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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, July 09, 1870, FOURTH EDITION, Image 4

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riiK DAILY EVENING, TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1870.
Evening dtpplt
PUBLISHED EVERT AFTERNOON
(SUNDAYS BXCBPTBD),
AT T3E EVENING TELEGRAPH BUILDING,
No. 108 S. THIRD STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
SATURDAY, JULY 0, 1870.
THE CHINESE QUESTION.
The politicians are becoming frightened by
the Chinese question. What they need above
all other things ia votes, and aa John China
man has none to give, while trades nnions are
a strong voting power in the land, time
servers are inclined to turn a cold shoulder to
the almond-eyed and pig-tailed Celestials.
Statesmen, however, take broader views and
act from higher motives, and the sober
second thought of the nation, as a whole, will
also prompt it to adopt the policy that is befit
calculated to advance the general interests of
all classes. No man who looks back now can
doubt for a moment the immense benefits
that have been conferred upon this country
ly the emigrants who have arrived here since
the formation of the present Government.
Without their aid our population would still
be sparse. Countries that had three millions of
people when that was the number of Ameri
cans have scarcely doubled their population
since, while ours has increased in the ratio of
thirteen to one; and if we were to strike to
day from the sum-total of our citizenship and
wealth all that is due to the emigrants and
descendants of emigrants who arrived on our
shores since 1787, we should have left but a
beggarly account. Against every form of this
emigration objections have from time to time
been made. The Irishmen, Germans, and
Englishmen have each in turn been antago
nized, but a liberal spirit has nevertheless per
vaded the body of the people which has been
incorporated in our laws and institutions,
and as a practical result not only is emigra
tion of hundreds of thousands of industrious
men pouring in upon our shores annually
from Europe, but millions ot their fellow
countrymen recognize this as the land of
freedom, and live in the hope that they, too,
will eventually become American citizens.
Applied to Europe this system has worked
veil for the emigrants and for this nation, and
doubt of its wisdom are suggested only
when the question of extending it to the
natives of Asia comes up for practical consi
deration. We have not yet seen any good
reason why the gates of the Pacific ports
should not be opened as freely as those of the
Atlantic. The arguments founded on Chinese
peculiarities have no real weight. If we ex
clude them because they are not Christians,
we should also establish a religious censor
ship at Castle Garden, and send back to
Europe every emigrant who cannot come up
to an orthodox standard. If we exclude
them because they save their wages and are
economical in their habits, we should also
ostracize thousands of our most useful Euro
pean emigrants. If we are to exclude them
on account of the desire cherished by a large
portion of their numbers to return to their
native land after they have accumulated a
moderate sum, we should, to be con
sistent, also apply this test to the
Atlantic seaboard. But the cross-examination
of the Italian organ-grinders in regard
to the final disposition of their superfluous
pennies, and laws forbidding Irish servant
girls to send back money to their friends
in the Emerald Isle or to invest in Fenian
fundi, would illy comport with the dignity or
true duty of an American Congress. Even
the allegation that the Chinese will famish
cheap labor affords no rational ground for
their exclusion. The same charqe has bean
made from time to time on the Atlantio coast
against the emigration of Englishmen, Ger
mans, or Irishmen, but it has never bean
deemed a good ground for their exclusion by
Congress. Workmen of all European na
tionalities very quickly learn to demand the
highest market rates for their services, and
the Chinese are too intelligent and too
anxious to accumulate wealth to prove
dull scholars in this important
branch of human knowledge. The prolonged
labor contracts under which they are said to
be imported are contrary to the spirit of our
institutions, if not to the letter of existing
laws, and it will be impossible to enforce
them if the Chinamen feel disposed to re
volt. The tawny children of Asia will soon
become as free as any other immigrants after
they land upon our shores, despite bargains
they may have made in their old homes. As
a ride, they are peaceable, industrious, and
ingenious, possessing abundant capaoity to
render great assistance, in developing the
resources of this country; and, in view of this
fact, the nation can well afford to overlook or
disregard their idiosyncrasies. Even if they
come here in large numbers, and
furnish cheap labor in large quantities,
the workmen who fear their competition will
be benefited by the reduction in the cost of
the necessaries of life. If they will give us
cheap boots, cheap coal, cheap bread, cheap
fruit, cheap cotton, cheap silk, oheap rail
roads, and cheap domestio service, we can
well afford to surrender, in whole or part,
some forms of American industry to them,
and transfer the labor and talent now engaged
therein to other pursuits. Much of the clamor
against the Chinese is as nonsensical as the
opposition made from time to time against
labor-saving machinery. It proceeds from
substantially similar causes, and does not do
serve more consideration than the old pro
tests against saw-mills and locomotives.
