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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, June 19, 1869, FOURTH EDITION, Image 7

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THE DAILY EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 18G9.
SriRiT OF THE rilESS.
BDITORIAL OPINIONS OF THK LF.AMNO JOURNAMt
WON CURRENT TOPICS COMriT.EU EVKBT
DAT FOn THK KVENINO TELEUUAl'U.
THE MANUFACTURE OF "ISSUES."
Prom th A'. Y. Sntinn.
If there h anything tvhieh the political ex
perience of the Unitod States hits tanghr
leftily, it is that political parlies are produced
y the spremlaiuougHt large boJiesof thopoople
if certain itleuHeapaMe of being clothodiu leg
rtlat ion; that the spread of ideas capable of f ur-
niHhing vitality to a party is generally hIow,
nd the result of great labor ana a combination
iii iavorina circumstances: ana mat, once
(hoy have spreud sufficiently, the party comes
iito exiHteuce ot itselt, just as naturally as
th corn sprouts after the seed is sown; and
hat, after tlie party is formed, it is impossible
io nse it in the service of any idea except the
Ime which created it; and that, when
Ibis idea has triumphed, the party dissolves
into its primitive elements and another
.."rings up to tukc its place. Ono would natu
rally suppose that all this was perfectly
familiar to every student of political history,
wild particularly 01 tne political history of this
Vmitry, and yet it sometimes seems as if
-n old politicians were quito unconscious of
i There ia hardly one of them who is not,
h some-lime or other in his career, seized
ith a crazy notion that he can make a party
imself w ith a little help from a few friends,
he can only get hold of a good popular
issue" and get it adopted by some caucus of
lis moulding. Every party which has existed
i this country, and made even a respectable
how at the polls Federal, Democratic, Whig,
(inow Nothing, and Kepublican has been
ased on a powerful idea, which had grown
i) gradually m the popular bruin, under
Irossure of external circumstances, or had
een " bequeathed to it by former gonera-
ions; but it would have been as impossible to
iy where or when it originated as to say
hence comes the wind or whither it goes,
he rise and progress of ideas is, in short,
ne of - the historian's greatest puzzles, and
ill always remain so. But among the curions
pisodes in the history of all these parties
live been the attempts of knots of politicians
ither to engraft something of their own in
ontion on the party policy, or else to prolong
lie existence of the party after it had done its
ork by some bitters or other stimulant of
lieir own concoction, or else to tempt it to
um aside from its appointed path by stories
f hidden treasure in distant mountains. The
snal result of these attempts has either been
idiculous failure from the outset like
ilessrs. Johnson and Seward s Philadelphia
'onvention in 180" or the production of a
iomical littl puppet like the iicll and Everett
lovement of 1SU0, or . the .Duller repudiation
lovement in 1S17.
It . seems not at all unlikely that we shall
ritness something of the same kind during
he coming fall. It is casting no extraordi-
ar discredit on the Republican party to say
that ever since !. it has been losing its hold
n the popular affection. It had a very dini-
tnlt work to do in reconstruction, and one for
which the experience of the war had hardly
fitted its leaders, and which, from its very na
ture! was sure to damage the reputation of
any party which undertook it. It was enabled
to curry it out successfully solely owing to
Andrew Johnson's folly and the Mouth's ob
stinacy and stupidity. How deeply the leaders
felt ' the importance of Johnson s lolly to the
Iparty was well shown by the frantic efforts
magnify his "crimes" and the gravity of the
impeachment trial, in addition to this, the
party Las had the spending for eight years of
enormous sums of money, and has been
forced to collect and disburse it without any
adequate administrative machinery. The con
sequence, and the inevitable consequence,
has been not only that the party has
had to shoulder the responsibility of great
abuses, but has had to witness the accession
to its ranks of a prodigious number of knaves
and adventurers, and to bear the burden of
their, "loyalty" . and "soundness" while en
tirely unable to put a stop to their plundering
and peculating. Some allowance, too, in in
yestigating the causes of the decline of the
party in popular estimation must, of course,
be made for the weariness of any party which
has been 'long in power which inevitably
comes over the public before many years.
Many people forget the misdeeds of the oppo
sition, are constantly fretted by the faults of
the administration, and gradually work them
selves first into a belief that any change would
be for the better, and then into a determina
tion to have a change of some kind at any
cost.
The party was, therefore, in a somewhat
sorry plight at the approach of the Presiden
tial election; and if it had made up its mind to
discard Grant, and Democrats had made up
their minds to take Chase, there is, we
believe, little doubt in the minds of careful
observers that it would have gone to pieces.
Here the folly of the opposition, combined
with the enen:etie action of the sensible men
fat the Chicago Convention, postponed the
evil day. As it was, Grant may be said to have
achieved a respectable victory only by the
peculiarities of the elective machinery. Had
he been dependent on a direct popular vote,
Le would have barely escaped defeat. The
history of Lis administration thus far has cer
tainly riot been of a character to give the
party a new hold on the popular confidence.
