aud to correct
Lis manners and excesses.
There is one other argumeut about whbh
tbe present course of eveuts causes us serious
anxiety. We have touud no proper uaiue for
it in '.he ordinary works on logic, but it ought
to have one, aud a good one, and we have
contrive I one ourselves, which we offer with
great diffidence, but which, we trust, wiil not
be found unsuitable. We propose to call it the
artunuutuin a (juudio iiifiddinm the argument
that you cannot be an honest or good mau be
cause what you say or do rejoices the Copper
heads. Tbis, too, was a favorite one with the
Tribune, until Mr. Greeley bailed Jelhrson
Davis, when it was used against him by
the New Yoik Times iu a cruel and
indecent manner, ana it leu out or use
in Mr. Greeley's paper. Its ordinary form is
this: "On Mr. 's motives we cast no im
putation; they may be good, or they may bd
bad; but this we d know, that there is not a
Copperhead from Maine to California who is
not made happier by what he did last Mon
day," or Tuesday, or Wednesday, as the case
may le. Now, we do not ourtelves think
much of this argumeut. We have known it
to fail, and we ourselves never use it. It is
too delicate for ordinary political discussion,
and it is certaiuiy falling into disrepute.
But before it loses all its power, we propose
to turn it against the sixty-one Re
publicans who followed Messrs. Cobb and
Batler in their attempt to disgrace their
country last week, and ask them whether they
kuow that there is not a copperhead or seces
sionist in the United States whom their con
duct has not delighted and inspired with
hope ? Nay, more, whether they . kuow tbat
theie is not an enemy of popular government
on the face of the earth who will not hear of
it with delight, and who will not treasure it
up for use iu defense of caste ami privilege,
and tbat there is probably nobody who, dur
ing the next five years, in any quarter of the
globe, preaches great poll'?' !:! psi'i'lities for
the human race, who will not hve it c ist in
his teeth, and whom it wiil not confound aud
make atihainwd?
Tlio liewildeml lirctimu.
From the If. Y. World.
It is doubtful if evou tt.e Ptrong Fouthern
wing of the radical party can ti'.d in the Fetish
observances aui solemnities (f Vou loo. any
thing like the real mystery that attache to
the radical candidate for the Presidency. 1 im
men and brethren, black and white, are in a
state of blind bewilderment as to their favor
ite's name and policy aud habits; au I at pre
sent, even as to his whereabouts, for he is not
in Washington, and the papers are absolutely
silent as to his presence in the West. Grant's
name has been variously state! bv his father
wno begot and baptized him, to be Hiram Ulys-st-P;
by Congressman ilamar. who scoured hiiu
a West Point cadetsbip, to be Ulysses Simpson;
and by various friends of the family to be
tlirani teimpnn, bimpsou fcidney, Ulysses Syd
ney, Hiiani Sidney, and, indeed, radical Journals
in the general bewilderment have rung the
changes so that be is Unconditional Simpson,
Sinipson burrender, AU-Snmnier bimpon, ami
Simpsons of other sorts and all sorts, till the
myth himself has moodily fallen back upon
the alphabetical U. S., which may he accepted
as tbe Unexplained Simpson. Then as to his
habits: Phillips, Ttltou, and other prominent
ladu als, declare or insinuate that Grant is a
drui kard, and the Tribune has published a
Western correspondent's statement that Presi
dent Jobuton declared that some one, sup
pnted to be Grant, had been in the Kxeoutive
Mansion "so drunk that he could hardly stand
upon Lis legs." On the other baud, II-nry
Wilson (who was so baptized by the Legisla
ture of Massachusetts) asserts that he has
never seen Grant take a "single" glass of wine,
aud ten prominent patients in the Boston iiliu t
Asylum stand ready te swear that they have
never seen him drink a glass of Bourbjn,
brandy, or beer, or even water. Next, as to
his fumigatory propensities, the inhabitauts
at the foot of Vesuvius were never
more anxious over the ever-to-be-expected
eruptions of that mountain tban the brethren
aie agitated as to whether Grant smokes.
