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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, October 22, 1870, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAILY EVENING TKLEGUAl'Il PHILADELPHIA, SATURDAY. OCTOBER 22, 1870.
riniT or snxi ran as.
Editorial Opinions of the Leading Journal
upon Current Toploa Compiled Every
Day for the Evening Telegraph .
GENERAL GRANT AND THE REPUBLI
CAN PARTY.
Frvm Uu A". T. Herald.
The ratification of the fifteenth amend
ment marks the opening of a new chtpter in
American polibion. It puts an end to "the
Almighty nigger" as a political issue, and
brings again into the foreground "the
almighty dollar." "Defeated o every point
in their long straggle for the old pro-slavery
Constitution, with its distinctions of caste
and color, the Demooratic party at length
submits) to the new Constitntion of universal
liberty and the civil and political equality of
all citizens of all colors. Successful in every
point on this question to the crowning en
franchisement of the black race, the Repub
lican party has fulfilled its appointed mission.
Thus the issues of the past have become dead
issues, and upon the new issues of the day
the" Democracy, with their old party shaokles
thrown off, have a fair field aud an inviting
prospect before them.
The general issue now between the two
parties is Grant's administration. In a new
form it is the old conflict of the outside party
against the party in power. Essentially the
Democratio party against General Grant's
administration is fighting the old battle of
the old Whig party against General Jackson.
The same sweeping charges that were made
against the corruptions, spoliations, extrava
gances, abuses, despotic usurpations and
blunders of ignorance of Jackson's adminis
tration by the outside-Whig are now made
againbt Grant and his party by the outside
Democrats. But as the popularity of Jack
aon and of his administration was equal to
all emergencies, so, we think, will be the
popularity of Grant and his policy. Jackson,
beginning with Calhoun and his confederates,
was kept very busy by mutineers and faction
ists in his party camp; but in his Cabinet,
or out of his Cabinet, he out them adrift, and
by his rigid discipline and ir jn will he made
himself the dictator and the idol of his
party. Grant, in another way, is doing the
same thing. Jackson was resolute bat im
pulsive, imperious, excitable, and boisterous.
Grant is firm, but cool, deliberate, amiable,
and reticent. Jackson, in his squabbles with
party maloontents and rebols, frequently had
the whole country in a stew. Grant clips off
the head of a Cabinet or Foreign Minister,
and the whole country is puzzled for weeks
in solving the mystery.
We have seen enough, however, of General
Grant in the Cabinet to satisfy us that, as in
the field, tenacity to his fixed purpose is his
great distinguishing quality. That strong
common sense, that clear insight into the
characters of men and into the weak points
of the Rebellion, whioh marked his prosecu
tion of the war are manifest in his conduct
of the Government. He has still a great
purpose to accomplish and his own plans
for reaching' it, and must have his
own men about him. In this view
the removal of Minister Motley, the ap
pointment of Mr. Murphy as Collector of
this port and the removal of certain officials
who were the followers of Carl Bhurz in Mis
souri, bignify that as the head of the Republi
can party General Grant does not intend to
be the mere servant of Senator Sumner. Sena
tor Fenton, Senator Shurz or any other
would-be party dictator. In a word, General
Grant intends himself to be master of the
situation, and as no Republican competitor is
though of to dispute nis claims to the suc
cession, the party, to save itself, will stick to
Grant and silence the factioniats till his re
election is secured; but then will begin in
- earnest the plots and counterplots of the
aspiring leaders of tho party for the inside
track.
Against General Grant in 1872 the prospect
of a Democratio victory is very slim. In the
chapter of accidents the chances may be im
proved; but from ail the facts and signs
before us Grant is good for another term
against any Democratic competitor. With
Kew York to build upon, however, the Demo
cracy have a foundation upon which they may
raise the overtopping party in 187C. Tam
many, with "the almighty dollar," has secured
and is sure of holding New York. Money con
quers everything. The coalition of the Tam
many ring and the Erie ring is irro sistible
in the State, and the Democratio managers
here have only to put their heads together
and make a joint stock alliance of
all the great railway and telegraph in
terests of the county in order to gain the
White House. The New York Central and the
Erie are in Democratio hands, and they, to
gether with Tammany, are masters of New
York. The Pennsylvania Central and its ap
pendages are in Republican hands, and Penn
sylvania is Republican. The Baltimore and
Ohio Railway Company arej Democratic, and
bo goes Maryland. The great Pacific road is
under Republican management, and it is
building up Republican States and Territories
from Nebraska and Kansas to the Pacific,
lint still, with New York as their base of
operations, Jay Gould and Yanderbilt may
form of all our great railway and telegraph
companies a Democratic coalition for the
Presidency which will be hard to beat in
1872, and completely victorious in 187(i. If
Congress does not assume the control of these
railways this is the way whereby these
railways may get the control of President and
Congress.
