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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, June 21, 1869, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAILY EVENING TELEGRAPHPHILADELPHIA, MONDAY; JUNE 21, 18G9.
SPIRIT OF THE PRESS.
IPtTOntMi OPINIONS OF THK LEADING JOURNALS
VrON OURKENT TOPICS COMPILED KVEIIV
DAV FOR TUE EVENING TELKOKAPH.
PENNSYLVANIA FAVORITE SON.
From the X. Y. World.
Pennsylvania hfH so "ny favorite Hons !
There in Fornev, there in O-tmorou, there is
Kelley, there is the toet Boker! But we
mean Andrew Cnrtin just now. The trn.
mnthitrj-on is the amphitryon who entertains
its at dinner, renusylvauia's real favorite
hon is the last son got into a high ollice.
Curt in now tills the post, for Curtin is now
on his way as Minister to llussia. Before he
wrung his nomination out of Grant, Curtin
hnd not been latterly inneh of a favorite.
But the commission did the work. Like a Ca
nadian field to-day all snow, to-morrow nil
flowers; like a varioloid patient to-day all
fever, and to-morrow all pustules Curtin,
despisod of all men when Borie was preferred
before him, muuleuly bloomed out the Fonri
fcylvanian of the period. Pennsylvania is
agonized at the thought of parting, even for
a brief period, with her "favorite son." The
Rachel of the Delaware refuses to be com
forted. Every village within her wide bor
ders, from Stony-Batter to Yonng-Worn ins
town, from Tinieum to Tideout, is in mourn
ing. The hammers of Centre county droop
and decline to trip. The eyes of Bellefonto
the Governor's natal place have become
fountains of tears, and the Bald Eagle and the
Susquehanna rivers, ordinarily as dry at this
season as the Spanish Manzanaves, swell and
throb with emotion.
Philadelphia is a perfect Niobe, save that
hers is not a voiceless woo. All her insti
tutions shriek, save, indeed, the Union
League; and from that, owned, as it practically
is, by Borie, of the late lloman but now dis
jointed nose, nothing was to be expected.
All else is genuine praise and heartfelt lamen
tation. Independence Hall, -which, in 18.",
was refused by Know-Nothing Councils to an
eminent Pennsylvania statesman returning
from a successful mission, is tendered to
Curtin; the Democratic Mayor writes him
a "touching letter" and makes him a mild
speech, and for an hour by the cracked
bell of the "Declaration" he shook hands
with the tag-rag and bob-tail of his party
occasionally, alter the manner of Lafayette
on the same spot, embracing some transient
anti-Catholic veteran of liS.lt. Then in the
evening there was a banquet at the Academy
of Music, with Ilassler's bund and reserved
teats for "the ladies;" none, however, for the
negroes they, proh pmhr, being secluded in
"the gallery. Judge Thayer presided, and
made a judicious introductory spoech, to
which "the guest" responded, and the gay
scene went on without interruption till the
small morning hours. And yet to us who
look on things at a distance, there are in
all this some unpleasantly noticeable features
negative and positive. Why were so
many well-known Pennsylvanians, military
and civil, absent or mute? Why was it
that, at the festivity in honor of tho great
'War Governor," Philadelphia soldiers, now
residing within a stone's throw of tho
Academy of Music Meade and Humphreys
and Patterson and Cadwalader and Nagle
and Winter and Hanpt and Crawford
and Tyudale were absent, and do not
Seem even to have Wen invited. Tho horo
of Gettysburg (we don't mean Sickles) was
not even toasted or alluded to. Then, omi
nent loyal Philadelphia civilians, founders of
sanitary fairs and Christian commissions
JStuarts and Ornes and Claghorns and
Bakers and Fells and Pratts where wore
they ? We do not detect Forney even in a
letter 1 though we do our own Walbridge.
Sumner does not seem to have been bidden,
and Senator Scott absolutely went out of
his way to pooh-pooh the great anglopho
bist's Alabama rhetoric. These are certainly
strange omissions. Nor is this all. There
were ominous utterances, too, as well as awful
lapses, at the loyal board, to which, as faithful
chroniclers, we feel bound to call attention.
If a Democrat, soldier or civilian, were even
now to speak disparagingly of the war ad
ministration of the sainted Lincoln, whether
as manipulated by Cameron or by Stanton,
great would be the wrath of the "loyal;" yet
Governor Curtin said, with emphasis and ap
parent deliberation, speaking of that very ad
ministration, and no . bottle of just indigna
tion silenced him: "The General Govern
ment, charged, with the preservation of the
life of the republic, was pitiless, relentless,
and deaf to the just claim of a volunteer
soldiery." To which his friend, Colonel
McOlure, 'whose speech is carefully reported,
added:
'Major-General Patterson, commanding tn Penn
sylvania, made a requisition for 25,000 tliree-yeara
men, and tliey were being rapidly organized when
the national authorities revoked the order, denied
the commander's authority, and refused to accept
the troops, because not needed. Our State wa
threatened and defenseless, and the Reserve Corps
was authorized after a puluful and desperate strug
gle with united Imbecility and luUdelity."
The troth is, and it was so known, though
concealed at the time, that in her hour of need
Pennsylvania was more than once shamefully
abandoned and offered up a sacrifice to Lin
coln's chronic alarm about Washington and
his own precious person, and to Stanton's
fierce personal antipathy to everything and
every man that bore the name of "Ponn
sylvaniau;" and Governor Curtin really does
deserve credit for what ho did, with Gov
ernor Seymour's help, to protect his State
and its metropolis, and the miserable orna
mental Leaguers who now shrink away from
him, and who, Bays the Ercning Ihdktiii,
commenting on this very banquet, "could
have no power but for the lavish use of ill
gotten money."