Indeed, its warmest friends have been forced
almost from the first to act on the defensive
' to devote themselves, in fact, mainly to the
' worji of proving, not that it has established
new claims to popular gratitude, but that it
has done nothing to earn popular distrust.
It is not at all surprising, therefore, that
the hack politicians, whose prosenoe in its
ranks and use of its machinery for their own
ends have brought so much discredit on it,
.4 should once more begin to feel anxious, and
oust about for soma means of rekindling the
V "fyoptua1' enthusiasm on its behalf or procuring
) a renewal of its lease of power. What is
wonderful is that they not being by any
means, in the ordinary sense of the word,
tools fhould fancy that they can,' by holding
a meeting and raising a banner, get people to
follow tliMii wherever thev choo.se to lead;
and what is most wonderful of all is that it ia
Pennsylvania politicians who should put them
selves in the forefront of the new movement.
We supnose there is no body of persons so
profoundly distrusted by all that is best in the
Itenublieau party, or w ho would find it more
dilhcult to get people to adopt any policy
M Licit was likely to give them more money to
spend or places to nil.
THE MARKET PRICE OF NATIONAL
SYMPATHY.
Frtmt th M Y. Time.
The London papers still strenuously insist
that "British sympathy with the South'' shall
not be paid for in cash; and, upon the whole,
ll.i.re is nothing unnatural in this protest.
Certainly we Lave no right to insist on a rule
to govern others to which we do not ourselves
submit- and probably no American would
like to be tongue-tied, lest Lis "sympathy"
for some unsuccessful striiKs;le on the other
side of the globe should be reckoned ui iu
dollars, and taken out of the treasury at
A ashington by the aggrieved party. It was
a distinguished apostle of freedom of speech
who first discovered that, when a whole nation
indulges in that luxury, it must be paid for
on the counter. Mr. Sumner imported into
his plea for Alabama reparation many such
statistics (if we may so tabulate them) as
theso:
ton. Three IS) cheers from a TlrltlHli nassnmrer.
Milp.
item. Two (2) gpoecheu of Mr. Laird
and so on; which moans, if Tom. Dick, and
Harry "cheer" an insurgent cause, or pub
licly wish it success, this is to "go in evi
dence" amiinst their Government, for the
recovery of damages for "prolonging a war."
Presented thus, and stripped of rhetorical
ornament, this argument mitiht be disowned
by its originators. They would probably say
that theso "items," for example, are only clus
tered as tokens of an unfriendly a minus to
the Union oathe part of Englishmen. How
does that help the case ? Some English
papers, like the A' fir nnd Star, some English
statesmen like Bright and Forster, insist that
the great controlling body of national syiu
pa thy in England was always with the North.
But let us suppose that it was not is that a
ground for "bringing in a bill" against Eng
land 'i Of course it is nothing of the kind.
Why then, in a controversy of the present
kind, do we drag it in ?
Mr. Sumner's partisans Would reply, pro
bably, that these historic events were not only
"indications of an unfriendly (iniinut, but
explained certain orcrt art.i. But that is like
substituting secondary evidence for primary.
il there irtre ' overt acts ot hostility done or
permitted by Great Britain against us, these
are in themselves sulncient for our case. They
cannot bo illustrated or strengthened by any
thing less weighty; and, on the other baud, if
overt acts do not exist, they cannot be pieced
out and constructively supplied from indica
tions of national sentiment. The Sumner
school presents three grounds of complaint
against England. One, the Queen's procla
mation, another, the ravages of the Alabama
and other English-built cruisers, and a third,
the "misdirected sympathies" of Great Bri
tain. And the last occupies more space in
the recital than either of the others, though
it has no business at all in a money claim
about such a matter we may go to war, but
not to law.
We shall be asked, however, why, since at
best this is but collateral matter, it may not
profitably be arranged and added to the olli
ciul legal case ? For two reasons. In the
first place, it weakens it. It is the error of
an attorney who crowds all sorts of irrele
vant matter into his pleadings, and is forever
delayed from getting a settlement by the ob
jections of the other sido. And this is the
mistake we have always made thus far with
out which, perhaps, the Alabama claims might
have been paid, and the various shipowners
and underwriters bo to-day walking about
with the "British gold" in their pockets.
Englishmen know very well that, when the
case is once put by America on its proper
grounds, divested of all ridiculous accompa
niments, these claims must be paid. But,
meanwhile, they are justified in taking ad
vantage of our weak arguments and prepos
terous demands, in order to avoid and ignore
what they cannot meet, except by confession
and payment. Thus the whole matter is kept
perplexed, mystified, and unsettled.
