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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, June 02, 1869, FIFTH EDITION, Image 6

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THE DAILY EVENING TELEORAm FHILADELriHA, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 1869.
HTERATUHD.
REVIEW O F N E H BOOKS.
From Cluxton, lU'inften fc 1 1. ifto finder wc
Imrc received "The WcddinR Tiny In all Ai;cs
and Countries," by Edward J. Wood. This is a
cry complete, very Interesting, and very amus
ing dissertation on the marriage ceremonies and
custOYns in all rjjos and among all natiouB. The
" . author has made a very thorough Investigation
of his subject, and the book is f$ of curious
Information, which makes It very pleasant
reading.
Wc give n few extracts as samples of the
kook:
"The Copts, an Egyptian ra-'fl, who were sernt.
Christians, hml th! following marring; custom in
the seventeenth century. On the wcdit!n day tins
bride cariu! to the husband's houso, and then they
both with their relations Hint friends, went to
church. The procession, which jrenerally started in
th evonintf, was accompanied by Hinders, who
chanted hymns, men whJ struck little talilet.s of
rbonv wlfh wooden hammers for music, and oth -rs
who carried lighted torches and candles. On reach
na the church, the liride(?rooiii, together with the
other men, was seated in the choir; mid ths lrido
was placed apurt with the women. 'J'lie pr.e.sls at
Intervals, accoinpaiiled hy thu peoplu, reclteil lengthy
and monotonous prayers and hymns. Then t he chief
priest approached the brldi'ttroom, and read several
nioro prayrs to him, and s.gned li!m wtltitlm crohs
at the tx'frliinliiK and end of each. The
bridegroom then sat down on tne pround with
his face towards the Fast, and a silver crois was
held over his head until the reiiiainiiif; prayers were
concluded. The sacristan then placed a seat, for the
bride and one of her nearest relations outside tlui
choir, and led her to it. lie then robed the bride-
?Tiom in a long white (larment reaching down to liis
cet. bound his waist with a girdle, and put a white
cloth npou his head. Thus attired, he was led to
the bride, and the priest, placing them close to cae.li
other, covered both with the same cloth, and
anointed their foreheads and wrisls with oil.
He then joined their rltrlit hands, and read aloud t he
iutlm ol their new life. Mori; prayers followed, and
alter mass, in which tho couple communicated, the
ceremony was at an end. A Copt priest at the pie
weiit day Is forbidden to marry again ou thy deal h of
his wife.
"The Muhomertan Copts kill a sheep as soon as the
bride enters the bridegroom's house, and she is
obliged to step over the blood, which is made to How
upon the threshold of the door."
"The ancient Persians, irom a notion that married
people were peculiarly happy in the future state,
used to hire persons to be espoused to such of their
relations as had died in celibacy. In fact, llvinu
people were married to the dead. The Persians con
sidered a numerous posterity to be a gilt from
heaver, and thu fathers of large families received
rewards from the State They had many wives and
concubines, and. according to some authors, the
grandees married their nearest female relations. In
the seventeenth century tho nobility might have as
many wives as they pleased; but the commonalty
were limited to seveu; and they might part with
them at discretion.
"When a Persian made love ie sometimes burned
himself on a visible part, in order to prove his faith
fulness to his mistress, who, if she accepted him,
jrave him silken sears to bind up. his wounds. On
the wedding day of a wealthy man his relations and
friends met, at his house, the noarest of them being
dressed in his livery, and the rest as well as they
could be. The bride started from her house on horse
back, accompanied by her relations and friends, all
mounted, with many slugeU in front. The l.riiie
groom also left his house in similar style; and the
two companies having mot, they a I went together
to the bride's house, where they danced. At ninht
two men conducted the bridegroom into tho bride's
chamber, and the couple were left together; the
company in the meantime continuing their ball.
About midnight an old woman brought to the com
pany some evidence of tho bride's purity, an 1 then
great rejoicing followed. Put if such evidence could
not he produced, the old woman took the bride from
the bed; and the bridegroom rejected her in tne
presence of tho company, uud sent lier home by her
parents.
"In more modern times matrimony in Pers'awas
so expensive an aif.ilr, that. th meaner chins of the
people took concubines instead of wives. Tri Ma
liomedans In that country t ok wives in one of three
ways; namely, by purchase, hire, or marriage. Of
the espoused wives, four were allowed, but in general
only one was taken. Marri tga contracts were made
by parents for their children when the latter were at
a very early age girla at twelve, and boys between
twelve and fourteen. Frequently the man married
ly proxy, and did not see his wne until alter eon-
Kutnination, wincn sometimes aid not take place
. until several days after the wile had been at her
husband's house. Generally the husband and wile
were strangers to eicjli other uoti! thoy were aeUialiy
pledged In matrimony.
"The courtship commenced by an elderly fema'e
being employed by the bridegroom's relations to visit
the lady selected by them; and her olllee was to as
certain the maiden's personal attractions ami endow
ments, and other requisite information. If the report
was favorable, the lnends of the Intended husband
sent sponsors to the lady's relations to exolain Ins
merit and pretensions, and to make a formal oiler
of marriage. If ho was ace jpted, the chlels of the
two families met, and the necessary contract was
drawn up; the presents and gills proposed by the
bridegroom's parents were arranged ; and when n'l
was finally settVd, the documents were signed and
witnessed before the Cadi. iSouietimes tho marriage,
broker was a man who lived by the profession of
iiiatch-makmg. ,
"On the duy before the wedding, the bride took a
bath; am) the bridegroom Heat iter soma Ik-ium,
with which after her bath her hands and feet were
stained. Iler eyebrows and forehead also were
tinted with a powder. The bridegroom was colored
in the Hame way with henna. On tho eve of the
nuptial celebration, the bride's friends assembled at
her house, attended by musicians and dauclng-glrls.