With all these drawbacks, however, the
honors of Curtin were worthy of his mother
commonwealth, and he goes on RU way re
joicing in their fresh luxuriance. On his
arrival at St. Petersburg, which we trust may
be safe and speedy, he will, as all newly,
fledged Ministers do, study the archives of
the legation and the correspondence of his
Bredecessors. In Ilussia this correspondence
extends over nearly ninety years; for the
first American Minister reached there in
August, 1781, so the work of revision will
not be an easy one. Aiueu, uowever, oy
two intelligent and experienced secretaries,
Mr. Curtin can, perLaps, accomplish it espe
cially as, in the light of contempora
neous republican ill ami nation, ho is not
bound to trouble himself with the obsolete
diplomatic rubbish of the Democratic past.
lie may dip into the original Dana, out of
respect to tne emineui liostou publicist ot
that name, a shining light in the radical
heaven, of whom General Butler knows some
thing and Mr. Beach Lawrence more; but
even then he should be on his guard, for
Francis P. Duna was a very pestilent "rebel,"
and labored hard for "recognition. " But
surely an orthodox Republican like Governor
Curting will not bo expected to trouble him
self with what was written by Adams, father
of Charlos Francis, or Bayard, the father
of James A., or MidUleton, or lUnUolpu,
or Buchanan, or Wilkins, or Dallas, or I
Thomas II. Seymour and Francis A. Pickens, '
or John Appleton. He had hotter ignore the
fact (for it will commend him to his employ
ers) that the only treaty evor made with Ilus
sia, and which now binds us together, was
negotiated by James Buchanan. All ho need
do is to study with care tho diplomacy of his
two immediate predecessors, over which shone
tho serene brightness of Mr. Seward's imper
turbable intellect, and which was guided by
the precepts of that stainless sage and adorned
by the splendor of his stylo, more gorgeous
man an windows ot all npothecAnes upon
earth. Especially will Pennsylvania expect of
him to study that brief and brilliant period of
diplomacy extending from July to October,
18l2, and illustrated by no 1ss than five des
patches, when this country was represented
at the Court of the Czar by one in whoso foot
steps Governor Curtin, no' doubt, must delight
to tread her favorite son, number two, three,
or four (we really f orget which) Simon
Magus'Cameron; may his tribe increase !
THE FOLLIES OF A KNIGHT.
From the X. Y. Tribune.
Earl Spencer, like tho loyal Lord Lieutenant
of Ireland that he is, determined to keep tho
last birthday of Queen Victoria as the birth
day of such a good woman and roy.il lady
ought to bo kept, especially in Ireland, which
has such good reasons for thinking her good
and royal. The land is poor, Earl Spencer
thought, the people wretched, ground down
by taxes, familiar with famine, led full of op
pression in nearly every form, loathing their
rulers, fleeing by thousands to a land, of equal
rights from their own land where they have
no rights to anything but wrongs how can
the good Earl Spencer but testify to the ten
der sympathy of Victoria, mother of all her
people, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland?
Earl Spencer has a bright idea born of prac
tical statesmanship, and the famous good
sense of the ideal Englishman. The Irish
people need help and sympathy, and this is
the way they get them. Tho Viceregal Lodge
is illuminated, tho drawing-room is fitted up
as a chapter room, a throne is placed in it for
Earl Spencer, and a table in the middle cov
ered with blue cloth and with the star of the
most illustrious order of St. Patrick
embroidered upon it. Tho object of all this
splendor is the investiture ot Lord Carysfort
and Lord Gosford us Knights of this famous
order, and "Sir Bernard Burke, Ulster King-
nt-Arms, is bound to conduct the ceremonial
with a scrupulous attention to every minute
detail of courtly form and etiquette for
which tho Irish prince of heraldry is distin
guished." And, if we may bolieve the
'1 lines, ho carried out his purpose. There was
a banquet, first of all, which wanted nothing
to its perfection but the gastronomic presence
of an American Minister, the lack of whoso
well-known speech was but tamely atoned for
by Sir Bernard Burke s grandiloquence.
Perhaps, however, ho ato better than he
spoke. But the banquet was merely pre
liminary, and Sir Burko was soon in the
midst of a scene where nature made him to
shine. Tho guests roso from tho table and
went to the drawing-room, where tho Countess
Spencer and a brilliant assemblage ot ladies,
who had been holding a sort of Sorosis with
their teapots while the men were m v.ung
for port, awaited the ceremonial of inves
titure, the tea things having having boon
cleared away. (N. B. This statemont about
the tea things is matte on our own
authority, but wo suppose we are justiiied
in taking it for granted that, though tho Irish
people were starving round the Viceregal
Lodge, while- Earl Spencer and the rest of the
gentlemen were faring sumptuously, yet the
lovely Countess and her ladies could hardly
have been permitted to share the fate of the
unhappy natives.) Ihe ceremony of iuvgsu
turo was no doubt a stately scene. There
was a flourish of trumpets, and Earl Spencer,
in liis part of Grand Master of the Order for that
night only, entered the apartment with his
procession, while a band stationed in the ad
joining room played tho national anthem with
excellent enect. 'Ihen the Urand Master,
with the aides-de-camp in waiting
and the aides-de-camp not in
waiting, and Sir Burke, C. B., Ulster
King-at-Arms, and the Right lion. This
and his Excellency That, and the sword of
state an implement with which the Irish
people are well acquainted took their seats
at the blue-table. Ihen, more trumpets, or,
as the Jenkins we are drawing upon beauti
fully puts it, "the trumpet-call was heard in
the distance. " Then enter more processions
in pomp and state. Then tho new comers
make the customary reveronoes. i.nen tne
Grand Master asks for inoro. Then to please
him the formalities are repeated, and tho
kniuhts are led in one by one, and "invested
in accordance with tho customary usages."
Ihen the Grand Master gave thein bonny blue
ribbons. And badges of the order. Aud
admonished them. And congratulated them.
And made them sit down at the blue table.
And the farce ended by the whole noble set
getting away from Ireland a soon as they
could to stay lor a couple ol months.