In the next place; Mr. Sumner's reasoning
is vicious, because we, as Americans, have
always claimed the privilege of expressing in
dividual opinion (we say nothing ot govern
mental action) regarding all sorts of wars and
rebellions. Pray, on the other principle,
what damage is duo from us to Russia for
sympathy in Polish rebellions, to 1 urkey for
sympathy in Cretan, to Austria for sympa
thy in Hungarian, to France for sympathy in
Republican, to Spain lor sympathy m Ouban,
to England lor sympathy in r email i A "nice
little "bill" we should run up to all these and
all other countries, on Mr. Sumner's princi
ple, and we might as well go into bankruptcy
at once. The Sumner school will tell ns that
England's sympathy "prolonged our war by
encouraging the insurgents," and hence the
war expenses must be partly paid for by her.
Precisely the rule that applies to our sympa
thy and that of all other nations with any in
surgent cause. Take the cose of Cuba, which
is right before us, as it were. The insurrec
tion would probably have died out long ago
but for American sympathy, and hope of
American aid. Should it ever die out, is
Spain to bring in a "bill for sympathy"
against us r And have we no right to speak
veil of the Cuban cause, or "cheer it, it wo
like?
It is worth while considering into what pre
aicaments this doctrine may lead us; tor it is
a rule that "works both ways," and most of
the time' it works against us. We, certainly,
have never scrupled to "encourage by our
sympathy whichever of two contending par
ties we happened to fancy, and have never
thought of having our sympathy reckoned up
against us at the market price by the other
party. In the case of England, especially, it
is doubtful whether she has been engaged in
any war for nigh upon a hundred years, in
which we Lave not publicly expressed our
Lopes tLat she would get soundly whipped.
Our Fourth-of-July orators for years have
talked this way, and many of our pubno men
have done the same. We have always given
our national sympathy m a much more un
divided way than England did in our case to
every insurrection Canadian, 1' enian, or
Indian, against English control and proba
bly we always shall. But, as wo have already
said, it has been reserved, by ono of those
Kutires on human wisdom and candor which
history constantly furnishes, for a special ad
vocate of liberty in opinion to deny that
liberty to any nation but our own, under
penalty ol mulcting in damages.
BEGINNING AGAIN.
t'rmn the -V. Y. Tribwie.
Napoleon begins another chapter of empire
with a mistake an inevitable one, however,
the premises of empire being granted. He
Hemes mat u is proper to uie imperial '.mi
respect to conciliate hia opponent, and
i ' i ; a il.. J ' : .. 1 li
Straightway he imprisons the editor ot the
radical Jtujypfl. The next move in order should
be the arrest and second expulsion of Count
Henri de Rochefort, the radical editor of La
Luh tcrne, and said to be a descendant of Hugh
Capet not the only son of the old noblesse
who takes sides against monarchy. Moreover,
the Emperor may so connive through Lis sala
ried agents that the frauds of the late elections,
albeit the radicals in the Legislature may ven
ture to contest them, shall arbitrarily accrue
to the empire. All disputed elections he will
still Lave tLe cLanco of managing his own way.
To the profound disgust of the Liberals
of Franco, ho is wilfully bent upon arroga
ting rather than concoding, and, so far as we
can make out from the cable's despatch, Las
taken the course which will emphasize tho
meaning of the late radical vote, aud not win
- i i ... 11.,-. tl.ma TuLinnr if nf
it at
a sini'ie convert vu m -
present ouly meaus
offense. The Emperor wilt wait, it appear,
to feel the pulse of France through its Legis
lative Corps, after having endeavored to mke
it temperately keep time with his own. What
Le has just done seems to repel the liberal
advice both of Trince Napoleon and Per
signy, but a hope remains that his arro
gance is but a prologue to concession of some
kind.
On the other hand, the empire will not en
counter mutes or imbeciles in the spirits
which it Las evoked from the depths of French
opposition. It has been a problem with Na
poleon to find out the temper and desire of
the uncertain and suspicious millions bolow
him. Tho facts are now before him, yet
do not deter him from a well-bred af
fectation of apathy to that sometime
smothered passion for freedom, which, how
ever devastating and almost self-dastroying
when hitherto fully ablaze, is yet an inex
tinguishable fire in tho heart of France. Her
patriots, however, are not disposed to be for
ever passive least of all are they inclined to
yield to ony attack on tho citadel of universal
suffrage. Many of them may be as much op--posed
as Jules Favro to violence as a means of
reform and progress, but perhaps the mass of
them would agree with hnn in tho doctrine
that "if rights are to bo attacked by violence
violence should be encountered." Upon the
right of universal suffrage, practised in one
way or other, since ISM, the liberalism of
France will take its well-fortified staud. It will
not be possible for the Emperor to invadj that
right with safety. He can only yield to it with
grace.
THE WAR IN PARAGUAY THE POSI
TION OF THE UNITED STATES.
rVnra the A. Y. Herald.
