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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, June 10, 1870, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAILY EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1870.
oriRiT or tub muss.
Editorial Opinions of the Leading Journals
uponCurrentTopics Compiled Every
Day for the Evening Telegraph.
TOWN Oil COUNTRY?
From th( '. Y, Timr.
Sixty miles beyond St. l'nul is a farm
worked by seven sisters. Tho parents of
these girls wero both invalids, and very poor.
They went from Ohio to Minnesota baroly
three years ego for their health. Under the
Homestead law the family secured a pre
emption claim of the usual hundred and sixty
acres. Moved by a natural sympathy for a
family so nnfortmiately situated, their neigh
bors helped them to put up a log house, and
they were able to hire men to split rails for
fencing and to plow the land. All the rest of
the work has been done by tho seven girls,
and lafct year they sold nine hundred bushels
of potatoes, five hundred bushels of corn,
two hundred and fifty bushels of wheat, and
some six hundred of miscellaneous vegetables.
They are now comfortably off, and find time
to read books and newspapers.
Now, there may be occupations more suita
ble to women than those connected with
agriculture, but the interesting facts we have
related convey a lesson of no slight import
ance. Jf a family of women, several members
of which are young and weak, can compass
within two years such results as those, begin
ning with absolutely nothing, it is easy to
guess what strong men might do. And yet,
in the great cities of our Atlantio coast, there
are thousands and thousands of stout, hulking
fellows who complain that they can get no
work, or, what is nearly as bad, who perform
in shops those ornamental duties which
women can discharge as well, and from which
the practical monopoly of one rgx necessarily
excludes the other. The rapidity with which
a comfoitable position can be obtained in
Minnesota, and other Western States, can be
partly estimated by considering the rate of
growth of the States themselves. It is, for
example, barely twenty years since Minne
sota was organized as a territory. The popu
lation in 18.10 was less than GuuO. In 1805 it
was more than 250,000, and the new census
will show, it is said, a total of half a million
souls. Of course, property rises in value in
rorylng proportion to this, but there can be
no doubt that any one who settles on fertile
land on the old lines of railway, and who is
honest and industrious, will amass a compe
tency in ten or fifteen years. The value of
real estate in Minnesota is set down in the
official reports, made to the State Legislature
last January, at one hundred and twenty
millions of dollars; it was worth,
if anything, only the Government
pi ice twenty years ago: and this
is a tolerably fair example of the progressive
augmentation of values. To reach thi3
swiftly-growing community costs about
thirty-five dollars, so that its accessibility to
the poor man bears a moderate relation to
the cost of establishing himself on arrival.
No country in the world oilers such twofold
advantages as these, and it is strange that, as
this is the case, so large a ratio of our native
as well as imported population should ob
struct each other in the great towns.
For those who have their way to make ia
the world, country life on the broad and
fruitful prairies of the West is the most pro
mising acd happy that can be adopted. Inde
pendence is there within easier reach from
small beginnings than in any other locality.
A young laborer may leave his Eastern home
for the plains beyond the Mississippi, and
find himself the possessor of a handsome
fortune in early middle age. Such things
have been, and will continue to be, until an
equilibrium of population is arrived at; and
this, even at the present rapid rate of pro
gress, will need several generations to attain.
The increasing density of our urban popula
tionsthe present corresponding discomforts
and high prices, and the future decrease in
wages that will result from it will of course
create a direct pressure calculated to thrust
superfluous thousands toward lands compara
tively empty. But it is unfortunate that,
without waiting for such a process, numbers
do not new perceive their own true interest,
and seek for themselves and their children
the health, comfort, and independence which
are afforded on such easy terms by the smiling
prairies of the West.
FKANCE AND THE F0PE.
From tlx A'. Y. Sun.
It is notorious that the present Government
of France and the more intelligent of the
French bishops in the (Ecumenical Council
are opposed to the adoption of the dogma of
the Pope's infallibility. It is equally noto
rious that, norwithstanding this opposition,
the majority of the council are resolved upon
promulgating the dogma, and that, though
they may be delayed in the accomplishment
of their purpose, they cannot probably be
defeated. In this state of things the French
newspapers are speculating with some soli
citude upon the consequences which may re
sult from the anticipated action of the coun
cil, and its effect upon the relations of Church
and State in France.
From a very early period the French Catho
lics have been indisposed to yield fully to
the claims of supremacy made by the Pope.
As far back as 12ti8, a royal decree forbade
the interference of Rome in the affairs of the
national Church. After many controversies
the whole French clergy, headed by the fa
mous Fossuet, joined in U'S2 in declaring
their adhesion to four points, which have ever
since been regarded as fundamental princi
ples, and have formed the basis of all the laws
and treaties relating to the Gallican Charch.
These points are: that kings and priacei in
temporal matters are independent of the
spiritual power; that the Pope is subject
to the decisions of an oecumenical council;
that the power of the Pope is limited by the
prescriptive rights and usages of the Galli
can Church; and that, in mattors of faith,
the decisions of the Pope are not in
fallible when not confirmed by the con
sent of the whole Church. The pro
posed fct.ema of infallibility directly
contradicts these doctrines. It declares the
Pope to be, in aff airs concerning religion, the
supreme ruler of all the faithful laymen as
well as priests; that ho is not subject to the
deciees of councils, nor bound to consult the
Church in declaring matters of faith; and
that his primacy is not merely honorary, nor
limited to a mere supervision, but extendi to
the discipline and government of the Church
in the whole earth. Tho question ia now
raised whether, in case of the adoption of the
schema, tie Government of Fiance will not
l;e absolved from its present obligations to
the Pope, p.nd whether as a natural conse
quence the Gallican Church may not be drawn
by the opponents of Ultraiuontauism into a
declaration of entire indbpfindeneo.