The effect upon the prosperity of Ireland of
these judicious measures was at once made
evident, ihe ceremony was on a Monday,
and on the next Tuesday Mr. Journey, of Kiln
nick, County Wexford, was callod up for trial.
Mr. Furney had bought some landed property
in the Landed Estates Court. A poor laborer
named 'Whitly lived in a-wretched cabin on
the estate. Mr. Furney wished Whitly to leave
his cabin aud live in his gate lodge, Whitly
taking care of Finney's herds, Whitly 'b wife
and family taking care or the lodge. W hitly
did not like the work he was set at, and
he and his family went back to their old
cabin. Then Mr. Furney requested him to
leave. Whitly said he would go when he
could find a place to go to. Mr. Furney, like a
noble-hearted landlord, ordered Whitly's cabin
to be pulled down, and pulled down it was
over the heads of the family. Whitly's wife
said she would allow the cabin to fall on her
before she would leavo. But Furney, in tho
goodness of his heart, had her pulled out first.
St. Patrick, being ut that time at tho Vicere
gal Lodge, could do nothing for these
wrutched people. But they managed, for a
wonder, to get Furney prosecutod, and he is
to bo tried ut Quarter Sessions, perhaps.
Meanwhile he was admitted to bail on his own
recognizance for fi'O, and tho Whilly.s are
probably looking out for a place to cover their
heads. Meanwhile, 'if their Excellencies, the
Knights of the Most Illustrious Order of St.
Patrick, while sporting their blue ribboiu in
England, should hear that Mr. Fiii-iiCf-h-id
been found dead on his own grounds, blud
geoned or shot by somo unknown hand, how
surprised they would bo that all their efforts
to pleaso the Irish had proved of no av.til !
NAVAL NOMENCLATURE.
From the Ckicayo Jtrjiublican.
Secretary Boris is emulating an amiable
weakness of the Oxonian Secretary of the
British navy. Sinoo the joint advent of him
self and Admiral Portor to tho command of
the naval ollice, he has been industriously
making use of his leisure hours in brushing
up his recollections of Lempriere; and, as
tho sequel will show, with groat success. Tho
fruits of his labors were made appare it
recently in issuing a ukw3 rechriMtenin so:n
forty vessels of the United State i navy. His
order robs them of the names unthr whi sh
some of them made for themselvei a proud
place in the history of our country, and sub
stitutes therefor a miscella leuus collection of
e-ognomina, culled without senie or rj.vwn
from a dictionary of the luythologicd p?r
sonages of tho Greeks and Ldins. Cuno
eook, Tippecanoo, Miantonomah, etc., aro to
give way to Ajax, Castor, Hercules, Cirje,
etc. Ihe names which have a direct refer
ence to the history of our country, and
which are quite common in Maine and Con
necticut, nre abolishnd for thoso whose wo irers
worn not of a character which would qualify
them for being welcome guests in refined so
ciety. For instance, the honorable Sesretiry
has reehristened one of the vessels Fury, an . I
nnothor Harpy. But as there were thfea
runes and more than ono Harpy, future gene
ral ions will be at a loss to determine which
individual personage of these celebrated fami
lies ho was desirous of commemorating. A
large number of the gunboats and other ves
sels in the British navy are named after gods,
demigods, goddesses, and other discreditable
personages of history (no doubt, in deferencs
to that well-known veneration of the English
mind for the classic, as the word is apphe 1
to education), and it is not difficult to reach
tho inference that Mr. Bono is infringing on
a patent to which ho has not the shadow of
a claim. In addition to that act of piracy,
he robs the seamen who manned our navy
during tho war for tho Union of all the glory.
honor, and reputation which they won in
thoso vessels. Jack Tar, on being asked in
what vessel he served, will give tho nime it
bore when chasing Kebel privateers; and on
being questioned as to her whereabouts now.
will answer, as "his pumps start working."
I don t know; they changed her name, and I
can't tell what's become of her." Captain
inslow, ol the Kearsarge, enjoys a reiiuti
tion extending Ironi polo to pole; but who is
Captain inslow ot the Jupiter Lcho
onswers, "Who i1" Ho has, also, by his inju
dicious action, destroyed that peculiarity of
nomenclature , which has added materially in
giving a distinct character to our navy, and
making it known as the navy of the United
btates m every port in every sea. home tew
pedants, who harp on the euphony of
the Greek and Latin, objected to the use
of the Indian names with which our
navy was so profusely christened dur
ing Mr. Welles' administration; and, no
doubt, in deference to their opiuions Mr.
Borie has made the change. To fall back o i
the mylhologico-naval, Mr. Borio has evi
dently run aground on Charybdis, while en
dcavoring to steer clear of Scylla, both of
which were studiously shunned by the naval
secretaries of those nations from which he his
borrowed so much. Congress should, at its
next session, pass an act restoring to the navv
the nomenclature of which it has thus been
deprived for no good reason. Far better
have the quaint Indian names which Welles
bestowed (and which was nearly the most
sensible thiug he did in office) than such bom
bastic titles as Centaur, Erebns, Spitfire, and
the like, which, besides bomg foreign to our
civilization, nre nearly every one duplicates of
the names of vessels in the navv of tha
"blarsted Britishers." Give 4i.s American
names for American vessels. The Secret try
has slavishly copied from foreigners; his de
vice has not even the merit of originality; let
us stick to our own nb-originanty.
FREE TRADE AND PROTECTION.
l"rii the HI. Loulx lUptiblican (Dehinrratic).
Mr. Horace Greeley has been latterly pub
lishing elaborate essays on tho above subject
in the columns ot the .New lork Irionne
Tho alternative that is really presented is not
between free trade arid protection absolute
and unqualified. It is between free trade and
artihciid protection, lhero is a natural pro
tection that no human laws can abrogate.