On the morning of tne wedding day the husband sent
a train of mules, laden with the promised gilts, to his
bride; tne whole being attended by numerous ser
vants, and preceded by music, besides tho presents
for the lady, the servants carried noli viands on silver
trays, ready nrenared to be immediately nlaced be
fore the inmates of the bride's house. Tho day was
spent by them in leastlng and rejoicing.
"Towards the evening the maiden was enveloped
in a long veil of scarlet or crimson silk, placed upon
ahorse or mule splendidly caparisoned, and con
ducted to her husband's house, accompanied by all
her relations and a noisy band of musicians. Ou the
way, a large looktng-glass was held before her by one
of her maidens, as an admonition that that was the
last time she would see herself as a virgin. When
she had alighted at her husband's door, she was met
by tils father and mother, and lee', by her female rela
tions and servants to her apartment, Iler mile
friends repaired to the bridegroom's rooms, where,
beiug met by his relations, all of them feasted and
made merry, with musical accompaniments. The
men and women supped separately. When the meal
was ended, the bride waa condjeted to the nuptial
chamber, where her husband met her and lieheld her
for the first time. Shortly afterwards he returned to
his party, and an old woman in waiting led the lady
baok to tier female friends. A space of time being
allowed for botii sots of relations to congratu
late the couple on their marriage and Its consumma
tion, the couple repaired again to their chamber lor
the night, leaving their friends to keep up the
revelry, which lasted several days.
"Tlie marriage con'ract stipulated lor the settle
ment of a certain sum of money and other present h
n tho bride, proportionate to the fortune ol the
bridegroom. This Jointure was Intended for her sup
port in case of a divorce. If t ie bridegroom was In
medium circumstances he gave his bride two com
plete dresses, a ring, and a mirror; he also supplied
Uic furniture, carpets, mats, culinary utensils, and
other necessaries lor their home. It was deemed tlie
greatest possible disgrace to take baok au ailianced
bride after she had loft her home to go to the bride
groom's house. When, therefore, tho latter had
promised a jointure beyond his means, he shut his
toor against the bride's cavalcade, and declared that
lie would not have her Unless tne jointure would lie
reduced. A negotiation took place between the par
ties, and the matter was ilna'ly adjusted aczording
to his wishes, to save the scandal or taking back the
maiden.
"Another marriage custom with the Persians was
for the parties to meet at midnight on a bed in the
presence of two sponsors, who held rice in their
bands as an emblem of fruitfuluess. Tho sponsor for
the man, touching the woman's forehead, asked her
If she would have tne man; and the sponsor for the
woman performed tlie sauie ceremony to the man.
The hunrin of the parties were then joined, the rice
was scattered over them, aud prayers for their fruit
fulness were offered.
"The archieology of marriage In India is curious,
and the nuptial contract there Is entered into with
many ceremonies. According to Hindu legend,
hvemkete abolished promiscuous intercourse, anil
instituted marriage. By the Hindu laws a- girl may
be married at eight years of age, or .even earlier;
and, if her father fail to give her a husband for throe
.years after she is capable of being a parent, she is
at liberty to choose one for herself. Tho parties to
Indian marriages are usually chlldreu under ten
years of age. These promuturo unions, instead of
producing attachment, often cause early and lasting
disagreements.
"Men may marry women of the class ijftow them,
tint on no account of those superior to their own. A
wan mm not marry within six known degrees of
relationship, nor with any woman whoso family
name, being the same as his own, shows her to bo
of the same ratio as himself. The marriage of eouais
is most recommended, lor tho first wile aM.'asf
tuat of BraliiuUi with a Budja-ihut is, one V the
' st. or servile cIkro Is rtist.nu raged; and, as a tir-t
oc, it is positively torbidrlen. Marriage Is indlsuoi i
ble, ami the parties are bound to preserve mutual
fidelity. , ,
"From the few cases hep-after Sp.-efiled, in which
the husband may tjie a second wlfe.lt mny bo lot
fcrrcd, cays Jtlphlnstonc, in his 'HiHtory of India,'
from v horn In part we gather these points of Hindu
law, that with these exceptions lie must have only
one wife; but the marriage of widows h discouraged,
If not prohibited, except In the case of Madras. A
wife who is barren for eight years, or she who has
produix-d no male children in eleven, may be sup ;r
Feded by another wife It appears, notwithstanding
this expression, that the first wife married retains
the highest rank in the family. Drunl.en and Im
moral wives, those who bearmnbee to their hus
bands, or are guilty of very great cxtravag nee, may
also be superseded. A wile who leaves her hus
band's house, or neglect 1,1,1, f,,r a twclvemoun,
without, a caiiM', may be deserted altogether. A nun
poing abroad must leave a provision for his wiie.
j v. in: m iiiiiiiiii 10 u.ii ior hit aoseni rrisbaiui ror
eight years. If lie be pom on religious duty ; six. If
In pursuit ol knowledge or fani"; ami three, if for
pi Hsure only. The r. "tico i allowing a man to
iHlse up issue to his bro: her. if be died without chil
dren, or even il, alihouu still alive, behave no hopes
of progeny, is reprobated, except, for Sudr.is, or in
case of a widow who I ns lost her hu-oaiid btore
Cf nsnmmatlon.
"Six foi nis of mariiiii'o are recognized as lawful.
Of these, tour only are n. lowed to linilimins, which,
although iliii.-nim in in mite particulars, ad agree ,,,
iiiM-lmg that the latlici shut I give away Ins daij-hter
v ithcut receiving u pric. The remaining two loi ms
an-permitted to !, Military emus alone, md are
abundantly libera!, i v. mi with that limitation. One
Is v. Vd, a soldier carrh s oil' a woman alt- r a victory,
and i spousi her ncattist herwib; and the oUn-'r,
when coiiMiiniiuitton iaj.es place by mutual omen;,
without any lormal o remnny whatever. In the
'li.stituii-ij t . ,,.,irriage by capture is ii,ri
tlt.ne.l as one of me j,ir i.s of the nuptial ceremony
used by the tour -... es in India. t Is called
I':vsli:'ii , and N oc. ,-ibed as 'ifie seizure of u
maiden by f"rec fr in -r bonne, while she weeps
ami calls lor ii-m-ii. e, alter her kinsmen an I
fneiiiis have been slu, n n battle or wounded, and
their henscs broken d.. ,,.' J tie 1 rm ol capture is
sli., in use among tlie li'udus, and in fact tt is pn
MYi'.ed pi n m!'.rrii!'.'e -ri -runny in the 'Sutras,' in
which It. is t rovldcd. tmt At a certain important
stiii'c of the rites, a MT" ig man and the bridegroom
tdiall fcrcibly draw tie- oride, and make her s!t down
on a red ox skin.
