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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, October 28, 1868, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAlL.y EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 13G8.
SPIRIT OF TJII1 PRESS.
EDITORIAL OriKIOHS OF THB HADING J0DRSAL8
CPOH CCBRBNT TOPICS COMPILBD KVKBT
DAT FOB TBI BVEN1HQ TKLffiJRAPO.
The Urcnt Ir inocraHc jJlumlcr The New
Ago of Meant and tlic Telegraph.
Jrrom (A If. T. Herald.
The Demooratio flagship, bearing the broad
pennant of 8eymonr and Blair, is "hard oq"
among the breaker! of r-outuem reoonstrno
tion. The Tammany platform on this eubjeot
flatly declares all the legislation of Congress
and all the reconstruction proceedings under
this leginlation "unconstitutional, revolution
ary and void," and General lilair, through
the' Southern wiDg of the Convention, was
made the Demooratio candidate for Vice
President mainly because of his Brodhead
letter, in which he declared that if he were
President he would assume the responsibility,
and compel the army to undo ita usurpations
in the South, etc.
Here was the great blunder of the Tammany
Convention. Here was a rare opportunity
wilfully and very stupidly thrown away. Upon
the general issue of the shortcomings, waste
ful extravagances, unparalleled corruptions,
exoesslve taxations, etc, of the party in
power, the Democracy, with Mr. Chase as their
candidate, had the succession within their
grasp. Unfortunately for the party, however,
the Convention was too largely composed of
the Northern JJonrbon Copperhead and old
Southern State sovereignty elements of the
echool of Calhoun, and the Southern wing, as
before the war, held the balance of power. And
eo it was that in the Tammany platform, and
In the nomination of General lilair the De
mocracy were made to fight over again their
battle of 180'4 npon the leading idea that the
War was a failure.
Thus the Tammany platform and ticket were
exaotly what the Republicans wanted; for
they could ask for nothing better than the
battle of 18G4 over again, combined with the
great issue of the constitutional amendment
fourteen, npon which they swept the country
in 18o(i against Johnson's plan of Southern
restoration. And here we are drawn to a
Mobile letter published in Monday's Herald,
giving some account of a conversation of
Howell Cobb with our correspondent in Au
gust last on the political situation. From this
letter it appears that Cobb, originally a sup
porter of amendment fourteen, had changed
Lis mind to the most decided opposition, and
(under the inspiration, no doubt, of the Tam
many Convention) demanded nothing less
than the "abandonment of every measure
(adopted by Congress) of reconstruction and
a recognition of every Southern as an
equal of every Northern State." As for this
amendment fourteen, "he considered it the
most dangerous enoroaohmint upon the re
served rights of the States of any yet at
tempted by the party in power." lie thought
the prospeot for Seymour's eleotion was bad
that the revolution must reach its climax, and
expressed a high opinion of Mr. Bennett's
politioal sagacity. But the most emphatically
expressed opinion of the late oonsplouons
Georgia politician was this that, alter all,
"the South will be, an independent repub
lic;" that "Jeff. Davis truly said that although
our cause is lost, the priuoiplea for which we
fought can never die."
From all this it will be seen that the mana-
fers of the Tammany Convention and the
outhern Democratic leaders are still delving
among the fossils of a past age. Abandon
these Southern reconstruction laws as "revo
lutionary and void?" Has Congress, then,
no power over a rebellious State alter disarm
ing it r II not, teen tue suojugaiou tnatc, uu
ita reserved rig lit 0, may go out again to-morrow,
and the war was a failure. The constitu
tional amendment fourteen is an enoroaohment
upon the reserved rights of the States as they
were before; but we cannot see how it is to be
set aside except by another amendment or
another civil war. It cannot be abandoned
otherwise, for, with the official voucher of the
Secretary of State affixed, we apprehend that
it has paesed beyond the jurisdiction of the
Supreme Court. ' Having made up their oaie
npon theBe issues, it needed no prophet to tell
the consequences to the Demooratio party and
their Presidential ticket of Seymour and Blair
against Grant and Colfax.
The idea, too, that the South will yet be an
independent republic is a fallaoy of the epoch
before the deluge. Within the last, twenty
years the telegraph, railways, and steamships
have introduced a new testament among the
nations and peoples of the earth. The old
theory of a confederation of petty sovereign
States is supplanted, and everywhere these
new political foroes of steam and eleotrioity,
together with universal education and an inde
pendent press, are operating to centralization.
We have one example of this in the unification
of Italy, another in the unification of the
North German States, and yet another in the
amendments of our Federal Constitution
sinoe the Rebellion against the pernicious
dogmas of State sovereignty and reserved
State rights; and these are but the beginnings
of this new dispensation. With the telegraph
the cities of New York and San Francisco are
brought into immediate rapwi t, and with the
railway the people of New York oity and St.
Louis areas sear to each other as were New
York and Saratoga fifty years ago. The
splendid turnpikes radiating from the Capi
tol were one suoret of the commanding power
of the Roman empire; but with his railwars
and telegraphs the strength of Napoleon III
at Paris reduces to a bagatelle the power of
Augustus.
