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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, March 17, 1870, FIFTH EDITION, Image 6

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THE DAILY EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1870.
THE CARDIFF GIANT.
Tee Frnad jposrd-Mtnry of th CJypsam
Mtatne, an ToU by Ita OrlclntMor What the
tJtnnt font, Whrre It 1'itine From, and How
IttJot to (nrdlft.
From the Buffalo Courier, March 14.
Oathe Kith of October, lfif.!), the Cardiff
Giant was discovered ou the farm of William
C. Newell, at Cardiff, Onondaga county, in
this Htato, and since that timo the "giant"
has filled a large upace in the publio eye,
nnd elicited more elaborate scientific com
mentary than anything which had ever been
unearthed, at least in the vicinity of Syraouse.
The descriptions, tho sciontiflo opinions, the
minnte analyses devoted to it are still fresh
in the minds of our readers. General Lea
venworth said of it: "It hns the marks of
the ages stamped upon every limb and fea
ture in a manner which no art can imitate."
Xrofessors Vv'oolworth and Hall decided in
favor of its antiquity. Professor Ward, of
Rochester University, was bewildered
by the spectacle it presented, and sug
gested that "all ones feelings persuade
to aocept it as a real human being,
once instinct with lite and activity, now a
noble corpse." Professor Olmstead said:
"As a work of art the Cardiff statue is per
haps a better embodiment of the intellectual
and phyHical power of a rock-hurling Titan
than any Italy possesses." lie v. Mr. Calthrop
said that in the ancient world only the Greek
school f art was capable of such a perfect
reproduction of the human form. Dr. Boyn
ton did not think the statue was 300 years old,
but did think it was the work of the early
Jesuit fathers of this oountry, who are known
to have frequented the Onondaga valley from
220 to 250 years ago. Subsequent to the
time when our scientific savans had exhausted
themselves on the subject came suggestive
hints of fraud and humbug, and the "iron
hound box" has come to form an important
element in the history of the giant.
This much by way of preface; and now for
the history of the Cardiff giant as told to us
by its originator, the prime author of the
most consummate fraud of the age.
II. 13. Morton arrived in the city Sunday
morning, at half-post 2 o'clock, from Boston
via the Erie Railway, and put up at the Con
tinental Hotel, and was quartered in room
No. C. He asked the clerk if he could see a
newspaper man, as he had something of im
portance to communicate. The writer of
this, who is not suspected of doing much in
the sleeping lino, was informed of the wish
of the stranger, and accompanied by a friend
visited room No. (i. Mr. Morton had retired,
but begged ns to take a seat, and being in
formed that we were a "newspaper man, he
paid that he wished to tell ns all about the
Cardiff Giant. We intimated that consider
able had already been said on the subject;
but ho replied, that although some true things
had been snid about it, and a good many
hints going 1 ow it up as a fraud, a cor
rect statfii i . the facts had never been
made. lie gave as a reason for making the
revelation that the "giant" had with him
been a failure, and that his partner, George
Hull, had not dealt fairly with him. We give
the language of H. B. Morton, although not
always in the precise manner in which it was
spoken.
Morton's statement.
1 got up that giant and worked on the idea
for a year and a half. I found difficulty in
getting the proper material, and travelled
thousands of miles. I made known my plan
to George Hull, who was recommended to me
for his shrewdness and enterprise. I knew
the American people liked to be humbugged,
and would pay well for it. I wanted to beat
Carnum, and the thing was played as well as
it could until that cuss (Hull) spoiled the
matter. I could have stocked the "giant" in
New York or Boston for half a million dol
lars, but I have made nothing out of it.
AT FORT DODGE.
I went with George Hull to Fort Dodge,
Iowa, on the Cth of June, 1808, and bought a
quarry of gypsam in section No. 1, and built
a shanty. Remained there six or eight weeks,
and finally found that in order to move the
block for transportation I should have to
build three-quarters of a mile of corduroy
road, which would cost too much money. I
abandoned that quarry and went over to sec
tion No. 3, where the railroad was getting out
stone for its culvert and bridge abutments.
