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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, April 16, 1870, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE" DAILY EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, SATURDAY, APRIL 1C, 1870.
srzzizT or tjiu rxuass.
Editorial Opinions or the Leading Journals
upan Current Topics Compiled Every
Day for the Evening Telegraph.
POLITICAL RIGHTS OF NEGROES.
From the N. Ti Time.
.The broad assertion of citizenship anil its
attendant franrhiHes wlticu was made in be
half of the negroes by the reoont amend
menta to the (Joimtitiition is Him ply a basin
for practical legislation, by means of which
those franchises can be realized. Constitu
tional provisions cannot enforce themselves
in the absence of statutory provisions, and
courts cannot assume jurisdiction or deal
with infractions of them except under afllrma
tive law. The declarations that slavery shall
' not exist within ttie United States, that all
parsons born under Federal jurisdiction are
oitizens, and that no citizen shall be denied
the right of voting on account of race, color,
or previous condition, neoessarily require
supplementary legislation to give thorn
vitality and practical effect. Moreover, being
new concessions by the States to the Federal
Government, Congress had no right, ex
pressed in the Constitution, to logislate with
regard to them, and hence the necessity of
the clause appended to each of the new
amendments, reciting that "Congress shall
have power to enforce this article by appro
priate legislation."
The resistance to the fifteenth amendment,
by refusing to register negro voters in Ohio
and California, and the spirit of intimidation
which has been exhibited in various localities
at the South, demonstrate the immediate
necessity for action upon the part of Con
gress. We are glad tosee that action has already
been had, and that the Judiciary Commit
tee of the House have agreed upon a strin
gent bill which will soon be brought forward,
and we hope passed. It is a substitute to the
bill previously introduced, and which was
thought to be objectionable. It provides, in
substance, that any officer who ahull officially
deny the right of any citizen to vote, on ac
count of race, color or previous condition,
at any election, shall be adjudged guilty of a
misdemeanor, and be punished by imprison
ment not less than one, nor more than three
years, or by a fine of not less than $500, nor
more than $5000, or by both fine and im
prisonment. , , The bill also declares colored citizens enti
tled to vote upon precisely the same terms
and conditions as whites, and that any per
son who shall prevent them by force, fraud,
or intimidation, or who shall refuse to assess
or levy or collect a tax of colored citizens in
States where the payment of taxes is a quali
fication of electors, or shall refuse or neglect
to register colored voters, or to receive his
vote when legally offered, shall also be' ad
judged guilty of a misdemeanor and punished
by fine or imprisonment, or both. A penalty
of $500 is also imposed for refusing to assess
or register any negro entitled to vote, which
shall be paid to any person who shall bring
suit therefor; and a similar penalty for re
fusing to receive the vote of any such voter,
to be sued for and recovered by the elector so
refused. Jurisdiction is conferred upon the
United States Circuit Courts in suits for f or
. . f eitures and penalties, and concurrently upon
Circuit and District Courts in proseoutions
for the punishment of misdemeanors specified
in tne act.
The bill Is very carefully drawn, and is evi
dently intended to cover every phase of re
sistance to the principle involved in the re
cent constitutional amendments. When it
shall beoome a law, whioh we trust will
speedily be the case, we shall cease to hear
of faotional opposition, and partisan preju
dice against negro suffrage will speedily die
out botn JNorm ana outn.
LETTER-WRITING.
From the y. T. World. v.
When Clio sits down at ber desk, in the
midst of tinted stationery and ivory-handled
pens and alluring ink-jars, and begins epis
tolary communion with remote Polyhymnia,
she naturally does not forebode that her un
reserved communings shall become the sport
ox cnance, and be published abroad for the
perusal of mankind. She is, therefore, less
reserved and reticent than she would be if
, she knew that the universe was to ba the
recipient of her epistle. Out of the ful
ness of her heart she writes, and she pro
bably says a good many things which, ap
propriate enough for the eye of friendship,
are apt to embarrass both writer and reel
pient when they glare upon them from the
broad daylight of the printed page. It is
v) not that the sentiments ot Vlio are in any
way objectionable, or that she lets out any
aangerous or compromising secrets, but that
the private communings of friend with friend,
' like the household converse of husband with
' wife or" the secret and moonlit colloquy of
lover and mistress, are not intended as public
outgivings, and they lose their grace and
appropriateness when they lose their privacy,
as the violet loses its sheen and lustre when
it is drawn from the shade in which it blooms
to the full blaze of the sunshine. Who
would like to see his love-letters printed.