The Democratic party, it may be said, is
opposed to all monopolies. Gammon. Mark
bow it has flourished in Jersey under Camden
and Amboy, and how it now nourishes in
New York under Tammany, Erie, aud the
Central. Money is king. It was money
even when it said "Cotton is king." The
Southern cotton monopoly and oligarchy,
through their money, ruled the Democratio
party and the country, with only a break or
two, from Jackson to Buchanan. Andy
Johnson has declared that in the national
bondholders a Northern has tiken the place
of the old Southern oligarchy. But the
bondholders are, many of them, Demosrats,
although "Old Buck" wouldn't invest a dol
lar in our government securities. Still the
national bondholders are a power in the land,
but they are as nothing compared with the
power of our great railway corporations,
ilere in New York the Democrats have a
nucleus and a base of operations from which
they may secure a joint stock political coali
tion of all the great railway lines aud tele
graphs in the United States and sweep the
country.
Tammany Hall understands the secret of
its strength, the secret whioh has raised "the
Boss" from a chair mender to a millionaire
and the New York Democracy from "the
Slough of Despond" to the "Delectable
Mountains" from which they can see the
Promised Land. The same system of Demo
cratic management and power will apply as
well to other States as to New York. It is
"the almighty dollar" that does the business.
A general course of opposition to tho alleged
abuses and the financial measures of the
party in power is alow work. The Demo
cratio manageis, in a great allianoe of power
ful corporations and monopolies," can fight
the enemy with their own weapons, and upon
this plan of operations their success in New
Y'ork gives the key to success throughout the
Union. Principles in the shape of abstrac
tions are good in their way, but the seven
Democratio principles of John Randolph,
"the five loaves and two fishes," or, in other
words, the substantial principles of "the
almlgbty'dellar," are the prinoiples that will
carry the Democracy to Washington.
TTIE UNDER-TOW IN ENGLAND.
From the N. F. World.
The bold and earnest sermon on the fall of
the Papacy preached by Archbishop Manning
in the pro-Cathedral church of his province
will have been read with deep interest by
thousands of educated Americans. There
comes to ns in our special telegraphic des
patches from London a striking a ad most
significant commentary upon one of its most
striking and significant passages. In speak
ing of the rellex aotion which he believes
the overthrow of the temporal power of the
Pope will have upon all established
order in Europe, Archbishop Manning said:
"Englishmen believe England to be well
governed: let them look to the classes
below those that have anything to lose." The
scenes in London streets, as faithfully re
ported in the special telegrams of the IVorW,
may well fix these words of the great Roman
Catholic prelate upon the minds of all English
men who "have anything to lose." We do
not agree with the Archbishop either in his
belief that the overthrow of the temporal
power of the Papacy is really a wrong done
to religion, or in his anticipation of damage
both to religion and to society from the reflex
consequences which he looks to see resulting
from that overthrow in the social and political
system of monarchical Europe. But nothing,
in our judgment, can be more Bound than his
inference from the events which have actually
occurred in Rome to the events which
he holds to be preparing throughout Europe
and in England. The Archbishop stands
among the purblind political leaders and senti
mental liberals of England (neither of them,
be it said, a class without its
congeners in America), like Mr. Dis
raeli's Cardinal Grandison among
the half-hearted aad near-sighted
peers and palaverers grouped about him in
that extraordinary novel of "Lothair," which
is less a novel than an apocalypse of the
actual English society of our day. The
classes in England which "have anything to
lose" cling passionately to the false prophets
who, in the Times and in Parliament, per
petually prophesy unto them "smooththings."