THE CENSUS OF 1870.
The citizens of St. Louis seem to be alive to
the importance of having acourate and full
information presented in the census reports
as furnished from their city. To aooomplish
this they have added the sum of ten thousaud
dollars to the amount appropriated by the
General Government. This is not only
praise worthy, but in all respects a judicium
expenditure of money.
The census returns will form the basis of
all information as to population and wealth
of the United States for several years to
come, and it is of the very first importance
that they should be accurate as well as ample
in all the items embraced therein. The wealth
aa well as the population of our country has
largely increased within the last decade.
It is not only a just pride, but important as
regards our credit and consideration abroad,
that the fact should be fully presented that
in spite of the devastation and losses occa
sioned by our great Rebellion, this young
giant of the West has made mighty strides in
everything that relates to material wealth and
power.
To accomplish this desirable end, to obtain
accurate and ample information, it becomes
the duty of every citizen to assist the oflisers
of the Government in the performance of
their duties. It is an uphill work at best for
the "census-takers'' to do all that is desired
and expected of them, and it becomes almost
impossible where citizens are disposed to
embarrass rather than assist.
Many persons are fearful of furnishing the
value of their real and personal estate,
through a foolish apprehension that it will
form the basis of f uture taxation. ' It is not
necessary to say to any intelligent person
that this is entirely groundless. Ladies have
more to fear that in giving their ages it
may serve as a bar to matrimony than that a
return of wealth will produce taxation.
The city of Philadelphia is espeeially inte
rested in furnishing in aggregate and detail
the sources of her wealth and importance.
Her factories, workshops, her thousand in
dustries, should mirror forth in the census her
solid wealth and high rank among American
cities.
KEEPING AN EYE ON 'EM.
Em.i ish theologians of all shades of opinion
Lave been exercised about the performances
of the (Ecumenical Council to an extent that
can scarcely be appreciated in this country.
If Protestantism has a firm foothold any
where it apparently has in England, and yet a
large portion of the population are thrown
into a state of alarm and excitement whenever
the Pope or his counsellors make any move
ment outside of the ordinary routine, aul
even when they are perfectly quiescent the
average John Bull esteems their silence to be
a suspicions circumstance, and considers it in
dicative of tremendous plots in process of in
cubation. As soon as the announcement
was made of the Tope's intention
to call an (Ecumenical Council,
the British ecclesiastics immediately began to
wonder whether or not an invitation would
be extended to theiu to attend, although it ia
difficult for a lay American to understand how
such an idea could have even suggested itself.
The Pope not only did not invite them, but
he entirely ignored their existence, consider
ing them as no more entitled to special atten
tion than the common herd of lost sheep who
are outside of the pale of salvation. When
they found themselves not only not invited to
participate in the grand theological pow-wow
at the Vatican, but ignored altogether,
some of the British clergy took the pains to
jog the memory of the Holy Father, and
to intimate that it would be a grati
fication for them to discuss the differences
of Protestantism and Romanism with the as
sembled fathers; and Dr. Gumming, the
celebrated interpreter to his own satisfac
tion of the prophecies of Daniel and John,
volunteered to engage the entire council
single-handed. The Pope, like a polite old
gentleman and a good Christian, replied to
these advances by informing the British
clergy that it would give him infinite plea
sure if they would all come to Rome and be
received into the bosom of the true Church,
after being instructed in sound doctrines by
learned persons whom he would appoint for
tLis purpose. There was a gentle sarcasm
about this that excited a laugh at the expense
of the British theologians, who did not desire
to be converted, but who burned with an ar
dent desire to controvert if not to convert
the entire council, with the Pope at its head,
in the very stronghold of papacy. Dr.