The greatest efforts have been made by
Brazil aud her allies to excite the United States
Government against Paraguay. Even some of
our own citizens, and those among them who
have heldoflieial positions iu South America,
have been tho active agents of the Brazilian
in misrepresenting the state of things existing
m Paraguay and in endeavoring to lomant
difficultiesbetween this country and Paraguay.
We were told that our Minister, Mr. McMahon,
was virtually a prisoner in the hands of Lopez.
Intimations were thrown out that even some
thing worse than that might have happened
to hint, and that the allies pointed to the lact
that nothing officially Lad been heard from
him since last December. We all along sus
pected the treachery and misrepresentations of
the Brazilian and allied agents and press, and
now it appears from the news published
recently from Paraguay that Mr. McMahon is
safe, that nothing has happened to him, aud
that, in fact, he is near Lopez, the President
'of Paraguay; and we have no doubt ho is on
the best terms with and is kindly treated by
Lopez. It is clear that Brazil and her allies
were tho sole cause of our Minister's isolation,
and in all probability they stopped the official
despatches between the Minister and his
Government for the purpose of withholding
the truth and deceiving the United States as
to the actual state of the war. From news
received by tho way of Washington, it will be
seen that the allies would not allow any com
munication with, Mr. McMahon. Mr. Wor
thington, our Minister to Uruguay, writes that
he Lad demanded of the Argentine Govern
ment cither an escort through the allied line3
or for permission for a United States escort
to pass through them to enable communi
cation to be made with Mr. McMahon, and
that both the Bitenos Ayres and Brazilian
Governments had refused. Of course the pre
text of this refusal was that the movements of
the allies would be affected by granting such
communication. Commander Kirkland, of
the Wasp, had a sharp correspondence with
Brazil and Buenos Ayres on the subject.
Thus, then, it is evident the allies are afraid
of the truth being known as to the actual
state of the war. It is equally evident that
the official representatives of the United
States, and, therefore, the Government itself,
are treated in the most high-handed and out
rageous manner by Brazil and her allies. This
only shows what a miserable and imbecile
Government we have. .Lvery little State,
especially if it be a monarchy for our State
Deportment has a particular tenderness for
monarchies and monarchical institutions
may insult this country with impunity. Our
weak Government will bear any amount of
kicking from nations, small or great, which
have active representatives in Washington,
but it will not raise its finger in favor of re
publicanism in America, of the struggling
Cuban patriots, or of anything else that is
liberal and grandly national in policy. The
great republic has sunk low in the character of
its actual government, and there seems to be
no hope of raising it up during the term of
the present administration.
GAS LIGHT FOR THE COUNTRY.
SAFE, RELIABLE, AND ECONOMICAL.
PLACED OUTSIDE OF BUILDINGS 1 1
FERRIS & CO.'S
AUTOMATIC OAS MACHINES
Han h.en in incoeMful onAr&iinn far aIotad year, and In
ail caaea given perfeut aatiafaotioa. Th light ia muuh
auperior to that of city gaa, at much lesa coat. 1 be man
accidents Hrioine from th uaa of KKKOSKN'K and COAL
OIL LAMPU and wortbluaa gaa uuwhinoa ahould in
rinca DArfiona to adnnt a aaf m. acnnomical. an 1 aatifaO-
tory lmht. The simplicity of our machine, its al iw motion,
its superiority over all others on acoount of ita R1C VOLV.
INU evaporator, wuioh takes up all the oarboa from the
material, and tha fact that it will run for years without
Aftat. for ranilrtL rAcrimiiiAnd 1L above all oth)ra in tU6
market. The machine can be aven in operation at our
fuice, wnere explanations ana relerenj-.ea win ubii.voo.
KKRKIS A CO..
6 ltnths 8m2pl No. 837 CHE8NUT Street, Fhilada.
nest quality of GASOLINE always on hand.
DYE1NQ AND PRINTING.
E
S T A B L I S II ED 18 19.
The New York Dyeing and Printing
n i . I 1 f 1 A.
jmaDUSiimeiiL,
'STAT UN IHliANBi
No. 40 North eighth Ktreet Vest Side), Philadel
phia; No. a DUA-NK Btreot, aud 76 BROADWAY,
TjftW York.
i n il i nM mrA ..v.Am rv.mr.nnT are nrenared. ai
uhuuI, with the higlieBt decree of still and the most
unmoved miu-hUiMrv. TO DYK. CLKANSK, and
HN1S1I every variety Ol LAD1KS' and OKNTLK
MKN'S GARMENTS, and GOODS, In their
UHiml auperior manner. .
OAKMKNTS CLEANSED WIIOLK f3 11 thgtoj
NOTK Thlg la our only offlce In Philadelphia.
I ARZELERE & DUCHEY,
Cualon llouaa Brokers and Notajiee Piibllc.
No. 405 LIBEAUY STEEET.
ALL CUSTOM IIOUSB BUSINESS TRANSACTED.