In a word, we are in the midst of a new age
of centralization under these tremendous cen
tralizing forces of steam and electricity, and
powerful central governments embra ing hun
dreds of thousands and millions of square
miles of territory will take 0t!ie placed of
petty municipalities and States and rickety
confederations of incongruous little sovereign
ties. The sooner onr Demooratio politicians,
Nenh and South (but especially of the South),
begin to build npon this idea the sooner will
they btRYu to see daylight.
Sejiuonr'a Insluceritj.
From the N. Y. Timet.
A man aspiring to the PreaHUnoy should,
at least, be truthful and honest in his inter
course with friends and the public. The
frankness and sincerity of General Grant are
among his qaalifioations for the office. He is
known to have a mind of his own, and to ba
candid and outspoken in the statement of his
opinions and purposes. What he says he
means; what he promises to do, everybody is
Bare he will perform. Mr. Seymour, on the
contrary, is an impersonation of insincerity.
He was hollow and hypocritical in his posi
tion as Governor during the war. While pro
fessing to aid the Government, he did all he
could to embarrass it. Pretending to desire
the preservation of the Union, he took the
Bide of Vallandigham and the traitors at the
nintHnor for its destruction.
If a Hunnnnnitrl t lift nbinct of the war while
feigning solicitude for it3 suooess, derided it
as a failure on the very eve of its triumph, and
. 1 . .1 .1. ii.
Las ever since endeavored 10 irustraie us re
sults. His whole publio course in this re
spect wears the aspect of treachery.
The same characteristio 1 apparent ia Lis
struggle for the Tresidenoy. He flgored as a
friend of Mr. Chase's nomination, and was
instrumental in defeating it. He disclaimed
all iiuaira tnr v.a nvm nomination, and pro
tested that he would not like it, then intrigued
to secure it, and shed crocodile tears beoause
his point had been oarried. He insisted upon
a compromise platform before the Con
vention, and endorsed a platform constructed
by Rebels and Copperheads. The humiliat
ing spectacle may have been occasioned by
weakness, but it was weakness so near akin
to duplicity that none could distinguish a dif
ference between them.
The last stage of all reveali the continued
exercise of the quality. Mr. Seymour wanted
or pretended to want to retire, and hU
party managers desired that he should. He
said he preferred private life, and they dis
covered that the weight of the ticket exceeded
the strength of the Democracy. Nothing was
needed to perfect a change whloh would at
once have gratified Seymour's professed wish
and relieved the party but Seymour's resig
nation. But he did not resign. He preferred
to stick. And by way of showing how com
pletely a candidate whom his party would
like to skake off could sink that party in
odium and defeat, he is performing a ten
days' crusade in behalf of nullification aud
repudiation.
Of what avail is Seymour's rhetorio, when
everybody feels that it comes from the lips
only, and has not the remotest connection
with the heart ? He has neither sincerity nor
consistency. All he now says in regard to
boiids and currency is flatly contradicted by
his own words, spoken before the nomination.
Conviction in such a oase is impossible. He
talks according to the partisan requirement of
the time, with not a siogle genuine feeling
save that which prompted opposition to the
war. He has been as treacherous in his deal
ings with Democrats about the Presidency as
he Las been dishonest in his discussion of the
financial policy of which he is now the ad
vocate. What It All Meaiis.
From the N. T. Tribune.
Even the emphatic voioes of the October
elections have not taught the Demooratio party
the real issues of the pending contest. Routed
at every point of the line, they still hug the
delusion that only their candidates, and not
their principles, have been defeated, and at the
last hour are casting about for new leaders, in
the hope that when the battle is already lost
they can save the field by a mere change of
standard-bearers. This error may break them
np forever. They are beaten, not because
Seymour is of doubtful loyalty and Blair a
revolutionist, but because their platform re
vives the very heresies which the North
fought four years to overthrow. No candidate
whom they could nominate oould be elected on
the Tammany plaform. The principles enun
ciated in that instrument were settled once for
all at Appomattox Court House. We have
no purpose either to throw away our victory,
or to fight our battle over again, or to put our
trust in a party which was dishonorably for
peace in the midst of war, and is now traitor
outly for war in the midst of peace. They can
didates are of comparatively little Importance
in this election, except so far as the repre
sent the purposes of those who put them in
nomination; and if the Democracy had any
chance of success on the 3d of November it
would lie not in a change of candidates, but
in a change of principles.
In the same way it is a mistake to suppose
that the Republican triumph is merely the
triumph of a popular general. Many good
Democrats, no doubt, will vote for Grant in
spite or his principles, because they honor the
man, though they are not in sympathy with
bis tartv. For this, amoncr other reasons,
the Republican majorities in November will be
much larger than they have been in October.
But we have already abundant evidence that.
quite apart from personal considerations, the
loval party which s'.ood firmly by the flag
through the long dark days of the Rebellion
has been true to its principles ever since, and
would be true to them even were there no
Grant to lead them on to victory in 1SG8,
as he led them through the Mississippi
morasses and the Virginia Wilderness.
General Grant, it should be remembered,
was not acoepted as the Republican leader
until he had given ample proof of his
thorough aocord with the Republican creed.