"Two hoi ts ol innr.i. ge are forbidden; namely.
When the lather rcce ves a nuptial present; and
when the woman, fron, .ntoxicition or other cause,
ha- been incapable of j iving a real consent, to the
union. The prohibition, po oifen repeated in Menu,
against the receipt b;, tlie bride's father of any pre
sent irom the In Idegroom, is now more strictly ob
served than It was in hi" time. Tile point of honor
in this respect is carried so fur, that, it Is reckoned
disgraceful to receive toy assistance in alter lile
from a son-in-law or b, i. hcr-iu-law.
"it is indispensable I'uit, the bridegroom should
come to the house ol t!:e father-in-law to sue for the
bride, and the marriage must be performed there.
At the visit of the sua the ancient, modes of hos
pitality arc maintained, according to a prescribed
form. The sort, ol rn'-i rainmeiit still appears in Ihe
production ol a cow to be killed for the feast ; but
the suitor now intercedes lor her life, and she is
turned loose at. his reipiest. In tlie c-iso of princes,
where the bride comes irom another country, a tem
porary building Is erected with great m.ig'ndlcence
and expense, us a h ai-e for the bride s father; and
in all cases the procession in which the bride is
taken home alter the marriage Is as showv as the
parties call ail'ord. I , i Uniigal these processions are
particularly sumptuous, and marriages there have
noon kitowu to cos; ,u s ot rupi s."
From the sail'.'- house we have received
The 1 Indue flbb; or. It.i'y in 1 .7.l." by .Tames
de Ville. Tills, lively scries ot sketches was
orii.',m.ii.y published in llarnr. Majm'itr,
wh-jvc they uitracted considerable attention, and
there are doubtless i.i.uiy persons who will be
pleased to repei'iiso tliem in their collected form.
rrora Turner lb-others A: Co. wc have re
ceived "Contributions to the Border Minstrelsy
ntid lialliida, by S,r Waiter Scott, being; the
fourth volume id (be Edinburgh edition of
Scott's works. This is a cheap,. elegant, and
complete edition ol S r Walter fSi ott's poetic.il
writings, which will consist of five volumes,
and give all his poo , is, dramas, etc., with tl.e
original introduction and va.lua.blo notes.
'J'he Kime house sends us the second monthly
part of Applet",,'.- innn', and "Apiih-fon's
K.ilhvay aud Swum N..vipitiou tiuiilc" tor .Tune,
lbO'J.
Tho. Lit Of C'orM.e, 5fiirJr.no, published by
Alfred L. ghewel' : Co.. Cli-Vago. II!., lias an
at'i'iiCtive table o! cutouts, as usual.
Grace Greenwood has sold her Liilii-
fjrim to the publislic s ot thin magazine, and it
will hereatter be issued in conjunction with the
J.it'lo Corporal. fraee Greenwood, however,
will continue to write lor it ns lier tub-a-.
From Turner Brother, it Co. wc h ive re
ceived "Vill.i Eden.' by lloi'tliold Aucib.'uli,
Part li, translated by Charles C. ttlinek ford, and
'The, Virginians," by VV. M. Thackeray, both of
wlibdi -ire low !;. -d paper cover editions,
primed on lo.k! paper wii.ii clear type.
Cluxton, Keniseu & IJaffclbngcr send us the
lourth and coin-Hidlnji part ot Ancrb.icli's "Vilbi
or ;hc liliine" (p. -.per edition), and the second
bound ol imc o: tit'- same work, which com
pletes it In it neat an.! attractive style lor the
library. This is one of the most fascinating
works ol fiction o: the (ley; it has already
gained n largo circle, ot readers, and has greatly
cnl.eiiccd the author's reputation in I'nl.s country,
and we art stiie '.hi. J. the more it is road the
better it will bo appr elated, no loss for its pure
and griccfiil style t, .u: !. the interest ot tlie
narrative.
FASHIONS.
I'lt'fit y.eii'.
The newest atitl most elegant spring dresses
are trimmed wH.i cvcral narrow ('ounces,
pinked. This style is much the best tor short
skirls, which reipi'ro to be made scanty, and are
prcatiy improved by iiaving many narrow, in
stead "of one broa.l flounce. The ' Sultiiiie
Anglaisc,'' striped nn.l chiucc, or th same ma
terial shot In two co ors grey mid ripe corn,
violet and green, tre-en and' inulc, rose-color
and grey, being; some of the lavorilo mixtures
is much used, triinii.t d with flounces of pinked
silk of one ol the suades. The new japonaise.
siik and the celeste empire arc also very fash
ionable, tho former having all this richness in
appearance of gros-j; ain poult de soic, with the
durability ol a tail and the great advantage oi
not crumpling. Tic: celeste empire is between
n foulard and China, crape, which gives it a
silvery appearance, and has u ehurmiug eltoi t
with colors such us turquoise blue, primrose,
lilas do Perse, roso-enior, and a soft greou.
l'anicr are 6till cry much worn; Cut thu upper
skirt, cut rather loni. at tint back, caught up
slightly at each side, and made cither round, and
not drawn in at the lower edge, or open and
pointed, is daily gaining favor, and is certainly
much more elegai.t and becoming than the
voluminous paniers u loptcd by some.