These considerations have, no doubt, been
duly weighed by the Pope and his advisers,
and they must feel assured in their own
minds that the Papacy will receive no injury
from the measure they are urging. Reporters
are not tuiiuitted to the sittings of the coun
cil, and the utmost pains are taken to pro
vent what is said in its debates from becom
ing public. Still, enough has leaked out to
make it sure that the minority are deter
mined not to yield without a struggle, and
that what they lack in numbers is amply
made up by learning and ability. Tho perils
which the adoption of the dogma in ques
tion will bring upon tho Church in France
will be set forth with vigor and clearness,
and fLe majority will not hereafter have the
excuse that they were not warned. The same
arguments which will be used in reference to
FranceJ w ill also be applied to the case of Aus
tria; so that tho Pope will find himself in
danger of a rupture with the two great Catho
lic powers of Europe at once.
RED CLOUD'S PLAIN TALK IN WASH
INGTON. l'rnm the A". Y. Bfrald.
The oratory of Lognn has evidently left a
germ in the bosom of tho red man which, at
this day, fructifies. The spirit of Red Jacket
and the obstinacy of Billy Bowlegs are not
extinct. The last of the Ogallalas as ho
described himself chief of the Sioux tribe,
lied Cloud, united in his speech in Washing
ton on Tuesday, before the assembled digni
taries of the Indian Department, a good deal
of the logic and pathos of Logan with the in
domitable pluck of Red Jacket and Bow
legs. When pleading for the rights of his
people. Red Cloud asked, "Whose voice was
first heard in this land?" and he answers the
question "It was that of the rel people, who
used the bow." With this intimation of inhe
rited right to the soil he proceeded to put into
a nutshell the grievances of his people. He
snys, in substance, tho Great Father may be
very kind, but his officials rob and maltreat
the Indian; they have left him nothing but
an island upon the vast extent of country
which his father and his mother told him be
longed to him. They these white marauders
steal the goods sent by the Government all
along the road, so that but a handful reaches
his starving nation. We fancy that the red
chief is not mistaken in this statement; for
"Indian annuity goods," whether composed
of blankets, bacon, flour, sugar, or ammuni
tion, are considered common property for the
pilferers who infest tho frontier, and are not
very scrupulously handled after the goods
pass beyond the iines of railroad. It might
be interesting to know how many larders of
Indian agents, sutlers, and contractors are
enriched by the material which should reach
the lodges of our wards, tho red men.
But the Sioux warrior, the last of the Ogal
lalloB, comes plainly to the point as to what
his people want when he emphatically pro
nounces against the maintenance of Fort Fet
terman and the continuance of our garrison
on the lands. "I want no roads," ho says,
"through my country. For the railroads you
are passing through there I have not received
so much as a brass ring for the land they oc
cupy." He will have no soldiers or railroads
upon the land, and the removal of both seems
to be the ultimatum of peace or war in Red
Cloud's region. Now, the meaning of all this
is simply what we have stated many times.
Tho Indians are defrauded by Government
agents and others to such an extent that they
are worked up to a state of exasperation.
Promises are freely made to them and are
flagitiously broken, so that it becomes a
question often whether it is not we, rather
than the Indians, who are the aggressors. It
may be necessary at times of absolute warfare
to use harsh measures with the savages; but
it should be considered whether the bad con
duct of our own agents has not provoked the
difficulty in nine cases out of ten. We be
lieve that the cause can be traced to this
origin.
The fact is that we want a thorough reform
in the management of our Indian Department.
We must be honest with the savage if we
attempt to control him by peaceful means, Wo
must not be driven by the misconduct and
avarice of our employes to the hateful
necessity of cruelty and extermination. The
Secretary of the Interior must have learned
something about the questions from the plain,
bold words of the chieftain Red Cloud. He
must be convinced that palaver ha3 very little
effect upon the Indian character. He must
have learned, too, that faithlessness on our
part in the matter of treaties, and gross
swindling of the Indians by our agents and
their tools, the contractors, are at tho bottom
of all this Indian trouble.
DEATH AND THE DRAMA.
From the A'. Y. World.
Our amusements are getting to be quite as
exciting as the gladiatorial shows of the
ancient Romans or the bull-fights of the
modern Spaniards. Only a few days ago
we had a young lady exquisitely bitten by
lions in the Bowery, and an athlete ecstati
cally tumbled headlong from his pride of
place in Fourteenth street. And now we hear
from London of a fearful interlude in the en
tertainments which nightly attract a motley
company 01 totn sexes and or all classes in
society to the "Alhambra Concert Hall" in
that city. A large trap door in the centre of
tne floor of the stage suddenly gave way, and
precipitated a number of ballet girls into the
vaults beneath. These vaults were filled with
all sorts of machinery and of lumber, so that
the hapless girls fared like the victims of
feudal tyranny in those medi;eval castles the
oubliettes of which have now become one of
the regular shows of the world of travel. The
Alt-Schloss of Baden-Baden has such an
oubliette. It was closed at top by a trap,
and when this trap gave way the" wretch
standing upon it went heavily down through
the cavity below upon a congeries of spikes
and knives, and bo tore himself quickly iu
pieces. Eleven of the London dancing-girls
thus dealt with are reported to have been
badly injured, which is likely enough, and
some of these to have been injured fatally,
which is far from unlikely. Of course, all
this will have no sort of effect either in pre
venting other dancing-girls from risking their
lives in the same manner, or in inducing
managers to give closer attention to the con
dition of their stages and their machinery, or
in diverting the popular taste from entertain
ments flavored thus with the cayenne of con
stant peril to life and limb. More than a
year ago one of the finest and most forcible
draughtsmen of our times, Mr. Matthew Mor
gan, of the London Tomahawk, enriched the
pages of that periodical with a powerful car
toon entitled "Death and the Trapeze."