Highly as we have honored him, liberally as
we would have rewarded him, we felt that the
election of this year wan to be a great contest
of ideas, which must either settle or unsettle
the theory of the Amerloan Government, and
either complete the work of the war or half
undo it. it was not a mere test 01 personal
popularity, like the voting at fanoy fairs for
the privilege 01 naming the prettiest gtn, or
bestowing a prize snuff-box. The people
were alive to the importance 01 the issue.
They demanded of the Chloago Convention an
honest representative 01 the loyal policy; ana
if Grant were not such a representative, they
would not vote for him. But the points of
his polioy, which his modest retioenoe
had long kept in doubt, were by this
time understood. He had been the
iirtt to urge a generous amnesty to the
defeated Rebels, while Audrew Johnson was
shrieking for the axe and the halter, and the
Northern people were still lull me d by the
a-sassination of Mr. Lincoln. He had insisted
upon military protection for the Southern
loyalists long before Congress recognized its
necessity, lie had faithfully enforoed the
recoiistruc'ion laws, repressed tin Rebel spirit
wherever it broke out, aud upheld with all
bm strength the nyal oihoers, like Mieridan,
who had incurrrd the animosity of a renegade
President by nn honest performance of their
duty. When Orr, aud Brown, and Walker,
and other prominent IielieLs came to him
for advice, lie proposed to mem me
self-same policy which was afterwards made
the very foundation of the Republican plat
form speedy reconstruction on the basis of
amnesty and universal suffrage. And, finally,
when the great rupture between the Presi
dent and Congress was completed by the re
moval of Mr. Stanton, Grant took his stand
resolutely on the right side; aud so we have
recognized him ever since as the leader of the
loyal hosts. When we elect him Pretident on
the 3d cf November, we shall do it not to re
ward him for his services in the war, but be
cause we think him the best man to complete
the work which the war left unfinished.
Uood-bye to Horace tirceley.
From the If. y. jporJd.
The measure ia full ! the thicken hath pipped
the shell 1 the "blockheads" of the Loyal
League have oilwd, "Konkx ompaxl this is
more than we can stand !"
Yesterday morning the indomitable Smell
fungus Flapdoodle entered the field as the
direct competitor of Horace Greeley. The
Morning Radical will henceforth blow the
trumpet dally with no unoertain sound about
the waIIs of this Demooratio Jericho; and the
loose livers of the Tribune, the halters betwixt
two opinions, the weak-kneed, white-hatted,
unfaithful watcbmtn who have basely paltered
with the Eternal Smash for strawberry
plants and the General Poet Uflloe, may well
tiembie in their squash-quartered, troine
tied, toEgu-less Bhoes I As Democrats, we
can take, of course, no vivid direct Interest in
this battle of the barrel-organs. As journal
ists we are bound to say that we doubt the
absolute suooess of Flapdoodle. Bat that
Flapdoodle can easily flummox the Tri
bune is clear. That newspaper, originally
started in the name of several noble prin
ciples naturally entitled to the honors
of small oaps and double-leaded brevier, long
since became the nnfragrant convenience of
a joint-stock association of adventurers. The
tamest enthusiasts who of old made its
columns as a daily crackling of thorns under
a pot, the hollow-cheeked, nre-eyed reformers
who never brushed their hair or went back
on a revolution, the discip'es of Fourier, of
Wendell Phillips, aud of Graham, the men
who hated with an equal hate roast beef and
revealed religion these have louir since
shullled off this mortal coil, or beeu pushed
from tht-ir stools by Wall street brokers,
Albany lobbyists, and Pennsylvania politi
cians. No one person in the Tribune own
ing stock enough to control and give purpose
to its policy, and no one of its writers having
force enonch of brain or will to impress him
self upon its columns, the piper, like a
hackney-coach, has been at the beck or who
ever happened to want a lift, and, like the pig
which bolted In bmithueld, has perpetually
"gone up all manner of streets I" It has
advocated "secession" as as inalienable right
of the bouth, and "coercion" as an imperative
duty of the North; it has denounced Abraham
Lincoln as a time-server and canonized him
as a martyr; it has abased the New York oity
"ring" and glorified Orison Blunt. If it can
be said for some years past to have consist
ently represented anything whatever, it is the
consistent inconsistency of II. G., who, having
got himself kicked out of the Union League
Club for balling Jefferson Davis out of prison,
forthwith got himself let in again at the ser
vants' gate by trying to pUBh Ben Wade into
the Presidency.