For them the house of Ucalegon burns un
heeded, bo angry is their anxiety as to the
fire-worthiness of their own comfortable four
walls. For them the tide of risingrevolution
moans and surges, as afar off, beyond what
they furiously insist upon being assured are
the impregnable sea-walls of their own decay
ing political institutions. The people below
those who "have anything to lose" have
other eyes and other ears. They are begin
ning to recognize a nearer kinship with them
selves in the disinherited millions of the Con
tinentthanin the fortunate thousands of
their own land. When this recognition, now
in its dim dawning, betrayed by scenes such
aB London lately saw, gets up to noon,
the Archbishop's words of warning will recur
as words of prophecy, we fancy, to many
upon whom they will fall idly and disregarded
now.
A contrast more complete than exists be
tween the point of view from which English
life and English politics are seen by the Ca
tholic Archbishop of Westminster and the
point of view from which they are seen by
the ultra-Protestant Earl of Shaftesbury, it
would not be easy to imagine. Y'et how
striking is the coincidence between the fore
shadowings of the eloquent preacher at Ken
sington and these words, recorded by the
1'acl Mall Gazette as having been uttered by
the favorite peer of Exeter Hall in August of
the current year:
Lord Shaftesbury, speaking at Ejcle on Friday on
behalf of the Loudon City Mission, said that he
believed that the next census would snow a popula
tion In London of 4, 000, (too, a serious proportion of
iv horn were in a state of moral aud social degrada
tion so great that, In his opinion, unless something
were done to improve them, theBntlsa Constitution
would not be worth a quarter of a century' pur
chase. His lordship thought that most of the evil
was attributable to the fact that all who could afford
H lived out of town, away from their poorer neigh
bors. The ignorunce and poverty of the large
masses of the people io the metropolis exceeded
anithlng that could be described. When times of
trouble come and they would come the lawless
classes would emerge from their doora by thousands,
and they might depend upon It that, unless the mass
of people were brought under the influence of the
Oosnel, the great city of London would some day
present a spectacle of conflagration, plunder, nd
bloodshed that would astonish the civilized world."
RETIRED NAVAL OFFICERS.
From tlte A'. 1'. Times.
The present system of retiring officers of
the navy is complained of by them as work
ing injustice to very many who deserve some
thing better of their country. If an officer
becomes disabled in battle or by siokness
while on service, it seems very proper that
he should be relieved from the performance
of duties for which he is physically unfit, and
that bis pay should, in that case, be propor
tionately reduced. Some such system of re
tirement or pensioning ia practised in every
civilized country which maintains a national
armament. Very often these retired officers
are able to engage in civil pursuits, and thus,
with the aid of their allowance, acquire a very
co f or table living. This, however, can only
occur when officers are comparatively young,
for when they have passed the meridian of
life, and are upon its decline, it is not often
possible for them to enter upon any new
avocation. The service has then taken their
best years, and while effectually dispensed
with as far as their former occupation is con
cerned, they cannot hope to adopt a sub
stitute. But officsrs may become superannuated,
and be fit subjects for retirement on acoount
of age, as well as because of physical disa
bility. In the army they may be retired upon
their, own application after forty or more
consecutive years of service, or can be sent
before a retiring board for examination
whenever the War Department may so order.
There is no great injustice about that, but
in the navy, when tho name of an officer has
been borne on tho register for forty-five
years, or when he attains to the age of sixty
two, he is retired whether he be physically
and mentally vigorous or not. According
to this plan, therefore, length of
serviee, instead of conferring honor, car
ries with it practically a punishment in the
shape of enforced retirement and reduced
pay. The injustice of such a rule miwt be
manifest to the least professional reader. Age
is no criterion as to a man's physical and in
tellectual vigor. Many are as capable at
sixty-two as others are at forty-five, and the
only just way of determining whether an
officer should be retired is to have him ex
amined by a suitable board. Hid Admiral
Farragut been placed on the retired list when
he was sixty-two, the country wonld have lost
a most valuable part of bis protracted service,
for be was over sixty-one when he led the
expedition which captured New Or
leans. Bo, too, veterans who are
conducting the Prussian campaign
against the French give indisputable evidence
of the vigor and efficiency of men whoso
years border closely on the three score and
ten limit. King William is over seventy,
Von Moltke and Von Roon have nearly at
tained that age, while Marshals- Bazaine,
MacMahon, and Canrobert, on the Frenoh
Bide, are all over sixty. In our naval service
every old naval officer with a family to sup
port must look with considerable apprehen
sion at the approach of his sixty-second year,
knowing as he does that it will bring with it
reduced instead of increased pay, aud retire
ment instead of continued honor and use
fulness. Recent acts, also, have rendered the status
of retiring officers less agreeable than ever
before. Formerly they might be detailed to
command shore stations, and they have even
been sent to sea in command of squadrons,
receiving while in the performance of such
duty the full pay and allowances of their
rank. Four years ago one of our squt4rons
was commanded by an Admiral who had been
retired on account of age, but still fulfilled
the duties of his position in every particular.