Ajuong the most charming walking-drcs-e, is
one tho skirt of will h was ol timpioise l ine,
trimmed with six na: row lloiitices. Second skirt
of faille modorce. with ruche ot blno up each
side. This skirt is raised at the back by the endrt
of a gilct mar.Ul.se, which Is made with rovers
lined with blue, and edged with a narrow ru die.
A costume of tdiot foulard, blue and grey, the
lower skirt trimmed with n wldo plaiting, stir
mounted by a ruelie of grey lined with blue,
the upper ekirt ol grey is trimmed with two
flounces of blue, and four largo poults drawn in
at the Fides Plain high body, trimmed with a
ruche like that on Uie skirt, so as to imitate, a
s.iiaro body. Muni. Ho echarpc with a hood,
drawn together at tho waist, and fastened at the
buck with large bows of blue poult de soic. Tho
mnntelle is trimmed with a frill uud ruche to
match the ekirt. A ery pretty dinner or visit
ing dress of mauve laille, with a long train Kt
the bottom ol the sk.i t are two flounces, plaited
one of deep mauve, and tho other a lighter
color. Above each llounce a bias told, bound
with Putin. This trimming ends at the sido
under a large how. body u rovers of light mauve
with jabots of lace. Long sleeves open up tho
back of the arm.
Auother dinner dicss of poult do solo lilus
d'Fspagne, trimmed up each side with bouil
Joijjjcb cf tie same, A bounce ol rich guipure,
about a quarter of a yard deep, bended by a
bouillon, is placed round the bot tom of the kirl
and a second flounce, beginning at the w-ii-a
behind the bouillonnes, in carried ronnd the
train at the back, so as to fall 'a little over tho
bouillon. Body open to tho waist in front and
trimmed with lace. Long sleeves, open up the
back of the arm. ChornisoUc of luce
A third of shot silk grey and male, trimmed
round the skirt with boulllonno and two narrow
pinked flounces, one at each edge. Upper skirt
of the same silk, making n short square t.iblier
in front, where it ends under two lone pnns
trimmed with a narrow bouillonnc edged with
pinked frills. Tho back of this okirt is open to
the waist, and forms two long points, the whole
trimmed to match the rest of the dress Hilk
nish, fastened at tho back with large' bows
This dress may be made much more elegant by
tne Fiiiiptittition oi lace for the flniinces. and n
mtin or crnpe bouillonnc. B-eteliesof silk laee
and high body of black or white tulic, complete
the elegant costume.
For ball dress, a robe of white foulard, with
satin ftripes. The lower skirt, with a long train
is trimmed with forr thinners, cut crdssway'
headed by a band of white satin, edged with
ponceau, and trimmed w ith small rosettes oi
white blonde, with centres of ponceau satin.
Punier skirt of foulard, drawn up at each side
under large bows ot ponceau satin, and trimmed
witli two thinners; the heading to match tho
lower hkirt. Low body, trimmed with a tu rtle
repeating the trimming on the sklrtx. '
Kobe of pink tulle, composed entirely of nar
row flounces edged w ith satin, with a long skirl
of tulle entirely covering it, and drawn up at
one side by u long wreath ot snow-t crr.es.
C-orselot of pink satin, with a berth! of pink
tulle, and a small wreath of snow-berries.
!-'kirt of white silk, trimmed with narrow trills
of blue crape placed mi ns to touch each othci;
this trimming is carried a quarter of a yard up
tint skirt, and above it is a wreath ol roses with
leaves mixed with bows of blm; satin. Aoove
this is another set of frills, about two-thirds the
width ol those below. Upper skirt of crape,
very short in the front, and quite long at the
back, trimmed with a frill of crape headed by a
bouillonnc of the same, and bouquet ot roses
and satin bows alternately. Low Pody. trimmed
with a trill of crapf uiid very lino" wreath of
roses. Hash of sntiu, tied in long loops at the
hack.
Fancy tind plain straws are coming into favor.
fcoinofinicK it is a diadem of straw, trimmed
with ribbons and lace; but the stvle most in
favor is a very small f.inchoii of straw, bound at
each edge with velvet or satin, and ulmost cov
ered with a large bouquet of (lowers. Thus a
chapcau "Floriau" ol tine straw bound with
black velvet trimmed with a large bouquet on
the top of field tlowcrs mixed with lino grass.
Brides of blaclt lace fastened by a small bouquet.
A diadem of "il.iry Mimrt" oi lace straw, sur
mounted by wreath of blue ribbon bows. Across
the diadem is a coquille of black lace mixed
with coin-flowers and wheat-ears. Across the
top ol the chignon is a frill of the straw mixed
with ends of ribbon, rather king. Brides of
black or white blonde fastened by a bouquet of
corn-llowcrs.
Chape-ail "Itiiper.itriee." A diadem of rice
straw, bound with green velvet, trimmed with
branches oi white life- f.illiii': ou ei.-li side, nod
one very long, like a Hat teath'-r uc-o-s the
chignon. A scart of Malines lace forms the
strings, which arc fastened at the .-idc bv a
bouquet of lilac.
A bandeau of rice straw, entirely covered with
rose leaves ami small green bud. At the side
is placed a rose, and two long widths of buds
and leaves are carried down tlie scarf of black
tulle.
Chapcau caniargo. made with double rovers of
finey straw, disposed en buichon: the rovers
lined witli violet velvet. A poult of white lace,
in the centre of winch is a lar-c heart's-ease.
placed between the rovers. The ,vr is carried
across the back oi the lam lion, and fastened by
seeond heart's-eu' under the cliignoo.
Diadeinc marquise" of blue tulle, verv lull.
and mixed with bows of blue, satin ribbon. A
rouleau ol blue satin around each edge. At tin;
side a bouquet of white daisies, surroui.ded by a
small gold butterfly.
1 he poult of black lace; serving as a support.
to a nest formed ol heath, moss b-aves. and
m'n'ature wild llowe.rs, such a-, bluebells, dai-ics,
forget-me-nots, and lilie of-t!ie-'.alley. in the
midst of which is placed a very small humming
bird, as if in the act. of tly'ng from the ties;.