This sort of thing it wa3 clear could not go
on forever without "riling" the lion of radi
calism. It was the more aggravating that the
guilty perpetrators began to wash their
faces occasionally, to wear cotton gloves on
Sunday, to drink lager-beer, to haunt the
theatres, and generally to indicate a hankering
after the del ghts of life. What Hume said of
the ancient Puritans, and Macaular stole from
Hume to ray it over again no better, is true of
me modern radicals also. Praise-God Bare
bones and his synagogue esteemed bear-baiting
heathenish and inhuman, not because it gave
pain to the bear, but because it cave pleasure
to the spectators. The Spencers, the Sheridan
Shooks, the Fentons, and other such severe
moralists of the radioal party, began to loathe
the Tribune as well as distrust it when they
iouna 11. u. revelling in tue dance and sup
ping anacreontio personals into the Herald.
and trolling madrigals to the gay guitar under
the windows or Lexington avenue, and desert
ing the mush-bowls ot Chappaqna for the
wine-bins of the MaUon Doit-e. the bean-pots
of the Loyal League for the Apician board of
Eeductive Copperheads in iweuty-third street.
iiae climax was capped when the Tribune
turned its back upon General Butler as a
vulgar fellow of mean extraction, and ap
plauded the nomination of a "gentleman of
ancient family," a "born gentleman," a
"gentleman by biooa, and breeding, and asso
ciations, and position," to represent in his
stead the "most pure-bloodad distriot iu
America." Then Spenoer arose aud swore.
and Sheridan shook the bag in which he puts
all the internal revenue he can get, and Fen-
ton Hung himself in an agouy upon his mat
tress. The hour of Flapdoodle had struck I
That greasy but gifted man is equal to his
opportunity, lie has turned a somersault
from twilight into dawn, lie was'an Evenina
Radical while H. G. and his scribbling satel
lites were oiiuniug tneir glasses together over
Wiudnst s groaning tables. He will be a
Horning Radical while they are yawning away
the coma of the misspent night npon silken
cushions. Let him have a fair field, for he
afks no favors, and we prophesy that the
wings of Victory will flap and the doodle of
victory crow irom his columns.
The Democracy Housed.
From the Botton Post.
What has ocourred sinoe the Ootober elec
tion has done good rather than harm for the
Demooratio cause, if we are to judge by the
vigorous renewal by the Demoorats of their
purpose to redeem the country. They are no
more stirred by the unnatural shoutings of a
half-beaten foe than by their untiring ca
lumny, xneygo iorwara hopefully to hold
up their banners, on which are inscribed the
great promises of the country's future. Un
faltering, HLdismayed, they breast the storm
01 noisy opposition, confiding in their cause,
devoted to their faith in free government, re
solved to rid the country of all forms of
tyranny, and believing that such principles as
theirs are sure to stand every test and trial to
the tnumpnant end.
The little that is yet to be overcome in order
to secure victory excites to eneouragement
alone. Only one vote in seven hundred and
ntty in indiana. One in a hundred and forty
in Pennsylvania. A reduotion already of the
radical majority of 45,000 in Ohio to 15.000.
A gain of three Congressmen in the latter
btate, of one, and perhaps two, iu Indiana,
and of two or three in Pennsylvania. The
fifteen thousand radical majority in Indiana
reduced to a doubtful eight huudred. In the
last Presidential election the Ohio Democrats
rallied eighteen thousand stronger for MoClel-
lan than at the Uelober election, if they do
near so well this year unio win give her eleo
total vote for Seymour and Blair.
These are Borne of the en
rouraging facts. That the Demooracy are
sun able to make a sturdy nsht Coltax him
self is ready to admit; he says that this has
been the severest political contest ever fought
in Indiana. Pennsylvania was carried by the
open importation of paid voters from New
York, while honest naturalized citizens of
Philadelphia, Germans and Irish, were turned
away from the polls by the offioers of a radioal
city government, mat government was
changed in the recent eleotion, and those oitt
zens will have their rights in November. The
New York voters will likewise be kept at home
So that, with persistent exertion on the part
of the Demoorats, and by keeping their orga
nization solid and strong, it is probable that
Pennsylvania, on a fair poll, will oast her vote
for the Union and the laws.
The addresses of the several State Central
Committees of Connecticut, New York, Penn
sylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois testify
to the new rising of the Demooracy for a final
effort. The appearanoe of our distinguished
eandidate himself in the field at this oritloal
hour puts frsh hope nd courage into every
heart. His words at the close of the campaign
are so many telling blows against radicalism
His masterly speeches are answered only With
base calumnies, by journals whose faculties for
argument are paralyzed by the overwhelming
force of his plain statements and calm reason
ing. Horatio Seymour just at this time is a
hoet in the face of the radioal army. Well
may the masses who hang on his temperate aud
statesmanlike words cry out when he is done,
"Thank God t we have a candidate who oan
talk t" Some of the radical papers sneeringly
reply to them that the offioe of the Exeoutive
is not to apeak but to aot. Their partisan
satire insults a free people.' It is their own
usurping party that has sought to take the
last vettige of constitutional power from the
President, even to the extent ot preventing
him from deposing office-holders who are
to-day expiating their proper crimes iu the
penitentiaries. They would have the Ksmui-
tive neither act nor ppak. He shon d bs a
mere dummy in their hands. As he should
entertain no polioy, so should he have no
voice. We are proud to present to th1 coun
try a candidate who can show that hrj has a
policy and a voice toother; while of his
executive ability no certificate is needed.