It represented in wonderful perspective a
theatre crowded with interested and excited
spectators in the orchestra stalls kid-gloved
roue with, opera-glasses intent upon the
stage, in the family circle open-mouthed chil
dren devouring the delight of exp3otation.
High in air, from a poised trapeze, swung a
graceful, lithe young female form, lightly
clad and more lightly balanced to her diuger
ons leap. In the near foreground, clad iu
the faultless dress-coat, the kid boots, the
white choker and gloves of the period, and
with arms artistically extended to receive
her. stood Death, a courtly skeleton smiling a
horrible smile. A bitter aad burning sermon
was the graphic sketch but to what purpose
One is forced to ak one's 6elf whether thi
munager who could engage weiv s'lch a
thing poFsible the ghastly services of Azrael
himself, in person and in fnnetion even m
Mr. Morgan's pregnant fancy bodied him
forth, would not thereby make a "hit" of
the most stupendous character, and secure
crowded houses for a season of indefinite
length.
TRAVELLERS AND TRAVELLING.
From the X. Y. mbunt.
Of all the fine things which the always
charming Horatius Flaccus sent down to pos
terity, tkere is none finer than the satire
which describes his journey. from Rome to
Brundusium. Very little the poet probably
cared for the quarrels of Octavius and An
tony, as he travelled in the train of Maecenas,
who went to Brundusium to promote a recon
ciliation. The satire itself is one of the
pleasanlest of itineraries, full of the sharpest
of observations, and the most good-humored
narrative of little troubles and difficulties;
droll growls at tho badness of inns and the
annoyances of fellow-travellers; the biting
of the gnats and the croakings of the frogs;
the rustic humors of the villages; boat travel
and travels by post-chaise, through the unfor
tunate town "not to be 'named in verse"
(Equotuticum), through Rubri, Barium,
and Egnatia, until Brundusium at last is
leached. The journey was not a very long
one and did not occupy many days: yet there
ere few books of modern travel which are
equal in value and interest to this gem of a
poem.
The great and long excursions which in
these days railways enable us to make, and
which at least suggest the annihilation of
time and space, render tho journey of Horace
small by comparison; and yet w e should be
glad enough if we could get from them some
thing like the result of his insignificant trip.
Our travellers, it would seem, carry their
eyes in their pockets, and only resume them
w hen the final goal is attained. The main
purpose seems to be to go from point A to
point B as quickly as possible; and the charm
of the feat is not in what it will produce, but
in the thrilling fact that it can be done at all.
Last week a whole car-load of clergymen
started from Chicago for San Francisco. The
week before a similar freight of men and
women left Boston for the same destina
tion. With a continuous rush, with the
scream of the whistle, eating, driuking,
sleeping, each party was hurried along.
All that charm of travel which proceeds
from a sense of personal danger, however
sligLt, will he lost all the power of en
durance which is strengthened by suffering,
all that discipline the re3nlt of which i3a
confirmed presence of mind, all those lessons
in quick decision which imminent danger
gives, will be eluded. This is travel with the
moral element left out. It is no more than a
day's pleasuring. There is no stuff in it to
vitalize a boy's book to bo read w ith awo and
wonder by the winter's firesido. How would
the best record which could bo made of it
compare with the talqs of travellers from
Marco Polo to Dr. Kane? The pilgrims to
San Francisco will see "antres vast and de
serts idle, rough quarries, rocks and hills
whose heads touch heaven;" but the rate of
progress will be too swift for much observa
tion, R'sthetic or scientific, and tho locomotive
has no poetical bowels of mercy. Nor will tho
meanderers see any "cannibals that each other
eat," nor any "anthropophagi," nor yet any
"men whose heads do grow beneath their
shoulders." The only possibility of an ad
venture will be in an accident, and an acci
dent would spoil all. There will be no man
ners and customs for the travellers to observe,
except the manners and customs of each
other aud pretty dull work that will be
found after the first day. The Western par
sons will, of necessity, fall back upon
theology, and the Boston ladies upon the
Peace Jubilee. Under these circumstances,
the kindest wish which we can send after the
wayfarers is that they may have a fine, natu
ral, rousing scare from the Indians. Far bo
it from us to desire that any clergyman should
be scalped, although a scalped clergyman
would draw enormous houses, should he sur
vive the operation and return. But a group
of hostile aborigines upon their tough little
ponies, seen in the distance, might occasion
an agreeable titillation of moderate appre
hension. We hope it will not be thought that w e
speak of these excursions w ith undue levity,
or that we miscalculate their honest value.
The Germans have a word the purport of
which is, "a dweller in a small town." No
man (unless ho be a hopeless fool) can go
from Boston to San Francisco and back again
without getting a great many village notions
out of his head; and he will begin, however
dimly, to comprehend that the world has
boundaries. somewhat wider than he has
heretofore supposed. Mr. Emerson long
ago, perhaps a little cynically, called travel
ling "the fool's paradise," and solemnly
assured his disciples that they would find
nothing abroad which they might not
also find at home; and yet Mr. Emer
son's practice has been somewhat different
from his preacrfiug, since ho too in his d.iy
has been a considerable traveller, with the re
sult of at least one delightful volume. Per
haps if Mr. Emerson had said that the fool at
home must also be a fool abroad, ho would
more nearly have hit the mark. The advan
tage of travel does not consist so much in
what is seen as in the escape from looal
grooves, in the collision with different orders
of men, and in absence from the belittling
influence of a neighborhood too close for
self-respect and too prone to waste its social
activity in worse than profitless gossip
and chit-chat of the tea-tables although
it may be doubted whether this end
will be so well promoted when large num
bers from the same point, and all associates at
home, travel together in a sort of caravan;
for there is danger in such case that iutellec
lectual habits carried away may be brought
back again, possibly, like the luggage, a little
the worse for the wear of the expedition.
