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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, June 01, 1869, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAILY EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 1869.
SMUT OF THE rilESS.
Editorial ortmoNB or thb heading journals-
CPOH COBBBNT TOPIOB COMPILBD BVBBI
DAT FOB THB EYaNIKQ TKLnORAPH.
JliK DEMOCRATIC PARTY-ITS PRINCI
PLES AM) ITS PROSPECTS.
Jnrni the N. Y. World.
The A'. 1'. Keening Post, uftnr two woks'
AicdiUtinn, findtt Unit it is dlniitislli!d with the
lnniiuU of ciicoiiniirciiiciit for the Pmiioi-rntic
Virty net forth bv The World, mid thinks miy
luirtv in in a budVny for whoso project noth
311U better cmi be said. Wo copy n few Hut
from the Post's long ui tlcle:
"Itnt thn prospecta of tho Democratic party tkwrvc
to 1m o(iihIi1oi1 " hroiidnr mid truer irnmii.ls tlmn
lhcne It Instill one of the two ureal party orgnu
ttntloii wliU'h divide tliu miirniixfs of the I'ouulry ;
IIioho who contnil and innnane It .hope and mean to
maintain It, no matter what ehantrt-a may come over
our politic; and desire to win power, not a parts of
fionio new political t-tiinhiiiutlnn, lint as "thi ot
3)enioorallc, parly." Their pertinacity, and the el
rctJvenenH of their HVKlein of orirtinixntlnn, make
XhelrproHpects of hiicci'sh of Interest to the country.''
All that the World professed to do in the
nrtielo to which tho J'oxt takes exception, was
to enumerate some of the recent siirns of the
times favorable to the Democratic party. A mer
rhant may employ himself usefully in looking
into his books to ascertain the Rains of the pre
ceding month; and It would be ridiculous to
represent the result of such an examination as a
fomplete statement of his assets nud the solidity
of his credit. For the first two or three months
nftcr tho Presidential elcetiou there was a lull, a
port of political torpor; both parties waitint: and
TvatehiiiEf with bullied curiosity, speculating
upon the policy of Ccneral Grant and the
composition of his Cabinet. The President
elect was BueU an inscrutable sphinx, and
the politics of the immediate future depended
bo muck upon what sort of a bird m'mbt tie
.hatched from the unehipped eir, that the public
judgment was kept in a state ot su-pense until
after the inauguration. It is absurd to pretend
that the Republican party had not a heavy stuke
in the success of the new administration. When
the first two months had developed nothing but
a succession of blunders blunders so egregious
that honest Republican journals.like the Chicago
ZTribune were constrained to cry aloud in tones
iif deprecation and warning it seemed natural
to post tho new entries into the political ledger
ynd estimate their eff ect on the balance as it
tood at the date of the last settlement. The
,1Vorld accordingly collected and summed up
several of tho new items, and made it apparent
enough that they were favorable to the future
Success of the Democratic party. Thus far, General
(irant has disappointed the hopes and belied all
promises and predictions of those who advo
cated his election. His mistakes and weakness
lire fatally damaging the party by which he was
chosen. "The discredit into which the new ad
ministration is falling is an advantage to the
Democratic party, because it will cure multi
tudes of honest" citizens of the hallucination
under which they have been laboring, and open
their minds for a candid examination of Democra
tic principles. It is, of course, on the soundness
and value of itsprinelples that the party rest all
its hopes. Hut the Evening Post has the assu
rance to assert that the Democratic party has uo
positive principles. It winds up its arraignment
iind invective In the following strain:
"Tho misfortune of the Democratic party is that it
lias fallen to be a party of negations. It 'hates the
HlKKcr,' It hates the Republicans, It hated the war,
It hates the debt; and the summit of statesmau
Hhtp In the Democratic party nowadays consists of
tilmse of the Republicans and decrying the blacks.
J'hey have been doing this ever since the Republican
party was formed, In 1850; they managed to retain
power by this policy for some years ; but we do not
Jiclleve they will ever be again trusted by the Ameri
can people, unless they show themselves capable of
eomething IxHter than this.
"Before they are likely to carry the country in a
general election, with their war record and their
.history since the war, they will have to grow llrst
Into a formidable and respectable opposition. At
present the Democrats have not able debaters
enough In Congress even to put the Republicans on
their mettle; they have not tho means to attract at
tention to their principles even if they had any
principles; and, so far as we can see. they are agreed
upon no political principles or policy even if they
Jiacl orators to state them."
The Democratic party is not a partv of mere
negations; and even if it were, that would not
necessarily be a reproach. It is the chief func
tion of an opposition party to take the negative
eide and bring into clear exposure the mistakes
and mismanagement of the party in power. All
parties which assail abuses, uproot errors, ex
pose dishonesty, or act as checks on insolent
and usurping authority, are, 60 far, parties of
negation. The Bible itself is perhaps the most
negative and denunciatory book in the world.
The ten commandment are a series of prohibi
tions, containing eight "thou-shalt-nots" and
only two "thou-shalts." Magna Cbarta was a
lrandle of restraints upon the abuse of authority.
Tho American Revolution was, in its origin, a
movement of pure negation and denial. All
the great humanitarian and benevolent
reformers, from Wilberforee down to -Mr.
Jtergu, have been mere negationists and assail
ants. Government, it has been smartly said, is,
like clothing, a' badge of lost innocence. Its
object is to hold human rapacity and violence in
check; and as rulers are also human beings,
with far greater powers to plunder and oppress,
one of the most Important and useful spheres of
politicaljactivity is opposition. It is the con
stant tendency of power to encroach upon
liberty; and while the world lasts the most im
portant service which patriots can render to
their country will consist in restraining gov
ernments within proper bounds. It is an
old Democratic motto that "the world is
governed too much;" and the Evening Post
itself, when a disingenuous partisanship does
not get the better of its Judgment, gives its prac
tical assent to this maxim. The greater part of
its editorial writing is habitually on the nega
tive side; its opposition to Government iuter
ierence with trade and industry being the most
conspicuous example. For such a paper to ob
ject to the Democratic party that it freely prac
tises negative criticism is self-stultifying. For
any journal to find fault with a strenuous nega
tive in politics evinces a misconception of the
prpcr sphere of governmental action. When
governments become so self-restrained that
there is no need of political opposition, the
world will be In the millennium, and govern
ments no longer be necessary.