and the phrases of endearment with which
be wooed the lady of his love made the sport
of ribald youth and unromantio middle
age; the jibe of hardened bachelors and
the derision of elderly maids who had
long outlived the peril of such amatory solici-
tations ? To a lover of becoming sensibility
suoh a calamity would bring grief beyond the
assuagement of speech or tears,- Nothing
would be left him except to put dust upon
his head and lock up his writing-desk for
ever. And yet the love-letters might be good
ones. They miaht be brimful of fantastio
superlatives and odorous of callow adoration
But the world coarsely translates the iinpeta
ous gushings of individual emotion, and it
would be likely to laugh at the lover s rhapso.
dies, and think his allusions to the moon and
other heavenly bodies absurd. . No one who
writes love or other letters can be entirely
sure that they may not some time be brought
forth and read by rude attorneys in open
court, or printed by merciless editors tiud
commented on by unsympathizing readers
far and wide. Nobody is exempt
from the danger of a lawsuit, and
nobody's letter is free from the
liability of some time being pub in evidence.
This being the case, it benooves correspon
dents, even in their most intimate moods, to
bear in mind the possibility that they may be
addressing tne human race instead oi an in
dividual, and fashion their letters according
ly. When the document is finished, if they
are in any aoubt as to how it would loon in
print, they might experimentally send it to a
newspaper, and, u it stood the test of pub
licity to their satisfaction, forward it to its
destination; if not, suppress it. This pre
caution would render a correspondent tole
rably ssfe, but except to refrain wholly from
writing there would seem to be no other.
The letters thus far made public in the
Mcl'ailand trial deserve to rank as epistolary
curiosities; but, except as exhibiting a little
womanly vanity and a groat deal of womanly
. - 1L. a - B a I -
warmin ana anecuou on vuo part oi mo
titer, tbev are of absolutely no significance.
The writer wbs very much in love with her
correspondent, and seemed to be ardently
desirous to promote what she deemed to be
her welfare. Whether she judged rightly or
wrongly as to the means of increasing her
happiness is beside the question. She evi
dently considered Mrs. McForland a suffer
ing and an ill-used woman. Mrs. McFar
land so considered herself, and it is natural
that she should have brought her friends
to her way of thinking. A prudent person
would have hesitated before counselling
a wife to leave her husband, whatever
bitterness and misery may have been
involved in the continuance of that rela
tion. Hut in matters of this sort womon
are rarely prudent. They take counsel of
their prejudices, their passions, their affec
tions. This is as natural to them as breath
ing; and if their counsels are indiscreet, or if
their affectionate zeal leads their friends into
error, it is the motive which animates thorn
alone of which we must judge. The severity
with which some of the counsel commented
upon the letters of Mrs. Calhoun was perhaps
to be expected. It is the business ef the
lawyer to make mountains of molehills.
Sergeant Unztnz aincemea a most sinister
implication in Mr. Pickwick's innocent order
for chops and tomato sauce. But when a
respectable journalist takes these sensoloss
animadversions ana preacuas a sermon
upon the ethics of private letter-writing,
as the Times did on Thursday, we have a right
to look for a certain measure of com
mon sense ana tairness. it criticises the
style and matter of Mrs. Calhoun's letters
with as much severity as if they had been
written for the public and challenged exami
nation and review. It says that they are full
of "transcendental rubbish." Why shouldn't
they be? Surely a lady may write "rubbish,"
transcendental or other, to her friend if she
chooses without calling down the critical
wrath of the limes. It says she "gossips"
and "makes mischief all round." This is not
true; but if it were it would only be an im
peachment of the discretion and good taste of
the writer. The publication ot almost any
private letter would embarrass the persons
who were alluded to in it, and Airs. Ualhoun s
ore perhaps no exception to this rule. But
the references in them to individuals are
none of them unkind or malicious, and.
at worst, they betray only that sort of indis
creet enthusiasm in which women are so
prone to indulge. To found, as the Times
does, a general arraignment of the writer upon
grounds of this slender sort is, we grieve to
say it, absurd. Ihe letters are appropriate
subjects of comment only as they relate to
the case betore the court. With their lite
rary style or personal allusions the 1'iines has
nothing to do. They were not written to be
criticised, like a leeture or a poem. If the
writer were on trial, the contents of the let
ters would aid us in forming an estimate of
her character. But she is not on trial. Like
many other innocent persons, she is acci
dentally involved in the publicity of a legal
process; and if chivalry had not departed
from the bosoms of lawyers and the attio
cells of editors they would treat with more
Gentleness and justioe a lady whese only fault
appears to have been too earnest a fidelity to
a friend who does not seem to nave been
worthy of her friendship.