But the supreme benefit of the journeying is
in its holiday. It is an emancipation of the
scholar from the volumes which ho may be
either misusing or over-using; of the man of
merchandise from the slavery of day-book
and ledger; of the clergyman from his con
gregation, and of the lawyer from his client;
asid it is a temporary liberation of woman
from that domestic management which,
whether she be rich or poor, may be domi
neering over her daily life and obstructing
all her steps towards a higher culture. Tra
velling is the adult's vacation; and often the
adult may as much need it as tho school
child.
The Salem (N. C.) Press has had In wonder
and admiration excited at the quickness wild
which the enterprising people of the North
obtain newe, audtuusexplaiusiti-elf: "Although
YanceyvlHe Is not upon auy telegraph route,
and though the body of the late Mr. ekephuu
was not lound uutil'the morniui? after he was
uiUsed, a succluci aud tolerably accurate ac
count of the tragedy was telegraphed all over
the North ou Monday aud appeared ia the papers
on Tue.-dav morning. Although we are not
much lurtlier than a day'g ride from Yaueev
ville, we did. not hear even a rumor of the a!t tir
until Tuet-iliiy noon, and tilled to get a correct
triuu until 'luuriday."
THE NAVAL ACADEMY.
TDK LIST OF GRADUATES AT THE EEC INT COM
MENCEMENT. At the commencement of the Uaited States
Naval Academy, hold at Annapolis on Tues
day, the following young aspirants for naval
renown graduated, the five first-named being
the honor men ;
1 George L. Dyer Maino.
2 Robert G. Peck Maisachnsetts.
JJ H. O. Rittenhouse Now Jersey.
4 Henry W. Schaoffer Illinois.
5 John Ilnkbard Arizona Territory.
Charles Briggs Rhode Island.
Herman F. 1 ickbohm Naval rppreutice.
Alexander McCrackin Iowa.
Wm. G. Mayer Ohio.
nenry Harris Illinois.
John W. Danenhower ....Illinois.
Lewis C. Ileilner Pennsylvania.
Samuel L. Graham Pennsylvania.
Joel A. Post : New York.
Joseph B. Murdock Massachusetts.
John 1). Keeler Indiana.
Lazarus L. Reamy Pennsylvania.
George A. Calhoun Naval apprentice.
Walter S. Holliday Wisconsin.
Charles P. Kunhardt Pennsylvania.
Harry M. Jacoby Pennsylvania.
Corwin W. Rees Ohio.
Jacob J. Hunker Ohio.
Nathan Sargent Montana Territory
Whitmnl P. Ray Indiana.
Landon P. Jouett Kentucky.
Greenlief A. Merriam Massachusetts.
HnileC. Nje Ohio.
William M. Wood Indiana.
Miers F. Wright Pennsylvania.
Edward M. Hughes At large.
Charles E. Vreelaud Naval apprentice.
Clayton S. Richmond Iowa.
Marcus D. Hyde Washington Ter'y.
William P. Conway Kentucky.
Boynton Leach New York.
George W. Holman California.
Thomas C. Spencer Son of officer.
John S. Abbott Wisconsin.
Charles II. Lyman Ohio.
John B. Collins Louisiana.
William Remsen New York.
Henry R. Tenington Delaware.
Charles F. Emmerich... .Distr't of Columbia.
Timothy G. C. Salter Naval appprentico.
John P. J. Augur Son of officer.
James H. Bull Pennsylvania.
Wm. H. Van do Carr New York.
Martial C. Dimock. Naval apprentice.
Hugo Osteihaus Missouri.
Freeman II. Crosby New Y'ork.
Willie Kilburn California.
Ferdinand II. Gentsch. ...Ohio.
Anson B. Milliman Naval apprentice.
John B. Milton Kentucky.
Hanson R. Tyler Vermont.
James H. Sawyers Kentucky'.
Joseph H. Utley Illinois.
Francis L. Ludlow New York.
Albert C. Dillingham Pennsylvania.
James M. Gore Son of officer.
Colin McDonald Ohio.
George W. Mentz New Jersey.
Tbeodoric Porter Son of officer.
Henry L. Green New Y'ork.
Frank Ellery, Jr Son of officer.
Francis Whiblow Son of officer.
A number of Paris ladies, under the name
of the "Christian Women's Union," have made
a covenant that they will limit their expendi
tures for dress to a fixed moderate sum, aud
Cfive all their savings from pin-money to the
Pope.
The Dresden Gallery has been enriched by
the purchase of a valuable picture by Hans
Holbein the younger, rcpreeeni'ma; the death of
Virginia. The tribune Appius Claudius sits on
a throne, and the tragic 6ceue takes place lu the
midst of a crow d of people before him. The
elevation of style and powerof expression shown
in this picture" aie paid to place it in the front
rank of German historical painting of the six
teenth century. It has very recently been dis
covered in Dusseldorf, but no account of the
circumstances has reached us.
SPECIAL. NOTICES.
JtiiT- PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD COM
PANY, TREASURER'S DEPARTMENT.