The rule is now that retired officers shall not
be called upon to perform any active duty.
They must, therefore, be content to practi
cally abandon the service to whioh they are
still attached. In death, perhaps, they may
hare a naval funeral; but having grown old
and grey-headed in their country's service,
they must in life submit to be laid aside. If
officers become incapable of duty from any
cause, they must expect to be retired, bat it
is gross injustice to a deserving class of pub
lio servants to force them into private life
only because they have happened to live
longer than the majority of their professional
associates.
THE POETRY OF THE WAR.
From th A'. 1'. Tribune.
Victor Hugo's first letter having drawn, as
he states, replies from ten thousand Prussians
in two days' time (a feat of postal servioe
which we commend to the attention of Mr.
Creswell), he is now at ease, delightedly pelt
ing , all Paris with epistles. His friend and
brother Bombastes Swinburne, on the other
side of the channel, not to be outdone,
wreaks his aillatus on unhappy France in an
ode. There is the prerogative of your lite
rary man. The tragedies that wring the
hearts of nations are so much ''stock" for
him. He coolly hales them into his shop,
and turns you off a neat little job at an hour's
notice, and so much a line.
We protest. As Hugo and Swinburne nod
at each ether, and pish and pash with letter
and ode over bleeding France, we see again
Betsey Prig and the immortal Saircy hobnob
bing over the dying patient, and compound
ing a salad out of stale garden stuff and a
dash of liquor. This last collection of stro
phes, antistrophes, and epodes of which Swin
burne has now made a bouquet and presented
"a Victor Hugo" strongly resembles that
"expansive vegetable which unfolded into an
umbrella, yet which Betsey could dispose of
in her pocket." Considered as to intention,
its proportions are vast; but when you look
for sense, it dwindles and becomes infinitesi
mal. It is worth attention, however, as
Swinburne is the poetical exponent of Young
England, and this ode, we are tol l, "embo
dies its highest ideal of lyric genius." There
is the usual magnificent flow of faultless
rhythm, the usual crash and gutter of
"days shod with flame," "thunders standing
astounded," "ravening hours," aud "god
effused," and gods, in short, in as uiiuy
postures as a circus troupe. But behind these
we are only able to discover one distinct idea
a figure that seems to tantalize tho poet very
much as that remarkable Cheshire cat did
Alice in Wonderland, that "perpetually van
ished, until nothing but a grin was left sus
pended in air." Mr. Swinburne's mysterious
presence appears to consist principally
of a brow. With regard to this brow
we are kept in constant anxiety. It
moves in the rod dawn, it walks,
it has feet and lips, and not only beautiful
brief tears on top of its eyelids, but kueos
which goes to prove what a brow is capable
of when left to its resources. WUh regard,
however, to its moral character, Mr. Swin
burne seems himself to be in doubt. On one
line he informs us it is a "mother mauy
wounded," and on the next a "bride;" finally
he accuses it of murderous proclivities
"Thine own soul hast thou slain and burnt
away, dissolving it with poison into foul
thin fume." Supposing its aoul thus com
fortably disposed of, imagine our amazement
to learn further on that this Brow itself is
the Brow's "own soul's buried head, with the
deadly wounds tho poison left upon her."
But what is our surprise to that of a Brow,
who, having first slain and then burnt up and
afterwards poisoned and dissolved into fume
its soul, finds that soul's head coming back
burned and with poison wounds (whatever
they may be) upon her, and not only coming
back but disclosing the bewildering fact that
that Brow's soul's head is the Brow jer se.
No wonder it demands in perplexity. "How
'shall her weak hands hold up my weak hands
to fight?" How indeed?
