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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, September 24, 1868, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAli iENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1B68.
SPIRIT OF THE PRESS.-
EDITORIAL OPllHOKS OF TUB LKAMtlO JOttR-tAM
UPOlt CCKKBNT T0P1CH COMPILCD BVKBT
DAT FOR THE BVENIHO TBnBORAPH.
The Unreconstnietpd Stales and tlic Elcc
tiou. "
From (hi Jf. T. Time.
The joiDt resolution ah'ob iu Jaljr beoame
lair, notwithBtaudiDg to PiWdent'B veto, pro
vides that none of the; Stated whose inhabi
tants were latel in rebellion shall be allowed'
to vote in the Preflideiitial election, unless
they shall have become eutitld to representa
tion in Congress uinler vbe Reoonatruotioii
acts. It further provides th1. no eleution of
electors shall be recognized unless held tinder
the authority of the new Constitution and
Government.
The law merely expresses the logical result
of the Congressional policy in regard to States
not formally restored to the Union. States
which are out of the Union in all other mat
ters of government have no claim to be oouuted
iu the Union for the purpose of voting in the
Presidential electiou. Having no share in
national .legislation and administration, they
cannot participate in the choice cf the national
Executive. To admit them to the Electoral
College while excluded from representation in
Congress, would be to surrender the vital
principle , of the reconstruction policy; the
conclusion is so obvious, that the enautsaent
of a law affirming it was desirable only a a
means of determining in advance the standing
of Virginia, Mississippi, and Texas in the
election. Had the dec'sion been left until the
time arrived for counting votes, its promul
gation might have worn the appearance of
partisanship. Declared as it was beforehand,
it is not subject to that imputation, while
its reasonableness and consistency are loo
plain to be disputed.
The Democratic party in Mississippi, how
ever, are seriously debating the question,
whether an election shall be held in defiance
of Congressional action. The Chairman of the
Executive Committee of the State some weeks
ago insisted that the law shall be disregarded
as nnll and void, and his view has since been
adopted by the Committee, whose address on
the subject has been endorsed by the looal
Democratic press, as well as by the extremists
of Virginia. A request for the issue of a
proclamation was addressed to General Gillem,
commanding the department, who declined to
comply. . From his decision an appeal has
been made to the President and General Grant,
and as no help is expected, or could legally be
rendered by either, the Demooratio oracles are
turning their attention to the suggestion that
an election shall be held under the authority
of the Government which Congress swept
aside in the beginning of reconstruction. The
view of thjse who favor this course is dis
tinctly echoed by the Louisville Journal, the
ablest and most vigorous Democratio print in
the Southwest. Says the Journal:
"Now our opinion, au opinion ai to the recti
tudeof wb Ion we Have not even a moment's
doubt, is, that the three Slates naniHd.Vlrjiinia,
Mississippi, and Texas, without me Hligiuest
deference or regard to tue lniiimousJy piriUan
and unconstitutional l-gllntlou ot'UuDgreu.
nnd without taking the least account of the
absence of enahliiiKordeia or psy ing any atten
tion whatever to threat lssuiug from under
the Bhauow of cocwl hate and epaulettes,
should, on trie Uar of the election of freslden
Ual electors throughout the United SUtes pro
ceed to the electiou of electors just as If there
were no such thing as a Jori!jresslonal disabling
law, a fierce hat, or u shoulder-strap. Let them
elect tbelr elector, fur we do not suppose that
tuey need be deterred from the exerciNo of that
prerogative by the fear of satraps and their
bayonets. Let them by ail rneans elect tUelr
electors and leave the consequence to tiio
people of the na'lou themselves included. We
can ascure them, that, if they eliall electSey
mour and Blair electors, and if the counting of
the volts of their electors would give Seymour
and Blair a majority in the elec oral colleges of
the country, the votes of their electors will be
counted and Heymour aud Blair placed In the
Presidency and Vice Presidency, De the cost
what It may. If we will not flrht for our rights,
we have no right to havo rights or at any rate
to tt-ik about them."
The plan which the Journal thus boldly
commends was not concealed by the more out
spoken of the Southern delegates t9 the New
York Convention. Congress had not at that
time finally acted in the matter, but the in
tention to exclude the votes of unreconstructed
States was understood. In anticipation of
this proceeding, the course now advooated by
the leading Democrats of Mississippi was un
reservedly advooated, in personal intercourse,
by the very men who foroed General Blair
npon the Convention. Wade Hampton's de
claration as to the exclusive acknowledgement
of white votes pointed in the same direction.
And it la reoommended, with more or less
reserve, by others of the same stamp.
Encouragement is found in the message of
the President communicating the veto of the
resolution to whioh we have referred. In that
document, Mr. Johnson repudiated as "illegiti
mate, and of no validity whatever," the Gov
ernments organized under the aots of Congress,
and asf erted that the only votes in the South
ern States "that can be legally cast aud counted
Will be those oast in pursuanoe of the laws in
force in the several States prior to the legisla
tion by Congress npon the subjeot of recon
struction." Mr. Johnson's opinion, however,
can have no practical effaot as against the law,
and the Democrats, who, iu Mississippi or else
where, make it the basis of proceedings in re
gard to the election, will expend their energies
in vain.