L'Om&tead, Bodge, and other anti-tobacconists,
swear that what the National Anti-Tobacco
League declares to be smoke is nothing but
tbe breath of Grant on a frosty morning. If
we believe these people, very little goes into
tbe mouth of Grant, and nothing comes out
no smoke, aud, above all, no speeches. Iu
place of a policy, the Mau of Mystery refers
you to Lis "record;" wheu asked to express
his political opinions, the Man ou Horseback
talks horse; and when journeying among his
political admirers at the Wet, the Myth is
uium. All of which tends to the eudless con
tusion of the brethren, plain and colored, aud
leads to an infinity of conundrums, as thus:
What is Giant's name? What does he be
lieve? Has he a policy? Does he drink? Is
he a smoker? Whvre is he just now? ami
last, not least, in what part of the boat will
he be wheu his party sails for the sources of
8alt Rive r? Washburne, or some other man,
Fhonld answer these questions, and dispel the
doubts which now bewilder the brethren.
"Ltt us have peace."
I'oforiii iu Naturalization.
From the iV. Y. Tribune.
We are not surprised that the articles which
we Lave pnblished ou the great naturalization
frauds in Pennsylvania, in behalf of the De
mocratic party in 1807, fchould have brought
to us Beveral suggestions from correspondents
whose attention has been attracted by the in
trinsic importance of the subject. The under
lying idea of liberal political institutions is,
that of the most perfect equity, aud there is
nothing more aristocratic in its tendencies and
nature than double-voting. The felou who
votes more than once, when the law allows
him to vote once only, neutralizes the
vote oi nis honest neighbor, aud may
ueteat the will ot a whole township,
or county, or even State. A correspondent,
who has Lad a practical experience of the
evils and dangers attending the present
reckless and unrestrained use of naturaliza
tion papers in the promotiou of fraud, pro
poses various changes in the law, which, if
they had been made soon enough, would have
effectually blocked the pretty little game of
the Pennsylvania Democratic btate Committee
He would have the naturalization process per
fected and both Sets of papers granted in open
court only; he would have the interval of two
years between the issue of the first and second
papers rigidly insisted on; he suggests that
those who mean te apply for naturalization
should give sufficient publio notice of their in
tention, and that printed lists of such apnh
cants should be posted in public places in each
election precinct for a proper time before the
application ia to be heard. These judicious
suggestions are worthy of careful considera
tion.
Our readers will remember that one of the
most shameful of the Pennsylvania frauds
was the voting by naturalized citizens upon
the strength of papers worthless at best in
half a dozen or more precincts. Fellows who
resort to this game, and who are knowu tech
nically ib Democratic soience as "rounders,"
are encouraged in their profitable but iniqui
tous perambulations by untrustworthy In
spectors and Judges of Klections, who are
utterly void of shame. Our correspondent
proposes, when any man registers or votes
upou the strength of his naturalization pa
pers, that the fact should be indorsed upon
them iu black ink, thus: "Registered at or
voted upon in this precinct of the ,
State of , on this day of , A. D.
, by the within named , now resident
and voter Leieof." This certiiicate, signed
by the Kegister or Judge of Election, might
not prevent au unprincipled offloer from
receiving a fraudulent vote; but he would siu
with his eyes open, and he could plead no
honest mistaite when brought to book for his
erime. Our correspondent says that when Le
was a Register in Detioit, in lbb'J, he took
the liberty, law or no law, of thus endorsing
naturalization papers. The local Democratic
journals of course set up a howl of indigna
tion, but their clamor did not kill him, nor
v. ill a like noise prove fatal to any Registers
elsewhere who may adopt this simple pre
ventive, taking upon their own Bhoulders the
responsibility until we can get the procedure
authorized by tbe act ol Cougress.
The honest and well-informed citizen who
votes but ODce at au election, is defrauded of
his niott precious immunity by the dishonest
or ignoiant naturalized citizen who votes upou
tue same occasion twice or tbrice. To a con
siderable degree the liberty in quest of which
Le Las crossed the ocean, aud the political
safety which he has abandoned his birth-place
to secure, are filched from him through the
ignorance or the dishonesty of his associates
of the same class, who should be as scrupulous
as he is in maintaining the dignity and repu
tation of the body to which both belong. He
Bhould be aa ready to have the swindlers of
the polls suitably punished as he would be to
Bend the petty laroenous rogue who picks Lis
pocket to the penitentiary.
MILLINERY.
MR 8. R. DILLON,
won, aas and gas hovtii ntukkt
Bu large auortmeut of
MILLINERY.