1 11 tf
PASSrORTS PROCURED,
3
FINANCIAL'
B
A N K I N O
HOUSE
or
JAY COOKE & CO.,
Noi. 112 and 114 South THLHD Street
PHILADELPHIA. .
Dealers In all Government Securities.
Old O-Sos Wanted In Exchange for New.
A Liberal Difference allowed.
Compound Interest Notes Wanted.
Interest Allowed on Deposits.
COLLECTIONS MADS. BTOCKS boogat and sold
on Commission.
Special boslneu accommodations reserved for
ladles.
We will receive applications for Poilcloa of Life
Inso ranee In the National Life Insurance Company
of the United States. Full Information given at oar
fflce. 18m
UNITED STATES COUPONS
DUE JULY I, WANTED.
COUPONS OF
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD
DUE JULY lf
Taken Same as Government Coupons,
DE HAVEN & ORO.,
BANKERS AND DEALERS IN GOVERNMENTS,
NO. 40 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
611
PHILADELPHIA.
LED YAR D & BARLOW
HAVE REMOVED THEIR
LAW AND COLLECTION OFFICE
TO
No. 19 South THIRD Street.
PHILADELPHIA,
And will continue to give careful attention to collect
ing and securing CLAIMS throughout the Unitod
States, British Provinces, and Europe.
Sight Drafts and Maturing Paper collected at
Bankers' Rates. 1 88 6m
M1TH, RANDOLPH & CO.,
BANKERS,
Philadelphia and Ier Yorlf.
DEALERS IN UNITED STATES BONDS, and MEM
BERS OF STOCK AND GOLD EXCHANGE,
Receive Accounts of Banks and Bankers on Liberal
Terms.
ISSUE BILLS OP EXCHANGE ON
C J. HAMBRO & SON, London,
B. METZLER, S. SOHN 4 CO., Frankfort.
JAMES W. TUCKER A CO., Paris.
And Other Principal Cities, and Letters of Credl
1 2tf Available Throughout Europe.
B. XI. JAMISON Ci. CO.,
SUCCESSORS TO
P. F. "KELLY & CO.,
Vankers aud Dealers in
Goia, Silver, and Government Bon3s,
AT CLOSEST MARKET KATES,
t
N.W. Corner THIRD and CHESNUTSts.
Special attention given to COMMISSION ORDERS
n New York and Philadelphia Stock Boards, etc,
etc o ut hi
QLENDINNINC, DAVIS &CO
KO. 48 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
GLENDINNING, DAVIS & AH,
NO. 2 NA9BAU STREET, NEW YORK
BANKERS AND BROKERS.
Direct telegraphic communication with the New
York Stock Boards rrom me ruuaauipuia
Office. H
(JIT Y A It It A N T 3
BOUGHT AND SOLD.
C. T. YERKES, Jr., & CO.,
No. 20 South THIRD Street,
41 PHILADELPHIA.
UNION AND CENTRAL PACIFIC
RAILROAD BONDS
1IOUGIIT AND SOLD.
WILLIAM PAINTER & CO.,
BANKERS,
NO. 36 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
Mllra
PHILADELPHIA.
T'O INVESTORS LOANS ON liKAL
X ESTATE in city of St. Louis, Mo., in .uius ol 5U00
and upwards, for three to nve year, ine aeouniy onorea
ia always double or orer. and Interest 8 per oeut. I'rin-
viiial aua luieienv paynoie in uiiiwim,
Tliey are eallod "domls of trust," and niter better secu
rity than mortgagee. They are regarded an tirst-claaa
investment. or mfonuaUon apply to ,.
Viiani'r. n. nr.r.n,
16 4t Mo. W) WALNUT btigol.
FINANCIAL.
A RELIABLE HOME INVESTMENT.
THE FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS
i i ...
. . . : i . i
j or TUB
Wilmington and Reading Railroad,
( BRAKING INTEREST
At SEVEN PER CENT, ia Currency,
Payable April and October, free tt NTATK and
UNITED STATES TAX KM.
This road runs thrmurh thickly rxijwUted and riob
agricultural and maimfacturinjr district.
For the preaont, we ars offering a Inui'.ed amount of tha
abova Bonda at
85 Cents and Interest.
The ornnoction of Uiisrond with the Ponnaylvania and
Reading Kaiiroada inmiros It a Ijriri and remunerative
trade. We recommend the bonda ai the cheapest Drat
olaaa investment in the market.
Win. rAZKTZ3-2X &. CO.,
BANKERS AND DRALERS IN GOVERNMENTS,
NO. 36 S. THIRD STREET,
64
PHlT.ADFr.PHlA.
It
E
M
L.
ELLIOTT & DUNN
HAVING REMOVED TO THK.IIt NEW BUILDHf
No. 109 S. THIRD Street.
Are now prepared to transact a GF.NICRAL BANKING
BUSINESS, and deal in GOVKBN.Mir.NT and other Se
oaritiea, GOLD, BILI S, V.te.