There are other abnormal curiosities in this
remarkable poem iron shafts that discharge
waves, forts with blood foundations, seals
that can tether cattle, etc., etc. What con
nection the whole matter has with France we
hope to hear explained when M. Hugo ful
minates his inevitable letter of thanks. There
are, we are happy to say, but few references
to the peculiarly rank class of subjects which
Mr. Swinburne usually delights to gloat over
in detail, and which are ordinarily supposed
to pertain especially to Sairey Gamp's and
Betsey Prig's profession, although those
ladies are decent enough to shut the doors
when they discuss them. Mr. Swinburne has
probably taken a late hint from them.
It is curious to note how little genuine
poetry ever grows out of any war. The few
true utterances which remain after our own
contest are singularly disproportioned to the
vast questions and terrible passions involved.
The noble thoughts astir among men seem
then to find voice in deeds, and there are
none left to spare for the song-mongers.
Consequently we have to content ourselves
with such trumpet-blasts as this, deafening us
with Eonnd and fury, but assuredly signifying
nothing.
SPECIAL. NOTICES.
HARPER'S IIAIK DYE. TUB ONLY
harmless and reliable Dye known. Tnls splen
did Hair Dye Is perfect. Changes red, rusty, or grey
hair, whiskers, or moustache lustautly to a glossy
black or natural brown, without Injuring the hair or
staining the skin, leavfhg the hair soft and beauti
ful. Only to ceuu lor a large box. C'ALLENDKR.
THIRD and WALNUT; JOHNSON, HOLLOWAV
ACOWDKN, No 608 AHOU Street: THEN WITH.
IN o. 61 4 1 H KS N UT btreet ; V A R N E LL, F I FT K KN T II
and MA ivKKT Btreets: BROWN, FIFTH aud
CHESMJT Streets, and all Druggists. 5 81tf4p
y- MANHOOD AND YOl'THFUL vTliOU
are regained Jbj Hklmbolu Extkact
Crciic. lOHw
8PEOIAL NOTICES.
Baf TUB ORE AT WHISKY ESTABLISH
MRNT OK THIS CITY. H. M. DALY'S
prrRt whisky war room are located at No. m South
NRONT Street and No. 13 DOCK Street. The
building, which Is probably the largest of Its kind In
the United States, Is five ptories high, and runs
through from Front to Dock street, a distance of at
least Hi 5 feet. Whiskies of the rarest and purest
brands are stored on every floor of this huge struc
ture, and the seeker after the genuine article can
there find Bourbon of old date, wheat ditto, and that
champion of all whiskies, the Golden Wedding. It
U of some importance to the liquor merchants of thla
and other cities to know that Mr. Daly's stork em
braces the productions of the celebrated dis
tilleries belonging to Thomas Moore fc Son,
Joseph 8. Finch It Co., and Thomas
Moore. Their whiskies are always made from
the beat grains, double copper distilled and put
np In if aaoned, heavily-charred, Iron-bound barrels.
As agent, then-fore, or these well-known firms, Mr.
Daly Justly claims that he Can supply the trade with
the finest whisky in the market, and In the original
rttrkaprt as received direct from the manufaeturera.
This tie will vouch for. and this Is a point which de
ervea the notice Of all purchasers. 9 lstnthsaet
jtjST FOR NON-RETENTION OR 1NCOKTI
nence of Urine, Irritation, Inflammation, or
ulceration of the bladder or kidneys, diseases ol the
prostate glands, stone la the bladder, calculus,
gravel or brick dust deposits, and all diseases of the
bladder, kidneys, and dropsical swellings, Ua
liBi.MBoi.D'a Fi.np Extract Buchp. 10 1 7iv
gy BARGAINS IN WORKED SLIPPERS.
We offer to tho ladles a large lot of Worked
Slippers, In raised work and worked on toes, at very
low prices.
One lot at CO cents.
One lot at 78 cents.
One lot at ft -83.
One lot at 1 to.
One lot at W5.
One lot at $2. .
Regular stock of Sofa Pillows, Pln-CushioHs, and
Embroidered Slippers, at low price.
Best Zephyr, sold full weight.
Best American Zephyrs 15 cents.
Stocking Yarns, Wool, and Cotton.
Silk and Jet Buttons. - 9 83 tuths lm
Gimps and Fringe. RAPSON'S,
N. W. cor. EIGHTH and CHERRY 8treeta.
Improved Rosa Wash cores delicate disorders
In all their stages, at little expense, little or no
mange in atet, no inconvenience, ana no exposure-
It Is pleasant in taste and odor. Immediate in its
action, and free from all Injurious proper-
ties. iu l iw
gr- OFFICE OF THE PHILADELPHIA AND
TRENTON RAILROAD COMPANY, No. 824
S. DELAWARE Avenue.
Philadelphia, October 8, 1870.