2 hired an Irishman named Mike Foley to get
out the block, and paid him fifteen dollars for
it. then wanted to get it to Montana, in
Boone county, a railroad station about forty
five miles distant, and let out the iob for
seventy-five dollars. The rough block must 4
nave weignea over ten tons. This man who
took the job could only get together twelve
yoke of cattle, and had to give up the work.
The job was let three times before the block
could be moved, and the seoond day out the
block had to be cut down to between seven
and eight tons. We broke through bridges
Beveral times and had considerable trouble,
but on the twelfth day we got the block
to Montana station. Here it was loaded on a
fiat-bottomed cor, shipped to Edward Burk
hordt, Chicago. Burkhardt is a marble cut
ter, doing business at No. 107 Washington
Street, in Chicago.
IN THE WORKSHOP.
The block was taken from the Chicago
depot at night and was carried to Mr. Burk
hardt's barn, No. 040 Clark street, and there
deposited. After I got into the barn we hung
up quilts and carpets inside so as to deaden
the sound and keep spectators from looking
in upon us. A man named Saley, one of - the
best sculptors in the country and who drinks
like a sack, was employed to carve the giant.
We were nearly two months at it, part of the
time nights on the rough of it.
THE GIANT FINISHED.
The giant is ten feet four and a half inches
long, thirty-three inches across the shoulders,
about twenty-two inches deep and weighs
290 pounds. The various marks upon it to
indicate the action of water and time were
chiselled out, and it took ninety dollars' worth
of acids and ink to give it its present color.
After the work was done we had a box made
into which it fittad, the iron-bound box about
which so much has been said.
THE GIANT SHIPPED TO ITS DESTINATION.
The giant was then shipped from Chicago,
but I was West at that time. It was shipped
to Union, Broome county, in this State, and
at Union was taken by Israel D. Armsby and
John null, a brother of George, and carried
to William C. Newell's farm in Cardiff, taken
from the wagon and laid at the side of the
barn, where it was covered up with straw.
Next night the pit was dug and the giant put
into it, where it remained till the 10th of
October.
PREVIOUS PROJECTS.
. I had intended originally to have the giant
discovered right in the quarry at Fort Dodge,
but this would require too much labor and
cost too much. I then thought of taking it
out to Smoky Hill, beyond the Missouri, but
the transportation would cost a good deal.
Hull having lived in Broome county, having
relatives there, and knowing the locality, and
that it was a great place Sot relics, I followed
Lis advice and shipped it to Broome county.
NEWELL.
Newell knew nothing about it till Hull went
np from Bingbumtw, let htt into tno secret
and offered hiu. quarter to have the giant
buried and discovered on his farm. I was not
there when the giant was dug np, and was not
to be there till afterwards; then I was to ap
peor and bid for an interest in it, so that
others might be induced to bid. Newell was
to do the selling. I read the account of tho
discovery in the Chicago papers and came on
immediately. I found the giant in the pit.
FINANCIALLY TREATED.
Newell had sold three-quarters of it for
$30,000, retaining one-fourth. Tho company
which purchased the three-quarters was coru-
S06ed of Hanian, Westcott, Sponcer, Gillett,
iggins, and. Rankin. Thoy paid $10,008
cash ana gave their notes for the balance,
payable in ninety days. George Hull drew
the $10,000 out of the savings bank, and this
excited their suspicions. They then took
Newell to Syracuse and made him take the
notes out of the bank, place them in the hands
of Mr. Noxon, their attorney, and sign a con
tract that if it was made to appear within
ninety days that this was a work of art placed
on his farm to defraud the people then these
notes should be null and void. During the
ninety days they never proved that it had been
placed there to defraud the people. After he
signed the contract Newell ran away, and I
have not seen him since. When the notes
did come due the company refused to pay,
because the draft for $10,000 was made pay
able to George Hull at the request of Newell.
Since they have given their notes for $4300
to George Hull, in payment of all demands
for the giant.
Mr. Burkhardt was to have one-fourth in
terest in the giant, but has never received
anything. Saley, the sculptor, was to have
received $1.10, but he has not been paid. I
have received a little less than $1000, and
Newell received about $2000. I do not think
the money has done Hull much good.