In the Democratic organization, there is as
much unanimity in leading principles and as
much fidelity to long-cherished convictions as
is ever possible among large bodies of men
When the freedom of Individual judgment is re
spected. The Democratic party is the strenuous
advocate of local self-government; and under
our mixed political system, It lias always been
the champion of tho right of the States to con
trol their internal affairs. The Pout cannot say
that this principle is unimportant, or that it docs
not form a conspicuous and perfectly well-marked
dividing lino between the two great political
parties in this country. In the great battle
that is yet to bo fouglit between the advocates of
State rights and tho abettors of Federal en
croachment, nobody can doubt that the success
of tho former will be a great Dem
ocratic victory. The Democratic party has, in
recent years, been unfortunate In the fact that
the just abhorrence of African slavery strength
ened the nartv of Federal encroachment and con
solidation. But the Democratic party no longer
Tests under that incubus. It will hcrcalter fight
its battle on more equal terms. And no mind
V'hich is unwarped by prejudice can doubt that
relief from that heavy load is lavorauie to nit
triumph of tho Democratic principle of local
tol f.irriwriimfMit.
Tim nemocnitle nartv. both by its instincts
nnd Its' antecedents, is on the progressive and
winning bide in all tho industrial and financial
questions which are likely to bo tho chief
topics of political debate for the ensuing tour
vears Both the Morrill tariff and the still more
Absurd- and oppressive tariff under which tho
trade and industry of Die country now
fcroail 'were passed by a Republican Congress.
Nino-tunths of all tho Republican papers in tho
i'.,i.,wi stntea ii r suiiDorters of protection. while
there is hardly a Democratic journal which has
not always twix ft etc iiUvwuto of. Irw
trade. It is self-evident, thereforo, that tho I
spread of free trade principles which is now In (
progress, and the fresh interest and activity
with which tho question is discussed, are cmi-
i aii.j n,wfiiirnrrn tlio lump rif thn I
iii'iii.ily inn.ii ,i.vwm. - - - i -
Democratic party. -
It is trud that our representation in Congress
is small and out of all proportion to the numbers
of tho Democratic party; but we labored under
the same disadvantage last year, when a politi
cian so experienced and sagacious as Chief
Justice Chase desired to be our candidate for
President, in full faith a faith shared bv many
Republicans that ho could be elected, lie may
have been mistaken: but his willingness to bo
the Democratic candidate, and the desire of
many Republicans to vote for him as such, prove
how little the party is damaged in public. estima
tion by what tho 'Post calls its "war record."
And as the war recedes more and more into the
past, the misrepresentations and obloquy with
which the party was loaded during the content
will rapidly fade out of the public mind. Had
the Democratic National Convention made no
mistakes last year, the party would either have
elected its candidate for President, or have come
very near electing him: and surely its prospects
are every wav brighter now than ihev were four
years auro.
BARON BOZ.
pniii flu1 .V. Y. Tribune,
"My dear friend," once said Charles Lamb, full
of mystification, to a learned but simple-minded
gentleman, "it is whispered that you are to be
made u peer." "O dear, no: I " hope not; it
would not suit me at all," was the reply. "Well,
I suppose," stuttered Lamb, "that yon cannot
help yourself: they will make youapeerwhether
you wish or not." And olf went poor George
Dyer, devising ways and means to keep himself
from being made "a peer! We trust that Mr.
Charles Dickens is not in a similar dilemma; but
it is whispered that he Is to be created one of
the nfw life Peerage. Men of letters in England
have been made belted knight or baronets; but
although titular distinctions of a higher order
have been bestowed upon writers and scholars,
it has been for political services, as in tho well
known cases ot Bacon, Brougham, Bulwer. and
Macaulay. Upon the whole, we think that a
writer whose claim is on the public affection,
and wlioe throne is in the public
heart and of whom is this more eminently
true than of Mr. Dickens? can 111 afford to
discard the cheery and familiar name which has
been uttered by so many lips with admiration or
affection. When we would express the one, we
use plain "Mr.;" but when wc arc governed by
the other, we drop even this. We presume that
nobody has said or written "Mr. Burns" since
that great man died: yet it-is noticeable that we
almost always say "Mr. Carlyle," as if Thomas
were a person by no means to be trilled with.
Goldsmith happened to be a sort of doctor of
medicine, and Johnson was made an LL. D., and
so both arc known as "Doctors" to this day;
although we relieve ourselves sometimes by saying
"fioor Goldy," and sometimes by writing "fain
Johnson." What a blessing it is that the fashion
of making literarv lords has come in so late!
Otherwise we would have had Baron Bolteourt
or Sir Oliver Goldsmith. That would not have
suited us at all. We have always thought the
"fir" before Richard Steele's name an imperti
nent superfluity. It is impossible to forget that
in making Mr. Dickens a nobleman
all tho honor and glory would
be on the side of the Government. The
fame of that gentleman is established. lie has
already an estate in every generous mind, and
not even in the days of chivalry could the most
powerful lord boast such a band of retainers.
His are achievements as treat as any which ever
won spurs or a coronet; his have been blwodless
triumphs over cruel wrongs and panoplied in
justice: his battles have been waged against out
rage and oppression with the 'pen, and why
should he be called to honors which are oftcnest
associated in men's minds with the butchery of
the sword, or with revolting subserviency to
the crown? The credit of tho installation is car
ried to the side of Government. It does not
make the genius of Mr. Dickens one whit greater,
but it chows Its own wonderful appreciation of
genius in general. It trades in popularity upon
his brains. It claims a share which docs not in
the least belong to it of his hardly-earned laurels.
It calls upon the world to ndmire Us magnani
mity in bestowing such unexampled honors upon
a writer of romances, who has neither conquered
armies nor captured fleets, nor even made a
monstrous fortune upon the Stock Exchange.