Cumming, for instance, pictured to himself
the immense moral, net to say dramatio,
effect of his defying the thunders of the
Vatican in the Vatican itself, and was con
vinced that nothing less than the final down
fall of the Church of Rome was to be ex
pected if he should succeed in convincing
the Pope of the error of his ways and inspir
ing him with sound Calvinistio principles.
Being convinced, however, that the Roman
ecclesiastics were determined to decide upon
the infallibility dogma without their assist
ance, the British clergy began to tremble for
the fate of Protestantism, and they have been
bhaking in their boots ever since. Not long
ago they inquired of the Government what
action it proposed to take in the matter, and
Mr. Gladstone, who was apparently unable to
see what the (Ecumenical Council bad to do
viilh the English Church anyhow, was obliged
to state that the case was one that scarcely
called for any interference on his part. This
rebuff appears to have driven to
despair, some, at least, of .the British
cleigy, and the Convocation of Canterbury,
probably impressed with the idea that the
price of religious liberty is eternal vigilance,
now proposes to appoint a permanent com
mittee to watch the proceedings of the Vati
can. Exactly what the committee will do in
case the dogma of infallibility is promulgited,
or anything else unpleasant attempted, it is
difficult to imagine. It may, however, give
comfort and a certain amount of assurance of
tnfety to the English Church to know that
tLis committee has an eye on the Vatican,
evtn if the Vatican refuses to be impressed
by the fact that it is under surveillance, while
the reverend gentlemen composing the com
mittee will have the great satisfaction of con
sidering themselves as the advanced piokct
guard of Protestantism, with the world watch
ing them while they watch the Vatican.
The last words we find in tbe last number
of the '"Mystery of Edwin Drood"are singularly
sunsenht: "Comes to au end for the time.'
TDK VISIT OF THOMAS HUGHES.
On the 3d of August Mr. Thomas Hughes will
sail from Southampton in the Bremen steamer
Donau for the United State, with the inten
tion of remaining about three months in this
country. He is almost as well known on this
side of tbe Atlantic as on the other, bv name nt
least, and there is no living Englishman who
could merit or receive a heartier welcome from
the American people. In view of his contem
plated visit, a bilef sketch of his life will not be
without interest.
Mr. Hughes is the second son cf John Husches,
Esq., of Donington Priory, near Newbury, In
the county of Berk, where he was born on the
20th of October, 1823. In one of his books,
"The Scouring of the White Horse," he has de
scribed In an attractive manner tbe scenes of
his early life in the neighborhood of his birth
place. At the customary nge he became a stu
dent at Rugby, where the celebrated Dr. Arnold
was then head master, and from there he went
to Oriel College, Oxford, from which he gradu
ated as B. A. in 1845. While at Rugby and Ox
ford Mr. Hughes entered with wonderful zeal
Into nil the muscular sports which character
ized both places, and became rather more
distinguished for his proficiency with the oar
than for his acquirements of an intellectual
nature. He early became a convert to Charles
EiDgeley's school of "muscular Christbiuity,"
and In his two celebrated books showed himself
to be its foremost disciple, (lifted with more
than ordinary mcutal power, and jog3escd of
n frank, mauly, and generous disposition. :is is
manifested in his writings, it was natural that
he should become a great favorite in his school
and college days in short, jtit such a young
man ns he has taken for the hero of his books
on school and college life.