REVELATIONS.
The first thing ever published about the
giant that was anywhere near true was pub
lished by Governor Gue, editor of the Worth
Went, at Fort Dodge. He was right about
the block of gypsum, but that was all. Saley
came out and told a Chicago reporter about
it, but he did not get anywhere near correct.
THE IRON-BOUND BOX.
The affidavits showing the movements of
the mysterious iron-bound box from Union
as far as Syracuse, on the Black River Canal,
and np into the Black river country, were all
trumped np by Hull for the benefit of the
company owning the grant. They had to get
that box by Newell's farm, or the humbug
Vbuld be exploded. The iron-bound box had
only to be accounted for from Union north
to Syracuse, or from Cardiff to Syracuse, but
that box never contained tobacco machinery,
as has been stated; it contained the gypsum
statue, and stopped at Newell's farm.
FRAUD AND DISAPPOINTMENT.
Omitting Martin's tribute to the honesty of
his partner, which was anything but flatter
ing, and the charges of perjury and
trickery which surround the giant, aocording
to his statement, in reply to some questions
he said: "I knew if I could get the giant
right before the publio I would have got a
fortune out of it. There was a fortune in it
for a dozen men, if it had been managed
rightly. I will humbug the American people
within two years, and the Cardiff' giant will
be a wooden nutmeg affair. If Hull hadn't
made a fool of himself I should have
had the mother of the giant dug up near the
same spot soon after tho first discovery.
There are people in Onondaga to-day who be
lieve that carved block of gypsum lived and
walked where they now live and walk. I in
tended to have the mother made of plaster of
paris, iron, and bone, and to have it appear
that she had killed herself while defending
herself against a large serpent."
HIS ACQUAINTANCE WITH HULL.
In reply to a question, he said his acquain
tance with Hull commenced at Baraboo, 111.,
where he, Hull, had been a tobacconist; but
we scarcely feel at liberty to give his history
of his relationship with Hull beyond what
pertains directly to the gypsum fraud.
CONCLUSION.
It will be seen that Martin's account of the
Cardiff swindle is circumstantial, and we have
no doubt of its truth. Some details that re
flect severely upon parties concerned are
omitted, else the story would be more tel
lingly emphasized than it is. And this is
what Mr. Martin informs ns is the first full
and correct statement that has been made in
regard to the Cardiff Giant.
FINANCIAL..
B
A W K I iw o
II O V 8 E
or
JAY COOKE & CO,,
Won, 113 and 1141 H. XlllKO St.,
PHILADELPHIA.
Dealers in Government Sesnntlcs.
Old C-20B Wanted In Exchange tot New.
A Liberal Difference allowed.
Compound Interest Notes Wonted.
Interest Allowed on DepoBlta.
COLLECTIONS MADS. STOCKS bought and told
on Commission.
Special business accommodation! reserved for
ladles.
We will receive applications for Policies of Life
Insurance In the National Life Insnronoe Company
of the United 8tates. TuU information given at oar
office. U 8m
I L r E K
FOR SALE.
C. T. YERKES, Jr., & CO.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
No. 20 South THIRD Street
PHILADELPHIA.
FINANCIAL.
NO SAFER OR BLTTEtf INVESTMENT
THIN TUB
FIRST MORTGAGE 7 PER CENT.
COLD BONDS
OF TUB
Central Railroad of Iowa
At 95, Free from Tax.
This railroad runs 234 miles north and south
through the finest and most thickly settled portion
of the magnificent State of Iowa, and Is the only link
wanting to connect the railway centres at St. Louis
and St. Paul by &n unbroken line, UT miles shorter
than edv existing route. This road offers many ad
vantage's. The building of the railroad north from
St. Paul to Duluth, at the head of Lake Superior,
where Ave railroads will soon centre the construc
tion of the Northern Pacific Railroad, already begun
and the rapid development of a new and produc
tive country In Minnesota and the Northwest, must
furnish ;a large). Southern traffic. As tho Upper
Mississippi Is frozen over during the winter, and Its
TvTpHtlnn Is often uncertain during the summer!