Philadelphia, Pa., May 3, li7i).
NOTICK TO STOCKHOLDERS.
The Board of Directors have this day declared a semi
annual Dividend of FIYK PER CENT, on the Capital
Steck of tho Company, clear of National and State Taxes,
payable in cash on and after May 30, 1470.
Blank Powers of Attorney for collecting Dividends can
be had at the Otlice of the Company, No. 238 South Third
street.
The Office will he opened at 8 A. M. and closed at 3
P. M. from M ay 3U to Juoe 3, for tho payment of Dividonds,
and ufter that date from S A. M. to 3 P. M.
THOMAS T. FIRTH,
6 4 !t Treasurer.
fk- NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, IN
accordance with the provisions of the existing acts
of Assembly, that a meeting of the commissioners nuund
in an act entitled "An Act to Incorporate the 1'KOI KU
TiO.N HUE INSURANCE COMPANY, lo be located
in the city cf Fniladalphia," approved the llithdayof April,
A. D. IrO:-', and ti e supplement thereto, approved the 2tu
day of April, A. D. 187U, will lie hold at 1 o'clock P. M. on
the lath ruy of Juno, A. D. 1870, at No, 133 S. SEVENTH
Street, Philadelphia, when the books for subscription to
the cupital stock will be opened and the other action
taken requisite to complete the organization. 6 13 lm
jfcp N OTI C E I S II EKE BY GIVEN, IN
accordance with tho provisions of the existing acts
of Assembly, that a meeting of the commissioners named
in an act entitled! "An Act to Incorporate Ilia MOVA
MHNSING UK K INM'RANCE COMPANY, to lie
located in the city of Philadelphia," approved the 13th
day of A pril, A. D. IkOsi, and the supplement thereto, ap
proved the ritb day of April, A. D. l7il, will be held at 13
o'clock t. on the 15th day of June, 187U, at'No. 1&2 S.
&EVFNTH htreet, Philadelphia, when the books lor sub
script m-u to the cupital stock will bo opened and the other
action taken requisite to complete the organizai ion. 6 13hu
tZiT OFFICE- O FTH E St mrYLKILL
NAVIGATION COMPANY, No. 417 WALNUT
t treet, Philadelphia, May U5, le7u.
Notice is hereby given that a Special General Meeting of
the Stockholders and I nanlolders nf tins Company will
be held ut.this ortice on MONDAY, tho J'Jth day of June,
lnu, at 11 o'clock A.M. for' the purpose of considering a
proposition to lease the wotki, franchises, and property of
the rchuvlkill Navigation Company to the Fuiladelpoj
and Reading Railroad Company.
by order ot the Muuugera,
tjtlKt F. FRALEY, President.
US' TREGO'S TEABERRY TOOTH WASH.
It is the most pleasant, cheapest and best dentifrio
itan '. VN arrauted tree from injurious ingredient.
It Preserves and Whitens the Teeth!
Invigorates snd Soothes the Go ma!
Purities aud Perfumes the Breath!
Prevents Accumulation of Tartar!
Cleaures and Purities Artificial Teeth!
Is a Superior Article for Children!
Sold by all druggists and dentists.
A. M. WILSON, Druggist, Proprietor,
8 3 lcm Cor. NINTH AND FILBERi'bts,. Philadelphia.
A TOILET NECESSITY. AFTER
nearly thirty yearn experience, it is now generally
admitted that MUKHAY A LANMAN'd 1- Co KID A
WA1KK is the n.ost rutreshing find agreeable of all
toilet perfumes. It is entirely diiferent from Cologne
Water, and should never be confounded with it : the per
fume of the Cologne disappearing in a few moments after
Its application, whilst that of the Honda Water lasts tor
many onys. B 15
BATCHELOR'S HAIR 'DYE. TITIS
splendid Hair Dyei the best in the wo-ild. Harm
less, reliable, instantaneous, does uot oentain lead, nor
auy viia 'ic poison to produce paralysis or death. Avoid
the vaunted and delnKive preparations boasting virtues
they do uot possets. '1 he geuuine W. A. Batuuelor's Hair
Dye has hsd thirty years untarnished reputation to up
bold its integrity as the only Per'ect Hair Dya Black or
Brown, bold by all Druggist. Applied at No, lri BUND
Street, New York ftfuawt
t- HEADQUARTERS FOR EXTRACTING
Teeth with fre'h Nitrous-Oxida Oaa. Absolutely
no pain. Dr. K. H. THOMAS, formerly operator at IU
Colton Denial Rooms, devote his enure practice to the
naiulea extraction ot teeth. Orhoe, No. U WALNUT
Street. iij
torf- QUEEN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
W LONDON AND LIVERPOOL. '
CAPITAL, i,uuu,otKi.
SABINE, ALLEN A Dl'LLKS. Age at,
K HUH and WALNUT Street.
YV A R D A L E G. M c A L L 1 8 T ER,
Attorney and Coune!!or at Law.
N.O. 3 o BKOAUWAY,
INvw Yoik.
FURNITURE, ETO.
IIOVISIl'S
Celebrated Patent Sofa Bedstead
Is now being mads snd sold in large nuinbnre both in
Erance and England. Cm be bad only at the manufac
tory. 'J his piece of turniture is In the form of a hund-ioiiie
PAKI.OK MiKA.yct in one minute, without unscrewing
or detaching in any wnv. it can be extended Into a beau,
tiful ! BENCH BKDhrtCAD, with Spring Hair Mattrcs
complete. It has the convenience of a Bureau tor holding,
is easily managed, ana it is impoiole for ii to get out of
order. This Sola Bedstead requires no prop, hinges,
fpit. or ropes to support it when extended, as all otLer
sofn beds snd lonoge bare, whioh are all Tory unsafe and
Imble to get out of repair, but the Btnstead is formed by
imply turning out the ends or clo-ing tbem wlun the
Sola is wiinted. The price is shiut the same a a lounge.