After graduating, he entered at Lincoln's Inn
as a student at law, and in January, ISIS, was
called to the bar. Iu his profession of bar
rister be has achieved a fair reputation and ac
quired a fair practice, although he has not riseu,
nor perhaps been ambitious to rise, to the higher
ranks of his calling. In the autumn of 1856 he
published his admirable picture of school life
entitled "Tom Brown's School Days at Rugby,"
certainly the most readable book of the kind
ever written, a book that possesses as much of
a charm for the old as for the young. It has be
come popular wherever the English language is
read and spokeu, and has probably hud a larger
circulation in this country thau in England.
In 1858 he published "The Scouring of
the White Horse," a work which
never attained anything like the popularity ot
its predecessor. Perceiving this, he, in 1801.
recurred to the subject which had made his
fame and forluue, and published "Tom Brown
at Oxford,' a book characterized by almo-t as
much ficshness. geniality, and vivacity as his
first venture, and destined to achieve a popu
larity almost as great aud lasting. Iu addition
to these works, he has written several tracts,
frequently contiibuted to the leading re
views and papers, aud prepared prefaces for tbe
English editions of Professor Lowell's "Biglow
Papers" and Whittier's poems.
Mr. Hugbes has also taken au active part iu
politics for teveral years past. During the pro
gress of the civil war in this country, he proved
himself to be one of the most earnest, sincere,
and effective friends of the United States in all
England, and was ready on all occasions to deal
a hard and telling blow against the upholders of
rebellion and their sympathisers. All his
political associations have been of the most
radical sort, but his radicalism has ever been
tempered with a sound discretion aud an
honest respect for those of opposite views. In
18C5 he was elected one of the members of the
British House of Commons for the borough of
Lambeth, but at the election for the present
Parliament, in 1818, through 6ome differences
with his constituents he was obliged to seek
another seat, and was returned In that year as
member for Erome, in Wiltshire.' "In personal
appearance," 6aid an English journal some
months ago,. "Mr. Hughes is a simple, frank,
honest-looking gentleman, his full face and
finely-cut features set off by a light fringe of
ruddy whiskers, and lit up by a pair of singu
larly keen, bright grey eyes, in which a lurking
imp of humor forever dances." His wide repu
tation as a writer, and his many kindly services
to the cause of the Union, will render his arrival
in the United States the signal for an outspoken,
generous, and unstinted welcome.
The Bahamas. An English paper says that Sir
Jan es Walker, Governor of the Bahamas, In a re
port to Lord Granville which has just been printed,
gives a melancholy account of the condition or that
colony. It Is, however, comforting to And that mis
fortune at the Bahamas means prosperity to the rest
o: the world, and, however much we may feel for
the troubles of the colonists, we should be sorry,
under the circumstances, to hear of any revival or
their former prosperity. The good fortune they for
merly enjoyed was due almost entirely to wrecks.
It was the property stranded on the islands, either
through misfortune or vlllany, which for a great
number ot years constituted the chief support or
the people and the Government. But from the use
or steam, the erection or excellent lighthouses, the
increased intelligence of the master mariners, aud
the eye or authority on their proceedings, wrecks
are now comparatively or rare occirrence. lathe
absence or wrecks there is no agriculture, no manu
facture, no commerce to fall back on ; nothing but
the precarlons cultivation or the pineapple an t the
unremnneratlve pursuit or sponge gathering. Thi3
decreace in the number or wrecks is not or yester
day's date, it commenced some years ago ; when,
just as the inhabitants began to reel tbe pinch, the
civil war iu America broke out, and aflordod oppor
tunities in these Islands for a large contraband
trade with the belligerents. The evil day was only
postponed; of the money which poured luto the
colony at that time there is little left, aud distress U
becoming every day n.orc apparent.
RELIGIOUS NOTICES.
.pi- CNION SERVICES. CENTltAL PR KS 8 V
w TEIUAN CHURCH uniting with the THIRD
REFORMED CHl'kCll. Rev. AL.UERT BARNES
will preach to-morrow (Sabbath) morning in the
Central Presbyterian Churoh.KUillTU and CHERRY
Streets, at V o'clocn, and Rev. A. REED. D. D.,
inihe Third Reformed' Church, TENTH and FIL
liElfT streets, in the evening at S o'clock.