n in ii. w water, this road must have at all times a
in Ke uuiount of transportation, and a monopoly of
TTn business at some seasons of the year. Its con
iM'tuuuH with other lines Interested by mutual owU
etShlp or running arrangements, will give It almost
the entire north and south travel between Us tcrml
TTMnta and thflr vlclultr.:gSM attach rf
luiaiuad will have a great advantage over any
other Western line In carrying tho best quality of
coal from where It Is abundant In Southern Iowa to
Northern Iowa and Minnesota, whero none Is to be
luuuci, and In securing return freights o lumber, for
which the demand Is very great.
Forty-six miles of the line are Just completed, and
eighty-eight miles more are graded. An abundant
supply of Iron, ties, and oth ar materials has been
contracted for. The Company have a large and
dally Increasing surplus of money on band, and the
stock subscriptions and the sales of the bonds, give
them uiuple means to push the work forward, so
that, with favorable weather, it Is expected that the
whole line will be completed this season.
SECURITY OF THE INVESTMENT.
So far as we can learn, every completed railroad
la the Northwest Is n i only earning the Interest on
Its bonds, but a dividend on Its stock, and we be
lieve the CENTRAL OF IOWA must occupy an
equally Btrong financial position.
The amount of Bonds to be Issued is bat 110.000
per mile, or less than four millions in all,
Of which over One Million have al
ready been told.
WE BELIEVE THERE WILL BE NO MORE FA
VORABLE TIME TO SELL GOVERNMENTS, AND
BUY REALLY FIRST-CLASS RAILROAD SECU
RITIES SUCH AS THESE THAN THE PRE
SENT.
Pamphlets, with map, maybe obtained, and sub
scriptions will be received at the COMPANY'S
OFFICES, No. 82 PINE street, New York, and by its
advertised agents.
W. II. SIIATTUCK,
TREASURER.
After a fall examination, we have accepted an
Agency for the sole of the above First Mortgage
Bonds, and desire to recommend them to our cus
tomers AS A THOROUGHLY SAFE AS WELL AS
PROFITABLE INVESTMENT. We have no hesita
tion in saying that in our opinion the CENTRAL
RAILROAD OF IOWA wUl be one of the most Im
portant and valuable roads In the West.
JAY COOKE & CO.,
No. 114 SOUTH THIRD STREET.
E. W. CLARK & CO.,
No. 35 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
B. K. JAMISON & CO.,
BOVEN & FOX,
8 10 thstuCtrp PHILADELPHIA.
jgLLlUTT & i u it it.
BANKERS
No. 109 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
DEALERS INI ALL GOVERNMENT SECURI
TIES, GOLD BILLS, ETC.
DRAW BTT.TJ Off WYnTT A NOW AND 138UB
COMMERCIAL LETTERS OF CREDIT ON TUB
UNION BANK OF LONDON.
ISSUE TRAVELLERS' LETTERS OF CREDIT
ON LONDON AND PARIS, available throughout
Europe.
Will collect all Coupons and Interest free of charge
for parties making their financial arrangements
with us. mt
P. 8. PETERSON A CO.,
STOCK BROKERS,
No. 30 South TIIIKO Street.
ADVANCES MADE ON GOOD COLLATERAL
PAPER.
Host complete facilities for Collecting Maturing
Country Obligations at low cost.
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS. 1 8C8
PINANOIAL.
THE BONDS
OF TUB
Chicap, Danville ani Yioncs
XU1XXXIOAD CO.
LTON EXAMINATION WILL BE FOUND TO BE
The Cheapest and the Best
Yet Offered to the Public.
THIS WILL BE BORNE OUT BY
The rich country the Road traverses,
with its agricultural and mineral re
sources; The cash subscribed to the Capital
Stock;
The excellence of the 65 miles already
built, and its full equipment;
The plans completed and money ex
pended for vigorous finishing of the
Line in the Spring;
The excessive earnings to accrue irom
the completion of the whole line;
The ample Sinking Fund for the cer
tain redemption of the Bonds;
The very liberal interest, running
over a term of 40 years;
The security afforded by Registry;
The mortgage covering the entire
Road, Equipment, Franchises, and all
Property, present and future indeed
the security of twice the amount of
Bonds issued;
The low currency price they are now
offered at.