It cannot be forgotten, either, that the honor
offered is a cheap one. Admission to a life
peerage, while a great hereditary nobility con
tinues to exist in England, will bring but little
social consideration, and the real princes will
look down upon the mock princes, as baronets
have always looked down upon " knights. A
nobleman whose patent dates from the Conquest
will regard a novel-writing peer much as the
Duke of Norfolk might look upon a Scotch
Judge; and will "My Lord" him as the grandees
of fDain used to "Mv Lord" the new dukes and
marquises, while they addressed each other
with careless familiarity. Succession is the root
and essence of nobility. A peerage without a
pedigree, or the prospect of creating one, 1b a
substantial solecism. While it brings no special
social consideration, it involves an increased ex
penditure in keeping up a barren dignity. It
does not found a family. It does not mako a
man an ancestor. He is lower in tho pages of
Jiurke or of JJebrctt, lor all Ms peerages, than
the poorest baronet.
Finally, we must be allowed as American Re
publicans to put in our protest. Mr. Dickens
Lharies Dickens Dickens belongs to us. lie
has been more generally read and more popu
larly admired here than even In England. If
we may be allowed to speak with a certain
rough sincerity, it shall be to affirm that upon
this side ol the water we Hon t tike Lords at all.
If the Queen would but ask Mr. Dickens to din
ner, or buwrlte him a half-familiar note to say
how much enjoyment his last book had given
her, we should be pleased if we thought that tho
attention gratified him. But we give notice that we
shall call him plain Dickens to the end, whatever
may be tho augmentat ions of his escutcheon.
CUBA AND THE NEW CAPTAIN GENERAL.
Frvm the ,V. J', llmraUX.
Our recent advices from Spain state that Gene
ral Dulee's urgent telegrams to be relieved of his
government of Cuba have been acceded to. Ho
has probably been compelled to take this step by
the condition of his health, which is very far
Iron) being good; but no doubt the situation of
Spanish affairs there lias much Intlueuce in
augmenting the urgency of his request. The
Captain Generalcy of that Spanish colony has
ceased to be the easy and profitable position
which it was up to a recent date. Three years
Is the established term for holding tho office, but
a shorter period has been the usual practice for
many years past; and yet of the many captain
generals who have been sent out from Spain since
the time of Vivcs, who governed forty years ago,
every one, excepting only General Ezpeleta, has
the public reputation ot'haviug returned a mil
lionaire to the peninsul.i.
Events which have tr.mspired during the last
six months have materially changed the value of
tho office. Revolution has overthrown tho
Spanish authority In one-half of the island and
made Its tenure very precarious in tho other.
The. Cuban leaders have decreed the abolition of
tlavory. and with tins decree the African slave
trade, which was the gre iter source of emolu
ment to the Captain-General, lias disappeared.
J he war of reprisals, a, carried on there against
both person and property, is destroying inJustry
and trade and driving the wealth of both
parties to seek safety elsewhere. With these
the revenues of the government are naturally
disappcarinir, while its difficulties daily in
crease. I bus little profit and lew laurels are
to be gathered by Spanish commanders, and
tho hope of succor from Spaiu is us remote
os it was to the old governors sent to the
Spanish main.
With this chango of circumstances it is uot
surprising that tho once coveted office goes a
begging. Months sineo General Dulco scut his
resignation to Madrid, and tho place was ten
dered to (ieueral Prim. It was thought to bo a
good chance to get rid of this factious and men
tally insignificant element in Spanish politics;
but'Prim was too keen to tako the bait. Cabal
loro do Roda wuu tUtiU IwliCil tQ s tk military
leader best ablo to cope with tho difllcnltle of
the situation, and it was announced that ho
would be sent. But tho situation of Spain her
self is too critical to spare for a colony a man
who, from all the. signs evident In tho flel 1 of
view, might soon bo a necessity for tho preser
vation of the homo government. A chango In
the Spanish government of Cuba Is a necessity,
however, and tho Spanish Ministry have ap
pointed probably their best soldier to cope with
the difficulties of the situation. The a;mroaeh
ing change of command, combined wltu'tho ad
vi nt of the rainy season, will have the efto t to
prevent much activity In military operations on
the part of tho Spanish forces, nnd the new
Captain-Genera! will find plenty of work on his
hands when he arrives at his po'-d.
IMPORTANT FROM PERU THE RECOGNI
TION OF CUBA.
Fnmi the. X. )'. llrrald.
We have the important intelligence that "Peru
has recognized the Cuban patriots as bellige
rents, and has decided to urant them all the
privileges attendant on that character." This
solves the mystery of those two Peruvian iron
clads bought in this country and at present
iiuvcimg wiiiuii animus sicaining oi Havana.
Peru, in short, means in this declaration of bel
ligerent rights the reopening of her war with
Spain, and Chill and Ecuador will back Peru.
Tho opportunity is inviting for a decisive settle
ment on their part with Spain, and iu serving
Cuba they will serve themselves. Whether those
two iron-dads will be sold to the Cubans or held
in reserve for a crack at the Spanish fleet before
Havana, the tact will shortly be made known.
That those two Peruvian war ships in the West
Indian waters are intended for a deadly blow at
Spain cannot be doubted, and Peru has had suffi
cient provocation to justify it.
As lor the Peace Conference proposed bv the
United States, and agreed upon by Spain, Peru,
Chili, and Ecuador, it may be considered as dis
missed; and if so we may have a declaration of
the renewal ol hostilities from those Peruvian
ships in front of Morro Castle. The cause of the
Cubans is wonderfully brightening. Several de
tachments of warlike filibusters from the United
States, with valuable supplies of artillery, sm ill
arms, and ammunition, etc., have got into tho
island. And tncy have already turned the tide
of the war to active and successful offensive
operations. Now, with Peru following tho ex
ample of Mexico iu the matter of belligerent
rights, the Cabinet at Washington ought to feel
ashamed ot us timidity and delay, especially
with the encouraging nnd emphatic resolution of
the House of Representatives in behalf of deci
sive action on this subject.
A proclamation of belligerent rights to the
Cubans from President Grunt would now settle
the question in Cuba in less than a month. In
fact, the Peruvians may settle it within that
time: but what a sorry settlement this would be
for the United States! We expect the annexa
tion of the island of Cuba; we want it, and we
ought not to depend upon the unaided efforts of
other mends ot liberty to secure the prize. We
sav that General Grant ought to be ashamed of
this sort of American dignity and decorum. It
is nonsense, it is stupid old fogy ism. and we
nave had enough ot it. Dignity, the fitness ot
things, and the cause of peace and humanity call
for the intervention of the United States in this
business iu some decisive form. To avoid the
complications and entanglements which other
wise may follow, General Grant should at once
in behalf of the Cubans, issue his proclamation
of belligerent rights; for, from present indica
tions, this is tho form which, after all, our
reparation tor English belligerent rights will have
to take.