An elimination of this novol invention is solicited.
II. F. HOVER,
5 24turhm No. 30 South RF.CONI Street, 1hil.i1t
RICHMOND & CO..
FIRST-CLASS
FURNITURE WAHEROOMS
STo. 45 SOUTH SECOND STREET,
KAST SIDE, ABOVE OUESNUT,
JJl PUILADKLPHIA
TURNITURE
Selling; at Cost,
Ao. 1019 MAUHITr Street.
419 8in Q. R. NORTH.
WHISKY, WINE, ETC.
QARSTAIR8 & McCALL,
No. 126 Walnul and 21 Granite Sts.,
IMPOUTKP.S OF
Brandies, Wines, Gin, Olive Oil, Etc.,
WHOLESALE DKALKH8 IN
PURE RYE WHISKIES.
IN BOND AND TAX PAID. 6 2S 2p4
WILLIAM ANDERSON & CO., DEALERS
la b in Waiakies,
No, 146 North 8EOOND Btreet,
Philadelphia,
CLASS.
205
Li A S S.
207
BENJAMIN II. SHOE.MAKEK,
importer or
FOREIGN WINDOW GLASS,
Manufacturer of
AMJCRIOAN WINDOW GLASS,
bole Agent for the sal of
PRENCII WHlrit PLATE CLASS,
IBliNOtl LOOKIMJ-ULASN PLATES,
FRENCH SKY-L to li V GUSS.
Having been appointed Sole Agent in Philadelphia for
the sale of the product? of the
FRENCH PLATE GLASS COMPANIES.
I would draw the attention of purchasers to the ery
Buperior quality of Glass made by them. It ia whiter and
more highly polished than any otuer (jlass in the world,
and won h twenty per cent, more for building purposes.
For sale, with every other variety of Gl.&SS, Ornamen
tal, Colored, Cut, Fmlnsed, nud Plain, by
JiENJ. II. HIIOKitl AKKIt,
Nos. 2H5. 2H7, uH, 211
N. FOURTH Strent,
200 ABOVK RACK. toliUmrpl -jit
FIRE AND BURCLAR PROOF SAFK
J. WATSON & SOff,
ig mi
Of the lata firm of EVANS A WATSON I ISi
TIRE AND BURGLAR-PROOF
s a jp e s t o re, ir,
No. 53 SOUTH FOURTH STREET,
3 31 A few doors above Chemnt st., Philada.
EDUCATIONAL.
AW SCHOOL
O F
HARVARD UNIVERSITY.
Oamdp.idoe, Mass.
Second Term Ii&t-70 begins 'Jlst February, ls7J.
INSTRUCTORS AND TOPICS.
Nathaniel Holmes, A. SI., Royall Profeeor. Domestl
Relations, Equity Pleading, and Evidence.
Christopher O. Langdell, A. M., Dan Professor. Nego
tiable Paper and Partnership.
Oharloa B. Bradley, LL. D Lecturer. Law of Real Pro
perty. Edmund H. Bennett, A. M., Lecturer. Criminal Law
V ills, and Administration.
John O. Gray, Jr., A.M., Lecturer. Jurisprudence of
the United Mates and fcankruptcr.
The instruction is by lecture, most courts, ezeroises in
written and oral discussion of legal subjects, and prepara
tion of pleadings.
The library is one of the most complete ia the United
States, and in some departments nnequalled ; it now com
prises about ltf,uoo volumes, aud additions are oonatantly
being made,
The fees are $50 per term, and $25 for one-half or any
mailer fraction of a term. No extra charges.
For admission to the school, catalogues, oiroulars. or
any information, address J. A. L. WHITTIh R,
2 1 Registrar.
E
D G E H I L L
SCHOOL,
MERCUANTVILLE, N. J.
FOUR MILES FROM PHILADELPHIA.
NEXT SESSION BEGINS APRIL 4.
For Circular apply
21 tf T. W. OATTELL.
PATENTS.
STATE RIGHTS FOR SALE. STATE
Rights of a valeable Invention just patented, and for
the SLICING, CUTTING, and CHIPPING of dried beef,
cabbage, etc., are hereby ottered for sale. It is an artiels
of great value to proprietors of hott Is end restaurants,
and it should be introduced into every family. HIATK
RIGHTS for sale. Mofol can be seen at TELEGRAPH
OFk ICE, COOPER'S POINT, N. ,J.
r.tt MUNDY 4 HOFFMAN.
STOVES, RANGES, ETO.
14 D G A R L. T II O M S O N,
Successor ti Mtaryie & Thomson,
IRON FOUNDER.
STOVES.
TINNED,
ENAMELLED, an!
HEAVY HOLLOW WARE.
OFFICE, No. xi'it N. SECOND Street.
FOUNDRY, South SECOND and MIFFLIN Streets,
Philadelphia. 17 wluitit
rpHB PRINCIPAL V E POT
FOR THE 8ALK OF
REVENUE STAM.P8
No. 804 CHESNUT STREET.
CENTRAL OFFICE, NO. 105 S. FIFTI1 STREET
(Two doors below Chc-snut street),
ESTABLISHED 13(1.
Trie Bale of Revenue Stamps U still couUiiaei at
the Old-Establtslicil Agenclce.