Receive MONEY ON DEPOSIT, allowing Intereat.
NEGOTIATE LOANS, (trine apoo ftl attention to MEB
0ANT1LK PAPER.
'Will execute orders for Stocks, Bonds, eto.. ON COM
MISSION, at the Stock Exchangee of Philadelphia. Nnw
York. Boston, and Baltimore. J J
p, 8. PETERSON & CO..
Stock and Exchange Brokers
No. 39 South THIRD Street.
Members of the New York and Philadelphia Stock
and Gold Boards.
STOCKS, BONDS, Eta, bought and sold, on oom.
mliwlon only at either city. 1 2C5
BAMUKL WORK. 1 1UANUI3 F. MlLNff,
BANKERS,
STOCK AND EXCHANGE BROKERS,
tl. 121 & THIRD St., PHILADELPHIA
CO V ERNMENT SAL. ES.
J B
I
s
L
OF
MEDICINE 3, HOSPITAL STORES,
DRESSINGS, APPLIANCES,
MOSOUTO BARS, ETC.
AsSISTANTlKDICAL Pl'KVEVOlt'8 OFFICE,
Washington, D. C, June 14, 189. f
Will be offered nt public sale In this city, on WED
NESDAV, the 23d liiBtant. at 10 A. M., at Judiciary
Square Depot, E street, between Fourth and Fifth
streets, a large aud valuable assortment of Medicines,
Stores, Dressings, and other property belonging to
the Medical Department of tho United States army.
Among the articles to be offered at auction will bo
embraced the following: Alcohol, 8B0 gallons; Sim
ple Cerate, 1200 pounds; Chloroform, BOO pounds;
Powdered Opium, 240 pounds, Ttnet. of Opium, 450
pounds ; Sulphate of Qulnla, 1000 ounces; Camphor,
1E0 pounds; a valuable assortment of Fluid Extracts,
altogether, nearly 100 lots of Medicines, prepared by
some of the best establishments In the country.
Also, 10,000 pounds Beef Extract; 2000 pounds Cau
dles; 6000 pounds Condensed Milk; (.ieiatlne, adhe
sive and Isinglass Plasters in large quantities; 2000
Gutta Percha Bed Covers, new, Gutta Percha Cloth;
Patent and Picked Lint, Roller Bandages, Feeding
Cups, Graduate Measures, Mortars, W. W., Scales,
Prescription and Shop, Dressed Sheep-skins, Spatulas,
Spirit Lamps, Turned Wood Pifr- Boxes, Pill Ma
chines and Tiles ; Vials, 2500 dnzcu. Also, 8000 Brown
Linen Mosquito Nets, Single, In original boxes.
Particulars In Catalogues.
Terms-CASH, IN" GOVERNMENT FUNDS ONLY ;
25 per cent, required as a deposit at time of gale.
All purchases to be removed in live days, ami
errors corrected after removal of the goods.
010 6t CHARLES SUTHERLAND,
Assistant Medical Purveyor, Brevet Col. U. 8. A..
COAL. OIL, ETC, ETO.
TILL I AM BALDWIN & CO.
Manufacturers and Doaler in
Coal Oil, Yinepr, Mm,
ALCOnOL, TURPENTINE,
LUBRICATING, WHALE, LAR9, and OTHER OILS
No. 129 ARCH Street and
Noa. 1440 and 1442 W VRNOCK Street
PHH.ADF.LPni
tire
C. F. 71VTAPP,
Manufacturer and Importor of
FANCY LBATXISH fJ0OD3,
NOS. 116 AND 118 NOliTfl FOURTH ST
Pocket Books,
Katchela.
Traveling Rafrs,
Porte-mounaie,
Portfolios,
Giar Cases,
Wri'nr Oisea,
Writing Dinks,
Kank'ttV t'naes,
lireasinir C.-i&ea,
Mutiny lln'ts,
Mutvli Coaoa.
HIIOI.KSAI.R AMI ui:taii.,
wnn 111! AVU HO VflDTlT imiTt)TH OT
X uo, iill All -as iio 1. 1 ouihiiiui,,
! 6 Mm PHILADELPHIA
IRE AND BURGLAR PFiOOF SAFE
0.
L. MAI
llAKUFlCTUUKil OP
S E
FIRE AND BFRLAR -PROOF SAFES,
LOCKSMITH, BELL-IIANORrL ANT) DEALER IN
BUILKINU HAUDWAItR,
BB5
No. 4-1 RACE Street.
HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS.
Mt. Vernon Hotel,
8 1 Monument street, Baltimore.
Elegantly Furnished, with unsurpassed CuUi&s-
On the European Vlan
O. P. &IOUGA2.
-lODGr.RS' AND WO8TKNTI0I.M'8 POCKET
X KNIVKS. Pearl and Stun llundlos.nf boaotiful Haish.