A DIFFERENCE.
From the X. Y. Sun.
The English papers are loud in their com
plaints about the neglect of the graves of Briti-h
soldiers in the Crimea and at Scutari. Our an
nual floral festivals, which commemorate the
victims of our war, must convince the world
that in this particular we are more fortunate
than the "mother country." Not that we are
any more given to mere thoughtless emotion
than the English, but our people are more
demonstrative and more liberal in the display of
their sympathies. Moreover, the genius of our
institutions impels us to pay that homage to the
rank and file of our army and navy which in
Europe is reserved only for a few great captains.
And then the surviving relatives of the men who
fell in the service of their country feel gratified
by the posthumous honors paid to their kindred,
while, at the same time, this annual tribute ac
quires more and more a national significance,
and cements a love of peace by periodically re
minding the country of the ravages of war.
At the International Congress assembled in
lb07 at Geneva, to provide for the better treat
ment of soldiers wounded in battle, the wise
men congregated there incredulously listened,
as if to a story of Haronn-el-Rashid, to the
narrative of the marvels of humanity achieved
by our Sanitary Commissions and the indefati
gable charity of American women. Now they
will learn that, after having taken care of our
wounded soldiers with a tenderness unknown
outside the realms of romance, we surround
the graves of the dead with a panoply of reve
rence and love equally unprecedented in the
annals of mankind, and relieved from the taint
of sentimentality by a vigorous national spirit
that knows how to honor the manhood which
shrank from no sacrifice, either of life or for
tune, in order to preserve the integrity of the
Republic.
So such stories about the neglect of soldiers'
graves us those which sadden the columns of tho
London Times are to be found in American pa
pers. We trust that the example exhibited by
us will have an inspiring influence abroad, and
relieve Europe from the hideous aspect of the
neglected graves of those who have fallen on
the Old-World battle-fields.
GENERAL BUTLER'S POLICY. '
From they. Y. Times.
General Butler's address at Gloucester on
Saturday, at the meeting to decorate the graves
of Union soldiers, was in the main appropriate
and in good taste. Wo do not see the wisdom or
policy of the exhortations with which it closed,
to keep in memory the evil England did us dur
ing our war, and to nurse a feeling of eternal
resentment therefor. England's course, cer
tainly, was not friendly to us but it was quite
as friendly as was that of France or that of
Spain; why, then, should she be singled out for
such enduring resentment, while other nations
equally culpable tire tacitly forgiven ? It is well
established, as a historical fact, that duing the
war the Emperor Napoleon proposed to recog
nize the Confederate Government on condition
that England would join him in so doing; and
nothing but the peremptory refusal of tho Eng
lish Government prevented his doing so. Vet
General Butler has nothing to say of the un
friendly action of France, and no exhortation
for Americans to cherish undying resentment
against the French for this act of her Govern
ment. (ieueral Butler Is understood to be in favor
of w ar with England, not only as a means oi
punishing her for her hostile action during the
war, but us a liieaus of promoting the growth
and enhancing the prosperity of our own coun
try. That question is certainly open to argu
ment, and there is no reason why General But
ler should not seek to make converts to his view
of the case. Tho closing paragraphs of his
Gloucester speech may be intended to accomplish
that purpose. Wo are not greatly alarmed at
his prospect of success. Past experience shows
that the great body of the American people are
accustomed to take moro calm and dispassionate
views of exciting public questions than the
English: and we have no doubt that they will
decide this Issue wisely and with due regard to
the public welfare.
General Butler not only favors war with Eng
land but tho harshest rigors of martial law
towards the people of tho Southern States for
the suppression of crime. We have no sympathy
witli tho policy, or tho feeling which prompts it,
in cither case. Tho paramount necessity of tho
country is pence, and the growth which peace
cannot fail to glvo us. And we have very little
doubt that wo shall have It, In spite of (ieueral
Butlor, if not with his help. Tho duty of tho
hour, in our view, is rather to allay than to
arouse resentments cither towards the people of
tlio Southern autua or towards Englimd.
ADVICE TO VIITLADELPIIIAN3
Frm the A. Y. World. j !
Tho Philadelphia papers exult over New York
In their freedom from those disasters which mado
week Monday such a Mun one for New York, but
which also and this is the silver lining to the
dismal cloud enliven the newspapers of a city
nnd make them vendible. There is something
like life In belonging to a town which can fur
nish so many first-class horrors iu a single day.
and which possesses newspapers capible of
spreading them promptly before you in all their
awful proportions, riuiaiieipni.ins escape inese
horrors, but they escape them at the cost of
undergoing another horror more frightful than
thrm all -the horror of being Phil.ule.l pliinns.
Surely, every righl-miiided man would rather
come t ) New' York and be bliwn off a steam
boat, or otherwise done to death in an exciting
and expeditious manner, than to drag out a
wretched and stagnant existence In Philadelphia.
Think what Boric, for instance, would have
been saved if he had only come to New York
nnd been dubbed to death by a playful policeman
n year or two ago. The Wurld, in that ease,
would have had a neat and full obituary of him,
giving the facts which were not to be had about
bim when Grant came to make him a Cabinet
officer. Come and be killed, O Philadulphlans !
and have yourselves written up in laudatory and
sympathetic strain by the World corps of neuro
logists. Die, and leap to everlasting fame. To
be sure, you may get killed if vou stay in Phila
delphia. But It will not do you any good. The
Philadelphia papers would never find it out.
When anything does happen in Philadelphia,
say once in five years, those journals have
nothing to say about it until they copy it from
the World. Witness the case of Hester Vaughan.
Witness the case of Twitchell. Witness the case
of Forney. You had better see New York and
die. You really had. You won't bo missed by
anybody if you are the average Philadelphia-it.