A week finishes the work that remains f r
the shaping of the destinies of this country for
a future whose length no human eye can pre-
tena to measure, in that brief urns the Da-
mooracy shou'd work as they never worked
before; not altogether with processions anl
musio, but by argument, by reason, by per
suasion; with earnestness, with a devoted love
for free institutions, with a zeal that refuses
to give way on a single point, for the labor
aud industry of the country, for equality an 1
lightened taxes, for economy aud retrench
ment, lor a restored Union under the perma
nent protection of law, for the latest posterity
that shall rise up to bless ns. Again to the
breach, then ! and this time let us carry the
enemy's works I No country, free or not,
can hope for a long existence with its
fairest substance thus wantonly wasted and
destroyed by a faction whose whole concep
tion 01 11 Deny is the liberty to do what they
will.
EDUCATIONAL.
H
AMILTON INbTITUIE DA AND BOARD-
Ing-Behnol for Young Ladles, Ho. 8810 CHE3NUT
Street, Philadelphia, wUl reopen on MONDAY, Sep
tember 7, 1868, For terms, etc,, apply to
S 24tf PHILIPA. OREGAR, A. M., Principal.
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION.
JISS JENNIE T. BECK, TEACHER OF
PIANO-FORTE, No. tit FLORIDA Btreet, between
Eleventh and Twelfth. below Fltiwater. 4
ALL AD AND SIGHT SlN'GING.-T.
BISHOP, Ho. W B, NINEl'EENTU BU B 28 Sin
B
LIFE INSURANCE.
THE NATIONAL
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
OF THB
United States of America,
WASHINGTON, D. C
Chartered by Special Act or Congress,
. Approved July 25, 1808.
CASH CAPITAL, S 1000,000
BRANCH OFFICK:
TlIiST NATIONAL 15 INK BUILDING,
PHILADELPHIA,
Where tbo business of the Company is trans
acted, and to which all general correspondence
should be addressed.
DIRECTORS.
Clarence H, Clark,
J A I I.UUJI K,
F. Katcuiurd Starr,
W. U. IOOKHEAl,
UKOU6K F. '1 YLKK,
J. liiCKLEY Clark,
K A. Rollins.
Henry i). Cooke,
Wm. k. Chandlkr,
John D. DurKUKS,
Edward Dodok,
ti. C. Faukksxock.
OFFICERS.
Clarence H. Clark, Philadelphia, President,
Jay Cooke, Chairman Finance and Exeoutlve
Conmiltite,
B enkv D. Cooke. Washlneton. Vica-Preiiiilnt
Kmkkkon W. Pket, fnuadelpula, Secretary
E B. Turner, Washlneton, Assistants ec'y.
Francis (i. Hmith. M. D.. Medical Director.
J. Kwino id ears, M. i Assistant Medical
.Director,
MEDICAL ADVISORY II O AUD.
J. K. Barnes, Burgeon-General U. a A., Wash'
lngton,
P. J. Horwitz, Chief Medical Departmen
U.S. N., Waxhlngion.
U. W. Bliss, M. i., Washington.
SOLICITOUS AND ATTORNEYS.
Hon. Wm, E. Chandler, Washington, D. 0.
Ukokuk Hakdino, Philadelphia, Pa.
THE ADVANTAGES
OSered by this Company ares
It Is a National Company, chartered by spe
cIhI act of Coogreks, 18U&
It Las a paid-up capital of 81,000,000.
It ( tiers low rates of premium.
It furnishes larger Insurance than other com
panies for the same money.
it is definite and certain In its terms.
It is a borne company In every locality.
lis policies art exempt from attachment.
There are no unnecesbary restrictions la the
policies.
Kvery polioy is Don -forfeitable.
Policies may be tasen which pay to the In
sured their full amount and return all the pre
miums, so that the insurance oosw only the in
teresl on the annual payuit nts.
Policies may be taken that will pay to the
luHured, alter a certain number of years, daring
life an annual Income of one-tenth the amount
named in the policy.
Ho extra rale Is charged for risks npon the
lives of females. 88 wsrp
It insures not to pay dividends, but at so low
a cost that dividends will be lm possible.
"legal notices.
TN TIIK DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNITKD
J h'l'A l KS FOR, THE KAttTKIlN 11je)TK1UT OF
i-KNNMVLVANlA,
OWH.N L. JUMK8, of Philadelphia, bankrupt, late
or Itie lira ol MaTTUKW 11. HOWK HiiUOWilX
L. JONJCB, laie Qulug builotws uudr tu llrui ot
H(J W K JON ES, having pelltloued fur till dl
ctiu'ge, a meeting or creditors will be held on the
third dy of November, Ibtd, at 2 o'clock P, M beor
KvKlBter WILLIAM tdcMlCH AJtL, Jq.. at No. 631
WALcvUT btreet. In lha oky of Pinladelpbla, tbat
the exam Inai Ion ol the bankrupt may ba nuuhed,
aud any bualneai of meetings required by pciIoos 27
ai d 2 of (he act of Cougresn traunacled. The Regis
ter wl i certlly whether tbe baukrupl has conformed
to bta duty. A meeting will alao be held on VVKD
IS Kb DAY, ihe iweuty-tlitu day of November, Uttn.
before the Court at Philadelphia, ai, 10 o'clock A. M.,
when parties interested way auow cauas against the
diacbarge.
Wit neH the Honorable John Oadwalader.