All this is verified in detail in the
cctaplete Pamphlet, which can be had
of us. -a
AVe KNOW these Bonds to be good, and we
know the character and capacity of the Com
pany's estimates can be implicitly relied upon
to give these Bonds the highest standard. We
therefore freoly and fully recommend them.
W. BAILEY LANG & CO.,
MERCHANTS,
Mo. 54 CLIFF Street, New York,
. Agents for the sale of the Bonds.
We have these Bonds at 95 and ACCRUED
INTEREST, and heartily recommend them to
onr friends and the publio.
DE HAVEN & BR0.,
No. 40 South THIRD Street,
8 6 stnthlmip
PHILADELPHIA.
IV E W LOAN.
City of Allegheny Six Per
Cents,
FREE OF STATE TAX.
We are offering a limited amount of this Loan
At SO Per Cent, and Accrued
Interest.
The Interest is payable first days of January and
July, in Philadelphia, FREE C? STATE TAX.
We recommend them as an unquestionable se
curity for investment.
The debt of Allegheny City being comparatively
mall, the security offered is equal to that of the City
of Philadelphia, the difference In price making them
a very desirable and cheap security.
WM. PAINTER & CO.,
Hankers and Dealers In Govern.
ment Securities,
No. 36 South THIRD Street,
l sesm
PHILADELPHIA.
D. C. WHARTON SMITH & CO.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
No. 121 SOUTH THIRD STREET.
Successors to Smith. B mdolph Co.
Ever? branch ef the business will haw prompt attention
a. heretofore.
Quotation! of Stock. Governments, and Gold eon.
sUntly received from Raw York brprivaM mirt, bom oar
friend., Edmnnd D. Randolph Oo.
JOHN S. RUSHTON & CO..
No. 60 SOUTH TniRD STREET.
MARCH COUPONS WANTED.
CITY WARRANTH
16 3m BOUGHT AND BOLD.
FINANCIAL.
CITY WARRANTS
Bought and Sold.
DE HAYEN & BM,
No. 40 South THIRD Street.
1 118
PHILADELPHIA.
QLKWlWICJ, IAY1 Sc. CO.,
No. 48 SOUTH THIRD STREET, -PHILADELPHIA.
GLENDINMNG, DAVIS & AMORY,
No. 2 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK,
BANKERS AND BROKERS.
Receive denOBltB Bllbloc.t tn chert, lllniv Internal-.
on Standing and temnorarv hnlnncpa. nrirl nviwula
orders promptly for the purchase and sale of
oiwao, uunusBQauiiLi;, in tuner city.
.Direct teiegrapn communication from Philadelphia
noiiHo tortew iura. is
B. K. JAMISON & CO.,
SUCCESSORS TO
P. JP. KELLY te CO.,
BANKERS AND DEALERS IN
Gold, Silver, and Government Bonds
At Closest Market Kates,
N. W. Cor. THIRD and CHESNUT Stt.
Special attention Riven to COMMI88ION ORDERS
in New York and Philadelphia Stock Boards, eta
etc 365
INSURANCE..
JjIRE AS80CIATI
INCORPORATED MARCH 27, 1SS0.
OFFICE,
NO. 34 NORTH FIFTH STREET
INSURE
4
BUILDINGS, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, AND
MERCHANDISE GENERALLY,
From Loss by Fire (in the City of Philadelphia only),
ASSETS, JANUARY 1, 1S70, S l,St,7 iZ"iS.
TRUSTEES.
WM. H. HAMILTON.
JOHN CARKOW,
OEOKGK I. YOUNG,
JOS. K. LYNDALL,
LKVI P. COATS.
CHARLES P. BOWER,
RUBT. SUOKMAKKR.
PH1 KR ARMBRUSjI'KR.
SAMUEL 6PARHAWK, ' PKTKR WILLIAMSON.
dObH.ru K. BUUKLL.
WM. H. HAMILTON, President.