And if you should be, we will send a copy of the
World, containing a full, true, and particular
account of your last hours, to your bereaved
friends, free of charge. And it is absurd to sup
pose that they would not derive more comfort
and consolation from that than from the pro
longation of your existence.
GAS LIGHT FOR THE COUNTRY.
SAFE. RELIABLE, AND ECONOMICAL.
PLACED OUTSIDE OF BUILDINGS!!
FERRIS & CO.'S
AUTOMATIC GAS MACHINES
Ilnve hrcn in successful operation for eleven years, nnd in
nil cases iriven Iierl'ect aatisfactioa. The bcht is much
superior to that ol city lias, at much less cost. The many
accidents arising from the use of KKKONKNB And ('i)AL
OIL LAMPS and worthless f;as machines sho'tM in
duce persons to adoot a safe, economical, and HiitUfn
tory unlit. The simplicity of our machine, its slow motion,
its superiority over all others on account of its KKV'OI.V.
l.N(, evaporator, which takes up i.ll the carbon from the
material, and the fact that it will run for years wltho.it
cost for r.-nairs, recommend it above all others in the
niarkft. The machine can be s"en in operation at our
uihce, where exp!anations ana reierencet win he given.
t'KKKIS A t'O ,
k itutns snupi jvo. :rj7 1 iiKssui street, rmiada.
iiei-t quality of fJANOLINK always on hand.
WATCHES, JEWELRY, ETC.
LADOMUS & C(T
'DIAMOND DEALERS Jt JEWELERS.
WATCHES, JEWELKY A 81LTKK VTA UK.
, -WATCHES and JEWELST EEPAIBEB.,
02Che8tnnt St.. PhilftL
Ladies' and Gents' Watches,
AMERICAN AND IMPORTED,
Of the most celebrated makers.
FINE VEST CHAINS AND LEONTINES,
In 14 and 18 karat
DIAMOND an other -Tewelry of the latest design.
Engagement and Wedding Rings, In lS-karat and
corn.
bold Stiver-Ware for Bridal Presents, Table CnU
lery, Plated Warw, etc 8 87
ESTABLISHED 1828.
WATCH BS, JEWELRY,
CLOCKS, SILVERWARE, and
FANCY GOODS.
CI. "VV. RUSSELL,
NO. 24 N. SIXTH STREET, PHILADELPHIA.
WILLIAM B. WARNE & CO.,
Wholesale Dealers In
WATCHES AND JEWELRY.
S. E. corner SEVENTH and OUESNUT Streets,
8 g Second floor, and late of No. 8B S. THIRD SU
LOOKING CLASSES, ETO.
E
STABLISHED 179 5.
A. S. ROBINSON.
FRENX'H PLATE LOOKING-GLASSES,
ENGRAVINGS,
UEAUTIFUL CHROMOS,
PAINTINGS,
Manufacturer of all kinds of
LOOKING-GLASS,
PORTRAIT, AND PICTURE FRAMES.
NO. 910 CHESNUT STREET,
8 '.5 Fifth door above the Continental. PhiUv
J S I T II,
l.OOIilNCM.LAS AM) PICTl ItE ! 11.1.11 E
itlAM'FACTlKEK,
EII5LE AND FRJNT PUBLISHER,
And Wholesale Dealer In
AMERICAN AND FRENCH CLOC KS AND REGU
LATORS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
Also, General Apent for the sale of the "Eureka"
rmcnt Condensing Ct tree and Tea Puts something
I hat every family should have, and by which tuey
cun ehvb lifty per cent.
Trade nupplied at a liberal disenrtnt.
4 16 Sm No. ll 1 H A KC'IINTIIF.KT.
ICE CREAM AND WATER ICE.
f H E N E A POL I TAN
ICE CREAM AND WATER ICES.
THK rURKST AND BEST IN THK WORLD.
This celebrated Itrick Ice Cream and Water Ice can be
carried in a paper to any part, of tue city, a, yon ould
uiiDdy. 1 iitctui or twenty dittorent kindn ot them are ken
ce.iiKtiintly on hand, and U.NK HU.N'liKKl) Ult r'FKKVT
r LA V(JKS cau be made to order for those who dosiie to
have Hornet Iuuk never beiore aeon in the United blfttea,
and superior to any Ice Cream made in Kurope.
Principal Iepot--No. i:4 WAI.XUT Street
Kiaucli biora No. li'Ju bt'RIA'li GARUKN Rtrcet
J 15 j-Ai-1'1'!" KiTI.
CURTAINS AN dVhADES.
Qb J. WILLIAMS & SONST.
NO. 16 NORTH SIXTH STREET,
MANUFACTURERS OF
Venetian Blinds & Window Shades.
Large and Hut aasortment at low prloea.
STORK SM ADKS made andlottered. 5 11 lin
INSURANCE.
DELAWARE MUTUAL SAFETY IN8UK
. ANCK (IOMPAHV. InoorDontsd b tb Leci
latnr of I'enniiylvuiU, laSfc ,
Office. 8. K. corner of THIRD and WALNUT StreeU,
rhilarinlphla.
MARIN K INmUKANOKS
On Vewols, Onrpo, and Freiirht to all purUof th world.
inLani iNsijRANuka
On Rorfla by river, cnrial, Inks nnd Und orrift to til
f ftrtA nf the Union.
KK INHUKANOKS
On MurohandiMgansrall; bUirvs, Dwellings, lloufea,
KtC
laRT OF TB OOMTAirr,
KoTenilr 1,
United Status r ire I'm Cent. Loan,
10 W W8,5001
Uii't"d Statue Six Per Uunt, Loan,
11 136.WU0
Unitod Slate. Si Per Cent. Loan (for
I'avilio Hailroad) (O.DOD'OO
State ol Punnaylvania Six l'er Cent.
loan .v. SI 1,375-06.
City of Philadelphia Six Per Cent,
Loan (emmipt irom tax) li-j.i'l 00
Stale of Hem Jeraey Six Por Cent.
loan tl.lkvruu
Penn. Kail. Kirat Mortgage Six Per
Cunt, llonda 9U.2OH00
Penn. Kail. Second Mortgage Six Per
Cent. Honda il.lAKTOO
Western Penn. Rail. Mortgage Six
Percent, lionda (Penn. 1 Call road
gnaranlen) J0,fi33M0
Bute of Tennessee Fire Per Oentl
loan gl,U001H)
St-ate of TunnMuiM His Per Cant.