A special meeting of the Stockholders of the
Philadelphia and Trenton Railroad Company will be
held at the office of the said Company, In the city of
Philadelphia, at 13 o'clock noon of TUESDAY,
October 85, 1S70, to take into consideration an ac
ceptance of an act of Assembly of the Common
wealth of Pennsylvania entitled "An Act to Entitle
the Stockholders of any Railroad Company Incorpo
rated by this Commonwealth, accepting this act, to
one vote for each share of stock," approved May 80,
1SCS; and also to take Into consideration an accep
tance of an act of the Commonwealth of Pennsyl
vania, entitled "An Act authorizing corporations to
Increase their bonded obligations and capital stock,"
approved December 80, is9.
By order of the Board of Directors of the Fhlladel
phla and Trenton Railroad Company.
F. H. WHITE, '
10 8 1st Assistant Secretary.
tffl- JOHN 8PARHAWK,
MERCANTILE COLLECTION AND LAW
AGENCY for Pennsylvania, the Western and South
ern States, No. 400 CHESNUT Street Commissioner
ror w estern states. s a ws cm
HELMBOLD'S EXTRACT BUCHD GIVES
health and vigor to the frame and blood to the
pania cneeK. uebiuty is accompanied dv manv
alarming symptoms, and If no treatment la sub-
nnueu io, consumption, insanity, or epileptic nts
ensue; iu l iw
e$? NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AN
application will be made at the next meeting
of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania lor the incorporation of a Bank, lu ac
cordauce with the laws of the Commonwealth, to be
entitled THE MARKET BANK, to be located at
Philadelphia, with a capital or nrty thousaud
dollars, with the right to increase the same to five
nunurea mousana aouars. i a s era
HELMBOLD'S FLUID EXTRACT BUCHU
" Is pleasant In taste and odor, free from all in
jurious properties, and immediate In Its
action. 10 1 7w
THE IMPERISHABLE PERFUME ! AS A
rule, the perfumes now In ubo have no perma
nency. An hour or two after their use there Is no
trace of perfume left. How different Is the result
succeeding the use of MURRAY A LAN MAN '8
FLORIDA WATER ! Days after its application the
nanaucrcmer exnaies a most aeiignuui, aeneate,
and agreeable fragrance. 3 1 tuths
gy TAKENOMORE UNPLEASANT-AND
nnsafe remedies for unpleasant and dangerous
diseases. Use Hblmbold's Extract Buciid and
Improvbd Rose Wash. 19 1 Tw
gge- NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AN
application will be n;ade at the next meeting
of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania for the Incorporation of a Bank, in ac
cordance with the laws of the Commonwealth, to be
entitled THE MANAYUNK BANK, to be located at
Philadelphia, with a capital of two hundred thou
sand dollars, with the right to increase the same to
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 7 8 sm
ENFEEBLED AND DELICATE CONSTI
tutions, of both Bexes, use Helmboi.d's Ex
tract Bicnc. It will give brisk and energetic feel
In gsandenableyoutosteepjve
gy- NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AN
application will be made at the next meeting of
the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania for the Incorporation of a Bank, In ac
cordance with the laws of the Commonwealth, to bo
entitled THE GEKMANTOWN HANKING COM
PAN Y, to be located at Philadelphia, with a capital
Of one hundred thousand dollars, with the right tj
Increase the same to live hundred thousand dollars.
gyp- THE UNION FIRE EXTINGUISUER
COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA
Manufactnre and Bell the Improved, Portable Fire
ExtlDguliher. Always Reliable.
D. T. QAQB,
6 80 tf No. 113 MARKET St., General Agent
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AXaF
plication will be made at the next ineettngrf
the General Assembly of tho Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania for the Incorporation, In accordance
with the laws of the Commonwealth, of the
SAVINGS AND DEPOSIT BANK OF MANA
YUNK, to be located In the Twenty-third ward of
Philadelphia, with a capltul of Ufty thousand dol
lars, with the right to Increase the same to 0110 hun
dred thousand dollars. T it sfiui
1Z2
TREGO'S TEABERRY TOOTH WASH.