SAMUEL SPARHAWK, Vice President,
WILLIAM T. BUTLER,
H Seoretary.
JfAME INSURANCE COMPANY.
No. 809 OHESNUT Street.
INCORPORATED 1850. CHARTER PERPETUAL
CAPITAL, $300,000. '
FIRE INSURANCE EXCLUSIVELY.
Insoree against Loss or Damage by Fire either by Pet.
petoal or Temporary Policies.
DIRKOTOUS:
William li. Khawn.
unaries Kionarason, Kobert Fearee.
William M. Seyfart.
John F. Smith,
Nathan Hilles.
Joan nessier, Jr..
Edward H. Orne.
Charles Stokes,
John W. Krerman,
Mordeoal Btubr.
OeorgeA. West.
CHARLES RICHARDSON, President.
WILLIAM H. RUAWN, Vice-President.
Wn.TjAMS L BLAH CHARD. Beoretary. 7 g3
THE ENTERPRISE INSURANCE CO. OF
X PHILADELPHIA.
Office S. W. corner of FOURTH and WAIJ'TTT Streets.
F1KK lNbURANOK EXULUKIVKITy.
PFRPKTUAL AND TERM POL1UIJCS ISSUED
CASH Capital (psid np in full) $au0,ooi-0l)
Cash Assets, Jon. 1, 1870 8 544.303 -13
DIRECTORS.
F. Ratchford Btarr, J. lJinROton Errincar
Junius L. OlnKhorn.
John M. A (wood,
lieni. T. Tredivk.
Charles Wheeler,
J nomas II. MnniMmiM
Georige H. btaart,
John 11. Hrown, 'James M. Aertsen.
F. KATOHFORI) STARR, President
THOMAS H. MONTGOMERY, Vice-President
ALEX. W. WINTER, Secretary. uens.
JACOB E. PH'lKKMiV. A wUnt Secretary
TI1E PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INSURANCE
COMPANY.
Inooiporated l&ib ttmrter PerpetoaL
No. 610 WALNUT btreet, oppueite lndeiendenoe Bonara.
This Company, favorably Known to the oonunanity for
ever forty years, continue, to lnsnre scainst loss or dam.
ace by tire on Pablio or Private bailduiM.leither perma
nently or for a limited time. Also on For ni tare, Stocks
of Goods, and Merchandise generally, en liberal terms.
Their Capital, together with a tafice Surplus Fund, la
Invested in the most careful manner, which enables them
to otter to the insured an undoubted eeoaritv la the ease
Of loss. tmwmtm
Dmcox &.
Daniel Smith, Jr., John Dtsverenx,
Alexander bonaon, Thomas Smith.
Iwao Uazlehurst, Henry Lewis,
Thomas Robins, J. UiLingham FeU.
Daniel Haddock. Jr.
DANIEL SMITH. Ja,. preaidea
WM. O. OROWELL. Beoretary. m
QREAT WESTERN
Mutual Life Insurance Co.
OF NEW YORK.
, EDWIN E. SIMTSON, MANAGER,
No. 5l!l WALNUT St., l'iiilada.
AU the good, equitable and liberal features of the best
Life Insuranoe Companies are guaranteed to the policy
holders of this Company. (1 22.utii2m
Liberal arrangements made with oeropetent agenta
WANTS.
TO THE WORRINO OLA SB.-We are now pro
pared Ui furnih all clases with constant employ
ment at home, the whole of the time or for the spare
momenta. Business new. light, and profitable. Persons
of either sex easily earn from Wo. to US per evening, and a
propurtional sum by devoting their whole tune to the
F.UHineiw. Boys and gir s earn neariy as muoh as men.
That all who see this notice may send their address, and
tetttbe busiue... we make this unparalleled offer :-To
.neb as are not well satisfied, we will send 1 to pay for
the trouble of writing, iull particulars, a valuable sam
ple, which will do to commsuoe work on, and a oopy of
i A. i'fr' lurrom tto..m-one of the largest and
best family newspapers publishedall sent free by mail.