B. CLINTON STREET PRESBYTERIAN
ClllRCH, TENTH Street, below Spruce.
I'nion services to-morrow at low A.M. Tlie First
Church will unite in them. Rev. 8AM TEL MILLER
11AOEMAN will preach. All cordially Invited.
tfx-- UNION SERVICES. WKST ARCH STREET
ami fc EVE NTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES
Rev. HENRY C. McCOOK will preach to-morrow In
thH West Arch Street Church at 10rf A. M., and ia
Seventh Piesbjterluu Church, Broud, above Cnes
uut, at 8 P. M.
won- NORTH
PTiKMlYTtflM AM flll-rU'll.
WW i
SIXTH Street, above GHKKN Prcachm? to
morrow by Pastor,
Rev. B. L. AGNEW,
at 10'f o'clock morning Ld s evening. Strangers
welcome.
PROFESSOR SAUNDER8, P. D., WILL
preach to-morrow ruorauig and eveniuii ia the
SIXTH PRESBYTERIAN CI1CRCII, . fePHUCE,
below Sixth. Subject: "isuUli aud his Prophe
cies." fS SEKYICBS AT THE NORTH C. P. CHURCH,
MASTER Mreet, abuvo r'tiu-eiiUi, uioruiuif
und evening, by the pusmr. Rev. u M. T. ow
REt-ICIOUS NOTIOh.3.
M- DIFFICULTY AND SUCl ESS. REV. ILA.
CLEAVELAND, D. D.. will, by request, repeat
hit great discourse on the altove subject Sunday
next, Jnly 10, at 10Vf A. M., in TRINITY M. E.
CHURCH, EIGHTH Street, above Race. Come and
hear.
fS?- ST- CLEMENT'S CHURCH, TWENTIETH
and CIIEKRY,iStreet8. Service .(Chorab and
sermon to-morrow evening at 8 o'clock. At this
service tht goats will be free. 7 8 art"
UfflT WAYNE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,
"w Radnor Rev. SAMUEL P. LINN will preach at
WAYNE HALL to-morrow (Sabbath), at 1C o'clock.
Sabbath-school at 9 A. M.
SPECIAL. NOTIOES.
Fbr adMUmal Special AoWrat th hiMdt
frT FLANNELS, TWEEDS. CHEVIOTS,
PKAP D'ETES. CREPES, ALPACAS, SEER
SUCKERS, LINENS, DUCKS.
SUMMER
SUITS
SUMMER
SUITS
SUMMER
SUITS
SIMMER
suns
SIMMER
SUIT
SUMMER
suns
SUMMER
SUITS
SUITS FOR BUSINESS. DRESS, TRAVEL
LING, HUNTING,' FISHING, BATHING,
BOATING, BEADY TO TUT RIGHT ON,
AT
WANAMAKEE'S,
SIS AND S-.'O
CHESNUT STREET.
GRAND RECEPTION BALL
IN HONOll OF US
N E W Y O R 1C S S V E N T H,
F R I D A Y EVE.MN G, JULY U, n;n,
STOCKTON HOTEL.
CAPS MAY.
TICKETS, admitting gentleman aud laiy $s
Additional lady's Ticket S3
May be obtained of
P.A1LEY A- CO.,
S. W. corner Twelfth and vtiesnut s'reets.
JOSEPH F. TOBIAS A CO.,
Nos. 100 and 20$ S. Frout street.
SMITH, ROBERTS A HOLLINSHEAD,
S. E. corner Fifth ami Walnut streets.
FiTLKB, QUIC.G A CO ,
No. 100 S. Ninth street.
General HBNRY H. BINGHAM,
Post Office.
THOMAS J. MAGILl,
No. 10 Merchants' Exchange. 79 Ct
STEIN WAY & SONS'
GRAND SQUARE AND UPRIGHT PIANOS.