This is local distance, time, the labor, the ex
ponse and danger of conveyance. Wheat
grown in Missouri or Illinois is shipped to
Liverpool, and sold there at or about the price
ot English wheat. .Nothing is plainer than
that in such case the English farmer will
pocket a considerably larger proportion of
that price than the American farmer. To this
extent, notwithstanding the lull acceptance ot
free-trade doctrines, the English farmer is
protected, and it is a groat aud substantial
protection. In England an article ot prune
necessity like corn should never have received
any greater protection. An English farmer
has to pay rent; un American generally owns
his land. But he pays a much higher rate for
labor. It was, in fact, to uphold the rents
that the corn duties were maintained by
the English landocracy. It may be ob
served that with all England's zeal for free
trade, it was not until tho present session of
Parliament that tho duty on corn was com
pletely abolished. A quarter dollar was re
tained as duty on the quarter of corn or grain
of every description. This was much felt on
tho coarser and cheaper grains. Mr. Lowe,
the present Chancellor of tho Exchequer, no
ticed this, and lately proposed tho abolition of
it. This natural protection is most efficacious
in bulky articles, as for instance corn. In
light, portable commodities it is less felt, but
even on them it operutes. A Geneva watch,
in the ordinary course of affairs, will sell at a
much lower rate near the place of its prolue
tion than in England or America. The
dealer in watches will only give such price to
the Swiss or Geneva manufacturer as will
admit of sales in other countries yielding
him a profit. This protection, then, which
nature itself upraises, is very considerable,
and of much efficacy in favor of the native
producers of every country. There is in
additiou a protection which may be called
that of convenience. There is no country in
which it is not necessary to raise some reve
nue. That rovemio can be most easily,
securely, and cheaply collected in the shape
of customs at tho out ports. We, to our sor
row, find that in addition to the customs
there must be an excise and internal revenue
collected also. Before the war, the internal
taxation was ultogether for the support of
State government and local institutions.
There is no prospect for some considerable
time of the return of any such happy state of
aff airs. The amount of this species of pro
tection will, whilst a largo revenue continues,
necessarily be great. And it is but just that
it FihQiild be so. Tho producers, the mecha
nics, and the laborers, all, in one shape or
another, contribute to the revenue. It would
not bo just that thoso who do not so contri
bute should bo allowed to compete with them
tax-free.
We soe, thon, that the Aniericm producer,
whether manufacturer or artisan, has two
groat walls of protection, of one of which he
can under no circumstances be deprived.
How can it bo that tho production of any com
modity or article can legitimately require
more? Prohibiting foreign competition, and
forcing the consumption of a native article,
for tho production of which the soil or cir
cumstances of the country are not adapted,
will only lead to smuggling, w ith all its de
moralizing results, and forco the consumers,
including tho laboring classes, in whose in
terest it is said to be done, to purchase at an
exorbitant rate, and put up with an inferior
commodity. It was not by protection of the
prohibitory kind that Peter the Gre it intro
duced ship-building and the arts into Russia,
or the hwiss mountaineers established tht
manufacture of watches for which they are
famous.
THE REGENCY IN SPAIN THE PRO
BABLE END OF MONARCHY.
From the X. Y. llsralA.
The situation in Spain continues to com
mand attention. Improving prospects have
given increased boldness to Montpensier. He
has not only appeared on Spanish soil, but a
little too mush in public. Remombering that
it was his gold that made the revolution a suc
cess; remembering, too, that the gold was
paid down on tho understanding that the
crown should be his if a crown remained in
Spain, it is not wonderful that he should be at
once more hopeful and more bold when he
sees all power given to Serrano, the man who
is pledged above all others to his support.
The Republicans in Spain have been defeated.
Tho new constitution has boen carried through
the Cortes and proclaimed, and Spain has
been declared a monarchy. The new King of
Spnin has yet to be fouud. Montpensier is
but one of many candidates whose names have
been promiuently mentioned. There are Isa
bella aud her son; there is the yttthful Don
Carlos; there is the father and there is the
brother of the King of Portugal; thoro are,
besides, at least two German princes. Which
is to be the successful caudidate is now the
great question. The outcry which his just
been raised in Valladolid and Seville against
Montpensier's presence in Spain at tho pre
sent juncture seems to indicate that tho Re
publicans are resolved that if Spain is to be a
monarchy the candidates must have a fair
chance. With Serrano as regent Spain can
wait for a king, and wait with patience.
Although Serrano is more or less pledged to
Montpensier, his duty points first to the wel
fare of Spain and the wishes of the Spanish
people. It is possible that Montpensier has
ruined his own hopes. If Serrano cannot re
concile the Spanish people to Montpensier,
Serrano is free. If the regent is successful
in preserving order. Spain will be taught that
good government is not necessarily asso
ciated with a crowned head. It is not, there
fore, at all impossible that the regency of Ser
rano may prove the destruction of the mon
archy in Spain.
PATRIOTISM SHOULD BE TAUGHT AT
WEST POINT.
From the X. Y. Sun.
The Military Academy at West Toint has
just sent out another graduating class, whose
members will soon enter upon their duties as
officers of the United States Army. They have
received a theoretical and practical instruction
in their profession which is unsurpassed by
that afforded by any other military school in
the world. It has long been the ambition of
American youth to procure admission to tho
Academy, more, we believe, for the sake of
the education which is there obtained than
even for the subsequent position in the army.
Successful in the highest degree iu forming
soldiers, does est Point succeed equally in
graduating patriotic men ?
The country can never forget the patriots
who were educated there Grant aud Sher
man among those still living, McPherson
and Kearney among the dead. But the traitors
whom West Point has nurtured have also
made a record in our history that is as well
remembered. Jefferson Davis and Robert E.
Lee are both graduates of the United States
Military Academy.
The one great, leading, controlling, all-pervading
sentiment to be inculcated at West
Point is that of patriotism. The instructors
there, iu teaching the history of the great
campaigns of the Rebellion, should take care
that wherever admiration for the skill of any
Rebel leader is excited by the acoount of his
battles, abhorrence for his treason should ac
company it. Unless heed is given to this
suggestion, a new crop of traitors may at
some future day spring up from West Point.