THE FARCE OF CONTESTED ELEC
TIONS.
From the If. T. Herald.
With all the important publio business
nressinff on the House of KeDresentatives.
that body has been spending two wnoie days
in the partisan work of voting to seats men
whom their constituents had eleoted to re
main at home. In vain did the chairman of
the Committee of Ways and Means object to
this interruption of the consideration of the
Tariff bill, which has been dragging its slow
length in Committee of the Whole for the
last fortnight, not counting the time occupied
in general discussion. The dominant majority
could not resist the demand of party, and
the important business of the country had to
give way to the petty interests of individuals,
First came one of the Louisiana cases, in all
of which the theory of the various Republi
can claimants is that it the negroes had
voted, and voted for them, they would have
been elected; and then came a Pennsylvania
case, where the sitting member, a democrat,
had to give way to his opponent on equally
plausible grounds. There are many other
cases of like character that are to be called up
before the session draws to a close each of
them to occupy time which might easily be
applied to better purpose.
There never was a greater farce in legisla
tive bodies than this one of contested elec
tions. No matter what their several merits
or demerits be, there is but one conclusion
inevitably to be reached, and that is that the
seat is to be given to the person who is of
the politics of the majority. The unfortu
nate individual who trains with the minority
might just as well yield without a straggle
Now and then an unmanageable member will
kick over the traces and vote according to his
conviction, as the irascible but unstable
Bingham did the other day in the Louisiana
case; but these eccentricities never affect the
general result. And the extraordinary spec
tacle is presented, whenever one of these
judicial questions is submitted to the House
of Representatives, of the facts being inter
preted in one way by the members of one
party, and in the opposite way by members
of the other party. What a high estimate of
Congressional purity and independence this
state of things is calculated to impress on the
public mind !
'J. here is but one remedy for this abuse and
for the systematic contempt of popular elec
tions which it brings vth it, and that is for
the House to renounce all interference with
the matter. Whoever Dresents the proper
credentials of election should be admitted to
his seat, and if any person oontests his right
to it let him do it before the judicial author.
ties of the State. If the Governor of a State
gives a certificate of election improperly that
question should be tested there, not in wash
ington. The courts are the proper forum for
the adjudication of the question, and to them
it should be remitted. The present system is
nothing but a gross partisan trampling on
private and publio right. What member will
be honest enough to initiate a meaSure that
will put an 'end to it and restore some little
confidence in the finality of popular elections?
Learning; to Cook.
A new mania has sprung up among the
Edinburgh ladies not quite a useless one
a fancy to learn to cook. Several of the lea J
ing confectioners advertise "cooking taught,"
and have large kitchens and bakeries titled
up for the purpose. Until reoently the classes
have only been attended by young ladies who
will probably find the use of the practice
when they become wives and mothers; but
lately the desire to achieve wonders in the
culinary department has spread to those who,
in all probability, will never see the inside
of their own kitchens when they oome ' to
rule a household, and dainty damsela put off
their silk attire, their rings, and their adorn
ments, and, donning linen dresses and white
aprons, become for the nonce amateur oooks.
One confectioner goes the length of having
blouses prepared for bis students exactly
similar to the costumes worn by eccentric
artists.
Internal Revenue Stump ('an
celler.
To the Kditor of The Evening Telegraph.
A communication appeared in the rress a
few days ago with reference to the authority of
Commissioner Poli.no to prescribe stamp can
cellers. Section 157, act July IS, 18(W, is quoted. That
section reads, In part, "that tho Commissioner
of Internal Revenue bo and ho Is hereby autho
rized to prescribe such method, etc.
Is the language "suoh method capablo of a
construction to mean mors than one method f
Can the Commissioner prescribe several different
methods T He has prescribed "Wheeler's,"
"Holt's," and "Chamberlain's," and, It Is under-
t-tood, has agreed to approve several other
"cancellers."