CHARLES BLASIUS,
SOLS AGENT FOR TBS SALE OF THI
WORLD-RENOWNED PIANOS,
AT THE OLD WAREROOMS.
14 ISt Hp
No. 100G CnESNUT STREET.
tf NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AN
application will be made at the next meeting
or the General Assembly of the Commonwealth or
Pennsylvania for the incorporation of a Bank, in ac
cordance with the laws of the Commonwealth, to be
entitled THE MakKLT BANK, to be located at
Philadelphia, with a capital of fifty thousand
dollar?, with the right to increase the same to live
hundred thousand dollars. 7 9 s Cm
11 A KPE KSTlA HI DYE TITE ONLY
bunnies and reliable Dye known. Thia splendid
Hair I! e is perfect. Change, red, rusty, or gray hair,
whiskera, or moustache instantly to a glossy black or
natural brown, without injuring the hair ordaining the
skin, leavinc the tisir soft and beautiful. Only W oents
fora large boa. OALLKNDKR, THIRD and WALNUT:
JOHNSON, HOLLOW AY A GOWDKN. No. 602 AROri
Btret;TKKNWliH, No.614 CHKSNUT Street; YAK
NKLL, 1'IFTKKNTH and MARKKT Streets; BrloWN.
Fit 'J 11 and OHKSWUl bts; and all Druggists. 6J1 tf 4p
FURNITURfc.
I
UKCHASKllrJ OF
COTTAGE CUAMHElt SLITS
And the various styles of
BEDSTEADS,
BUREAUS,
WASIlSTANDS,
WARDROBES, ETC.,
Finished in imitation of Walnut, Maple, or other
"hard woods,'' and now generally known as ''Imi
tation" or "painted'' Furniture, are hereby informed
that every article of our manufacture is
STAMPED WITH OUR INITIALS AND TRADE
MARE,
And those who wish to obtain goods of our make
(there being, at the present time, numerous imita
tions lathe market), should invariably ask the dealer
of whom they are purchasing to exhibit our stamp
on the goods, and take no other, no matter what
representations may be made concerning them.
KILBURN & CATE8,
Wholesale Manufacturers of Cottage Furniture,
No. G19 MARKET STREET,
7 2 smwGmrp PHILADELPHIA, PA.
WASHINO MACHINES.
JY PURCHASING A
KING WASHER
Your washing can be done Iu two hours much bet
ter and more satisfactorily than uy the old-fush-loued
wash-board or any other washing machine.
LESS THAN MX MONTHS IN USE,
AND THOUSANDS OP THEM SOLD,
AND EVERY ONE SATISFACTORY.
J. H. COYLE & CO.,
Dealers In Wooden Ware, General Ageuti,
No. 510 MARKET STREET.
Alro Agents for the
6 6 th8tu3mrp GREAT RELIANCE WRINOER
HOTELS.
COLONNADE HOTEL.
FIFTEENTH AND CHESNUT STS.,
KNTIRILT HEW AND HiHDSOMKI.Y FUH
ftlSUt- M i D7w rJj for Prmi3at or traiat ciottl
OLOTMINQi
Blow Gently, Summer Breezes.
People may blow as they please about their
lis all-wool Butts,
111 all-wool suits,
$13 all-wool Suits,
$12 all wool Salts,
BUT WJS CAN SURPASS ANYTHING
IN THAT LINK
YET OFFERE9!
HEARKEN! HEARKEN !! HE AB KEN II!
PLAIN FACTS AND NO NONSENSE ABOUT IT,
"E CAN GIVE YOU A REALLY HAND
SOME ALL-WOOL
Scotch Cheviot Suit
FOR TEN DOLLARS.
Bring on your suits and beat our TEN DOLLAR
ALL-WOOL SCOTCH CHEVIOT SUITS if you can.
tf jou want to see some leally well-dressed people,
looV out ror the men who wear the Ten Dollar
ScotcU Cheviot Pu.ts from the
GREAT BK0WN HALL
603 and 605 CHESNUT STREET.