Reader, if woo wsnt permanent, profitable Work, addree
qfYtj'rN IH).. Amm.ta. Maine. 1 111 Bin ,
TOHN FARNTJM & CO., COMMISSION MERj
I chants and Msnuf aotarera of Oonestoga Ticking, eto,
Bo.aUUJUWUTbUeWPeiiA4eiplua, ilwojiiT
INSURANCE.
DELAWARE MUTUAL SAFETY INSURANCE
COMPANY. Incorporated by the Lenlxlftture
or Penngylvania, is.tr.
Omce aonthewt comer of THIRD and WALNUT
mreoiR, rnua'iiMpnia.
MARINE 1NHRANCES
On Vessels, Cargo and Fright to all parts of tho
INLAND INSURANCES
On goods by river, canal, lake and land carriage to
B 1 1 pHnn i iiih i num.
KIRK INSURANCES
On Merchandise generally; on Stores, Dwellings,
uousea, eiu.
ASSETS OP THE COMPANY
November 1, 118.
1200,000 United States Five Per Cent.
Loan, U-n-fortles taX.OOOW
100,000 United stau-a six Per Cent.
Loan (lawtul money) 10T,TB0KK
60,000 United Htatea six fer Cent.
Loan. 1H1 M.OOO'OO'
800,000 State of Pennsylvania SU Per
Cent. Loan S13.SB0DO'
800,000 City of Philadelphia Six Per
Cent. Loan (exempt from
tax) 900,ttS-00
100,000 Stare of New Jersey Six Per
Cent. Loan 101 009 OO
. 90,000 TenuBylvauia Railroad First
Mortgage Six Per Cent.
Bon'1 19,460-00
86,000 Pennaylvanla Railroad Se
cond mortgage Six per Cent.
BourtB ; Kew-OP
86,000 Western Pennsylvania Rail
road Mortgage blx Per
Cent. Bonds (Pennsylvania
Railroad guarantee) 0,000'OOi
80,000 State of Tennessee Five Per
Cent. Loan lB-OOOW
1,000 btate of Tennessee Blx Per
Cent. Loan 4,170-00
18,600 Penimylvanla Railroad Com
pany, SM) shares stock 14,000 "00
6,000 North Pennsylvania Rail
road Company, loo shares
stock 1.900-00
10,000 Philadelphia and Southern
Mall Steamship Com-
... . P""?' 80 """res stock T,600-00
,00 Loans on Bond and Mort
gage, first Hens on City
Properties 844,800-00
$l,83l,oo Par. Market value, H.86B.870-00
, , Cost, l,816,o!fli-S7.
Real Estate ' Bo.OOO-OO.
15111b Receivable for Insurances made.'.'.' 88s!l(K)-R
Valances due at Agencies :
Premiums on Marine Policies, Accrued
Interest, and other debts due the Com-
pany 65.081-89
Stoek, Scrip, etc., of Sundry 'corporal
tlous, 47ti6. Estimated value 8,T40-8O
CaBhlnVank 1168,818-88
Cash la Drawer 818-86
169,29114
11,868,100-0
DIRECTORS.
Thomas C. Hand, .Samuel K Stokes,
John Dftvin
William H. Houlton,
Kdward Dorliugtoa,
II. Jones Brooke,
Edward Lafourcade.
Jacob Riegel,
Jacob P. .Tonus.
Edmund A. Souder,
Theophllus Paulding,
James Truqualr,
Henry Sloan,
Henry C. Dallett, Jr.,
James C. Hand,
William C. Ludwig,
Joseph Ii. Seal,
Hugh Craig,
John D. Taylor,
Georgo W. Vernadou,
William C. Houston.
James B. McKarland,
uuHiiua r. .yre,
Hnpncr Mi'llvnln
J. B. Scrapie, Plttslmrg,
A. H. Hprirnr. Plt.rahnrir
D. T. Morgan, Pittsburg;
THOMA8 C. nANH, President.
JOHN C. DAVIS, Vice-irealdent.
HENRY LYLUVKN, Secretary. ""0B1UBni'
UEJiRYllALL Assistant Secretary. 11
INSURANCE COMPANY
or
NORTH AMERICA.
Januabt 1, 1870.