Now, as he has approved of three distinct and
pcparate methods, and is about to approve of
other methods, which one of all these will he
require the 'imperative" use of? The.lattor
part of the section roforred to roads, "And ho is
further authorized, in his discretion, to make
tho application of such method imperative upon
the manufacturers of proprietary artlclos, or
articles included in schedule C, and upon stamps
of a nominal value exceeding twenty-five cents
each." If "Whcoler's" is purchased to-day,
will not "Holt's" be imperatively required to
morrow ? And when "ilolt's" Is purchased to
morrow, will not "Chamberlalu's" be impera
tively required next week ? And if there is to
bo an uncnumerated variety prescribed, may
not "his discretion" by May 1st prescribe that
none of them shall bo used: and, like the
"Klsh book," they all be consigned to the "tomb
of the Capulets ?"
As stamps upon documents of value, such as
deeds, bonds, etc., must be legally cancelled, It
bocomcs a very nico 'question, What will bo the
legal form of cancellation, after April 30, upon
such stamps ?
As the law will only require tho uso ot "such
method" upon stamps "of a nominal value ex
ceeding twenty-flvo cents each" (we refer to
schedule B, which is tho schedule for documen
tary stamps), why has not the Commissioner seen
fit to exercise "his discretion," and required an
"imperative use of "such method" upon such
stamps, so that tho public might know exactly
what form ot cancellation was legally required,
and no doubt be cast, hereafter, In any leal
tribunal, upon the form of cancellation.
This is very Important; and every buyer of
realty, purchaser of mortgage, or other title or
eccurity, wants to be assured of a certainty In
the premises.
Let the Commissioner try his hand at thl mat
ter once more, and see If he cannot make a clean
thing of it.
The Commissioner says these cancellers "may
be used," or else stamps when used must be
cancelled by writing tho initials of the user and
the date when used thereon.
This is alternative, and contrary to law. The
new method must bo a 'substitute for" or an
"addition to the method now prescribed by
law" so reads section 157. "Wheeler," "Holt,"
and "Chamberlain" ought now to go into part
nership and issue the most profitable stamp
canceller, withdrawing tho others; else they will
simply cut one another's throats, and that
would be cancelling tho cancellers. .
We think this suggestion of ours a good one,
because tho public can afford to pay better for
one good thing than be obliged to pay for five or
six cheap things that are good for nothing.
These gentlemen should each now send you a
long advertisement.
FINANCIAL.
S I L V E R
On hand and FOR SALE In
amounts and sizes to
SUIT.
DE HAVEN & BE0.,
No. 40 South THIRD Street.
sin
PHILADELPHIA-
B. E. JAMISON & CO..
SUCCESSORS TO
JP. JP. ICEJL.il, Y & CO.,
BANKERS AND DEALERS IN
Gold, Sliver, and Government Bonds
At Closest Market liases,
N. W. Cor. THIRD and CUXSNUT Stt.
Special attention (riven to COMMISSION ORDERS
In New Yorfc aud l'imadelplua block Boards, etc.
etc. :s69
yirH fi aniu wa.' inivr.rt wrf-r-.j,,
EDUOATIONAU.
JDGEHILL SCHOOL,
MKROHANTVILLK. N. J.
FOUR MILES FROM PHILADELPHIA.
NEXT SESSION BEGINS APRIL 4.
For Circular apply to
8 Hi U T. W. OATTKLL.
DEINQ AND SOOURINQ.
JO H H I' II n () T T U T,
KLKVK DK PAKIft.
FRENCH 8TKAM UYklNU AND BOOITRINQ,
On any kind of W oaring ApparoL (or Ladio. Uouu, and
Children. Pat.nt avparatao lor BUoUilun VauU (rata
on. to nv. i non,
W
PINANOIAL.
JayCooke&(p.
niiLADFxrniA, new york, and
WASHINGTON,
BANKERS
AMD
Dealers in Government Securities,
Special attention given to the Purchase and Sale of
Bonds and Stocks on Commission, at tho Board of
Brokers In this and other cities.
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS.
COLLECTIONS MADE ON ALL POINTS.
GOLD AND SILVER BOUGHT AND SOLD.
RELIABLE RAILROAD BONDS FOR INVEST
MENT. Pamphlets and full Information given at ouroitlce,
Wo. 1 1 l S.TIIIKX) Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
1413m
EVEN PER CENT.