If such are to be educated anywhere, let it not
be at the expense of the nation.
WINES.
HER MAJESTY
CHAMPAGNE.
DuriTon 6l lussoiy,
215 SOUTH FRONT STREET.
HTIIE ATTENTION OF THE TRADE IS
X solicited to the following very Choice Wines, etc., for
DUNTON A LUSSON,
315 SOUTH FRONT STREET.
CHAMPAGNES. Agents for her Majesty, Duo da
SI on t a be I lo, Carte Blone, Carte Blanche, and Charles
I-'urre's Grand Vin Eugenie, and Vin Imperial, M. Klee
nuin A Co., ot Mmyeace, bparkliog Moselle and RHINE
INKS.
M ADKIRAS.-OId Island, South Side Reaerve.
KHKRRIKS. V. Rudolpbe, Amontillado, Topaz, Val
lette, Pule and Golden Uur, Crown, eto.
PORTS. Vinho Veltio Real, Vullette, and Grown.
C LA R F-.TS Prom Is Aine A (lie., Moatterrand and Bor
deaux, Clnretaand Sauterne Wines.
GIN. "Merler hi wan."
HRAND1KS. liuuuen&ey, OUrJ, Duptiy A Co.'s Tftriotn
QAR STAIRS & McCALL,
Kos. U6 WALNUT and SI GRANITE Streets,
Importers of
BRANDIES. WINkS, GIN, OLIVE OIL, ETO.,
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
For the sale of
PURE OLD RYE. WHEAT, AND BOURBON WIIIS-
Kills. 6 28 3p
pARSTAIRS OLIVE OIL AN INVOIC1S
KJ of tue above tor sale by
CARSTAIRS A Mi iC ALL
S' 2p Nos. LM WALNUT and lil GRANITIC Sta.
NEW PUBLICATIONS.
BUREAU VERITAS
(FRENCH LLOYDS).
INTERNATIONAL REGISTER FOR
CLASSIFICATION OF VESSELS.
THE REGISTER VERITAS, containing the Olaaal
flcatioa of Veuels surveyed in the Continental, British
and American ports, for the year IS69, is FOR SALE by
the Agents in New York.
ALF MERIAN A OO.,
4 M No. XUHANGJPLAOtt
111IILOSOPIIY OF MARRIAGE.
1 A New Couise of Lectures, as delivered at the New
York AluHtuin of Anatomy, embracing the eubjauts:
Hew to Live, and What to Live for; Youth, Maturity, and
Old Age; Manhood Generally Reviewed; Tne Cauae of
Indigfitlnn; Flatulence and elvc;u Diseases Aceouuted
For; Marriage Philosophically Considered, eto. eto.
Potkt-t volumes containing these Lectures will be for.
warded, post ouid, u receipt of -J cents by addressing W
A. LEAKY, Jit., S. h. corner of t It TH and WALNUT
Hi reel syiillao el puis. a i
OROOERIESANP PROVISIONS.
M
I O II A E L MEAGHER & CO
Ko. 23 Bouta SIXTEENTH Street,
. Wholesale and Retail Defers la
PROVISIONS,
ovvritPS. ANTJ SAND CLAMS.
FOR FAMILY USB
TERRAPINS III PER DOZttJ. V St
INSURANOE.
DELAWARE MUTUAL SAFETY IN3U
RANCH COMPANY. Incorporated by tbe Leis
la t tire of Pennsylvania, 18.15.
Office, 8. It. cornor of THIRD and WALNUT Btreets,
Philnrlelnhia.
MARINK INSURANCES
On Vessels, Cariri, and Freight to all parts of the world.
INLAND INSURANCES
On (cood hj river, 0Rnil, ke, nd land carriage to all
liarts of the Uninn.
FIKK INSURANCES
On Morohandiae generally ; on Stores, Dwellings, Houses,
Eto.
ABHtfTS OF THK fOMr AWT,
NoTemlwr t, IM-M.
Unild States Five Per oeut. Loan,
10 4o $208,60000
United States bis For Cent. Loan,
iHHl 1M.8O0-O0
9WO.0O0
120,000
60,000
fioo.ooo
126,000
60,000
0,000
35,000
5,000
80,000
7,000
ls.ooo
10,000
6.000
20,000
' 207,000
United States Six Per Cent. Loan
(for PaoiHc Railroad) 60.OW00
State of Pennsylvania Sis Per Cent.
Loan 8U.8750
Oitjr of Philadelphia Six Per Cent.
Ixian (t-xeuipt from lax) 12A,6!1'00
State of Now Jersey Six Per Cent.
Loan 6t,603'00
Pcnn Rail. First Mortgage Six Per
Cent.. Itonds ID.JJ0 00
Pcnn. Rail. H.oond Mort. Six Per
Cent, llonrts Sf.OOO OO
Western I'onn. Rail. Mortgage Six
Per Cent, bonds (.Ponn. Railroad ,
guarantee) 80,625'00
State of Tennossee Five Per Cent.
loan 21,000 000
State of Tennessee Six Per Cent.
Loan 8,(Jll 25
Gerinautown Gas Company, prin
cipal and Interest guarantied hy
City of Philadelpuia, 800 shares
KUM.k 15.000 00
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 300
hares Stock 11, 3 WOO
North 1'er.nnylvania Railroad Oo., luO
shares Stock 3,5l)0 00
Phikiiiolphia and Southern Mail
SteHiiisliip Co., 80 sliarna Stock. . . . 15,000 00
Loans on Hoard and Mortgage, first
Liens on City Properties 2 )7,900.(X)
syl.lina,iU0 Par. Market value, $l,U0,32o 25
, Cost, sjl.OKJ.tilH io.