It will probably be found that the duty of
the military commanders is not to be limited
to the refusal of requests like that addressed
to General Gillem. If only to prevent disturb
ance, they would seem to be required to forbid
and prevent proceedings instituted in the
name and under the pretended authority of
Governments which Congress pronounced bas
tard and unlawful. In no other way does it
seem possible to avert collisions and prevent
complications, and we doubt not that the Gene
rals in command will be instructed accordingly.
The Wcorgla Kebcls.
From ihe N, T. Tribune.
We suppose the case at Camilla to be a per
fectly clear one. Shall the late Rebels be the
only class in the Southern communities suf
fered to hold political meetings and bear
arms J That is the essential question at
issue. The Hebel admissions make it quite
as clear as the statements in our despitou
from Atlanta on Tuesday thelmportant asser
tions of which remain unchallenged in any
quarter.
"The right of the people to keep and bear
arms ehali not be infringed. " That is the
pledge of the Constitution of the United
States. "At the r-quest of the citizens, M.
O. Poor, the Shenir, with a committee of six
other citizens, went out to met the prooes
sion, and to state to them distinctly that, if
they would put down their arms, no objec
tion wonld be made to their entering the
town and holding their political meeting."
That was the gracious permission of the
paroled Itebel soldiers to the loyal citizens
of Mitchell county, Ga., aoor.rdlng to their
own elaborate self-justifioatiou. Geueral
Howard telegraphs the statements of a Re
publican in the dispersed procession, who
(ays he was expressly warned against enter
ing the town (Mi the Finglu ground tlitt "tbe
people were determined thut radioah fchonM
not speak at Camilla," ad who elsewhere I
incidentally explains that "the colored men, I
being unarmed," could not be rallied.
Hut we are willing to oorwiider the case on ,
the showing of the Rebels themselves. Here
is the understanding of the matter attained
by the Exprts, after a study of the accounts
irom its friends: '
1 "It is quite plain that If the 'ra-lloal canal
date for Congress' aud his negro moo find for
borne to invnde a town wbtcn me rslierilF soil
elllzent. bi lged thetn to leave in peaoe, no out
bleak would have happened."
"The radical candidate for Congress and hi9
negro mob" were simply a political proces
sionnot even charged to have acted thus far
otherwise than -peaceably of citizens of the
State, If tbey were armed, as is posslble; is
that a new thing at political asst mblages, or
assemblages of any sort, in Georgia T : Is there
any law, written or unwritten, by which one
citizen shall be permitted bear arms for that
he has been a Rebel and is now a paroled sol
dier, and another citizen shall be punished for
bearing arms for that he has been a Union
man and is now a Republican f 1oes it con
s i ute an "invasion" of a town in Georgia
for a peaceable procession of Union men to
enter it f an "iudasion" so dangerous as to
warrant the late Rebels in mustering to repel
it, and in pursuiug the scattered aud lleeiug
Union men five to seven miles from the plaue,
killing and wouuding indiscriminately all they
can reach f
We now have five versions of the occurrence
that of our special correspondent, published
on Tuesday; the Rebel version of the Associated
Press, given in the same paper; the formal
statement of the sheriff and other citizens of
Camilla; the accounts gathered by General
Howard and others from eye-witnesses, and
telegraphed to Washington; and a report made
by Georgians to the local officer of the Freed
men's Lureau. They all agree on the follow
ing points:
1. The Republican procession wai peaceably
approaching the town, in accordance with a
previous announcement, to attend a meeting
to be addressed by the candidate for Congress
in that district.
2. While still some distance from the town
they Were met, first by couriers, aud subse
quently by a regular committee of resident
Rebels, warning them that they could not enter
it in safety.
3. Thty refused to hi deterred by such
threats, insisted on their rights, aud, while
entering the town with their inusiu, were fired
npcu by white citizens.
4. They made little resistance, soon fled,
and weie pursued six or seven miles. They
lost in killed and wounded numbers variously
stated lrom forty, in oue Rebel account, all the
way up to a hundred in another. The rebels
lost none killed, aud the largest nuinbdr
claimed to be wounded is six.
These are the facts admitted on all hands.
Can the most prejudiced man put any but oue
honest construction upon them? It was de
liberately determined that a Republican meet
ing should not be held in Camilla. "Carpet
baggers," "scalawag," and "loil niggers"
were to be taught that Rebels ruled in that
bailiwick, and none but true Democratio senti
ments were tolerated.
The Rtbel accounts, in their impotent and
impudent attempts to conceal this, fall into
sufficiently distressing difficulties. They admit
that "a citizen," i. e., a white Rebel, fired the
first shot, but plead iu extenuation that he was
drunk. They insist that they were themselves
legally and virtuously unarmed, but admit iu
the very next, Hue that the moment the
negroes returned this shot, 'immediately
about twenty of our citizens sprang
to their arms and fired into the
column, by which two negroes were
killed and an uukuowH number wounded."