Strings of blonde, fastened " by a bow ol I'i.e k
satin.
'Flu I:ii-iimi P;irjnlt'.
A Paris correspondent writes; "We get pcoe
Irom nil parts ol the globe, who too oiten lal. in
love witli I'aris and do not like to go home ng iin.
I was calling lately on a Peruvian family. Tim
mother is one of those grand t'panisl; beamios,
willi big eyes and pale complexion, and tho
I.iini.i.ir ligui'c that gels vciy full am! round ut
thirty, felie tells me thai, she is savagely ordered
home bv her husband immediately. Mie has put,
oft her return already for six liiouths byjdci hiring
that tin- dentist said he could not complete tin;
restoration ol her teeth in less time. Beiore that
one ot the children was ill. 'And what arc von
going to do now, mtulatoc Y said 1. She looked
at uie smilingly 'Why i shall be ill
myscli, of course; my doctor has offered
to write; what I like to my husband.' Some
of her Brilannic Majesty's subjects admire
Paris so much because "they do not like London.'
You may get to like Paris lor a home for so
many and such queer reasons. I have a friend
who declares that he lives in Pari6 because he
can pass half the day uudcr cover in tho pas
sages and arcades. I wo ladies 1 know live here
because we have divorce courts. There must bo
resources also in Paris peculiar resources.
There is Major ; we all remember him
lounging about the pier at Boulogne-sur-Mcr in
seedy clothes, lie is here driving a magnificent
phirton in the Bois de Boulogne, and wearing
foreign orders. Nothing, he says, will ever in
duce him to leave Paris again. We have one or
two of the richest ot the Uussiun army among us,
who pationi.e music and the drama by protecting-
artistes. Wc have the Spanish emigrants
declaring they prefer Paris to Madrid.
It lias always puzzled mo why King Victor
Kmaiiuel does not eomo to Paris. He is fond of
horses and races and soldiering. Well, we have
le sport' lor him. too, and he is notoriously a
sportsman, lie would not come when we de
moralized so many sovereigns and primes at tho
time of the Universal Exhibition, and he will no;
come away, we hear, although invited byhli
daughter to do so, and put up at the Palais
lioyal. King Victor Emanuel, the Pope, and tho
Emperor of China are the three people we wan;
particularly to get hold of. I am quite sure th.i;.
if' the roval princes now among us would mui 1
them their diary in Paris, those illustrious ,-
sonages would no longer neglect us.'' j
Slow licsii-iMw IMctf.
'flic Newark ('auriir says: We are informed
by a prominent lawyer ol this city ihai. whiio
sojourning in Amboy last night lie passed a
pleasant hour in company with a tormor Kcijel i
ollicer, who was attached to b tone wall Jackson s '
division of the Confederate army during the
war, and who related au interesting reminis
cence of the death of General Kearney, of which
sad event ho was an eye-witness. "Tlie gallant
Kearney," he said, "received his death wound '
from a private under my command, aud when I
ho fell, from his horso I hastened, with many !
others, to tho polut where he lay, not supposing j
ion woium vi iin inoi iai one. .nisi as we reaeneu
his body, however, his limbs gave one convulsive
quiver and then all was over. Seeing that ho
was a major-general, word was sent to head
quarters to that effect, nnd tieueral Jackson
coming to the spot immediately gave one glance
at the dead officer's features, and exclaimed,
My Cod, boys, do you know whom you have
killed ? You have killed thu most gallant officer
in the United (States urmy. This is Phil. Kear
ney, who lost his arm In the Mexican war.' lfe
then voluntarily lifted his hat, every ollicer In
the group followed his example, anil for a mo
ment a reverential silence was observed by all.
Subsequently the body of the dead soldier was
placed on two boards, and when being removed
to headquarters, was followed by tlenoral Jack
son, (ieneral Kwell, and other officers, while n
regimental baud preceded it playing a dead
PAPER HANGINGS.
ARD & McKEEVER,
if ',.. 1 i
'Vo 1400 CKISNUT Street
SXIMIT STYLES.
THE FINEST f-TCC K,
THE C I IE A3 IT I ilK'E,
5 n inwtfrn
THE BEST 'OEXMANSHIP.
EJ II A Pi & V A b,
PLAIN ANI DECORATIVE
PAPER HANGINGS,
NO. 251 SOUTH THIEI KT.UEUT,
bitween walk ft )n Frr.rrB,
- ruiLAMcn-nu.
COLNTKY
TO.
VOUK JPKOIWPTLY
ATTENDED
2 18J
T OOK! LOOK!! LOOK !!! WALL PAPEK8
ek1 Linen Window Si.mfef) Manufactured, tl
eh! wt in tho ci'y. at .lOHNSTON'N l)piot. No. O.'lj
SI'H IN) A K III N Ktrret. tipitiw Klnvumli, branch. No.
KKDKKAL, Street. Carnd!, NcwJorwf. ? 1!54
REFRIGERATORS.
g A V E K Y ' 8 PATENT
com nis ed i.;-noo:r
Water-Cooler and Hcfrifjcrator.
This article hnsatankfnr Ice and water, of iron, ena
meled, arranged in am i) a munner as to cool an cnain tli.d
iron chamber, both boinfi covered with an ornamental wal
nut case; in the chamber, butter, milk, an I oilier irovi
niona can bo kept cool and sweet ; tho ice in tho water-t.-ink
la not wasted, but, up.lie at all time' cool water for drink
inn purposea. all beinu perfectly free from the tto of zinc,
or any oilier aubatanee that ran in any way be detriments!
to health: and aa thUariicio i intended for tho dininn
rmmi, ita atipnrinUinrience is easy and convenient, and it
cannot fail to recommend itself to all htiuReKeriiors aa a
upelul as well as an ornamental piece of furniture. Nos. 3
and 4 aro set on Ioks and answer the purpusoa oi side tables
in dining-rooms.