The stoclc comprises every deuomlnattoa printed
by the Government, and having at all ttins a large
Bupply, we are enabled to nil and forward (by Mall
or Express) all orders, laiuiediatoly upon receipt, a
matter of great importance.
United States Notes, National 15anfc Notes, Draft
on Philadelphia, and Post Oillce Orders received la
payment.
Any Information regarding the decisions of the
Conimksioner of Interna! Revenue cheerfully aud
gratuitously furnished.
Revenue Stamps printed tipon Drafts, Checl
Receipts, etc.
The following rates of commission are allowed
Stamps and Stumped Paper:
On 25 and upwards. 8 per
loo 3 '
300 "
Address I.. ers, etc., to
STAMP AGENCY.
No. 804 CHESNUT STREET. PHILADELPHIA.
T
H O M A 8 SIMONS,
(Succeator to Henry Simonb).
IT W V I'l'l.iAl i I
WAGON AND COACH WORKS.
OFFICE, No. 523 EW MARKET M REET.
Wagons, Carts, Drays, Wheelbarrows, Timber, Wheels,
etc. All work warranted
Orders promptly attended to. 6 i lm
JOHN FARN'UM & CO., COMMISSION MER-
f ) chants and Manufacturer of Ccneslona 'licking, eto.
ISO,
pap
CORDAGE, ETC.
WEAVER & CO.,
ROPV MANIJrAVTl'Ui;il
AND '
sun i ii viii:us.
No. 29 North WATER Street and
No. 89 North WHARVES, Phlladelpala
ROPE AT LOWEST BOSTON AND NEW YORK
PRICES. 41
CORDAGE.
Manilla, Siial and Tarred Cordage
At Lowest New York Price and Freight.
EDWIN II. FITL.EK cV tjo..
Factory. TENTH St. and GERMANTOWN AT.naa.
Stor. No. S3 V. WATER St. and ii N. DEL AW ARB
Avenue.
SHIPPINC.
fffQ LORLLLARLV3 STEAMSHIP LINE
FOB
rsT 13, W Y O K I
are now receiving freight at
5 CPiitii per 100 pounrU,
J rente per foot, or lreul per cnltou, h!a
cpilon.
INSURANCE OF 1 PER CENT.
Kitra rate on email packages Iron, metals, etc.
No receipt or bill of lading signed for less than SO ent.
The Line would call attention of merchants generally to
the fact that hereafter the regular shipper bvthiilin
will be charged only 10 cent per 1J0 lb., or 4 sent per
foot, during the winter season.
For farther particular apply to
PIFIL I?- NORTH WHARVES.
f fQ, PI"LAT)ELPIIIA AND SOUTHERN
Till ,r-Yii MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY'S I REtUT
LFANSbL THLY LlSK NtVV oK:
The YAZOO will sail for New Orlean direct, on
Thursday, June 1H, at 8 A. M. '
The ACHILLES will sail from New Orleans, via Havana
on -I una
THROUCH BILLS OF LADING at as low rates as by
any other route given to Moliile. Ualveton, Indianola La
vacca.and lirazos and to all points on the Mississippi river
between New Orleans and St. Louis. Red River ireights
resbippid at New Orleans without charge of commissions.
WEEKLY LINE TO SAVANNAH, GA.
The WYOMING will ail for Savannah on Satur
day, June 11, at H A. M.
'1 he TON AWa ND A will sail from Savannah on Satar
day, June 11.
.TtjhOUUH BILLS CF LA DING given to all the priu
cipal towns in Ceorgin, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi,
Louisiana, Arkansas, and Tennessee in connection with
the Central Railroad of Ueorgia, Atlantic and Cult Rail,
road, andll londa steamers, at as low rates as by competing
RUSH-MONTHLY LINE TO WILMINGTON, N. O
Hie PIONEER will sail for Wilmington on .Saturday,
June lth. Returning, will leave Wilmington but ur Jay.
June 25th.
Connects with the Cape Fenr River Steamboat Com
riany, tho Wilmini ton and Weldon aud North Carolina
Railroads, and the Wilmington and Manchester Railroad
to all interior points.
Freights ior Columbia. S. O., and Augusta, Ga., taken
via Wilmington, at as low rates as by any other route.
Insurance ollucted when roqueetdd by shipper. Bills
of lading sigued at ljueeu streot wharf on or before day
of sailing.
WILLIAM L. JAMES, General Agent.
6i; No. 13u South THIRD Street.
fffift PHILADELPHIA AND CHARLES
TON STEAMSHIP LINE.
This line is now composed of th. following first-clssa
Steamships, sailing from PIER 17, below Spruce stioat
ou FRIDAY of each week at 8 A. M. :-
ASHLAND. 8HI tone. Capt. Crowell.
J. W. EVER. vl AN, toVJ tons, Capt. Hinckley
PROMETHEUS, mm tons. Capt. Gray.
JUNE, 1870.
Prometheus, Friday. June 3.
J. W. Everman, Friday, Juno 1(1.
Prometheus, Friday, June 17.
J. W. Everman, Fridav, June Si
Through bills of lading given to Columbia, 8. O., tl in
terior ot Georgia, and all points South aud Southwest.
I- reights forwarded with promptness and despatch.
Rates as low as by any other route.
Insuiance one half per cent., effected at the office ia
first -class companies.
No freight received nor bills of lading signed after 3 P
M. on day of sailing.
feOl'DEIl cV ADAIH, Agents,
No. 2 DOCK Street,
Or to WILLIAM P. CLYDE CO.
No. 13 S. WHARVES.