1 hey profess only the must lauiVlike dispo
sition and the most perfect willingness for
Republican meetings to bo held, but iu the
next sentence regret that only negroes were
killed, and that the white men escaped "wi'.h
but little injury," t. e., with only a bullet-hole
in the leg of the "scalawag" candidate for
Congress. They profess fears that the negroes
wonld have become "an infuriated mob," and
explain that therefore they got up a mob
themselves. They complain that the negroes
"vastly outnumbered" them, and were fully
armed, while they were "wholly unarmed,"
and then exhibit, as the result of this danger
ous state of affairs, 100 negroes, more or less,
killed and wounded, with a beggarly loss of
"six wounded" on their own Bide.
A flimsy exouse is set up by the Sheriff
and other citizens of Camilla that, because
the negroes were armed, Governor Bullock's
late proclamation warranted their forcible dis
persion. Let us see. The only sentences in
that proclamation referring to the subjeot are
as follows:
"No authority has been granted by the Exe
cutive for the format lou of armed or unarmed
organizations of any kind or character, and t he
dillllug or exercising in military tactics with
aims ol any organized body of men wiihin this
State, except tue army of the United States, Is
unauthorized, unlawful, and against the peace
and good order of the Slate, aud must be im
mediately suspended."
The following extraots from the Constitution
and the Code are reoommended to the thought
ful consideration of the public:
"SccMon 5. The right of the people to appeal
to the Courts, to petlllou Gov. ramout in all
matters, aud peaceably to Assemble for the con
siOeiuiiou ol any mailer, shall never be Im
paired. "Section 11. The right of the people to keep
and bear arms shall not be Infrlogrd."
It is not pretended that the dispersed pro
cession was drilling or exercising in military
tactics. That is all that Governor Bullock
forbade. Admitting the Rebel statement that
the negroes were armed, wherein do we find
them differing from the Rebel themselves,
save that the negroes carried their arms
openly and the Rebels had theirs concealed r
Does the Sheriff ot Mitchell county happen to
know which of these acta it is that the laws
forbid?
But why should the negroes not be armed ?
lias not John Forsvth said: "Orgauize a
Ku-Klux Klan whenever they orgauize a
league; meet friendship and peace as Chris
tians should, meet midnight leaguers and
enemies as manhood dares."
Were the negroes incapable of understand
ing the plain language ol the Meridian Mer
cury? It said:
"With the skull and nrnta-hones of the Most
cause' before us, we will sweir thu this is a
white man's governtneut. We must make the
reyrouuders'and we aro the men we were when
we held Mm Id at Jeot bond ige. and mtke him
feel that when fm oearaone ceases t be a. virtue
he has aroused u po wer that will o mtrol him or
destroy him."
Were the uegros, or th accompanying
"carpet baggers," or even the '-scalawag, "
to blame if they thought Mr. II well Cobb
meant a little of what he eaid at Atlanta ?
'Kbemie they were Id war, enemies they
continue to he In peace. Iu war. we drew the
fcwmii and bade tueui deflation. Iu nonoe. we
tatl.tr up the mannooit of the Snnth, and rais
ing the banner of constitutional equality, and
gathering around It the good men of the North
as wen as tne houtti, we hurl into tholr teeth
to day the same defiance, and bid them come
on to the struggle. We aro ready for It, If you
are. Young men, in whose veins the red blood
of youth runs so quickly, come Come one aud
all, and let us suuioh the old banner from the
Oust and give It again to the breeza, and, if need
he, tot lie god of buttles, and striae one more
honest blow for constitutional liberty."
The good cause will go forwarl. The ont
rages and atrocities that continue the 'desola
tion of the south will end with tin election of
Grant. Murder, cannot delay, nor slander of a
feeble and perseoated race prevent, that oon
enmmatlon. But we beg Northern voters to
observe who it is that seeks to profit by these
agencies. . Other allies of the same party onoe
sought similar aid in a more oonspiouous in
stance. Their leader was Mr. Wilkes Booth.
General Dix's Letter.
Prom I ht IT. r. World.
The American Minister at Paris has writ
ten a ranoorous letter, bitterly denouncing
and abusing Governor Seymour, aud laying
bare a heart ulcerating with spite aud envy.
The letter, by a transparent subterfuge, pur
ports to be private, but its whole tenor and
composition show that it was written for the
American newspapers. We do not condemn
its publication, tor an open calumniator is a
less blameworthy and less dangeroui charac
ter than a secret backbiter. We do not object
to the publioity, but to the affectation that
that publioity was not intended. If it were
proper to make such an assault at all, it should
be made with manly openness. The false
pretence of privaoy, and real intention to pub
lish, put the writer in a dilemma between a
meditated stab in the dark, and a con?clou4
violation of propriety in appearing before the
public in a character that does not become
him.
We adopt the more favorable supposition,
and relieve General Dix of the Imputation of
being a snake in the grass. We assume that
he intended that his vituperative letter should
be printed in the public journals. We have
then the ppeotaole, to whioh we can reoolleot
no parallel, of an American Minister to a
foreign Government taking sides, with bit
ter ostentation, in a party contest at
home. Mr. Adams, who haj lately returned
from England, has a j aster sense of pro
priety, lie feels that he oannot, without a
violation of decorum, embark in this party
contest, and assigned that as a reason for ab
staining from party topics in responding to
the welcome of his admiring fellow-citizens.