$10 810 $10 $10 $10 $10
$10
910
$10
$10
$10
$10
$10
$10
$10
$10
SUITS.
$10 $10 $10 $10 $10 $10
A IX WOOL
CHEVIOT 3UIT8
3IADU TO ORDE It.
$10.
Good Fit Guaranteed.
EVANS & LEACH,
No. C23 MARKET STREET,
CISstUthlmlp PHILADELPHIA.
CHARLES STOKES.
no. 891 CIIES3H T Street,
CLOTHIER.
LARGE AND CHOICE STOCK OF GOODS FOU
CUSTOMER WORK.
also, 6;tr
FINE BE iDY-M APE CLOTHING.
SEWING MACHINES.
II IS
WHEELER & WILSON
BirtYlNO MA.CIIINI3,
For Sale on Easy Terms.
NO. 914 CHESNUT STREET.
4 mwsj PHILADELPHIA.
FINANCIAL,
T) It Ii X i; L Sc C O.,
No. 34 SOUTn THIRD STREET.
American nncl Foroijjn
ISSUE DRAFTS AND CIRCULAR LBTTfiRS OF
CLED1T available on presentation in any part or
Europe.
1 ravellers can make all their financial arrange
ments tarougU ns, and we will collect tlielr interest
and dividends without charge.
Dkexkl, Wiktebop & Co.,
New York.
DRKXEL, HiRJKS & Co.,
Pans. (3
lehigh Valley Railroad Company
Will, until August 1 next, pay off at
Far and Accrued interest,
Any of their FIRST MORT3AQE BONDS, due in
1873, on presentation at their Office, No. 303 WAL
NUT Street.
iv. ciiaiviui:ki,a.i:,
TREASURER.
June 23, 1870. 6 27 imp
OAS FIXTURES.
821 CHERRY STREET.
CORNELIUS & SONS,
MANUFACTURERS OF
CAS FIXTURES, Etc.
WHOLESALE
AKD
RETAIL SALESROOMS
, 821 CHERRY Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
IVe have no Store or Salesroom
on Chesmtt Mreet.
611 lmp CORNELIUS & SONS.
FOR THE SUMMER.
To prevent Euuburn, Freckles, au l to make the
skin white and beautiful, use
Wright's Alconated Qlyceriae Tablet
of Solidified Glycerine.
It la a sure remedy ror mosquito bites, aud Is the
best of all Teilet Soaps. Said by Druggists aeueraily.
II. v A. Wit I UK T,
8 80 tlistulMrj No. CA CUE-NUT frrieet.
0?
DRY QOOD8.
BARGAINS! DARCAIMBI
C. H. HAMRICIC & CO.,
tfs. 45 NORTH EIGHTH STREET.
NOTICE.
Before taking stock we will dispose or our CHOICB
SELECTIONS OF GOODS, purchased this
season, at very low prices.
BUYERS WILL FISD TUB GREATEST BAR.
GAIS8 OFFERED THIS SEASON.
DBKNANIE8, 75 cents; recently sold at l.
HEHNANIK8. 1 : recently sold at titso.
BERN AMES 1 86; recently sold at $1-76.
BLACK SILKS, H-60, l-75, i. These are rery
cheap.
PERCALES, 100 styles for Garibaldies, all dwlr.
able, 85 cents.
FBRCALES, 1 yard wide, fait colors, 15 cents.
ALPACAS In choice colors, 1S and IB cents.
LINENS for Dresses, Suits, 1 yard wide, 85 cents.
LINENS for Dresses, Suits, 1 yard wide, 8t cents.
LLAMA GOODS. .
CLOSING OUT SHAW 13, SACQUK POINTBS,
ROTONDKS. AND OTBER LLMA GOODS,
CHEAPER THAN BL8BMIEKE.
CALL AtD EXAMINE.