11,01)0
60.1XX)
&il,l)00
125,000
60,000
91 ',000
36,000
Ss,000
80,000
7,000
16,000
lo.oou
6,000
SO.OUO
8u7,iMI
loan B.031'25
Uermantown Gas Company, pirn
cipal and Intaroat guaranWied by
City ot Philadelphia, DO0 share
SUick U.OOODO
Pennsylvania Itailnuui t lomnanv. 91)0
shares Stuck 11.3X) t
North Pennsylvania Railroad Co., 100
share Mock 8,500'DO
Philadelphia and Southern Mail
. Steamship Co., i Sharen Stock 15,000110
Loans on Kond and M nrt.iriurn. timk
Liens on City Properties fcrt.ORl'UO
81.1oV,00 Par. Market value, $U3");BiT16
Cost. 81.093.tKH .
Roal Folate IW.miO-tlO
Pills receivable for Insurance made &12,4oti'M
uaiancea aue at agencies, premiums on manna
policies, acorued interest, and oLhardubts due
the company 40,178'88
Stock and scrip of sundry corporations, $31jS.
Katimated value 1,813 00
Caah in bank 11h 1AI IM
Cash In drawer 413 o5 116.5H3 78
$l,lH7.3n"7t0
PIBECOIIS.
Thomas O. Hand, K.dmund A. Sunder,
Jolin C. tavis, Samuel K. Stokes,
James O. Hand, Honry Sloan,
Theophilus Paulding, William O. Ludwig,
Joseph H. Heal, George O. Leipor,
Hugh Craig, Honry O. Uallett, Jr.,
John R. Penrose, John I). Taylor,
Jacob P. Jones, Guorge W. liernsdon,
Jamos Traquair, William U. lloulton,
Kdward Darlington, ! Jaoob Uiegel,
H. Jones Hrooked Spoucer Mcllvalne,
James 11. McKarland, I). T. Morgan, Pittsburg,
Kdward I-afourcado, 1 John It. Semple. "
Joalma P. Kyre, 1 A. ii. Merger, "
THOMAS C. HAND, President.
, JOHN C. DAVIS, Vioa-Preeident.
HKNRY LYI.BUHN, Socretary.
HKNKY liALL, Assistant Secretary. 10 6
1829.OHARTEK PERPETUAL,
Frantlin Fire .Insurance Company
OF PHILADELPHIA.
Office, Nos. 435 and 437 CHESNUT St
Assets ca Jai 1,1869, $2,677,37213
CAPITAL
ACCRUKD SURPLUS....
PREMIUMS
UNSKTTI.KD CLAIMS.
400,000'00
liMs:l,iV70
l,l;i,!s43J
INCOME FOR ISC9
.JtU,UUtt.
Losses paiil since 1829,over $5,500,000
Perpetual and Temporary Policies on Liberal Terms.
The Company alao issues Policies on Rente of Building
ui iu sjuub, uiuuuu xiuubs, iuu mortgagee.
DIRKCTOBB.
Alfred G. Baker.
Samuel Grant,
George W. Richards,
Isaac Lea.
r ivtpr.
Thomas Sparks,
William S. Grant,
Thomas S. Kills.
George Pales,
Gustavus 3. Benson.
ALFRED G. BAKKR. President
JAR. W. McALLlSTKR, .Secretary.
1 11KODOKK M. REUKR, Assistant Secretary.
89
A S B U R Y
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
No. 2P1 BROADWAY Cor. READE St., New York.
('null C'npilnl K 130,000
8Ui6,oo0 Deposited with the State of New York as Security
for Policy Holders.
LEMUEL BANGS, President.
GEORGE ELLIOTT, Vice-President and Secretary.
EMORY MoCLINTOCK Actuary.
A. E. M. PURDY, Al. D Medical Examiner.
Thomas T. Tanker,
KKFKKKNCES BY FKHMISHIOM.
John M. Maria.
J. B. Lipplnoott,
James long,
James Hunter,
cnaries bnencer.
John A. Wright,
Artfeur G. Coffin,
William Divine,
S. Morris Wain,
John B.MoC'rearr.
h. ii. worne.
In the character of He Directors, economy of manage
ment, reasonableness of rates. PARTNERSHIP PLAN
OF DECLARING DIVIDENDS, no restriction in female
lives, and absolute non-forfeiture of all policies, and no re
striction of travel after the first year, the ASBUKY pre
sents a combination of advantages offered by no other
company. Policies issued in every form, and a loan of one
thira made when desired.
Spkcial Advantaokj Oftorrd to Cleboymen.
For all farther information, ad re as
JAMES M. LONG ACRE,
Manager for Pennsylvania and Delaware.
Office, No. Sua WALNUT Street, Philadelphia.
FORM AN P. UOLUNSHEAD Special Agent. 4 165
3 trTctly mutual.
Provident Life and Trust Co.
OF PHILADELPHIA.
a
OFFICE, No. 1H8. FOURTH STREET.
Organised to promote LIFE INSURANCE among
members of the Society of Friends.
Good risks of any cluas accepted.
Policies issued on approved plans, at the lowest
raU'L
President, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY,
Ytce-Presldeut, WILLIAM C. LONUSTKETH,
Actuary, ROWLAND PARKY.
The advantages oilered by thla Company are tin
excelled. a i 2jj
JNSUKE AT HOME,
IN THK
Penn Mutual Life Insurance
COMPANY.
No. 1121 CHESNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA.
AET, 82,000,000.
CHARTERED BY OUR OWN STATE.
JIANAiiED BY OUR OWN CITIZENS.
LOSSES PROMPTLY PAID.
POLICIES ISSUED ON VARIOUS PLANS'. .
Applications may be made at the Home Oftlce, and
at the Agencies throughout the State, 2 is,
JA.MEM TRAQUAIR PRESIDENT
SA.U EL E. STOKES VICE-PRESIDENT
JOHN W. IIOUNOU ,..A. V. P. and ACTUARY
HORATIO S. STEPHENS SECRETARY
THE ENTERPRISE INSURANCE COMPANT
1 OK PHILADELPHIA.
Cthie S. W. Corner EOI'KTH and WALNUT Streets.