How infinitely stronger are the reasons for ab
staining while a minister is actually serving
abroad in his diplomatic capacity I The true
sentiment on this and kindred subjeots was
wel' expressed by Mr. Webster iu a Bpeech iu
Congress during the war of 1812, when he
said that all our party differences ought to
cease at the water's edge. A genuine patriot
ism oan accept no other rLle; and hitherto,
as far as we can recollect, our foreign
ministers and our naval officers serving
abroad have practised the wise reticence
whioh i-atrloiisui aud decorum enjoin. Geue
ral Dix is the first to forget that he lithe
representative of thn whole country, aud to
exhibit in one of our great missions the fierce
acrimony of party politics. Tue exouse whioh
he oilers for this breach of propriety is a
statement (a statement whioh we have never
seen, and whioh nobody who knows him
would credit) that he desired the election of
Mr. Seymour. If such a sUtemeut has beeu
made, and General Dix .desired to contradict
it, he might easily have made the contradic
tion in a more d.plomatto, or at least in a
more decent aud considerate manner. He
could have disclaimed tin imputation with
out such a tirade of vituperation. The
assigned reason is only a pretext; for the
lettrr makes it too evident that its author
is glad of an opportunity to pour out the
rancor which has long been festering in his
breast towards Governor Seymour. There
are hundreds of men as virtuous and respsot
able as General Dix who do not think it in
cumbent on them to make such aggressive
demonstrations againt Governor Seymour. If
patriotism inspired this attack, why have we
had nothing similar from Chief Justice Chase,
or Charles Francis Adami, or Reverdy John
eon, aud utlior men or lib-e nlau'llng T 1'Qe
difference between such men and General Dix
is that they have no personal hostility to
Governor Sej'mour, while General Dix har
bors old grudges which he takes this occasion
to display. General Dix is a New Yorker
many years the senior of Mr. Seymour. He
has always been a greedy place-hunter; he
has, in his time, encountered many mortify
ing disasters, and. not the least of these is
his constant failure to get the Democratic
party to think him a good candidate for
the Presidency. He has seen a younger
Democrat in his own State eclipse his popu
larity and bear away the honor for whioh he
has so long pined and aspired. He is accord
ingly as fair a judge of Mr. Seymour's oharao
ter and publio career as a neglected spinster is
of the beauty and manners of the reigning
belle by whom she is thrown into the shade.
General Dix is mortified that his name was
never talked of, nor even thought of, in con
nection with the Democratic nomination. It
galls him beyond endurance that he should be
of so little account in a party to which he has
always professed to belong.
As regards the matter of General Dix's letter,
there is nothing in it which everybody has not
seen a hundred times ia the Tribune, and a
hundred times replied to and exploded by
Demooratio journals. There is nothing new
but its utteranoe by General Dix, who
merely attests his personal hatred of Mr.
Seymour, but contributes no new ideas to the
canvass.
TlieSIinlule in the Southern Stales.
Pon. the A. r. Herald.
Everything appears to be getting into the
worst kind of a muddle in the South. Tennes
foe is in an almost inextricable muddle about
Krownlow's militia, the violent doings of the
Ku-Klux Klans, the distrust and distraction of
people in remote districts, the fierce struggle
lor power among the partisan leaders, aud a
generally uncivilized condition of things all
over the State. The President has been
appealed to to send down United States troops
to preserve the publio peace. Ihis he has
agreed to do, and we suppose we shall in a
short time hear of something like the restora
tion of order in Tennessee out of the present
chaos.
North Carolina is in a muddle about her
State bonds and the general maladministra
tion of the civil law. With Holden, a radical
of the Brownlow pattern, to lead the ultras,
there is very little courtesy or common de
cency to be expected in the oampaign going
on. But North Carolina does not seem to be
quite as bad off as South Carolina. There
the reign of disorder seems complete. Depu
tations have been sent to Washington com
posed of her first citizens appealing for pro
tection from the depredations of bauds of
armed negroes.
Think of a proud, imperious South Caroli
nian craving from the "rotten old wreck of
a government" at Washington defense against
the "cussed nigger 1" South Caroliua is like
a beautiful coquette with a favorite lover.
One day she does not like the military, and
dismisses them; but the next the brutal
blacks menace her with outrage, she regrets
ber decision, prays for the return of the mili
tary, and implores their protection. In one
case the blaiks, it will be seen, have just
taken the law into their own hands, and were
about administering justice to oue of their
color according to their own notions of right
and wrong, when they were interfered with
and prevented. Armed bauds of negroes are
roaming about the country, and have regular
organizations on the islands ndjateut to
Charleston. In giving them iu their ignorant
cotidition the right to vote, they have bien
ltP.d Ihe vk tilus oi the ll iUe'rie.s, bribrii,
L
temptations, and triokeries of every soulless
wretch of a politician who would use them to
attain a political position whioh he has no
Inst, native, or Christian right to possess.
The negro thereupon conceives himself to be
allowed to run wild in his career of riot and
licentiousness, to defy the laws, insult white
people, and be shielded in his crimes and inso
lence by the whole power of the nation.
inis is not only true of South Carolina, but
of every other Southern State where the radi
cals have been using their inftaennn to retain
their grasp npon the reins of government, with
us fat money bags and untold stores of
plunder, rather than to restore peaca ani
order and to establish a new. a substantial.
aud well-adjusted system of looal authority.
Georgia nas got nerseit into a curious muddle.