It)
C. II. HAMRICK A CO.
"AT THORNLEY'S."
ANOTHER SWEEPING REDUCTION.
GOODS MUST BE SOLD.
I am determined to clean out my SUMMER STOCK
If the community need goods at HALF their usual
price. 1 bare went right through and marked
prices down In some C ASES F1FTV PER CENT.,
and In MANY CASES TWKNTY-1IVE and TIIIItTV
PER CENT.
Lace Polntes from t to 55.
Lace Sacques from 10 to f&.
1 hln Mixed Tress Goods.
Lawns, Percales and P. R's.
B'.ack Hernanies and Grenadlnei.
Linens and Japanese Grass Cloths (tor Suits?.
Black Silks, Pongee Silks, Japanese Silks.
Kid Gloves, Parasols, Corsets, Skirts, etc. etc.
A full stock of STAPLE and DOMESTIO GOODS
"AT THE OLD ESTABLISHED STAND,"
KOBTBEAST CORKER
EIGHTH and SPRING GARDEN Sti.,
JOSEPH H. THORN LEY,
S3thstnt PHILADELPHIA,
rARGAINS FOR TIIK WARM WEATHER.
PKUE. A lot of recent 42 cent goods now
ottered at 25 cents.
IMITATION TUCKED RWISM,
recently CO cents by the piece, now S7 cents, very
line quality, clOBely resembling Tucks.
FHENCII HkVmlAS MI. TI CKED,
extra width, 75 cents a yard, one half recent prices.
HH'IN.S Air.SMN.
One lot of fine Swiss, only 15 cents a yard, finer
than usual for the price.
FHENCII MUSLIN, 4-1. -l,nndS-1.
Just received, lots of French Muslin, much better
than usual for the price.
tJKIOIAN KNITTED TIDIB,
six sizes, same style to match, from 25 to T5
cents, very cheap.
new niinuR(;,
consisting chiefly of Showy Designs; very cheap
goods.
Early closing for the relief of the employe.
WORN EH Store will be closed on Saturdays at 1 P.
M. during July and August.
E. TI. WORNK'S
Lace and Einbroiderv Store.
It No. IS N. EIGHTH Street.
CLOSING SALE
OF
Lace Jackets, Sacques and Poiatei.
BLACK LACE POINTES from 12 50 to IW.
SACQUES AND JACK STS rrom S to f40.
All or recent purchase, and must be closed out
rapidly.
OURWEN STODDART & BROTHER,
OLD CHEAP LOCATION,
Nos. 450, 452, aud 45 North SECOND Street,
7 7 St Above Wlhow.
J R 8. K. DILLON.
ROS. m AND 881 SOUTH STREET.
Lsdiai and Mine Or.p., Gimp, Hatr Pam.I tad
Straw Round and Pyramid IJatt; Ribbon., Batina. BiUra,
Velreta and VelraLens. Orapaa, Faatbara, Clowaral
Framsa, Baan Ribbon., Ornament., Uoarainf Uillinsry
Orapa Vaile. ate 4
HOSIERY.
COOK & BROTHER,
TRADE MARS.
Retailers of Hosiery Goods,
Exclusively or their own Importation,
No. 53 North EIGHTH Street.
4 13 tus3m4p
PHILADELPHIA.
CARRIAGES,
GARDNER & FLEMING,
CABRIAGE BUILDERS,
No. 214 6. FIFTH Street,
BELOW WALNUT.
In order to make room for extensive, alteration,
and repairs to our Warerooms and Manufactory, wa
are rioting out our entire stock of . 1 7 s tfrp
Phaetons,
Jenny Llnds,
Dusgles, Etc.,
at v Euyair cjr it kd wja i prices.
"1A1VORCES LEGALLY OBTAINED WITHOUT
1 unnecessary exposure. Advice free aud prl
ate Tmus moderate. Apply at "studio, '
7 6 tlillifOt- No. 4 N. NINTH Street, llooin 1,

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