Ladles', MUges', aud Children's Bilk, Velvot, Fell
fcilraw and Fancy Bonnet and Hats of the UUwt
itylwi. Also, H'lks, Velvets. Klbbous, Crpe.
! millers, i lowers, frame., etc., whulwtHla and
retail. tiei
OAn -CAST-OhTCLOTHISO.-THEHieil
O v eat price paid lor Ludiosand Omim.
Address H RKIITON,
t IS luar No. 809 oO U TU bueet.
218 & 220
S. FRONT ST.
4
OFFER TO THB TRADE, IN LOTS,
FIRE HIE AM) BOUtBOK WHISKIES, IV IMD,
Of 18GC, WOO, 18G7, and 1808,
AI.S(, FKEE F1AE ME AD E(lim WUlSIilES,
Of GREAT AGE, ranging from to 145.
Liberal coutiaots will be entered Into for lota, in bond at Distillery, of this ywus' inmaiactiiJ?.!
SPECIAL NOTICES.
t1Zf OFFICE PENNSYLVANIA RA1LU0AD -
Hi, A .
PHILADKLPHIA, May 13, ISfiS. j
tJOTICR TO STOCKIIOLKKKS. In pursuance Of !
renoluiluns adoptd by tbe Board uf Directory at a
slated meeting held this day, notice Is btueby given
to tbe btockbolders of tbls Company, that tlicy tvlil
liave the privilege ol subxcrlbliiK., either directly or
by imbslliutiou under mien rules as may be prescribed
thereior, for Twmity-Hve Per Cent, of additional
Block at Par, In proportion to their respective Inter
ests as they ntnud registered on the books of tbe
Company, May 2o, Itm.
Holders of lees mau four Ph&res will be entitled to
subscribe for a mil Bhare and thone holding more
bbares tli.in a multiple of four Shares will be entitled
to an additional Share.
Subscriptions to the new Block will be received on
aud alter May 8U, 1M, and tbe privilege ol subscrib
ing will ctase od tbe Kdth day ol July, itttt&.
The Instalments on account ol tbe new Shares shall
be paid Id cash, as follows:
lht. Twenty-live Per Cent, at tbe tlino of subscrip
tion, on or before thesutb day of July, 1868,
2d. Twenty-five Per Cent, ou or before the 15th day
ol lec-mber, 1888.
8rt. Twenty-live Per Cent, on or before the 13th day
ot June, 1M19.
4th. Twenty-five Per Cent, on or before the 15th day
ol lieceniber, iw, or It blocknolders should prefer
the whole amount may be. paid up at once, or any
remaining Instalments may be paid up In full at the
time of the payment ot the seooud or third instal
ment, and each Instalment paid up, shall be entitled
to a pro rata dividend tbat may be declared on lull
bbares. ' THOMAS M. FIRTH,
5 14 11 w Treasurer.
7;.? PHILADELPHIA AND IiKADIXO
BAIL ROAD COMPANY, OUlce No. 227 8.
FOURTH B.reel. Philadelphia, May 27, 1SGS.
SOT I C. To the holders of bonds of the PHILA
DELPHIA AND READIKU RAILROAD COM
PANY due April 1, U70.
The Company oiler to exchange any of these bonds,
of KK 0 each, at any time before the (1st) first day of
October next at par for a new mortgage bond of equal
amount bearing seven per cei.t, Intere t, clear of
United Btctes and Btate taxes, having twenty-five
vear. to run.
Tbe bonds not surrendered on or before tbe 1st of
October next will be paid at mturtty, In accordance
wilh their tenor. b, BRADFORD,
b 2B101 Treasurer.
rTif- PHILADELPHIA AND BEADING
RA1LRVAD COMPANY.
Piulauki.pr-ia, Jane 23, lsi?,
DIVIDEND NOTHJK.
The Trsnsfer H iokK of llim Company will be closed
on TUKfeDAY, Juuu 3U, and be mopeued ou THURS
DAY, July lfi, ltt(i8.
A Dividend of IVE PER CENT, has been declared
on the Preferred aud Ooiuo-on block, clearof na.lonal
and ("lute taxrs; payable on Common tUock ou aud
atttrJLLY 15 to the holders thereof, aa they shall
stand registered on the books ot Hie Company ou the
2u h limiaut. AU payaO e at thm otllce.
6 16 i!m H. BKAUt'UUD, Treasurer.