First Mortgage Bonds
OF TtlB
Danville, llnxlcton, and Wilkes
bnrre Itailroad Company,
At 82 and Accrued Interest.
Clear of all Taxes.
INTEREST PAYABLE APRIL AND OCTOBER.
Persons wishing to make Investments are Invited
to examine the merits or these BONDS.
Pamphlets supplied and full Information given by
Sterling & Wildman.
FINANCIAL AGENTS,
No. 110 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
4 12 tf PHILADELPHIA.
Government Bonds and other Securities taken In
exchange for the above at best market rates.
D. C. WHARTON SMITH & CO.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
No. 121 SOUTH THIRD STREET.
Bnoceaaon to Smith, B mdolph A Oo.
Everf branoh of tho ba.lneai will bavo prompt attention
si heretofore.
Quotations of Btooka, Goremmenta, and Gold eon.
tantlf received from Hew York brprivaU wire, front oat
friends, Edmund D. Randolph & Oo.
8. PETERSON A CO..
STOCK BROKERS.
No. 39 Booth XIIIK1 Street.
ADVANCES MADE ON GOOD COLLATERAL
PAPER.
Most complete facilities for Collecting Maturing
Country Obligations at owcost.
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS. 1 M9
JJ R E X B L fc CO.
No. 84 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
American and XToroIe-n
IBSUE DRAFTS AND CIRCULAR LETTERS OF
CREDIT available on presentation In any part of
Europe.
Travellers can make all their financial arrange
monts through us, and we will collect their Interest
and dividends without charge.
DKKULi WmTHKOF & CO.iIDKIXSL, HaBJXCI A CO.
NewYortc I Parts. tSl
gLLIOTT efe UURII,
BANKERS
No. 109 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
DEALERS IN ALL GOVERNMENT BECTJR1
TIES, GOLD BILLS, ETC. .
DRAW BILLS OP EXCHANGE AND IS80B
COMMERCIAL IJCTTER3 OK CREDIT ON THE
UNION BANE OF LONDON.
ISSUE TRAVELLERS' LETTERS OF CREDIT
ON LONDON AND PARIS, available throughout
Europe.
Will collect all Coupons and Interest free of chargs
for parties making their financial arrangement
with us. , H8C
& I l" v IS Xfc
FOR SALE.
C. T. YERKES; Jr., & CO.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
No. 20 South THIRD Street,
tZS PHILADELPHIA.
MNANOIAL.
THE UNDERSIGNED
Offer For Sale $2,000,009
OP TBI
PENNSYLVANIA CENTRAL RR. CO,
GENERAL MORTGAGE
Six Per Cent. Bonds
At 92i and Interest added to Date of
f arcuate
All free from State tax, and lstmed In sums of 11000.
These Bonds are Counon and Rcirfnferd Interest
on tho former payable January and July 1; on the
lauer, April ana ucioikt.
The tMud8 soon red bv this mortiraire are Issued to
WISTAR MORRIS and JOSIAII BACON, Trustees,
who cannot, under its provisions, deliver to the
Company, at any time, an amount of bonds exceed
ing me luu-paici capital stock; oi tne company
limited to $.'v)00,ooo.
Enough of these bonds are withheld to pay on all
existing Hens upon the property of the Company, to
meet which at maturity It now holds ample means
Independently of the bonds to be reserved by the
Trustees for that purpose, making the bonds prac
tically a FIRST MORTGAGE upon all Its railways,
their equipment, real estate, etc. etc.
l ne gross revenue oi tne rennByivania munrao
In 1809 was $lT,2fiO,811, or nearly twenty-eliiht per
cent, of the capital and debts of the Company at
the end of that year.
Since 1867 the dividends to the Stockholders have
averaged nearly eleven and one-half per cent, per
annum after paying Interest on Its boiuls and pass
ing annually a largo amount to the credit ot con
struction account.
The security upon which the bonds are based Is,
therefore, of the most ample character, and places
them on a par with the very best National securities.
For further particulars apply to
Jay Cooke & Co.,
E. W. Clark & Co.,
Drexel & Co.,
C. & II. Borie,
AV. IT. Ncwbold, Son & Aertsen.
WU. PAINTER & CO.,
BANKERS,
No. 36 South THIRD Street.