HOUUICKS'and WAUK A BUT IH I.U S H AZOItS, and
the oelubrated LKCiULTKE RAZOR SUl.SSOUii il tU.
titiMut .utMlilv.
Ilasoia, Knives, fiolsaora. and Table Cutlnty flround and
Iliabod at 1. MADKlHVti, Hq, U& b, TliN'lll blieet,
DUIvri vuvauui.
En
AUO riON SALES.
M.
JHOMAR SONS,
B. roUBTH 8TRKKT.
NOS. m AND 141
Aaxk of rkai. f.it ktk ahd 8T005.1 , -
fjTTur 4, ki ia n clock nrmn m ai.l tr
A Mill HI HKKT l!i"4?,n.t.1' Rnb.n -
Art a aa . "WWIHT.
I7bH0f.f.
I our uy Brick K Mid on
OK.HM ANTOWN TtTRNPMTJr -r -.
ValuahloOlarI.ot.Sl rri.. ' . ewj-KH warn-
MtKKMII I Ml K V KT - IM.
HA.rll.KY HTKK.KT
THIKTKKMII M
Hfckl I North t N.
Two .Htorr and Iwlliiiir an I li Ornirt Hu9a. '
VINK NT UK I' l, NO. loll Urirk lwnllinjk
GHRH.N 8TMRKT, No. 71.1- HHrk KmMonro
HANSOM ST HKKT, No. rn -Holol, "Wpt.tii.rill Mirou
THIHTKKNTH AND JKFr'KK-SON 8TH1.K1- TL.
KAMI, Mi KFANCO., Fa.--l-arefl Hutol an1 S aoria.
c r j ii m n 1 ft r.r. 1 tmnirri i, rto. rai more anu awellin
lini-.NiNU r mi.i, n.mirmim rimimnir iita.
HI. HKKT fi'l'l) I.K.T, No. ItiU -Hrick )wnllin.
NINTH ttTKKlil (.South). Noa. and 2-Buainaaa
locution.
81 XI KKNTH STkF.Jct (South). Nod. 9 8 and S23-Brick
Dwelling.
(.!KAHI AVKNl'K AND I'A Ll'.THORP STRKKT.
NorthwpMt rrtrnrr ltn.innna Stand.
t;ATM A KINr, .MKL'KT. Noa. ftM an 1 AN-Rrlnar
Dwrlhnirs.
ISKX 8TFFKT. No. TO -Brick Dwelling
WISTKU STRKKT ((ierniMilowii), No -Dirallln.
(iKOUNO HKNT. 27 '
STOCKS, Ero.
1 ahare Point Brocr.o I'ark.
Aliarea Knipu-o Transportation Oo.
!H wlmrrn rhiliuloljihiit Kir lr.urinc Oo.
tfumu 7 pr rent. lion. In Njrth Pennarlvxnia Railroad.
25 Hhnro Oirnrd National Bank.
WK) City 6 old.
vfiahnrt'f .lotter-Min Fire Insurance Oo.
511 pmrm Fame InMirnnco Do.
$;HH0 Oatniviw.a HailniRfl 7 pfT Cnt.
4 fOiarea Hark nf Northern l.ibertiea.
It nliuros Fmnkliti Kiro Iiih. Oo.
IKK' ali.iros Junction Onn.'il Oo. '
IU nharen Pttnnnyiriinia Iviidroad. ...
1 rOiiiro Aciiilpnir of Kino Arlc.
A 10. 1.KAMK OK OITV VHRVRH
Will be ImiI ut public silo tor a term of 0114 or throa
roam, to tho liilii"I mid bent biiidor, tho following mm nit
whnrvea and lnndifip:--
ainut street wiiarf, on tiio river Delaware.
Poplar " "
Himover " . ' "
Palmer " " "
6IH.H By ordor J. II. PCOH, Commisitonr.
OntaloRUPA now ready.
BUNTING, ni'RBOROW
KK.RS, Noa. 'i'l'i and 'i'.lt
CO., AUCTION"-
MArtKKT Stroot. eorua
of Bank street.
butxeaaor Ui John B. My era A Oo. '
LARGE SALE OF FRKNfJH AND OTHER EURO.
PIC AN" DHV OOOOS.
On Monday Morninff,
June 21, at 10 o'clock, on four months' credit. 6 15 54 .
ALSO.
4iH! carton Bt. Etlenna and llarlo RihboiH.
loiHlpiecoB white (rmxla,
75 pieceH blHt'k nilk.
21 'or.en PhHb kid rIovos. 6 19 2t
NottiiiKhnm curtains, roul I.l.'imu lace shatrln, crepos, oto.
SALE OF 150H CASKS BOOTS, RHOKS, HATS,
CAPS. 8TKAVV GOODS, KTU.,
On TueHday Morning,
June 22 , at 10 o'clock, on fvur months' credit. 6 W 5t
LARGE SAT.F OT BTUTISH, FRKVCH. GERMAN,
AND DOMKSTIO DRY HOODS.