ETW BY ORDER OF THE COURT OP
COMMON PLKAH a slock vote ot the MRlt
ANTILK LIBRARY COMPANY will bn taken ou
the foi owing proposed amendment to the Chirler:
bectlou 5 The Hoard ot Directors shall nave mil
power to moke and alter such Rules aud Bylaws us
ility may deem necessary lor the weli-belug ondfue
management ot the allairs uf tbe Company: Provided,
sncli 1!) laws are not repugnaul to nor luconslsieut
with this Charter, or with the Constitution and laws
o this Hia e or ot the United states.
The polls will be opened lu the LIBRARY, on
MONDAY, Juli 6. and Ciosed SATURDAY. July II.
The huuis lor voting will be, on Monday, Wednes
day, and Friday, Ironi 10 A. M. to 2 P. M., anrt on
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, from 4 t' 9 P. M
The vole will be by ballot, eauu snare ot stock bel ig
entitled to one vote, which must be pieseuted In
person.
JOHN LARDSER, Recording Socretarv.
Philadelphia July 1, 1M. ?2?''
WATCHES, JEWELRY, ETC.
'VtVUS LADOMUS & CO.
( DIAMOND DEALERS & JEWKLEliS.
WATCHES, JKtVKLKT m BILTBIt W A It K.
."WATCHES and JEWELRY EEP AIRED.
J02 Chestnut St., Phili
WATCHES OF THE FINEST MAKERS,
DIAMOND AJD OTHER JEWELRY,
Of the latest styles.
SOLID SILVER AND PLATED-WARE, ETC. ETC.
SMALL STUDS FOR EYELET HOLES,
A large absortment Just receive I, with a variety of
attlngs. S Ijlp
We keep always on band an assortment of
LADIES' AMD CIEBCrS "FIHH WATIH.
Of tbe best American and Foreign Makers, all WM
ranted to give complete satlstactioii, and at
GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
F Alt It ft BROTHKBi
Importers of Watches, Jewelry, Musical Boxes, ala.
11 llsmtnjrpj Ko. 824 CHEtfNUT St., below Fourth.
Especial attention given to repairing Watches aat
Musical Loxes bv S'LUKT-CLABM workmen.
TURRET CLOCKS
G. W. RUSSELL,
Importer and dealer In fine Watches.
French Clocks, Gold Jewelry, Etc., No. 82 N. SIXTH
Street, having received the agency ot
BTEVENS' PATENT TOWER CLOCKS,
la prepared to make estimates and contraoU for pat
ting np these Clooks for Town Halls, Churches,
Schuol Houses. Etc, in the full assurance that they
are the best and cheapest
TURRET CLOCKS
In the United States,
Inquiries by mall promptly answered. 826
FURNISHING GOODS, SH1RTS.&C
H. 8. K. G.
Harris Seamless Kid Gloves.
KVCBY PAIH WABBANTED,
utcLrsrvE agents fob gents' gloves.
l. W. SCOTT ft CO.,
1 27! rp SO, Rl CHESMUT MTHKKT.
PATENT SHOULDER-SEAM
KIUBT MAHCrACTOBT,
A 31 nUEHlXKMEar rVBMIMHIMCi STOUS
PKKKKCT FITTING SHIR re AND DRAWERS
mad from mMuiurement at very short notice.
All other article. Oi OlOMTLlLMJaM b DREfci
GOO 14 la full variety.
triNCHEMTEB CO.,
UU Mo. 7trt CUKBNUT Street.
FINE WATCHES.
. .1B It . i
218 220
4
S. FROM T.ST.
& CO
DRANDY, WINE, GIN, ETC.
ft LI ALL ft CftcDRIDS,
IMPORTERS OP
B2AKBIES, WI3TES, GIITS, ETO,
AKD DISTILLER OP
Flf!E OLD RTE, 80URB01 AND E310KGAHELA
AV II I B II Y,
TUPE AND UNADULTERATED,
' Wo. 151 South FKONT Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
Liquors by the B ttle and Demijohn furnished
expressly tor nmilly nd medicinal pnrpoxea. Order
by mall will bo prom n'ly attended to. lUtbslurp .