It appears that the radicals have been eznnl.
ling negroes from the Legislature, whereat the
coiorea population have beoome indignant
ana are aoout holding a State convention to
deliberate upon what they shall next do. If
the Jfemocratio leaders in Georgia manage
rightly and they are sharp and audacious
enough to do anything-they oan turn this
negro expulsion business to their aooount,
and, by dividing the negro vote, defeat the
radicals and easily carry the State for the
Democracy. The latest reports from Georgia
represent a horrible and bloody muddle of
whites and blaoks, in whioh it is difficult to
ascertain at present who are the wrong
doers. Probably both parties. A proposition
made by the radicals in the Legislature to call
upon the President for United States troops to
preserve the peaoe was voted down, making
another muddle precisely the opposite of that
which prevails in South Carolina on the same
point. Alabama will always be in a muddle
so long as her Demooraoy are led by the light
of the firebrands now at their head; but they
are gradually beooming toned down anl are
not half bo ferocious, but yet, perhaps, more
wily than they were three weeks alter their
return home from the Tammany Convention.
The negro vote seems to be inclining -Democratic-ward
in Alabama, while in Arkansas the
latest report is that "intelligent negroes are
going against the carpet-baggers." This is a
good sign. In Louisiana the Demoorats are
making superhuman exertions, and may be
assisted by the Warmouth muddle, about
negro processions, negro outrages, negro mur
ders, white persecutions, and the like, whioh
is disturbing the radicals. Tiorida seems to
be luxuriating quietly among" her orange
groves, now aud then exoited by some looal
muddle about offioes and carpet-baggers.
Poor old Virginia, with Mississippi and Texas,
are in a muddle beoause thy are left out in
the cold. In the case of Virginia, however,
there appears to be a muddle amng a portion
of the blacks, who have held a convention
and passed resolutions declaring a want of
confidence in the radical Executive Commit
tee, a muddle which may prove serviceable to
the Democrats when the proper time atrives.
On the whole, we have reason to still think
that our prophecy that a majority of the
bouthern States can be carried for the Demo
cratio candidates will be fulfilled. But it will
not affect the general result. The North and
West will settle that. Nothing at this mo
ment visible in the canvass oan prevent the
election of General Grant. But by working
zealously in the South the Democrats can
secure and organize a number of States there
which will form a splendid nucleus around
which they can rally in the grand struggle for
the restoration of their party topower in 1872.
RELIEF ASSOCIATION.
OTIC
E.
Oirim or -run nAnnTan uw-wi-k-BATIVK
BELIEF ASSOCIATION,
Ne. 432 WALNDT STREET, PHILADELPHIA.
Objkct. The object ot this Association Is to secure
acasu my men L wiihin forty daysatler tbe death ol a
member of aa muuy Qol ars as there are uiemberH in
the cIrrs to loch lie or sbe belong, to tan lieira.
H-iLClsTKATlUjN; (Jlttta "A," baa Giuu male uueiuuura.
A member attH. The Asaociauou nu over wiibui
lorty days tsw to toe widow or lieim, and tbe
remaiDiug memoerg forward witbiu thirty days one
dollar ana leu ceuis eauii to the Association to re
imburse it i'aMng to send ttiU bum, Uiey ior.nl. to
the isscclaUon all moneys paid, and the Association
ttupplks a new member to nil the place of the retiring
one,
lh.X CLASSES PORMEN AND TEN FOB
tr.ASSKs. In Class A all persona between the ages
ot 16 aud 2(J yearn; in ulaes B, all persons between the
ai:e ol auu 26 years; lu ciss V, all petsous bu
tweeu the sues ot 25 and 30 years: iu Cabs D, all per
sons between tlieakeoot so and Kfi years; iu Clans K ail
persons between the ages of 85 ana 4u yers; in uuss
If , all persons between the ages ol 40 aud 46 years; in
Class U, ail persons betwevu the ages of 46 aud 5U
ears', lu Uas" H, all persons between ihe ages of 50
und SS years; in class 1 all persons between tue ages
ol 66 and w years; lu Ulass K, all persons between tue
agtsot buaudfoyeurs. The tlssses for women are
the same as above. i&cu class Is limited to 5J)0
numbers. K&ch persuu pas stz dollars upon be
coming a neruoer and oue dollar and tea cuius
entli lime a member dies balougiug to the aaiua
ulass he or bhe la a member of. Oue dollar
goes direct to tbe heirs, leu cents to pay for
collecting. A member of one clast uanuot be asiess-td
this dollar II a memberot auother class dies, lacn
elbss is independent, Having no connection with auy
oilier. To become a member it is necessaryTo uy
Hi x Dollurs Into tue treasury at tbe time of making
ihe application; to pay Oue Dollar and Teu Cents
luio me treasury upou the death of each and auy
member of theciats to which he or she belongs,
within thirty days alter date ol uoilce of such death;
to give your &aiue. Town, County, Mtale, Occupation
etc.: aieu a mtdlcal ccrtul jaie. livery minister Is
an ken to act as ageut, aud will be paid tegular rates
ODm. Cucuiars win explalu fully lu regard to
lunris and Invisuuents. Circulars giving full expla
nation and blank tortus ol application willbHs.int
on requestor upou a personal application at the onl.e
of the Association.