Real Estate SI.OOO OO
It 1 Us receivable for insorHtioa mndn !U.4Hl'M
Balances due at agoncios, premiums on marine
policies, acorued interest, and other debts due
the ct-imianv
40,178-88
1,81300
116,56373
Stock and scrip of sundry corporations.
Estimated value.
Cash in bank
Cash iu drawer. ...
...ifUltMliO-ixa,
lilitv
$t,l?.3S7-KI
Thomas O. Hand,
John C. Davis,
James O. Hand,
Thoophilus Paulding,
Joseph H. Soal,
Hugh Craig,
John R. Penrose.
DMF.L'Tons.
I Edmund A. Sender,
Samuel E. Stokes,
Henry Sloan,
William C. Ludwig,
toorge u. Lciper,
Henry O. Iallett, Jr.,
John D. Taylor,
tioorge W, Hernndou,
William . lioulton,
Jacob Riegel,
Spenoev Mcllvaine,
I). T. Morgan, Pittsburg,
Jacob 1 . Jonen,
lames 1 raniinir.
Edward Diu-linnton,
11. Jones lirooko.
,1 uines 11. McFarlund,
Edward fitourcade.
John If. rompie,
'A. H. Berber, "
THOMAS C. HANI. President.
josiiua r. Eyre,
JOHN C. DAVIS, Vice-Preaidunt.
HENRY LYLRURN, Secretary.
HENRY U ALL, Assistant Secretary. 10
1829 -C1IAKTEK PERPETUAL.
OF PHILADELPHIA.
Office, Nos, 435 and 437 CHESNUT St
Assets on Jan. 1, 1869, $2,677,37213
CAPITAL
100,O0OOO
l,4.IS:i,.V2.N90
I,10i,sl3'43
ACCRUED SURPLUS...
PREMIUMS ,
UNSETTLED CLAIMS.
INCOME FOR 1S09,
SJtiO.OOU.
'I
Perpetual and Temporary Policies on Liberal Terms.
The ConiDanv also issues Polioies on Rents nf Ruddinsr
of all kinds, Ground Rents, and Mortgages,
DIRECTORS.
Alfred O. Baker, Alltod Fltler,'
Samuel (.runt, Thomas Sparks,
George W, Richards. William S. (.rant,
Isaac Lea, Thomas S. Ellis,
George t ales, I Oustavus S. Benson.
ALFRED O. BAKER, President.
, GEORUR FALES, Vice-President.
JAS. W. MCALLISTER, Secretary.
THEODORE M. REUER. Assistant Secretary. 8
S B U R Y
LIFE INSURANOE COMPANY.
No. 2!'l BROADWAY, corner READE Street, New York.
CASH CAPITAL ifloJ.OOO
$15,000 deposited with the State of New York as security
for polity holders.
LEMUEL BANCS, President.
GEORGE ELLIOTT, Vice President and Secretary.
EMORY Mi CLINTOt K, Actuary.
A. E. M. PURDY, M. D., Medical Examiner.
Thomas T. Tasker,
BEKrj.Hf.NCKH BY PFHMIHSIOM.
John M. Mans, I J. B. Lippinoott,
Juhn A. Wright,
i. uarles ttnencer.
nuiiam iiivine, James ling,
S. Morris Wain, Jan a Hunter,
John B. McCreary, E. 11. Worne.
ext Ita I k. . ..I
Artnur u. ajoinn.
In the character
nient, reasonableness of rates, PARTNERSHIP PLAN
OF DECLARING DIVIDENDS, no restriction in female
lives, and absolute non-forfeiture of all policies, and no
restriction of travel alter the first year, the ASBURY pre
senta a combination of advantauea offered hv mi nt.hnr
company. Policies issued in every form, and a loan of
one-third made when desired.
Special advantages offered to olergymen.
For all further information address
JAMES M. LONGACRE,
Manager for Pennsylvania and Delaware.
Office, No. 8n2 WALNUT Street, Philadelphia.
FORMAN P. UOLLINSIIKAD, Special Agent. 4 16
S T R I C T L Y MUTUA L.
Provident Life and Trust Co.
OF PmLADELPIIIA.
OFFICE, No. Ill S. FOURTH STREET.
Organised to promote LIFE INSURANCE among
members of the Society ol Friends.
Good rinks of any class accepted.
Policies Issued on approved plans, at the lowest
rates. '
President. SAMUEL K. SITIPLBT,
Vice-President, WILLIAM O. LONGSTKETH,
Actuary, ROWLAND PAKRY.
The advantages orTered by tola Company are un
excelled. a 1 U7S
I N S U It E A T H O M E,
in Tin
Penn Mutual Life Insurance
COMPANY.
No. 931 CHESNUT 8TREET, PIIILAD2LPIIIA.
ASSETS, 8,000,000.
CHARTERED BY OUR OWN STATE.
lHANAUED BY OUR OWN CITIZENS.
LOSSES PROMPTLY PAH).
POLICIES ISSUED ON VARIOUS PLANS.
Application may be made at the Home Office, and
at the Agencies throughout the State, 3 188
JAMES TRAOUAIR PRKSIDRNT
HAJH'EL E. NTOKK4 VIOK-PRKSIDKNT
JOHN W. HOIlNOK A. V. P. and ACTUARY
IIOltATIO H. STEPHENS BKORKTABY
THE ENTERPRISE INSURANCE COIPANY
X OF PHILADELPHIA.
prHce S. W. Comer FOURTH and WALNUT Street.
: FIRK INbllRANt'K EXCLUSIVELY.
PKRPhTUAL AND TEK.M POLICIJiS lSSIIKD.
Cash Capital ikJumWOO
Cabli Aaaets, May, Ibbfl, OVER HALF A MlLLlO
DOT. LA IIS.
DIRECTORS.
i F. Ratchford Starr,
J. Livingston Krrianr.
' naiuro r ruzior,
I John M. Atwood,
! Benjamin T. Tredick.
Ceorge 11. Stuart,
John H. Brown.