4skalV Judge ol the an Id District Court, aud aeal
tv ' theieot, at Philadelphia. Uuiobar 2 i, t)i,s.
O. It. FOX. Clerk,
Attest
William McMichaml, Bealster. 10 a' wit
US. MARSIIAL'S OmCE, K. D. OF PESX
. bYLVAJSlA. . .
FHII.ADKLrHIA, Oct. 21, 18(1
This Is to kits nollcf ; Ihalon tue 'Ma day ol Ooto
ber, A. i lnos, a warrant ia bankruptcy was Issued
ifialUBl the estate ol WILLlAU. M. BAKKUl'P, ot
hhlikuelplila. In the couuty of PiitaUelplila. and
Male ol i'enn.) I voia, who bai been adjudged a
taukriiil, on tils own patulous that the pywHul of
uuy debts and delivery ot any property belouglug o
aucu bankrupt, to hlui, or lor ula use, and the irausfer
it any property by hlui, are iorlddeii b law; mat a
metliDx of ihe creditors ot the said bankrupt, to
prove Ibflr debia.aiul to choue oue or inure asilg
lien of hla relate, will beheld at a Court ol Baltic
rupicy, to fee lioideu et No MO YY'ALN UT ttt'fel, Phi
ludelpbla, riefore WILLIAM Wi MlUIIAKL, K o..,
itegla er, n Ihe Imh day ol November. . n. lKtwj, at
II o'clock P. 11. P, V. LLM a ICfttrt,
lu 21 wat V 8 Wursxal, ai sinner.
COAL.
218 & 220
S. FRONT ST.
I i - V
VI A a
OFFSR TO TUB TRADB, IN LOTS,
FINE RYE AM) BOURBOK W1I IS-KI-E S, IS CO:
Ol 1807, uiul lHOs.
ALSO, DUE FIRE KYE AM) EUlTiB0. .WlILMUESj
Of GREAT AGE, ranging from to lkz.
Liberal contraoU will be entered into for lota, in botut at Xilaimery, oitnin yi' .u.n.uf: ij
INSURANCE COMPANIES.
WINES, ETC.
TILLING HAST & HILT '.8
USSUKAXCE R003ISr
D
O
No. 409 WALNUT St.
AGENTS AND ATTORNEYS IOBJ
Home Fire Insarauce Company,
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
Springfield Fire aud Marine Ins. Co.,
BPRLNOFIELD, SCABS,
Yonkers and New York Insurance Co.,
NEW YORK
Peoples' Fire Insurance Company.
WORCESTER, 2CA8P,
Atlantic Fire and Marine Insurance Co.,
PROVIDENCE, R. I,
Guardian Fire Insurance Company,
NEW YORK
Lumberman's Fire Insurance Co.,
CHICAGO, ILL
Insurance effected at LOWEST KATEd.
All losses promptly and liberally adjusted at their
Office, No. 40S WALNUT Street,
HI PHILADELPHIA
ELAWAKE MUTUAL SAFETY IN3TTK.
AJNv K COMPANY, Incorporated or the Leila
e ot Pennsylvania, W3.
OOlce, Southeast corner THIRD and WALVUT
(Streets, PniladeU.hia
MAKINIS ISSUUAN'..E
On Vessels, Cargo, and i'relgm, iu all parts of the
World.
INLAND I.N.SUHANCK3
On Ooods, by river, canal, lake, aud laud carriages to
all' parts ot the Ui-inn.
" VIHH INSURANCES
On mercbanlse generally.
On SiortS, Dwelling Homes, etc.
ASM El M OV THC 0PAr
Novtuiber 1, HHi7.
t;oo,COO United states Five Per .Cent.
Loan, lu 4Us fioi noo 00
lZu.tO) TJnlied btatea Jfiva Per Cen..
Jomn. l.Hl .. m.100 00
80,000 United r-tates 7 8 101 Per Cent. Lean
Treasury Notes 52.562 10
2C0.0C0 Btate of Pennsylvania eix Per
Cent. Loan 210.070'GO
125,000 City ofPhlladelpbla Six Per Cent
Loan (eit-mpt from tax) 125 621 oi)
59,000 Slate of New Jersey Hix Per Ceuu
Loan 51,(0)'oo
20,000 Peunsylvaula Railroad Pint
MorigaxeBix Per Cent, Bonds. 19,800 00
25,(00 Pennsylvania Railroad, fctt-coud
Mortgage Ull Per Cent. Bonds... 23 S75'80
25,000 Western Pennsylvania Railroad
Six Per .Cent. Bonds (Pennsyl
vania Railroad guaranteed;. 20.000 00
80.0C0 Btate or Tennessee Five Per
Cent, Loans 18.000 00
7,000 Slate ol Tennessee Blx Per Cent.