OHUeTEES AND CFFICEK3.
E WcMCRDY. Pieiue-u
E. T. WH1U11T (President Star Metal Co.) Vice
rrf slueul.
W. & CAltMAN (President Stuy voaut Baulc), Trea-
LEVv'IS'sANDERB, Secretary.
L. H. ivAfUAM (President National Trust Co.)
J). H, lnjNCOJJH, Wo. 8 Pine street.
The trust funds will be held In trnt by the
fi'ATTOSAL TKU8T COM f AMY.
. . o. 8i ilroaditay, Mew York.
Agents wanted for this city.
Adorns
W liXIAM LTPPINCOTT. Gmral Aent,
Manhattan Co-operative r.eiier .vsHcciauan,
9 2!ui No iSi WALNU 1' Btrbet, Pul:aJ.
SEWING MACHINES.
GREAT
ABlfiUICAN COMBINATION
BUTTOA-llOLE OYEJiSEAMIKU
AMD
SEWING MACHINE,
Its YYuudcrful Popularity Conclusive l'ruol
of its Ureat Merit.
The Increase In the demand for this valuable
Machine has been TENFOLD during the last seven
months of Its first year before the puoilo.
This grand and surprising success is unprecedented
In the history ot bewlug Maculuos, aud we teal ruily
warranted lu claiming that
IT HAS MO EliUAL,,
Being absolutely tbe best
' FAMILY MACHINE
IN THE WORLD,
And Intrinsically tbe cbeapest for It Is really to
Mw.iiU.eo combined in one. fcoid at the
218 & 220
S. FRONT ST.
A
218 I 220
S. FRONT ST.
Sr C O
OFFER TO TUB .TRADB, IN LOTS, , v
FINE RYE AM) BOURBON WIIISKIE 3, I BOND
Of 18045, 1800, 1807, unci 1808. ' ,
AIS0, FEIE FI1VE ME AND BOURBON WUISRIES, "j
Of GREAT AGE, ranging from 1804 to 1845.
Liberal ooatracta will b entered Into for lot, in bond t Distillery, of thU years' -nauniactnrr.i
EDUCATIONAL.
EILDON SEMINART (LATH LINWOUD
HALL), opposite tbe York Koad Station, N irib
Pennsylvania. Itailroad.seveu mile lrom Puliadel
phla. 'Ihe Fifteenth Besalon of Miss CARR'S Bilect
Boarding Bcliool lor Yonng Ladles will commen ;e at
the above beaumul and healthful situation, bepiem
ber 16. 188. 1 r
Jucreased accommodations having been obtained
by change ot residence, there are a few vacancies,
wh ten may be tilled by early application to the Prin
cipal, bhoemakertown P, O., Montgomery County,
Circulars, and every Information regarding: the
school, given at the Ofllee ot JAY COOKK B CO..
Bankers, No, 114 B. THLHD Btreet, Philadelphia, or as
above. 8 m'im
ST. FKANCIS' COL LEU K, IN CARE OP
Franciscan Brothers, LORhiTTO, Cambria
County, fa", four miles trora Cressun. Chartered In
1K6S, with privilege ol conferring degrees. Location
the most healthy lu the State, the Allegheny Moun
tains being proverbial lor pure water, bracing air, aud
picturesque scenery, hciiolantlo year commence 1st
ol beplember aud ends litUu of June. Land Surveying
apparatus lurulshed gratis, bliideius admitted from
eight years to manhood. Board aud tuitinu. payable
In advance, iU0 per session.. Ciassicul aud modern
language extra, 1 10.
lielerences flight Bev. Bishop Wood, Philadel
phia; Bight llev. Bishop Lomoimc. Pittsburg; and
Kev. T, tt. Khj lioldn, Lorelto. Music (plauo a.id use
of Instrument), 2o. 81a lux
gTEVENSDALE INSTITUTE.
BOARDING SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES.
Terms Dcard, Tuition, etc. per scholastic jer, .00.
KO EXTRAS.
Circulars at Men'.rs. Fairbanks & Ewlng's, No, 715
CHI-fciiUT dtreei; also at Messrs. T. B. Peiersoa b
Brothers' ,Ko. 806 CH&SNUT Street.
AdilrCbS, personally or by note.
. FOSTER BKOWNK, Principal,
JOSthmtf
fkm'h Araboy, N. J.
pTAMILTOa INST1TUIE DA AND UJaRD-lug-echool
for Young Ladles. No. 8310 CIIE-1NUT
Street, Philadelphia, will reopen on MONDAY, Sep
tember 7, ltx8. For terms, eto., apply to
8 Mtf PHILIP A. OREOAR, A. M., Principal.
TAKE M. HARPER WILL REOPEN IIER
School for Boys and Girls, No. lra CUhSMUT
Street, September (ninth month) 21st,
Ar plication for admission can be made at tbe
room on the 17th and Hih, from 10 10 ll o'o'ock, or
alter the school commences. Old liu
CHESNDT STREET FEMALE SEMINARY,
PHILADELPHIA.
Miss HoNSUY and Miss DILL AYE will reopen
tbeir Boarding aud Day bcuool (Thlriy-seveulo.
cession), September 16, at No. 1813 (jhesnut street.