Jumea L. Clughorn,
William O. lioultun,
Charlea Wheeler,
Thomas 11. Montgomery,
James Aertsen.
This Company insures only
nrat-claas risks, taking no
specially hazardous risks whatever, such as factories,
uiuis, etc.
, F. RATCHFORD STARR. Prosidont.
THOMAS H. MONTGOMERY, Vice-President.
ilKIANUKM W. Wutkb, Secretary. So
DIICKNIX" INSURANCE COMPAN Y" OF
J PHILADELPHIA.
INCORPORATED 1H04-CIIARTEJI PERPETUAL.
' No. iM W ALN UT Street, opposite the Fiuhaue.
j Tiiis Company insures '"""u .hM or damage by
on liberal terms, on tiuildinga, merchandise, furniture,
etc., fur limited periods, aud permanently on building by
deposit of premiums.
The Company has been In active operatic for more than
SIXTY YEARS, during which ail I" fcave been
promptly sJjusUd and piild , ,
' John L. Hodge,
, M. E. Ma bony.
Tielijauim l-.Uing,
John T. Lewis.
ilimiiaa II. Powius, ,
A. R. Mcllennr,
Ktliuund Caatillon.
Samuel Wilcox,
1 ...... M Nrri.
William S. I. rant,
Robeit W. I.eaminf,
V. Clark Wharton,
lwreuce Lewis, Ji
JOHN R. WUUli&KKU. President.
JwcicUry. 4Sfci
INSURANOE,
rpiIE PENNSYLVANIA FIRK INSURANCE
J. COMPANY.
- Incorporated IMft Charter Perpetual
No. B10 WALNUT Street, opposite Independents Square
This Company, favorably known to the community for
over forty yearn, rontinsesfninsuro against loss or dam.Mre
by fire on Public or Private Bmlilines. either permanently
or for a limited time. Also on Furniture, Stocks of Oooda
in, .iviviiniiui'vini,'TiHi7,iM, innriM ivrms.
Their Cauital. toa-ether with a la nre Hnrnlua FiitM
vested tn the most careful manner, whioh enables them ti
Is In.
II, l no mon mitiiii ...... a. .i , .iiiun 0llltUie IHSUI .1
otter to the Insured an undoubted security iu the case of
ions.
Daniel Smith. Jr..
PIKK0T0H8.
John Dorereui,
Thomas Smith.
Hmiry l,ewis,
Alexander Itenson,
Issi'o Hn7.1cliurt,
luomae uomn.
llaniel Ilsddm-k.' Jr.
.1. i.uiinKiiam reii,
-., , DANIEL SMITH, Jr., President.
WM. a. CROWri.L, Heerotary. gM)
OFFICE OF THE INSURANCE COMPANY
9 NORTH AMI4R1UA. No. its WALNUT Street,
Philadelphia.
Incorpoiated 1TM. Charter Perpetual
. . Capital, $300,000. 1
Asset a eo Q-te sjki
MARINK. INLAND. AND FIRE IN8URANOK.
OVER $;W.0U0,OiJ0 LOSRKR PAID 81N0K ITS ORGAN.
IZATION.
Arthnr O. Coffin,
Samuel W. Jones,
John A. llrown,
Charles Taylor,
Arybroee Wliili,
William Welsh,
S. Morris Wain,
D1KKOTOBS.
ranois R. Cope,
Edward If. Trotter.
Edward 8. Clarke,
T. Charlton Henry.
Altrsd D. Jeesup.
John P. White.
l)llfs(l M.rlniM
, uuantvi vv.uusnmsA. i
Oeorge L. llarnson, 1 1
. M.,C1LARI'KS 1'LATT, Vice-President,
MATTHTAR Mams, Secretary. j 15
JMPEKIAL FIRE INSU11ANCB CO.
LONDON.
ESTABLISHED 1S03.
PaKl-ap Capital and Accumulated Funds,
18,000,000 IN GOLD.
PEEV0ST & HERRING, Agents,
2 45 No. 10T S. THIRD Street, Philadelphia.
CHAS. M. PRKVOST. CIIAS. P. IIKRRINQ
BHIPPINQ
coud Mason,
Charles W. Oushinso.
.CHARLESTOrJ, 8. C.
TUE SOUTH AND SOUffRWEST
FAHT FKEIGIIT LI1VE,
EVERY THURSDAY.
The Steamships PROMETHEUS, Captain Gray. J
W. KVERMAN, Captain Vance, '
WILL FORM A RKUULAK WEEKLY LINK.
Tho stcanmliip PROMETHEUS will sail on
THURSDAY. June 21. at 4 P. M.
miroiiRh bills of ludliifr Riven in connection with 8.
C. It. R. to poiHla in the South and Southwest.
Insurance at lowest rutes. Rates of freight as low
as by any other route. For frelKlit, apply to
E. A. HOUDER A CO.,
g22f POC11 STREET VVUA KP.
jjaj. ONLY DIRECT LINE TO FRANCE
THP! GKNRRAT. travsitt a wTiTn
jTOlW YORK AND HA VRK, OALmSS a
The splondld new vessel! ion this favorite route forth
Continent will sail from Pier No. to North river, as foE
ff jjf H" finohesne Saturday, May I
A iVimJ V'V Koussoau SaturdaJ Mayll
S!i f AV& Bauiis I"'""-.. Saturday, May 28
VILLH DE PARIS burmuunt Saturday, Juni U
PRICE OF PASSAGK
in gold (including wine).
TO RRF.8T OR HAVRE.
First Cabin .140Socond Cabin. ..$a
(Includinc railway ticketa, furnished on board )
First Cabin $146 Second Cabin ' gas
Theso steamers do not carry steerage passengers
Medical attendance free of charge.
A niericnn travelers goin to or returning from the oon.
tinent of Europe, by tilling the steumers of this line avoid
nuneceasary risks from transit by English railways and
orosaing the channel, besides suvintr time, trouble and
expense. UEORCiK MACKENZIE, Agent.