On Thursday Morning,
Juno 24, at 10 o'clock, on four mouths' credit. S 18 St
CLOSING BAT.E OF OARPETINGS, OAXTOS MAT.
. TINGS, OIL-ULOTHH. ETO.
On Friday Morning.
June 2n, at II o'clock, on four months' credit, aboot
2t)0 pieces Ingrain, Venetian, lint, hemp, cottage, an
rug oarpttinga. 600 rolls Canton mattinga, oil olotha,
eto. etc. TJ ID 6
T IENKY P. WOl.UEKT,
1 1 U0i MARKET Street.
AUCTIONEER, No.
Sale at No. ."5 N. Second Street.
8PF.CIAL PKRHM PTOltY SAI.K OF THK ENTIRE
STOCK OF A CAIf PF.T STORE.
On Thursday Morning.
Juno 21. at 10" o'clock, will he sold, without reserve, br
oilier of Messrs. Townsend A Co., No. Hit N. Hooond
street, to close businesa, their entire stock, comprising a,
general assortment of carpots, matting, mats, window
shade, etc., sold in lots to suit purchasers. Open for ex
animation diiy previous to sale. Store to rent. 6 17 6t
TirPINCOTT. SON & CO., AUCTIONEERS,'
A J No. a 10 MARKET Street.
LARGE POSITIVE SPFtTAL SALE OF DRT'GGISTS
KCNDRI.ES, PF.RFUMEKY, ETO. ETO.
1 On Tuesday Next,
June 22, l8, at .In o'clock, at- No. 714 Ohnsmit street,
by order of Messrs. Oliristisni A Oo., their entire ookof
drm gists' sundries foreign and domestic perfumery,
soacs, combs, brushes, eto Store to rent and nature for
sale. , 6H4t
CD. McCI.EES CO.,
e No. 50tt MARKET Street.
AUCTIONEERS,
BALE OF 1500 CASFR BOOTS, SHOES, BROQANS,
KTO. ETO.
On Monday Morning,
June 21, at 10 o'clock, including a large line ot city-made
N: B. Sale every Monday and Thnrsdar. 617.3
T"nOMA8 BIRCH A SON, AUCTIONEERS
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, No. lit
OUE8NUT Street : rear entrance No. IIP? Ransom B
M" ARTIN BROTIIERS, AUCTIONEERS.
(Lately Salesmen for M. Thomas A Sons.)
No. AW UUKSN U t street, rear entrance from minor.
sax J). o w v . a , r iv ,
DsOOTrS ART GALLERY. No. 10J0 OHfiSNVrt
Street. Philadelphia.
KEENAN, SON A CO., AUCTIONEERS, NO
114 N. FRONT Street. (IU
OARRI AGES. -
CARRIAGES! CARRIAGES!
WILLIAM 13. ROGERS,
CAXUXIAriTj BVZLDZ.ZI,
1009 and lu c:iESNTJT STREET.
Superior Carriages of my own manufacture Sbutit r
for th
DIUViriG CEASOrj
or
1 s a o,
C0MBININ0 , ' ' ''
STYLE,
DUKACILITT, AND
ELEGANCE OF FINISH
Attention given to repairing. L41I stutn 3ux
Carriages Stored and Insurance effected. . 1
CAHEZAOE SUZLDX3HS,
No. 214 South FIFTH Street,
BELOW WALNUT. .
A Large Assortmeut of New and Second-hanl
INCLCDIKO
Coupo Rot kaway, l'ha?tons, Jenny Llnds, Buggies
Depot Wugons, Etc. Etc., 3 S3 tutha
For Sfllo at Reduced PrlCOS.
c
A K 11
G E SIH
CARRIAGE IJTJILDlllS,
No. TH SANSOM Street, Philadelphia,
Invite all In need of any kind of CARRIAGES to call
and see their large assortmeut before purchasing, a
they Intend selling at
REASONARLK RATES. 3 Wsw20trp
rOODLANDS CEMETERY COMPANY.
1 ' The following; Manager, and Oftioera have heas
elected for the your law:
KLI K. PRIOR. President.
William II. Moore,
WilliHiu W. Keen.
rismuel n. Moon,
(.illu-s Dallott,
Ferdinand J. Drear,
(ieorgo L. liuzby.
W A. Kniubt
Jtuwin LirM,le,
boorotary ana treasurer,
JOSKPli B. I'OWNSKND.
1'he MaJianors have linseed a reaolulion raouirina both
Lot lioluers and ViHitora to urustml tickets at Uio oiiirauoa
for adiniunion to the (Jemtry. Tiokots may be had al the
timi eoi tuo t;oui'ny, iso,, bis a.twu nicuot, or ol an
th Mauaivra,
u1

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