WM. A. COtTRTENAY. Agent in Charleston. 8ji tf
iatasTOWN. lnman line of Mail Steamer are as.
pjimeu to sail as follows;
City of Brussels, Saturday, June 11, at 1 P. M
City of Antwery, via Halifax, Tuesday, June 14, 1 P. it,
Cityof Washington, Saturday, Juno ln.f A.M.
City of London, Saturday, June , 1 P. M.
Acd eaoh succeeding Saturday and alternate Tuetda
from Pi.r ii. North River. .
RATES OF PA8SAGB.
BY THE MAIL 8TK42CEB SAXLLNO tVtlUt i TtTBOAI.
Payable in Cold. Payable ia Oarrcnof .
FIRST CABIN $H)0 I STEERAGE $tf
To 1-oudon I05 I To London 4.1
To Pari 115 I To Pari. 44
FA8SAOB BY THE TUXaDAl SI&IMEB, VIA HALTTaX.
FrrtST CABIN. STKERAUK.
Payable in Gold. Payable in Currenoy .
Liverpool. $W Liverpool f
Halifax 4) Halifax 1
St. John', N. F.. 1 St. John', N. F., j
by Branch Steamer....) by Branch Steamer... .(
Passenger also forwarded to Harre, Hamburg, Bremen,
to., at reduced rates.
Tickets can be bought here at moderate rata by person
wishing to ead fnr their friend.
For farther particoi&r apply at tc Company" Otfloe
JOHN O. DALE, Agent.
No. 15 Broadway. N. Y.
OrtO O'DONNELL A FAULK., Agents.
4 4 Bo. m CHESNUT Street. Phliadelpnia.
-fjFff PHILADELPHIA. RICHMOND;
iTTJ U J-l- vr NORFOLK STEAMSHIP LINK.
'ItiROLi.H FREIGHT AIR LINE TO THE SOUTli
INCREASED FACILITIES AND REDUCED RATES
J-OR lHTn.
Steamers leave every W KDN ESDAYand SATURDAY
at 1-2 o'clock noon, from 1 1RST WHARF above MAR
KET Street.
RETURNING, leave RICHMOND MONDAYS and
THURSDAYS, and NORFOLK. TUESDAYS and bA-
1 L'RDA YS.
No Bill of Lading signed after 12 o'clock on sailing
da.
THROUGH RATES to all points in North and South
Carolina, via Seaboard Air Une Railroad, connecting at
Portsmouth, and lo Lynchburg, Ya , Tennessee, aud tue
West, via ir.inia and Tennessee Air Line and Richmond
and Danville Railroad.
Freight HANDLED BUTONCK, and taken at LOWER
R A T Ft Tb AN ANY OTHER LINK.
No charge fur commiaaiou, drayage, or any expense of
transfer.
Meumships insure at lowest rate.
Freight received daily.
ttate Room accommodations for uasaengors.
WILLIAM P. CLYDE 4 OO ,
No. liS. WHARVKSand PierlN. WHARV E8.
W. P. PtiK'l ER, Agent at Richmond and City Point.
T. P. CROWELL A CO.. Agents at Norlolk. t IS
m-p ..FOR N E Y T ORK,
lcI,V'4r via Delaware and Raritau Oanal.
g&aSM&AFXPRK.SS STEAMBOAT COMPANY.
1 bo Meant Propeller of the line will commence load
ing tin the Mh instant, leaving daily as usual.
HlhOL'GH IN' TWEN TY FOUR HOURS.
Goods furwaided by all the lines goinccutof New York
North, East, or VN est, tree of commission.
Freight received at low rates.
WILLIAM P. CLYDE A Co.. Agent.
No. li South DELAWARE Aveaua.
JAMFS HAND, Agent.
No. lit WALL Street, New York. 8 4$
rr v v w vntjir t-T nirr i
VtT ware and Rariian Canal.
i SWIFitSLKK TRANSPORTATION OOM.
DESPATCH AND SWIFTSURE LINES,
Leaving dally at 1 j M. and 5 P. M.
Thestefctn propellers ot this company wid commence
oadiug on the 8tu ot March.
'J hrougb in tweniy-lour hours.
Gnods forwardeJ to any point free of commission.
Frouhts taken on accommodating terms.
Apply to
WILLIAM M. BAIHD A CO., Agent,
4 No. oi South DELAWARE Avena.
. fTP v DELAWARE AND CHESAPEAKE
fivAT STEAM TOWBOAT COMPANY.-Barge
i 1 inn 1 1 urn H towed between Philadelphia, Baltimore,
liavie ue Grace, Delaware City, and intermediate point.
WILLIAM P. CLYDE A CO., Agent.
Captain JOHN LAl'GbLIN, Superintendent.
Otlice. No. 12 bout ri Wharves. Philadelphia, i 11
j fc NEW EXPRESS LINE TO
"Alexandria, Georgetown, and Washingtoa,
1 sin 1 in v., iu uuubigaU ana Lieiaware Uanat,
with connection at Alexandria from the most direct
r.ilild fur r.L'niOthniir KriMtol K.v.:n. .1
ton, and the routhwest.
Steamers leave regularly every Saturday at noon from
the liist whart above Market street.
Freight received daily.
m. WILLIAM P CLYDE A CO.,
wi liuiriT iV.r'-ri f"""1?, Georgetown
uv-rw a. tviid . " """K" "
M.
615
pOTTON SAIL DUCK AND CANVAS,
V-' of all number and brand. T.nt, Awning, Trank
and Wagon-cover Duck. Also, Paper Manufacturers'
Drier i eltt, from thirty to Mvaaty-eig tnoha. wits
Paaun. lifting, bail iwtna, .to.
JOHN W. EVKKMarW--K3.U
0HLlUU6uat(0.v fcwtU

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