CHA5TPA(?Kf.-AN INVOICE OK "l'LAST
Here" Champagne, Imported and for sale by
J A M ("J CA k.-TA t HH, J R.,
lfl WALM'l and 2' GRANITE Street,
c
"lIlAHII'AfiNE.-AN INVOICE OF "GOLD
Lac t hai.- pague, tmporteu ana ior sale by
J A IB IUS CA KM I A 1 KS, J It,,
12 WAI.M1T and ! ORAM TE Btreit.
CHAMPAGNE. AN INVOICE OP "GL0
rla" Chan. pHS lie. Imported and (or SR'e by
JAMIS CAKKTA1RS JR.
411 1M WALMJ 1 aud 21 ORAM TE blreet.
CARSTAIUS' OLIVE OIL. AN 1NV0ICB
ol the above, lor na!e by
Jam K3 CA RSTATR. JR.,
lai WA LK UT audtft UKAIsITE Biroei,
OPERA GLASSES "
I
uoii uakdou ii aox, rims.
JAMES E. CALDWELL & CO.,
JEWELLERS,
No. 002 CHESNUT Street,
Have Just Opeiaed a Large 1st voice of
rAIiTICULAILLY FLE
OPERA CLASSES,
Anciuaiug every variety or
Rock Crystal,
Ocular Graduated,
lhiehessp, arid
VARIABLE AM) MUUT LEASES.
ALSO, Mew
Tourist Glasses and Tclcsoopcs.
SEWING MACHINES.
THE GRE AT
AJIIRUAS COMBINATION
IIUTTOX-JIOLE 0VEKSEAXIXJ
AND
SEWING MACHINE,
Its wonderful Popularity Conclusive Troor
of its Urcat Merit.
The Increase In the demand for this valuable
Machine has been TENFOLD during the last seven
oioDths oflta first year before the public
1 his grand and surprising success Is unprecedented
in tbe history ol Sewing Machines, and we leel fully
warranted in claiming that
IT HA KO EQUAL,
Being absolutely the best
FAMILY MACHINE
IM TDK WOBLO, .
And Intrinsically the cheapest, for It Is really two
Machines combined In one. bold at the
S. W. Cor. of ELEVENTH aud CHESMJT,
PHILADELPHIA. fS 0tutbtf
PAINTED PHOTOS.
NEW THING IN AS T.
BERLIN TAINTED PIIOT03.
A. S. ROBINSON,
No 9 U CHE8NOT Street,
Han ust received a superb collection of
11EJBLIN PINTKI) PHOTOQRAPlId Off
r low am.
They are exquisite getus of art, rivalling in beauty,
uaturalness of tint, and perfection of form a great
variety of tbe choicest exotic (lowering planui. They
are mounted on bourdi of three sizes, aud sold from,
is recti to t'l and $1 each.
For framing and the album they are Incomparably
Oeautllnl. S i2
LEGAL NOTICES.
TN THE DJSTK1CT COURT OF THE
J. TJNI I Kl) til aTHb t'OR IUK JtASTEUN
TltlCT Ol' PENKbYLVAM.
JN BANKKUPTCY.
The undersigned berehy glvrs notice of his appoint.
Uient as ASKlgiiee of KV i.N UALKYMPLK, of the
ii'y ol Philadelphia, county of Philadelphia, aud
nta e of Pcnusylvaula, within said DUtrlcl. who has
betD rc Judged a bankrupt upcu his own petition, by
the IUairtct Court uf siild Inntrlot.
JuHN HUBERTS, Assignee,
No. liH H. MIX I H street.
Da'fd at Philadelphia, June 24, imw, 2Tstuth8w
J-HE STEAM GENERATOR
BUM FACTUKIXG COMPANY
CAPITAL, - - S 100,000
This Company are now prepared to furnish
WIEUANli'WI'ATKftTIMPKOVEDfcTEAM
UEMEttATOlii
Of any power required, npon two weeks' notice. They
have been Introduced In tbla city, and thoroughly
tested, with moat satisfactory resuius, and are sold
CNDUR OUAKANT OV AB8ULUTE KAFETY
FKOM DSUTKUCTIVK EXPLOSION. They are
cheaper In first cost, and In expense of erection, more
economical In fuel, durable and convenient In ose
than any other apparatus for generating steam,
OFFICE OF COMPAST,
(UOOM8 Nos. I aud 6),
No. OCa WAL.NUT BTltKKT
N ELTON J. NICKERtsON, Presldeut,
KDWABD II, HRA1IAM,
Secretary and Trea are.
Hp

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