.Wo manufacture fonr size: Nos. 1. 2, 3. and 4 holding
respectively 2, 4, tl, and 8 Ballon-!. No. 1 is small, and is
smtahlo only for very small fa mi lie., or for milk nnd butter.
No. 4 for largo families, boarding ho. lees, etc. JS'os. 2 uud
3 are intermediate fies.
I l:ey eun be liad of uny responsible f-.irnishin(r .toro, or
of tuo manufacturers,
S V I
A ..
os. m4 nnd tiltj Al AUivT. p Streot,
AMI
Corner South I HOXTand ItEKP Ktreta.
fib'lm "liil.ulelpl.ia.
CHOOLEYS NEW PATENT SELF.
O YHXTILATIXG A UK It WAX
REFRIGER ATOH
.. . , ... ... t, k ... , ,
. T '
IS THE BEST AND ONLY rERKECT SELF
VENTILATING rKESEUVEK in tlie WOULD!
And will keep sticli articles as VVjretaliles, Fruiw,
MeuW Ctiiiiio, KIhIi, Milk. Et'irs. etc. etc.. iont'er.
drier, nn,i colder, witli iesu ice, than auj otiier
jtviiiLUftiui iiuw in iibe.
n. s. PAEinozij ti co.,
BSwumlm 2.'0 dock ST., PllILADELrillA.
FIRE AND BURCLAR PROOF SAFE
Jjij C. L. ?I A I S E 11,
Hulls! MAxrrACTniEK of
lUi FIRE AND BURGLAR-PROOF SAFES,
LOC'KbMITH, BKLL-HANiiFR. AND DJEALKK IN
IILTLUINU lLsP.UWAKK,
8 6 No. 434 RACE Hlrnnt.
SEVERE TEST
AND
I 11 II.H I'll
OF
c;i:i:at
KAISER'S FIHE-PEOOF SAFES,
At Die (rtat Fire and entire desiruv.tion o! the
MAMMOTH SKATING RINK, TWENTY-FIRST
AND RACE STREETS. .
The MA1SRR SAFE used liy Mr. Proskaiier, the
Caterer, at the (treat Odd Fellows' Hull, was Uken
from the rniiiB the day alter this lire, and opened on
the ground, before an iniiiieiiNe crowd of Hpectntoru.
NotwithHUudlDK that It had been at a white heat for
a lonu time, the contents were found to tie wholly
uninjured.
The hero has returned to Ijjb coiiij.udioum at
KAISER'S SAFE STORE,
Where he can lie examinee!.
5 3 rnwHin
STOVES, RANCES, ETC.
NOTICE. THE UN U ER8I G NeL
-a would call the at tention of the public to his
TJ, KKW UOI.lJKN KA.I.n t UK SACK.
This is an entirely new bcauir. ltHui...n.in-i
as to once comineud Hoeli to ffeneral favor, beitiK a eoiulii
nation of wroiiKbt and cast iron. It is very kuu pie in ita
construction, aud is perfectly air-liicht. aell-luaniiitf. hav.
Idk no piues or drums u be taken out. and cle.iuod It ii
so arranKed with nurinht tiuos as to produce a larifar
amount uf heat from tlie same weight of coal than any fur
naco now in uee. The bytaoiuctiio condition of the air at
produced by my new arrannemeut of evapomtion will at
onoo demonstrate that it is the only Hot Air It uiuacu that
will prmluce a perfectly healthy atmosphere.
TIioks in want of a complete Heating Apparatus would
do well to call and ejamine the (lolden Kavle.
CIIAULKS WII.LIAM8,
Nos. 1 13 and J lit M A HK K I Street.
. . . . . . . Philadelphia,
A Iargs asnortment of Cooking Kaneos, Kir,vBoird
Stoves, lw ilown (iratea, VeoiUntors, t,tc., aiitays on
baud.
N. H. Jobbin of all kinds promptly dona (
U. THOMSON'S LONDON KITCHEN iK
-4 or Kl'KOFKAN RANUK. for families, hotels or
I' publio inntitalions. In TWKNTY UIFtKKK'Vr
r Kl.KS. Also. l'lllidoll.h. Ranvna. II... i .. ia..
ences, Portable lleatere, Lovrdown Orates, I'iroboard
Htoves, Bath Boilers, Hlow-liole i'iato. Boilers, Cookiui
Stoves, eU)., wholesale and retal, by the inanutaeturera.
hHARPK A THOMSON,
627wfinHm No. M N. 8KOONH Street. -
F U R NITU RE, ETO.
JOHN F. FOREPAUOH & SOU,
Successors to Richmond 4 Forepangh,
rURIJITURE WAHBn.001VZ3
NO. 40 SOUTH SECOND ST11EET,
B 7 Went Side, riilladelnhla.
FOREPAUOH
m Af V " 111
i'H ' ' f 'A
CTATE R10HT8 FOU SALE. STATE
Is!? KiKhUnf a valuable i Invention Inst Patented, and for
the H1.1CI1NU, OUTTINd, and (JHfPPlNu of dried beef,
cablmne, eto., are hereby ottered fur sale. It is an article
of trreat value to proprietors of hotels and resUurunts.
and it should be Introduced into every fajuilv NTATK
kU.HTH for sale. W can be seen at i'KLKti It API!
OH ICK, COOPKK' PVIN T, N.J.
ta? HVHM U0l tMAN,
' .1 -
FINANCIAL.
muz
GREAT PACIFIC RAILROAD
IS FINISHED.
FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS
0P TUB
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD
KOI C.'IIT A.a SOLI).
DE HAVEN ol BRO.,
BANKERS AND DFAI.EH.S IN OOVEKN'.tKNTS,
NO. 4(t hOUTH Tlimi) STHEET,
Mijm rtuLAnrari'.iA.
J A N K 1 N CJ m JJ O U S B
OF
JAY COOKE & CO.,
No. 112 and 3 14 South THIRD Street
I UILAIiELrmA.