Particulars from circulars. ( 10 to 10 1
ACAULMY OF TUB PROTESTANT EPI3
COPAL CHUnOH, iXJUoT aud JUSIPIlR
Bireetu.
The Autumnal Session opened en SEPTEMBER 7.
jAMi.d W. ROBINS, A, M
B 7 mwf4w Head Matr.
MISS ELIZA W. SMITH'S FRENCH AND
KSULlOrL HUAlloliSU AND DAY BOliOOL
iOil YoUU LA IU hH,
will reopen ong JMieSuemugri. s a sw
C CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, DEAN STREET,
J above bPMl'cib
The duties ot tuo Classical Inttltute wl'l be resumed
September 7. J. W, FAIKnii. U. I.
a 27 lm Principal.
LAW DEPARTMENT, UNIVERSITY OF
Pf!.NN oliViiii l A. A term will commence ou
'1 H llJiHUA v . Ojiuber 1. introductory by frolesaor
K. SPKACKlt M 1LLH.K, at 8 o'clock P. M. U i t
THE MISSES JOHNSTON'S BOARDING
and Lay School ior Young Ladies, No. ujtf
bPKUCis btrett, will reopen (1). V.) eepteoioer
1. sal 2ia
THE MISSES ROGERS, NO. 1914 PINE
Street, will reoinu meir Mcnnnl ,ir V.m.u
Lkdles aud Children, on MONDAY, beptember 7.
, Vltutlislm K fe J.BOUKK9.
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION.
jISS JENNIE T. BECK, TEACHER OF
PIANO-FORTE, No. 746 FLO BID A Street, between
Eleventh and Twelfth. below Fltzwater. 94
ROFESSOIi E. BARILl WILL COMMENCE
his Singing Lessons on the 14th of tteplember.
Address No. 1102 UHESflUr St.eet. O'rculari can
be obtained in all Music Stores. 9 7m w f 1 m
SIO. P. EONDINELLA, TEACHER OF SING
1NU, Private lesnons aud clauses. Residence.
No. 808 B. THIRTEENTH Street. 819 1m
PIANO. MR. V. VON AMSBERQ HAS RE
Burned hla .Lessons, No. 264 aouih i6tu at. U16Uu
rp BOWERS. TEACHER OF PIAMO AND
JL blNUINU, NO. 6C8H. TitN'TH Street. 9 11 If
MILLINERY GOODS.
-JJMOIITII SIltEi;!' IUimOX Sl'OIiE,
No. 107 N. EIGHTH STREET,
Four slooia above ARCH Street.
I have now open for the
FALL AND WINTER SEASON,
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF
BONNET RIBBONS, VELVETS,
TRIMMING RIBBONS, SATINS,
SATIN RIBBONS,
VELVET RIBBONS,
LACES,
FLOWERS,
FEATHERS,
SILKS,
CRAPES,
HATS,
BONNETS,
FRAMES,
To which I would kindly call the attention of
the ladles.
JULIUS SICHEL,
No. 107 N. EIGHTH Street.
P. S. No trouble to show gooflg. 0 22 tuths
GAS FIXTURES.
Q
AS FIXTURE B.
MiSKKY, MERRILL & THAOKARA.
No. 718 yUWNUT Street.
iuannfaotnrers of baa Fixtures, Lamps, eto., eto..
would call the attention of the publio to their large anal
eteaant assortment of Uas Chandeliers. Peudama,
liracketa. tto. They also lntroduoa aas-ulnes Inm
dwolllnirs aud pnbilo buildings, aud attend to extend)
las, altering, and repairing gas-plpea.
. All work warranted. I UJ
Ct r.of ELEVENTH aud CIIESNUV
PHILADELPHIA
S Wttuihtf
JOHN CRUMP.
CARPENTER AND BUILDER,
NIIOPBJt Ml. am LODUII STBEKT, AM
0. 1783 CUUiNVT ST BEET,
121 PHILADELPHIA
WILLIAM B. GRANT,
Nf .8 8. DKLaWAKK Avenue, Philadelphia,
AUUNT JTOH
n.-r.-nfs Gunpowder, Ketined Nitre, Charcoal, Etc,
. W. I ukei it l o.'s rhoco'ate t)co. and Hroroa.
f t kei, isms, A Co.'a Yellow MwuJ Bueatulng,
Knltr and (V'l. yjjj
WINES, ETC.
LUMBER.
186a
BPRTJCB JOIST.
BPKUCK JOIST.
H tiki LOCK.
HUAILOCK.
186a IVttiSSSSfc . iqiJo
Di-LAWAiUC FLOOMLNui
amh floor! not
Walnut fluoking.
FLORIDA STi,P bUAJWB.
IQfrO W A LN U T RDS, AN D PLAN K ln,"
aOUO. Walnut jid?andpl1nk 18fifi
WALN UT BOARD?, AU
WALNUT PLANK.
000. UNDHJtlAKKJS' LUALoaJt Ififift
WALNUT AND PINK.
Ififtft tjKASONKD POPLAR. 1 o -
1O0O. bi.SONJi.D CHJOIRY, 186a
WEITB OAKHPLANK AKD BOARDS,
lfttett CIuAR UOX MAKERS' i
SPANISH CKDAR BOX WARDS UO
FOR BALK LOW.