Government Securities
BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Gold, Stocks, and Bonds
BOUGHT AND SOLD ON COMMISSION.
Southern and Western Col
lections, AND ALL OTHER TOINTS, PROMPTLY
ATTENDED TO.
ACCOUNTS RECEIVED, AND INTEREST AL
LOWED ON DAILY BALANCE. 1 2G3m
WE OFFER FOR SALE
THE FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS
OF TUB
SOUTHERN PENNSYLVANIA IRON
AND
RAILROAD COMPANY.
These Bonds ran THIRTY YK1R8, end pay SRVRN
FUR OKNT. interest in gold, cleer of all text, pejMble
at the First national Bunk in Poiladelpnia.
The amount of Bonds issued is ti43,000 and are
secured by a First Mortgage on real estate, railroad, and
franchises of the C'ompanr the former of wtiloa oost two
hundred thousand dollars, whioh has been paid for from
Stock subscriptions, and after Ihe railroad is iiaisaed, so
that the products of the mines can be brought to market,
it is esiimatsd to be worth 1 ,000,000.
Ihe hailroad connects with tbe Cumberland Valloy
Railroad about (our miles below Uhambersbara;, and runs
through a section ot the most fertile part of tue Ooiuber
land Valley.
We sell them at ft'3 and accrued interest from March I.
lor further particular apply to
C. T. YERKES, Jr., A CO.,
BANKERS,
NO. 20 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
BSOtf FBIiiADELFHI A.
QsLllHIJlHi Nll, DAVIS Jt CO.,
No. 48 SOUTH THIRD STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
GLEHD1KNING. DAVIS I AMORY,
No. 2 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK,
BANKERS AND BROKERS."
Receive deposits subject to check, allow Interest
on standing and temporary balances, and execute
orders promptly for the purchase and sale of
BTOCKS, BONDS and GOLD, la either city.
Direct telegraph communication from Philadelphia
bouse to New York. IK
WHISKY, WINE, ETO.
KEYSTONE
PURE WHEAT WHISKY.
Distilled from the Grain
TIT
T. J. MARTIN & CO.,
KEYSTONE DI8TILLERY.
NORTHWEST CORNER OF
TWELFTH ftLd WASHINGTON Sts.;
No. 150 North FRONT Street,
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
7i fAom It may ronrern:
All the leading medical authorities reconilr.e the value
of diBusire sthnnlants. numerous eminent physioiaaa
and surgeons might be named who here ad roosted their
employment in the treatment of a large class of disorders.
No Dispensary is considered complete without them.
They are prescribed in all publio and private Hospitals,
and administered by all beanide practitioners.
But tbe difficulty has been to obtain
Alcoholic Liquors Fare.
Tbe pungent arnma of the fusel oil and biting aoids pre
sent in all of them can be scented as tbe glass is raised to
the lips. The nausomis flavor of toes, active poisons is
perceptible to the palate, and a burning sensation ia the
stomach attests their oxietenoe when the noiions draught
has goae down. Paralysis, idiocy, Insanity and death are
the pernicious fruits of such potations.
Medical science asks for a pure stimulant to as as a
spociflo, whioh, while it diffuses itself through the system
more rapidly than any other known agent, is brought into
direct and active contact with the seat of disease. It is
tho property of the stimulant to diffuse, and by tho aid of
its peculiar nutritions component parts to invigorate,
regulate, counteract and restore, and it is by the happy
union of the prinoiplo of aotivity with tne principles of
invigoration and restoration tliat enables a
l'lin; wiusitv
To accomplish beneQoiul results.
Having great experience in the distilling of Whiskies,
end tho largest and best equipped establishment of its
kind in tbe country, snpplied with the latest Improve
ments in apparatus for cleansing Whisky of fusel oil and
other Impuritlos, and by strict porsoual supervision, the
proprietors of
lieycttone "Wheat Whisky.
A re enabled to off or a
Iur Whlslcy
Distilled from WHEAT, and, being made from the grain,
possesses all its
ftuirlfloiiM Qualities,
and ean ba relied upon 1o be strictly as represented,
having been examined thoroughly by tbe leading analyti
cal chemists of this city, whose certificates of its purity
and fitness for medical purposes are appended.
We invite examination, and any who would convince
themselves we ask a rigid analysis.
T. J. MARTIN A OO.
N. B. Notice that tbe caps and corks are brnoded with
our name to prevent counterfeiting.