KIIJE INST K A.NI E EXCLUSIVELY.
PERPETUAL AND TERM POLICIES ISSUED.
Cai-ii Capital iji'Jim.iitiirfln
tuuh Awels, May, Wi, OVEK HALF A MILLION
DOLLARS.
DIRECTORS.
F. Ratcbford Starr,
I. Livincelnn Krrimn.
JNalliro f ra.ier.
Jamos L. Cliiirhm-n,
William (J. lioulton,
Charles Wheeler,
Thomas H. Montgomery,
.John M. Atwood,
Hi nmiinn T. Trudiik,
Ct'ortie H. Stuart,
i tin II. bruwii,
Thin Company insure only Hit-claaa ri-k, taking no
q.et-ially hazardous ri&ks whatever, such as factories,
mihs, etc.
E RATCIII ORD STARR. President.
THOMAS H. MONTGOMERY, Vice President.
A I.HAM'H1 W. Wihteh, Secretary. Jj 6i
"PIKENIX INSURANCE COM TAN V OF
J PHILADELPHIA.
INCORPORATED 1"4-CHARTER PERPETUAL.
No. WALNUT Street, oppiwiiu the Exchange.
Thin Company lnauren from In or damage by
EIRE,
on lilieral terma, on huilduiife, merchandise, furniture,
oti'., tor limited period, and permanently on buildiuga by
depotit ot preiniuma.
The Company ha been In active operation for more than
SIXTY YEARS, duiinif which all loaae have buen
promptly adjuolod aud paid. a
tianieg Aertsen.
John L. limine,
ikviil rvria.
nt. i'.. jvianouy,
John T. Lew la,
William S. (I rant,
Robert W. I-aamlnfr,
lleiijaimn Ktting,
Thimiaa II. Powow,
A. It. Mi-Henry,
Edmund Caatillon,
i'. lara rt uarion,
l-awmiice Jowia, Jr
nainiuii nuox,
Lewia 1 1. Noma.
Jr.. Lewis 1 1. ftorria.
I.lllV It WllOlll.'lf I, I! Pm.l I...,, a
SAMUEL Wjwq. Suvrvtary. 4 an
I N SURA N Oft..
riMLK PENNSYLVANIA KIRK INSURANCE
X . OOMTANY.
- . -JJDf1T',,'d litii-Chartw Pntnal
"Si."',?; WA1'N v Si.reet, optHMile Independence S-inar.
Thin Company, favnrah v hnm. l .. i
ever forty yeara. ermt.lnuea to Innnre anlnit lone or ilvnul -by
Are on Puhlie or Print Knildlmra, either permannntly
or for a llmMd time. A I no on Enrniuire, Stock of Oooda,
Their Capital, ttwethnr witii a Urwe fcurnlue Fun, I, U ia
veated In Uie moet oarefnl manner, vrhieb enable Uiem ut
offer to tho inanred an undoubted, eourity in tbo nit of
loea.
Panlel Smith. Jr..
DIREOTOII". ...... - -
Jinn IMiTivrent,
Tnomaa hmita. ,
Henry I .em, '
.1 1 Ii . I. ui.
Aleiander llennon,
laaao liar.leliurat.
Tnomaa Hoblna,
J , j V '""a
DAMKL SMITH, Jb., Preatdnnt.
WM. O. OROWKLL. SoonitJir till
OFFICE OF THE INSURANCE COMPANY
OK NORTH AMERICA, No. StU WALNUT Street.
Philadelphia. -
Incorporated 17!M. Charter Perpetual, , ,
Panital. .r.On.nOll 1 '
Aaaeta f? IvV.ilW
MARINE, INLAND, AND EIRE I.VSURANOK.
OVER $30,(XI0,lKjn LOSSES PAID SINCE. ITS OIWAN-
IS. A I 1111.
Arthur V. r.ntT.
WltKIlTOIlH.
rrancin It. Coim,
Edward II. Tru'tor,
Edward S. Clarke,
T. Charlton Henry,
Alfred D. .lenvip,
John P. Whit,
I -il I fl MailairA.
IKam mil W. Jnnntt,
John A. Brown.
Chnrloft Taylor,
Amhrot White,
W illiam WpIhIi,
H. Morris Wain,
.lfi)in 1iLMain
Ch&rloa W, CuaiiaiAfi.
etrfte U Ilurridon, '
ANTIITTW CI f'HlTIV T i.-l a, I
. CH AJil.KS FLA TT, Vice-IWJunt.
MATT11IAH MAlUrt, rwuTotnry. g
pi PE11IAL FIRE INSURANCE CO.
LONDON.
ESTABLISHED 1N03.
Tald-up Capital and Accumulated Funds,
SH,000,000 IN GOLD.
PREV06T & HEREIN G, Agent,
2 4 No. 10T S. TUIRD Street, Philadelphia,
CIIAS. M. PREVOST. CTIA8. P. IIKRRINO
ROOFINO.
KEADY ROOFING.
This Rooting la adapted to all bnildinsa. It can b
applied to
BTEEP OR FLAT ROOFS
at one-half the exnenae of tin. It 1 readily pot on old
Shingle Roofa without removing the shingle, thu avoid
ing the damaging of oeiling and furniture while under.
foing repaint. (No gravel used. )
KKSKBVK YOUR TIN ROOFS WITH WKLTOiTB
ELASTIC PAINT.
I tm always prepared to Repair and Paint Roofs at short
notice. Alao, PAINT FOR SALE by the barrel or gallon,
the beet and cheapest in the market,
w, A. WFLTOff
No. 711 N. NINTH Street, ahove Ooate. and
S 1"? No. 818 WALN UT Street.
ki:
KICAI
are selling their celebrated paint for TIN ROOKS and
for preserving all wood and metal. Also, their solid com
plex roof covering, the beat ever offered to the public, with
Lrunhea, cans, buckets, etc., for the work. Anti-vermin,
Eire, and Water-proof; Light, Tight, Durable. No crack
ing, pealing, or shrinking. No paper, gravel, or heat. Uood
for all climates. Directions given for work, or good work
men supplied. Care, promptness, certainty! One pnoe!
Call! Examine! Judge!
Agents wanted for interior counties.