. No. ,YS BROADWAY, New York.
For passage In Philadelphia, apply at Adams' Krpresi
Company, to H I. LEA if
! NoJS-JOKSNUT Street.
PHILADELPHIA. RICHMOND.
r-".AND NORFOLK STEAMSHIP LINK
U trTHROlKiH KH k-KJii -r ' a ,trHiIiff
AflMFTIlK SOUTH AND WEST.
m K VERY SATURDAY,
Street"00"' 'HWT WHARF above MARKET
THROUGH RATES to. 11 points in North fand South
Carolina, via Seaboard Air Line Ruilroad. connecting it
Portsmouth and to Ijmchburg, Va., TonnesseerauTthi
rndiDTvi);er1t"!rroaandI 1 " U d "
RaK!? oTOras lowkb
The regularity, safety, and cheapness of this route oona
mend it to the imblio as the most desirable mediumfor
carrying every description of freiubt
No charge for commission, drayage, or any exnensa of
transfer.
Steamships insured at the lowest rates.
Freight received daily.
, ,r o . WILLIAM P. OLYDF A OO.,
No. 12 S. WHARVES and Pier 1 N. WHARVES.
T. P. CROWfcLL A CO., Agonts at Norfolk. 1
LORILLARD'S STEAMSHIP
LINE FOR
NEW YORK.
Balling Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays.
REDUCTION OF RATES.
Spring rates, commencing March IB,
Balling Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. On
and after 16th of March freight by this line will be
taken at 19 cents per li)0 pouuds, 4 cents per foot, or
1 cent per galltm, ship's option. Advance charges
cashed at oillco on Pier. Freight received at all
times on covered waarL
JOHN F. OHL,
vA'if . . Pler 19 Nortn Wharves. ,
is. it. Extra rates on small packages Iron, metals, etc
t ffSs NEW express' line to
Lr"3 Alexandria, Georgetown, and Washington, D.
C., via Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, with
connections at Alexandria from the most direct rout for
Lynchburg, Bristol, Knoxville, Nashville, DaJton. and the
Southwest.
Steamers leave rc-rnlarly every Saturday at noon from Uia
flint wharf sbove Market street.
Freight received daily.
WILLIAM P. OLYTE A OO..
. . . No. 14 North and South Wharves.
RLDKIDGK A CO., Agents at Alexandria. w 615
t-tjs FOR LIVERPOOL AND
2Wry.UKKNSTOWN- laml !' of Mail
!S" fe? MhK. ft,MU1"w appointed to sail ae iot -
v-'"j--m lows
cny oi liniuklj n, Saturday, June 2B, at 1 P. M.
AM Washington., via Halifax, Tuesday, June 2., at 10
City of Antwerp, Saturday. July 8, at 12 noon..
! City or rn'.r, r-, t'li day, July 10, at 1 P. M.
And each succeeding Saturday and alternate Tuesday.
Xroin Pier 45, Nort h Kiver.
i RATES OF PASSAGK.
, ST THE Mall NTKAMea iUU.U' KVt'.UI SATtmDAT.
' Payable in (..old. Payable in Curroucy.
FIRST CAbiN $100 'STEERAGE. ...$3
i To london l,io' To lxiudon 40
' To Paris. Uil To Paris f
; JTASHAUK BY THK ZCaVUUAT STXAMKlt, VIA BAUTAS.
I rillNTCAillM. fU'KKHAU.
Payable in .old. Payable in Currency.
Liverpool gn ' Llvorpool .ft SO
Halifax , go Halifax 15
St. John's, N. F., ) SU John's, N. K.
I by branch Stti.uier 1 by liran.-h Steamer (w
Paaaengeis also forwarded to Havre, Hamburg, Bremen,
to., at reduced nutca.
1 Tickets can be bought here at moderate rates by perrons
wishing to send fr their friends.
; Eor further inhumation apply at the Company's Oifloes.
JOHN t. DALE, Aiteut, No. U, MtOADVVAY, N. VV
orto O'DONNELL 4 KAU1.K, Agents.
4 6 Ho. UCUKS.NUT Street, Philadelphia.
NOTICE. FOR NEW YORK, VIA
BH.AWAHK AND RARITAN CANAL.
V.X PRESS STEAMRO yp UOMPANV
LI'
I ihe CUKAPI-NT and yU ICR EST water oommunloav
tion between Phiiiidelohis and New York.
Steamers leaw daily from first wharf below Market
Street, Philadelphia, aud foot of Wall atreet, New Yoik.
Cecils forwardi-d by all the liuea ruuuing out of New
York, North, Eat 1, and West, free of commission.
, freight reoeive'l and forws tiled 00 accommodating terms.
WILLIAM P. CLYDE A Co., Agonu,
No.12 . Dk.LAWARKAvr.nne, Philadelphia.
. JAMES HAND. Agent,
I 8 85 ; No. lift WALL btreot, lie Voik.
JSOTICE. FOR NEW YORK.
na Delaware and Rarltnu Canal, SWIFT-
NIN K TRANSl'liHTATlllV rillMPlNV
i . . '.-. n . ni. 1 0 v , r 1 ,-i un, i.init.
The buhineaa by those lines will be resumed on and aftr
the etu of March. I'ur Ereixhta, which will be token oo
accouuuudaUng terms, apply to
W. M. BAIRD A CO..
IB No. l;M South Wharves.
hiuui'i ou . . i. l- , ...... . .
CORN EXCHANGE
UAOMANUKACTORY,
JOHN T. BA1LKY,
1 H. K. oornot ut MARK ET and WATER Streets,
i Philadelphia,
DEALER IN HACS AND BAGGING
Of every description, fur
Grain, Flour, Bait, Super-Ptipbute of Ume, Bon.
Dust, Klo.
Large and small GUN N V HAliS constantly on Uandk
I . Also, WOOL SACKS.
ft

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