Loan ... ... 4.270-00
6.000 8(0 tiUares U'.ock of (iermautowu
Gas Company (principal and
Interest guaranteed by tbe cliy
Of Pbllaaelobia) 15,00000
7.500 1(0 Shares Htock ot Peunsylva-
. nla Railroad Company 7.8J0'00
5.000 100 Htiares Htock of North Peon-
. ... . sy'vanla Railroad Company 8,000 00
. 20,000 80 Shares Block Philadelphia and
buutbern Mall Bteumshlp Ooni-
. . Py - 15.COO-00
4ll,V0U Loans on Bonds and Morliage,
first Ileus on City Property 201.WO-00
Bmidhleios co., dkalehb ia
. HAULrill.Ii LEHIGH and KAULM VEIN
UUAL. Kept diynnder cover. Prepared exnrets!)
l family tue. Yard, No. 122s WAt-iUINVloJ
.r.aue. Office No, Ut WALNU A' tttxeeW ti
,1,101,400 par. Mrket value, f i.luii.SiU eo
, Cost, l.OM7U'aO,
?fiRl M.000 00
Bills Htcelvable for Insurance
Dnde- .. 219,18567
Balances due at Ageucles Pre
miums on Marine Policies
Accrued Interest and other
deois due the Company 4J.JJI 86
Block aud Hcrlpol sundry innu
rauoe and other Companies,
rakh In n fV'6'lS estimated value 1,017 00
7 Dk"- i0i.iil7 10
Cash lu Draa er. ., 29 52
183,815 6
niRLCTOnS
Thomas C. Hand, James C. Hand,
Kdmuud a. Sunder.
Joieph H. (Seal,
Tlieuphiuia Paulding,
H ugu Craig,
Kiiwaru Durllngton,
John R Peuro.te,
It. Jones Brooke,
Henry Moan.
George U. Lei per
l,5,60J'iS
William G Boultnn,
Kit w anl LMourcade,
Jacob itlegel, .
' THOMAb
John c.
HFNRY LYLBLRN. Biri.r.
HJtNRY BALL, Astihtant Becretary.
(Samuel f. Bfikes,
Jamea Traijunlr,
William v. Ludwig,
Jacob P. Jones,
James B. WcFurlaad,
J ,sbua p, i-.yre,
John D. I at lor.
-Ipencer Mullvnlna,
rlenry U. lialletr, Jr.,
Jeo'ge W. ilernnrdou,
( T. Morgan, Pll'4burg,
I. B.Brt nple, '
t. U. Hefner.
O. HAND, President.
BAVlc, Vice President.
12 30
TNSURANCK COM PAN
X or
NORTH AMERICA,
No. 232 WALNUT STREET, PHILADA.
INCORPORATED 1794. "CHARTER PERPETUAI
91 urine, lulaml, aud lire Insurance.
ASSETS JANUARY 1, 1868, - 12,001,266-72.'
20,000,000 Losses Paid in Cash Blaoe iu
Organization.
DiaiurroRS.
Arthur G.Cooin, George L. Harrison.
U ranniS U I nna
Eoward H. Trotter,
Edward B.Clarke,
T. Charlton Henry,
Alfred D. Jeasup,
John P. White,
Louis U Madeira.
fcamnel W. Jon
John A. Brewo,
Charles Taylor,
Ambrose while,
William Welsh,
Diehard D Wood,
B. Morris Wain,
Jril.n M ajinn.
ARTHUR Q. COFFIN, President,
Chablks Platt, ftecietary.
WILLIAM BUEHLKR, Harrlsburf, Fa-, Central
Agent for the Btate of Pennsylvania, i2o
QTRICTLY MUTUAL.
PRCVIDENT UFe"aND TRUST CO.
OF PHILADELPHIA.
OFFICE, No. Ill S. FOURTH STREET.
Organized to promote LIFE INSURANCE among
members ol tbe
BOCIETY OF FRIEND3.
Good risks of any claw accepted.
Policial Uued upon approved plans, at the lowest
rales,
President,
BAMTEL R. BHIPLRT.
Vice-President, WILLlAU O. LONUMTRETH.
Actuary, ROWLAND PARRY,
Tbe advantage, ottered by thU Company are
XOeUfcd !
PAR STAIRS & McCAl
Kos. 120 WAL3UT aud 21 (iRAMTE
IMTORTEBB OF
Brandies, Wines, Uin, Olive Oil, Etc
AND
COMMISSION MKHhham'
OR THE BALE OF j
rUllli OLU Kit, nil EAT, AAD 110
im WHISKIES. t
INSURANCE COM PAN IES.
1S25) "CUAIIXEI. TERPETU4
Franklin Fire Insurance
OF PHILAlvlaUiAt
OFFICE?
Aos. 435 oiid 437 CliESMT STKEf
AAfcKT ON IAAIAUV I. 18M
VAA iJ lsHa.MMaa a a 1
ACCRUE WJWWZZZZ ZZIXXZZ
FEE Ml VMU.. . .-7
UNSETTLED CLAIMS, INCOME Fob
auoofo
IVOS4F. PA11 hlXVU I8S0 Vt
G.COO.OOO.