For sale by all respectable Druggists.
Price per bottle, Sim
Orders sent to No. ISO N. FRONT Street will receivi
prompt attention.
Chemical Laboratory, Nos. 108 and 113 Arch st,
Philadelphia, Marcb 19, 1870.
Hitrrt. T. J. Martin if Co., FhitailrlpMa, ..'
Gentlemen: I have made a careful examination of tbe
Keystone Pnre Wheat Whlnky, and found it to be a per.
fectly pure article, and entirely free from fusel oil and
other injurious substances. Its purity, and its pleasant
and agreeable flavor, render it particularly valuable
for medicinal purposes.
Yours truly, ' F. A. GKNTU.
Chemical Laiioiiatorv, No. 138 Walnut street.
Philadklphia, March 17, 1870.
ilxrr. T. J. Martin it Co., t'hilmUltthta, in..
Gentlemen : The sample of Keystone Pure Wheat
Whisky, submitted to me for analysis, I find to be pure,
and, as such, I highly reooinmend It for medicinal pur
poses. Keepeotfully, etc., WM. H BRUCKNER.
Anulyt. and Consult. Chemist.
Chemical Lajioratory, No. 417 Walnut street,
Philadelphia. April S, 1870.
Mtturt. T. J. Martin if Oo., I'hila'i'lphia, 111.:
Gentlemen: I have made an analysis of the sample of
Keystone Pure Wneat Whisky, sent by you for examina
tion, and find it entirely free from fusel oil or any other
deloterious matters, and I consider it applicable to any
use for which pure whisky may be desired. 4 14 thslra
Respectfully, CUA8. M. ORKSSON.
Hold Wholesale by FRENCH, UICIIA ttlH &
Co., IS. W. corner TKNTII and .tlAKKST Hit.
QAR8TAIRS & McCALL,
No. 126 Walnut and 21 Granite Sts.,
IMPORTERS OV
Brandies, Wines, Gin, Olive Oil, Etc.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
PURE RYC WHISKIES,
IN BOND AND TAJ PAID. 6 88 3p
LITIZ CURRANT WINE.
ALBERT O. ROBERTS,
Dealer in every Description of Fine Groceries,
117?
Corner ELEVENTH and VTNII Street .
"WILLIAM ANDERSON & CO., DEALERS
la join, yr.ia.ies.
Ha. 146 North SEOOND Street.
. PWladslpbia.
93
WATOHES, JEWELRY, ETO.
WILLIAM B. WARNE & CO
Wkftlu.). i
liiii WATUHK.S aU JKWiCIJtY,
K. corner SKVKNTH and CliKHNIIT Rtma.
s. " uwiDO) I 'lTiiri D 111
8M Keuond Boor, and lata nl No. Hi S. THIRD Ht.
CLOCKS.
TOW KB CLOCKS.
MAKliLK CLOCKS.
BRONZE CLOCKS.
COUCOU OLOUK8.
VIENNA KKOUl. ATORS.
AMKKIOAN CLOCKS
u. v. m;stiJUjL,i,,
No. 22 NORTH SIXTH STREET.
REMOVAL.
THE 0LI)-ETA1JLISIIKI
UNITED STATES
REVENUE STAMP AGENCY
HAS ItSMOVED FKOM
No. C7 South THIRD Street
TO
No. 50 South THIRD Street,
8 21 JACOB B HIDOWAV.
1. I. kAKTlM.
Hj SHJl HA
iHltflK( AND OOMMIftSlON MKHOHASTS.
Ko.2. CO KM 1FN KLIP. New York.
No. 18 HOUTH WIHKVKS, Pnilad.lpbla.
a A. W l L 4 '1-1' t . U..1.1
W. are vransred to .hip overjr description of Kreln ' (
Philadelphia, New York, Wilmington, and tutor maA
Roints wiln promptness and dospatib. Usnai Ho aim Kit
lavm-tiiirs taraiHhaui at ! shorljiat noiin-
OTTON BAIL DUCK AND CANVA8,
of all numbers and brands. Tent. Awning, Trunk
and Waoo-oov.r louk. Also, Paper Manufacturer
liner Fells, from thirty to aevantrsU luuhM, witta
Paulina. Aln. ball 'I.. w KVFRMAIf,
Ko, 111 CUUttUU Slxet (Ombwca.
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