It Is the most pleasant, cheapest and best dentifrice
extant Warranted free from Injurious ingredients.
It Preserves and Whitens the Tenth
Invigorates aud Soothes the Gums)
Purines and IVrf umes the Breath !
Prevents Accumulation ttf Tartar I
Cleanses aud Purines Artl Octal Teeth 1
Is a Superior Article for Children I
Sold bt all druggists and aentlsts. ,
A. M. WILSON, DrMiist, Proprietor,
8 8 lOrn Cor. NINTH AND P1LLSKT SU., Philada,
fcy- STEREOPTICON KNT SU TAIN M ENT5
given to Churches, Sunday-schools, Societies,
etc. etc. Having the largest assortment of Slides
in the cltv, I have unequalled facilities for giving
these delightful entertainments. Constantly re
ceiving new pictures.
Engagements may be now made by Inquiring of
W. MITCHELL MCALLISTER,
No. Via cujtSN UT street
9 83 thstulm
Second story.
TUB GLORY OF MAN IS STUENGTU
Therefore the nervous and debilitated
should Immediately use Hku4boi.d's jExtkact
Btcnu. iu 1 In
i3- HEADQUARTERS FOR EXTRACTING
Tib with freuh Kitrou-Oxid Uu Abaolattf.'y
bo pain. Dr. V. R. TUOMAS, fonuerlj operator at tt
Ooltoa Dental Room, devote bit eatira pmuliua to tt
painloM xUaotioa ol Uaib. Otto. No. kll WALNUT
Btrt. y
mf SHATTERED CONSTITUTIONS " RK
stored by Uklubold's Extbact Blvuu. ho l iw
OLOTHINO.
HO! FOR AN EIGHT DOLLAR SUIT.
$8
BETTER THAN THEY SELL ON MARKET
Street for IU. Really fins Fall and Winter Suit!
$8
Fit for the Finest Folks in Town !
Rfc
$8Bcl
ar ahead
Better than any offered elsewhere at 118!
W
are far ahead JQ
of all compel! J)0
Tea thousand of them ready!
tlon In the maun-C Q Going off rapidly!
facture of a Bup-)0
nor class of gentlemen's Q More being made 1
clothing at -the lowest 40
possible price. Ixng experl-C Q Beautiful In style !
ence, practical knowledge of 4) 0
the business, and a thorough cqualnt-( Q Flnelr
ance with the wants of the gcntlemenotrlmmed;
of Philadelphia and Its vicinity, have reMUlted toff O
placing the THE OK EAT BROWN HALL atJ0
the head of the reliable clothing trade of this city.
The whole comrau-CT STOUT AND STRONG!
nlty are invited to J
call and examine what we Q NOBBY !
offer. We can give you a J) 0
better article, In choice stj 1 c, and r O FINE!
at lower prices than those who are jQ
trying to imitate us. W have an eudiess variety
of Kali and Wliiter stock ready made, or ready,
to be made, to order, at prices which will make you
open your eyes.
603 and 605 CHESNUT STREET.
Ji4HESTNyTST.
I THE
HOTEL
KV- 'J
'PIULADCLPHIAiFA.
$15 We Have the
$15 Testimony of
$15 All
$15 That our FIFTEEN
$15 DOLLAR SUITS are
$15 worth THREED0LLA.RS
$15 More than any Others
OFFERED ELSEWHERE.
rea.xy-m:aie
CLOTHING,
Combining Style, Durability, and Excellence of
Workmanship,
JONES'
Ono-I l'ico
EST A BLIO H MEN T.
No. 604 MARKET STREET.
G E O. W. NIEMANN.
Handsome Garments made to order at the short
est notice. 10 3 tfrp
EXCELLENCE WITH ECONOMY.
GENUINE SCOTCH CHEVIOT
GENUINE SCOTCH CHEVIOT
GENUINE SCOTCH CHEVIOT
GENUINE SCOTCH CHEVIOT
GENUINE SCOTCH CHEVIOT
GENUINE SCOTCH CHEVIOT
$20-00 8UITS!!!
ISO-00 SUITS!!!
820 00 SUITS!!!
$00 SUITS!!!
120-00 SUITS!!!
. $20-00 SUITS!!!
JllAUr, -l't flir.ABl KB.
MADE TO MEASURE.