Perpetual and Temporary Policies on Liberal Terj
juariea ft. ahuukw,
Tobias Wagner,
Bainuel Grant,
tteorge W. Riobarda.
iaaao ijea,
LUeorge Fales,
Aiireu finer, ;
erancn w. Lewis, itl
l tin 111 UN K:,.... ' '
&SA.S?J.?; fJR. Leiden
JAB. W. .''""enu i
- - wsvaoisuj pru t)
n irii Company
e - iv w va a nwuuil,, jjj
OHGENIX LNSUBAJiCJS
J. PHILADELPHIA.
iNCuRPORA'IMiD lH-CHAKlJR PKBPRTrri
This Company liuureyrom iob, o,'
on liberal term, on bnlldings, mercnandiaa ,. J
etc.. tor limited penoes, and permanently S Tbu
lugs by deposit of premiums, wjr on buM
The company has been in active operation iw. J
than BIATY aR. during wnlon ili'lol
Dten promptly aujnated ana pain.
xjaviu Aiewis,
Bentamin letting,
Thomas H. Powers,
Jobn L. Hodge,
n. a. aianouy,
Ji-no T. Lcwbi
WllUnm B. Urant,
Robert W. Learning,
D. Clark Wharf n.
Lawrence Lewis, Jr.
A. R. ilicHnurv.
lUlmnnd castlllon,
jatnuel Wilcox,
Kevin j. r)rris.
JOHN R. vBrumi?on'Z: .-.J
RlunnT. WiTnn. n...'.' , """""""
".vi.l,(
TP1RE INSURANCE EYrT.neivrr v wi
JJ t KNNH YLVANlA FlBai iNaOKANnK l
PA NY Incorporated lStf-Charter Porbetnal H
6IU WALrsUi Btopposi.e IudependeKc Xu"3
This Company, favorably known tothe oommu ,
for over lorty years, cntluues w Insure against 1.
or damage by Ure on Public! or Private Bu idlrii
either permanently or for a llmlied time ai.J. i
Furniture Stocks of Goods, and MeKhadU,'Br0J
rally, on liberal terms, " es
lnelrCapllal, together with larga Bnrplns FnJ
Is invested in the most carelul manner, which on. hi
thunl In nffer tn Lhu liunrul an nnllmik, n li 1 1 ,
tbe case wioei. w ecMI"
DiBaOroBS.
Daniel Smith, Jr., John Deverenr;
Alexander Bhusoii, Thomas rsmuh.
Isaac Har.H burst, Henry .Lewis.
Thomas Robins, J. Uiilingham Fell,'
DAN1KL MM1TH Jk. PrealoentV
WM. 8. CROW ILL. Becretary. J-'IW1B1;
CHROMO-LlTHOGRAPHS.
REGAL DESSERTJ
A new and beantlful Cbromo-LIihograpb, aftec
painting by J. w. Peyet, just received by
A. S. 11 Oil INBOX,
So. 910 CHbNUr Street,
Wbq has Just received
NEW CHROilOrt,
Na,W FRKNOH PH0TOGRAPH3.
Nii-w DithauiiN anauklI
LOOKING ULA8UKB, Kto.
Ibff FiiKK GALLERY.'
STCVLS, fiANGES, ETC. 1
KOTlCt?.-TUE UNDERSIGN id
Would ca:l atiuu.iou ol the public to hla 1
jjijiw ouLuan jl&UUb, JT UKN ACS. I
This is an uniUeiy new lnnu-r II i. u.J
structed as to at oi.ee commend Kseli to general lavoi
being a combination ol wrougut aud cast irou. It i
Very simple lu Ita cnaatrui lion, aud la perleotly au
tight; seli-clei.nl g, having no pipes or drums te k
taken out and cleaned. Ills so arranged with nurlgi
tluesastoprortucealaigeramouut ol beat from th
name weight of oual t- . any lurnuce uow in vast
The bygrouietrli) condlima ol the air as produced b
my newarrace.:eal of evaporailou will at once di
monstrate the I It is tbe ouly Hot a.lr Furnaoe tba
Will produce a perfmny healthy a'nio .pliore. '
Those In wml of a complete Heating Apparatrf
would do Weil to call aud examine tbe Golden UaaU
CHABLK4 WILLIAMS, J
N OS. U33 aud IIM MARK KT btreet, J
. , . w, Philadelphia,)
A large assortment of Cooking Ranges, fire-hoar
Btoves, Low Dt.wn Urates, Ventilators, etc,, alwai
on band. ,
N. B. Jobbing of all kinds promptly done. Uul I
BOARDING.
NO. 1121 GIRABD ETREET, CENIRaLL
located, within two squares of the vuminenu
andGlrard House An nnfurnlshed
BECON D-BTORY FRONT ROOM,
With Orst-class Board,
Vacancies fbr Gentlemen and Table Boarders.
Reference required. -t
DRUGS, PAINTS, ETC.
1
JOBERT SnOMAKER & CO.j
N. E. Corner of FOUltXH and RACE St
PHILADELPHIA,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS
IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
h'lm. YA.i ri.. 1 1 n..t..4a H.-.4
KUllO AA.au nuu lvivicu iuwu auitj,
YaruUiics, Etc
AOKNT9 FOR THK CELEBRATED I
FKESC1I Z1AC l'AIMS.. !
DEL LEK3 AND CONrUMERfi UUPPLItD AI
LOWEST PRICEH FOR CASiL
Still

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