Dcaifrs m ell C-tovcrnmpnt SocnnniiB.
Old 6-208 Wanted In Exchange for N? w.
A Dberal Difference allowed.
Compound Interest Notes WaiUea
Interest Allowed on Deposits.
COLLECTIONS MADE. BT0CKS Louptit and sold
on Commission.
Special business accommodations reserved foi
ladles.
We will receive Tppplications for Policies of Life
Insurance In tlie N-rt.onal Life Insurance Company
of tlie United States. Full Information given at our
3ve l 3ra
QLENDINNIHC, DAVIS & CO
NO. 4S SOUTU TIIIltD STltEET,
IDIL.VDLLI'ULA.
GLEHD!NKINGf DAVIS & AMORT,
NO. 2 NASSAU STHEET, NEW YORK
BANKERS AND BROKERS.
Direct telegraphic communication with tne New
Tork bmck Boards from Uie Philadelphia
Ollice.
CITY W A R R ANTS
EOUCHT AND SOLD.
C. T. YEFtKES, Jr., & CO.,
2fo. 20 South THLTID Street,
4S
PHILADELriHA.
LEDYARD & BARLOW
EAVE REMOVED THJIIR 0
LAW AND COLLECTION OFFICE
TO
Ro. 19 South THIRD Street,
IHILADELTD1A,
And will continue to give careful attention to collect-
jug ana Becurwg uljujhs throughout the United
States, British Provinces, and Europe,
Sight Drafts and Maturing Paper collected at
cmiKurs (nates. i 29 gra
SMITH, RANDOLPH & CO.,
BANKERS,
Philadelphia and New York.
DEALERS IN UNITED STATES BONDS, and MEM-
BEIiS OF STOCK AND GOLD EX CHAN UK,
Receive Accounts of Banks aud Bankers on Liberal
Terms.
ISSUE BILLS OF EXCHANGE ON
C. J. HAM BRO A SON, London,
B. MF.TZLER, 9. SOItN A CO., Frankfort.
JAMES W. TUCKER & CO., Par's.
And Other Principal Cities, and Letters of Credl
J 2tf Available Throughout Europe.
STERLING & WILDMAN,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
1IO H. TIIIKI) tit., IMilla.,
Ppcclal Agents for the Sale of
Danville, Iluzloton, nnd Wilken.
Itarre I'uIIroud
KIKST MOKTCiACK ItONOS,
, Dated 1S67, due In 188T. Interest Seven Per Cent,
payalile half yearly, on the hist of April and first of
Oc tober, clear of Utato and Untwti suum taxes. At
present these bonds are offered at the low price of 60
and accrued Interest, In currency.
Pamphlets containing Maps, Reports, and full In
formation on hand for Ulatributlou, aud will be sent
by wail on application.
Government Bonds and other Securities taken In
exchange at market rates.
Dealers In Stocks. Bondq, Loans, Gold, etc. 6 T lm
pm S. PETERSON & CO..
Stock and. Exchange Brokers,
No. 39 South THIRD Street,
Members ol the New York and Philadelphia Stock
and Gold Boards.
STOCKS, BONDS, Etc., bought and sold on Cora
mission only at either city. 1 80
SAMUKL WORK. FRANCIS F. MlIJiK.
woxize & ranrjE,
. HANKERS,
KTOCK AND EXCHANGE BROKERS,
. . JiV, 121 A 2MIHD St., miLADSLlUU
FINANCIAL..
UNION AND CENTRAL PACIFIC
RAILROAD BONDS
ijoxjg i rr jLnu o li;
.1
WILLIAM PAINTER & co'
BANKERS,
NO. 30 fc-OlTTH TlflllD STREET,
. p n lm .'. . rniLATKLrnu.
I
E
C)
ELLIOTT & DUFitt
IJ.VVTM; RTCMUVfvD TO Tlir.ITt NRW HIJILMi0
No. 109 8.. THIRD Street,
Ate now prepared to trau-et fJKNP.RAl. B ANK I7IO
BCSINI-SS.Mil ,1..,d i (!OVF.KNMK.rf nod rtfaw Stv
Curitips, (illl.K, lill.l.S, Kio
Hp-,.voM.)N,-.y ON lKroslT.ali.,wr,K t.
c antm'kpkk' eM ' MRR
Will pxccuie mi..rs Inr rt.j. k.., lioartn. u. . ON COM
MI'-SION.ttl1.s.,.(k l.x..h.H,r ,s of riul,rti,,r,. K
V:r .' 'r'l'on. .mi BttltiTjurn. 4 jyjg
tu.vi?i;:R.
)?fi:rcr'. .ioiht.
sriii i'K .joisi-.
II KM Li h .K.
Ilk Ml,' "i'K.
mo
'HOICK. !'Ti'i;i pUn
SPANihii fiKn.jyroK iwriyusa
1 S( (f i,,JL""inA t'i, okim,. iTTT.7i
lCUf H,OIUDA ll,OOUINO. lo(ri)
CAHOl.l.VA fl.OOKlN.ii 17
VIKiilMA 'I.OOHINO
DKI.AWAIIH I I OOifl.VCi
ASH ; 1 00 KINO
WAI.NUi f'tOokl.VO.
FLORIDA Sli-P HOAUIXS.1
. RtI ! VN1C.
1 WALNUT l'.DS. AND PLANKlTTc Tni
J 00 J WALNUT BIIHL AND PLAWK. 1 OOl)
WALNUT PLANK.
1W;0 UNDERTAKEK8' LUMBTCR. iCCk
WALNUT AND PINK.
EEASONED POPL.M
1809
WtiSUSIili OIIERJRV,
WUITK OAK PLANK AND BOARDS.
UICIiiOUY.
1 L .JO CIOAH BOX MAKERS' -I Ol'Ci
XCUt7 (IHIAK BOX MAKKHN' 100i7
SPAMbil ( I.DAR BOX HOARDS.