4 i'tf JOSEPH LEEDS,' PrincipaL
TO BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS.
We aro prepared to furnish English imported
ASPHALTIU ROOEINU FELT
In qnantities to suit. This rooting was need to oorer the
Paris Exhibition in li".
MERCHANT A OO..
4 29Sra Nos. 517 and 619MINOR Street.
ROOFING. LITTLE & CO., "THE LIVE
ROOFERS." No. 1238 MARKET Street. Every
description of Old and Leaky Roots mads tight and war
ranted to keep in repair for live years. Old Tin Roofa
made equal to new. A trial only required to insure aat re
faction. Orders promptly attended to. 18 Urn
OLDGRAVEL ROOFS COVERED OVER
with liastie Slate, and warranted for ten yearn.
HAMILTON A OOORFER.
8 168m No. 46 8. TENTH Street.
FURNITURE, ETC
JOHN F. FOREPAUGH & SON,
Successors to Richmond A Forepaugh,
FUKIUTTUZIXJ WAZlBROOXkZS
NO. 40 SOUTH SECOND STREET,
8 75 West Side, Philadelphia.
WINES.
HER MAJESTY
CHAMPAGNE.
DUNTON & LUSSON, h
215 SOUTH FRONT 8T. 11
THE ATTENTION OP THE TRA19E IS
solicited to tho following very Choioa Wines, Ao., foe
sal by
DUNTON LUSSON, '
915 SOUTH FRONT STREET.
CHAMPAGNES. Agents for Her Majesty. Duo da Moo.
tebello.Carte Blene, Carte Blanche, and OhaaFarre's Grand
Via Eugenie and Vin Imperial, M. K'leeman A Oo.. of
Mavence, Sparklinjr Moselle and RHINE WINKS.
MADKlRAS.-Old Island, South Side Reserve.
SHERRIES. F. Rudolphe, Amontillado. Topai, Val
lette. Pale and Golden Bari Crown, Ao. P.
PORTS.-Vinho Velho Real, Valletta and Grown.
CLARETS. Promis Aine A Oi., Monti errand and Bor
deani. Claret and Sautern Wine.
GIN. "Med er Swan."
BRANDLKfi.-UnneM7, Otard. Dapnj A Co.' varionj
intacea, 4 4
c
ARSTAIRS
&
M c O A h L,
No. 126 WALNUT and 21 GRANITE Street.
Importers of
BRANDIES, WINES, GIN, OLIVE OIL, ETO.,
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
For tbe sale of
PURE OLD RYE, WHEAT, AND BOURBON WHIS-
K1ES. 6 88 apt
pARSTAIRS' OLIVE OIL-AN INVOICE
01 me auove ior aaie by
r)K9Tlttl A uriltr
8 22p?
Nos. 12 WALNUT and 21 GRANITE sis.
LEGAL NOTICES.
TN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOR
ia2'liFi.Ci7XiLDlCOUNTy OF PHILADELPHIA.
MARY E. IOX, by her next friend, v. ADAM FOX.
December Term, lhtW, No. a. In Divorce.
To ADAM FOX, respondent : The deposition of wit
neeves in the above case on the part of the libellant will be
taken before ISAAC S. ATKINSON, Esq., Eiaminer, at
the office, No. 12H South SIXTH Street, in the city of
Philadelphia, on FRIDAY, June 4, A. D. I80D. at I o'clock
P. M., vihen and where you maybe present if you think
proper. Personal service having failed on account of your
absence. JOHN ROBERTS.
0 It) lot Attorney pro Libellant.
IN THE ORPHANS' COURT FOR THE CITY"
aa.t v-uirn j 1 vj 1- riiiiiAur.ijrniA,
L'.i.,.nMI I 1)11 . . I J 'I' I.' I ..
j'.state ot juaiua uaki kh, a Minor.
The Auditor appointed by tho Court to audit, settle, and
adjimt the account of CHARLES CARTER, Guardian of
the Estate of MARIA CARTER, and to report distribu
tion of the balance in the hands of the accountant, will
Autr.-i me pan ie iiuerum eti, ior ine purpoae oi ma appoint
ment, on TUESDAY, June 1, lutiH, at 11 o'clock A M
at his ottice, No. 430 WALNUT Street, in the city of Phil!
d9,:"1- . JAMES U. CAMPBELL,
Auditor.
7 T N1TEU MAILS PATENT OFFICE
vJ Wahhinuton, I). C May 7. 1M6V '
tin the petition of SARAH T. STONE. 0 Philadelphia
Pa . adiiiiniatratri of the estate of AM ASA STONE de
ceased, Pruying for t he extension of a patent granted to
the said A. MAS A MuNE.on tho 7th of day of August
IkS.-, lor an improvement in forming Screw Thread, etc
in tho Necks ol Glass Hetties and similar artiolee.
It is ordered that said petition be heard at this office on
the Sunday of July neat Any person may oppose thii
extension. Objections, depositions, and other imiiii
should bo hied iu this olHce twenty days before the dav M
he.niig SAMUEL B. FISHER,
J".1"1-'1 . onimiiMioner of Patent.
l.E?JLfLANOE:S, ETO.
a- NOTICE TIIW TlVllvna r
''3 11 , uiiuunumnirii
-i would callth. : attention of the public to hi.
Thl. i. . - 1" -" V V1'15 . V RNACK.
a. to one'.' commend i.aeltoVenetal 'favor' ftfnT.10
nation of wrought aud eas? f,n "it i, w,mi!tl?' itl
construction, and I perfectly air tight Vltle.n ! ! k iU
ing no pipe, or drum, ,0 b, taken out ind el "n jd' It".'
so arranged with upright tluus as to nioIi.T 1 H
amount of heat from the earn weight of Snal?EV U7
doui
I V,. S!,.IA "!''' WILLIAMS.
I o. 1 Ui and 1 1 Jl MARKET Street,
aT&resJs-Sfe
K. il.-JohhiK of all kind promptly dona. j.
T'O OWNERS, ARCHITECTS, " BUILDERS
X AND ROOFERS. Roof.' V V. . ,
nd. old or new. At No. 543 N. Til IRI) Street.. th A M if.
CONCRETE PAINT AND Ronw dipawv

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