Charter Perpetual.
Incorporated 1704.
CAPITAL. 8300,000
ASSETS 84,783,381
Leases paid since organization. ...82:1,000,000
Kecelpts of Premiums, J8G0-...81,frJl,S37'43
Interest from Investments, !. 114,00674
8-4, 100,334' 19
..81,033,38U'84
Losses paid, IStiO.
Statement of tbe Assets.
First Mortgages on City Property
United States Government and other Loan
Bonds
Railroad, Bank and Canal Stocks
Cash in Bank and Office
Loans en Collateral Security
Notes Receivsble, mostly Maiine Premium. ..
Accrued Interest
Premiums in course of transmission
Unsettled Marine Premiums
Real Estate, Office of Company, Philadelphia..
766,0
1,123,849
SS,70
847,630
83,668
821,944
30,867
85.19S
100,900
80.000
DIRECTORS. 8WS3M1
Arthur O. Oo
Francis R. Cope,
Kdward H. Trotter,
Kdward S. Clarke,
T. tlharlton Henry,
Alfred D Josnup,
Louis O. Madeira.
Charles W. Uasoman,
Clement A. Orisoom,
William Brockie.
Samuel W.; jei,
John A. Itrot a,
Cbanea Taylor,
Ambrose Wbite,
William Welxh,
B. Morris Wain,
John Mason,
George L. Harrison,
ARTHUR O. COFFIN, President.
OHAKLKS PLAT1', Vice President.
Matthias Mabib, Secretary.
C. H. Reeves, Assistant Seoretary. g 4
CHARTER PERPETUAL. J870
JFrantlin Fire Insurance Company
4-111 miff a rTnr w a
OF PUILAOBLPUIA.
Office, Nos. 435 and 437 CHESNUT St.
Assets Jan. liv70L$2l825i73la67
CAPITAL ' 4fl0,000'00
ACURCKD SURPLUS AND PREMIUMS.... U.4J6.731 67
INCOMK FOR 18i0,
fjblu.oou.
LOSSES PAID IN 1869,
$144,900 42.
LGSSEspaMsmcel829QTer $5500,060
Perpetual and Temporary Policies on Liberal Terms,
The Company also ibeues policies upon the Rente of all
kinds of liuildings, U round Rents, snd MortgaKes,
ihe "tUAKKLHS" has no PlttPUTKO CLAIM.
DIRKOTOR8.
Alfred O. Baker,
A urea ritier,
Tbomas Sparks,
William H. Grant,
Thomas 8. Kills,
f .urtjfcvn. H. Benson.
rtamuei itrsnt,
Ceorge W. Richards,
Isaac Lea.
(Jeorue t ales,
ALFRED (i BAKKR. President.
GKOKOK FALKS. Vice-President.
.TA VFR W MnAI.l.l.STHR. K rlrv
TliKODORK M. RKUKR, Assistant Secretary. S 193
V S J3 U 3EL Y
LIFE INSURANCE CO , N. Y.
Number of Policies itsued by the five largest New Tork
Oonipaniea during the first years ef their exlstenoe:
MUTUAL (23 months) . .1099
NJ VURK (is months iohi
Manhattan t mouths)
KNICKftKIiOCKlR...(20mouthB) 669
EyUiTABLK. (17 mouths) ssd.
During the 81 months of Its existence tho
ASSBURY
HAS ISSUED 2600 POLICIES,
INSURING NEARLY 16,000,000.
Reliable Caiivassing Agents wanted throughout the.
country.
, JAMES M. LONOAORK,
Manager for Pennsylvania and Delaware.
Offloe, No. ri v A INUT Street, Philadelphia.
BAMUKL PUW HKS, Spee'al Agent. gf
JMPKlilAL FIRE INSURANCE CO..
LONDON.
ENTAIII.IMIIED 1803.
Paid-up Capital ruid Accumulated Fundi,
08,000.000 IN GOLD.
PHEV0ST & HEllllINO, Agent,
I ; No. 107 8. THIRD Street, Philadelphia.
CHA8. M. PRSVOST.
CliAS. P. HSRKESa

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