1ftQ CAROLINA SCANTLING. lonn
XOOO. OALOL1NA H. T. SILLS 1868.
NORWAY SCANTLING XJU-I
Ififift CEDAR BHINGLK9. inin
AOUO. 0YPRKHSSHINGLK8. 1868.
AtAULiC, BROTHER A CO
111 N0.g-rX)bOCTHfcltrit.
DEBICCAT1D COT JISH FOR FAMILY USB.
OSE POUND EQUAL TO FOUR POUJND3 BA W
FISH.
Warranted to keep In any climate for any nnrahar
of years. Great saving li, fie ghi.iehrink.gr, aud de.
ray. One-third Ol a pound iu.kts a meal lor uv.n
pei sons.
Kample cat es 21 and 48 pounds each.
Mulu by all Or cere, auu uiauuia -lured hy the BOS
TON AND PHILADELPHIA SALT Fi8j COj
PANV, LKUUFH PLAt K. rarM iott COA-
Blttuttislua No.ti Nor h feKOOND Bt., Ph 1 1 id.
TATEMEl) JULY 7, JSCS.
PHIIADKLPHIA EAST INDIA
COCOANUT COMPANY,
TRADE MARK. LEDiJKR Pt-ACB
Kcar o. 52 Sorlh SECOXD St., riiiluda.,
MANUFACTURE Kls
PREPARED COCOANUT. FOR PIE3, PUDDINGS.
CAKES, BTQ. KTO. (9 IB tnthalm
OFFICE OF COLLECTOR INTERNAL
.. . BtVEwUR. SECOND Dlal'RlOT, PJMNSYL.
AMA, No. m DOCK btreet,
. , HATUBDAY, Sent. 96, 18M.
Will be told at Publio Pale, ai o'clock P. M., ou the
premlres. Twenly. third aud Buuth streets, the fix.
Hires ol a Distillery, consisting of three Copper Sthis.
three Worms, one Douhler, li t of empty Hogsheads,
etc., seized under warraut of d isiralut, and to l sold
as the property of Michael Murphey, for United
blates internal Revenue taxes dun and unpaid.
ia lot JOHN H. D1KHL, Collector,
B. KINKELIN. AFTER A RESIDENCE
and practice of thirty years at the Northwest
coiner of Third and UnlO" atreeis, has lately re-niov-d
to Hi inn Kl.iiVKaiH btreet, between. MAR.
LeT'nd CHEbNUT.
uisBuperioni? in me prompt ard perfect care ol
all rtceot, chronic, looal, and coimtltuiloual alfeo
tinr s of a special uatuu), is proverbial.
Dif eases of the skin, appearing in a hundred dif
ferent forms, totally eiadlcali d: mental aud physical
Wftknehs. and all nervou debilities S4!!iillllcally
ann ..ccea-imU treated, Ollioe houis Iruiu t A. M.
to 9 P. M,
JAL1E8 CAR8TAIR8. JR.,
Kos. 12G WALJiUT and 21 GRANITE Sts
IMPORTER OF
Braiidics, Yt Incs, tiln, Olive Oil, Etc Etc,
AND
COMMISSION MEIIOIIANTJ
IOR THE SALE OF
IXKE OLD EYE, 1YIIEAT, AXD BOUK.
HON WHISKIES.
18m:
1 fidR BEABONED CLEAR PINK. ,
lOOO. BEAISONKD CLE.H?iSS! ftfifl
CHOICE PATTERN P1?K
BPANtoH CEDAR, Fo I PAEttlSH I
Red cedar. "-ttNH.l
"JJKITED STATLS BUILDERS' MILL,"
Kos. 21, 20, and 28 S. FIFTEEATfl St.,
PHILADELPHIA.
CSLER & BROTHER,
- S)HC1II1IIU OF
WOCD MOULDINGS, BRACKETS. STAIR BALU8
TEKS, NEWELL PObTo, GENERAL TURN-
ING AND SCROLL WORK. Era
The largest assortment of WOOD MOULDINGS in
this city constantly on hand 9IJm
T. P. GALYI1V & CO.,
LirDER CCiVMISSJON MERCHANT8
S1IACKA3IAX0X STREET TflLAKl',
BELOW SLOATS MILLS,
(BO-CALLKD), PHILADELPHIA,"
AGENTS FOR BOUTHERN AND EASTERN Mann,
faclurersot VELLOW PiNE aud bPRUCKTiMBEB
HOARDS, etc., shall be hai py to furnish orders at
Wholesale rates, deliverable at any accessible port
tunvfuvul rvT.'V,,."K,,"id oa ba1 ' O"' wharf
SOUTHERN FLOOjktlN'G, bOANlLIiNG. BH1N,
ULEh, EAWTEPN LA THrtU;KEl7B-BLATS
fcPRUCB. HEMLOCK. heLecT MICHIGAN AMD
CANADA PLANK AND BOABDS. ANL i HACL
MATCO BHIP-KNEES. ' 1 81stutb
ALL OF WHICH WIU BE DEUTEBEO
AT AS Y PARI OF Illli 1IT PUQMPTLT,
l'ATEMEl) SEriEMUEll 8,
BOSTON AND PHILADELPHIA
SALT FISH COMPANY.

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