FOR rtALK LOW. . ,
CAROLINA HCANTIJNGL uIPTi
XOUO CAROLINA H. T. HILLS.- .lOOij
A'OltWA V SUANTL1NU.
1t!(;(l CKDAli SHINGLES. IGrri
MAC LK, IIKO I HKR A (JO .
11!
ESLER & DROTHE RS
U. S. BUILDERS MILL,
Nos. 24, 26 ana 28 S. FirTEENTH St.
We offer this season to the trade .lror Dd uuixu ta
pcrior stock of
Wood Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters,
Newell Posts, Etc. '
The Block is made from a caraful selection of Miohi(tan
Lumber, from the mills direot, and we invite Imililers una
contractors to oiiunino it bofore purohnsiug ckewbere.
l'urnin and Scroll Work in all ita yariotiee. 5 6 2m
jLUMBEK UNI) EE C O V ER.
ALWAYS DRY. :
VATSOri & CILLINCHAM,
39 No. 924 RICHMOND Street.
")ANEL PLANK ALL TIIICKNESSE8
X 1 COMMON PLANK, ALL TIIIOiLNKBSK'i
1 COMMON HOARDS.
1 and 3 KIDK FKMIK HOARDS
xjw.i.i.T nnu rAr riit1. rl.UOKLNOS
4. Bl'KUOK JOIST, ALL SIZKS.
II r..M LO. ' K JOIST, ALL SIZES. '
PLASTKRINO LATH A KPKUIALTT.
To?ethir with a neueral sasortment of Building Lnmba
for huIh low for oasu. 1. W K WALTZ
326 FltTKKNTH and STILKH HtnsU
ENQINES, MACrflNEKY, ETOl
PKN.N 8TKAM ENGINE ANL
M bii . "V-Hf IK l.KVY,
for ninny years buen in snccossful operution, and beun ex
clusivoly enKaod in buil.iiu(t and roimirinn Marine and
kiver hnKinoa, hifrh and low-pressure, Iron Boilers, Watet
lanks. Propellers, eto. etc., respectfully ottor their servioes
to the public as being fully prpard to contra, for en
(tmes of all sizes. Marine, Rivor, and Stationary j havina
otsof pulternBof dillerent sizes are prepared to eiecutS
orders with quick despatch. Kvery description of pattern,
making made at the shortest notice. Utah and liw-nrei.
jure l ine rubular and Cylinder Boiler, ol the best Vena.
evlvania Charcoal Iron. Horalnirs of all sizes and k.ndi
Iron and Brass Oastjugs of al f descriptions. Roll Turmng.
obus""' d " "h"' WUrk oae
DrawinKB and specifications for all work doaeat tha tula.
blishulont, free of charKe, and work guaranteed
T i he aubsonbera have auipU wharf-dock tooni fo? repair!
of boats, where they can lie in perfect eafety, and are pro.
Tided with shears, blocks, talis, eto. eto., tor raising bean
Or light weuthu. ""'
jaoob O. NKAFIE.
ei;
BFAOn and PAjjlKR fitreet
M
RRICJK & 80NS
SOUTHWAnic POTTNrriT?v
No. 430 WASHINGTON AVENUE, riillttdelpLJa.
WILLIAM WRIGHT'S PATENT VARIABLE
CUT-OFF HTEAAI ENGINE,
Kognlated by the Governor.
MERRICK'S SAFETY HOISTING MACHINE,
l'tttcuted June, lboa.
DAVID J0T8
TATENT VALVELESS STEAM HAMMER.
D. M. WESTON'S
PATENT SEU-CJiNTIMNO, SELF-RAMNCITSa
CLNTRII LUAL SUGAIt-DllAININU ilACUINIL
AND
HYDRO EXTRACTOR.
ror cotton or woollen ftluuufacturem 7 in mwt
1. AHUBN MtnlUCK.
WILXXiM H. aUJUUCX.
JOHN . OOPB.
COUTIIWARK FO UN DUY, FLFTU AND
O WAbHLNCTON Street. U
FUU.Al.HLPHIA.
MKRRIOK A SONS,
RNGINKKHiS AND II AUlllNISTfv
mannfaetnre Hirli and low Pressure hteua ICngiDae law
Ijind. liner, aud Marine Serice.
Hoilers, .iaiiiiii.ters, Tuuka, Iron Boats, eto,
OaHtingiof all IiiikIb, either lion or hnm.
Iron 1. nuue Roofs for lias Works, Workshop, and KaiL
load Matioiis, eto.
- v. ytAV Mwwv mam inost lm.
proved conatructiou. w ua
r.vury uosuripiion or nantation Macrilnery. also. ni.
8aw, aud (irist Mills, Vacuum Paus, Oil hUaua TnJnaTlII:
locators. Filters, Pumping Kuuinos, eto.
fiiti, eBnlytis Pateut btoam Hammer, and AjTi,inVi
.Woolsey'. Patent OtDtriiiiKal (Suwr' lirJLlXi M?.
QIRARD TUDE WORKS.
JOHN II. MUIirilY & BROS.
SlaDiiliu'lurf r of Wruuslit iron iIp,
. lie
faiUAUKLPRlA, PA.
WOHKN.
TWUNTy.TIUHX and FJXJIE11T htrreu.
utPlUK,
. No. 44 North FIFTH Ntrool.
HI
I ARZELERC A BUCHEv:
Cu.loia Ilouee Broker) and Notorlea Pullle
No. 405 1IBKARY STREET
ALL CUSTOM IJ0USB BUSINESS TRANSACTED,
T) A C.C.TtArin.n 1 II tl
laoofuma fKUU UK ED.
to QIRARD, VETKlARYSLTU
r.,?l .11 . lrBt disease, of horse and oattlav
fcr hor.TtM 0rTU0M' Jith 8rtiuint mTooVUo
ior Horse, at hualiit Iriliais Ha iun uiv.n.i i m." "
k,Ww 1-Uiil, '

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