MADE TO MKASURB.
MADE TO MEASURE.
STYLE, FIT, AND WORK GUARANTEED.
evans & .i;ajii.
No. C23 MARKET STREET,"
0 17 BtuthSm PHILADELPHIA
WESTON & BROTHER,
TAILORS,
S. W. Corner NINTH and ARCH Sts ,
PHILADELPHIA.
A fall assortmect of ne most approved styles for
FALL AND WINTER WEAR,
JUST RECEIVED.
A SUPERIOR GARMENT AT A REASONABLE
PRICE. 916 3mrp
MILLINERY, TRIMMINCS, ETC.
Till .MISSUS
McVAUCH & DUNCAN,
No. IU SOUTH ELEVENTH STREET1,
Have opened their Fall Assortment of
FRENCH CAPS
FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN.
REAL AND IMITATION LACES.
H&NDERCaiKKS IN VARIETY.
OLI.ARS AND CUFFS IN L1NBN AND LACE
DCCHESSB AND VAL. LACS SETS.
FRENCH WORKED AND LINEN CHKMMETES.
NEW STYLES IN MADE-UP LA'JE CrOOOti.
NOVBLT1KS IN NECK. T14S AND HOWS.
LACE TIDIES, New Designs.
HAMBVRU EDGINGS AND INSEinTN'OS.
RIBBONS, FANS, AND FANC 1 ARl'IOi-EA
INFANTS' OUTFITS
On band and made to order. 1 IS 20tUsni3:n
M
R 8. It D
L L O N,
NOS. 323 AND 331 SOUTH STREET.
FANCY AND MOURNING MILLINERY, CRAPE
VEILS.
Ladles' and Misses' Crape, Felt, Gimp, nalr, Satin,
Silk, Straw and Velvets, Hats and Bonnets, French
Flowers, Hat and Bonnet Frames, Capes, Laces,
SiilF, Satins, Velvets, Ribbons, Sashes, ornaments
tnd all kinds of Milliner Goods. 1
C L O V E S E TO.
aBelle
BEST II 5 KID Q LOPE IN AMERICA.
Ever pun guaranteed, if the rip or tear, another
nalr given in exchange.
V . A. & J B. BARTHOLOMEW,
No, : North KK1HTH Street.
Bole Agency Wholesale and Retail, y 80 tatluJrs
Y
Clove
Kid
GROCERIES. ETO.
FittSH IMPORTED FRENCH GOOD
BON EL Ef 9 SARDINES,
NONPAR1IL CAPERS,
PEAS, MUSHROOK
PRE "ARID MUSTARD AND TRUFFLES,
JAMEO R. WEBB'S,
B. E. Corner WALNUT and EIGHT!
8 81 Btuth3mrp
PHILADELPHIA.
NEW 1870 SPICED SALMO
IN LARGE CANS AT $1-60 PER CAN.
WHITE BRANDT FOR PRESERVING
PURE SPICES, ETO.
COUSTY'S East End Grocer
No. 118 South ECOni St.,
IMthata 8ILOW OHMNUT STRKKT:
CHOICE NEW BUCEWHEAi
Just Received.
ALBERT O. ROBERTS,
Dlr la Flo Groesrita,
11 7 Corner KLSVKNTU and VUIB StrMta-
OARPETINQS.
34 SOUTH SECOND STREET. 3
CARPETINGS.
HAVING REMOVED TO OUR NEW STORE, iH
are offering superior inducements In
Carpet, Oil Cloths, IVIuttinffJ
Window Shades Drnsaets,
ETC. ETC.
At the lowest Cash Prices.
G. B. SNYDER & CO.,
No. 34 SOUTH SECOND STREET ,
West Side, below Martet. 9 24 stuthlm!
(Formerly Shapless', latterly Snodgraaa' Old Stand,
723 CABPETINGS. 72!
PCADODY A WESTON.
Successors to
E. ZX. GODSXXALS dc CO.,
No. 723 CHESNUT StreetJ
ARE OFFERING THEIR FALL IMPORTATIONS
or
Eoffllah Ilody llrnssels,
Crosaley'a Tapestry llrusselsj
3-PJys Ingrains,
Venetian Stairs, Oil Cloths,
Mats, Rugs, IVIattlntr, Etc. Etc J
At Moderate Prices.
We are oAVring a large line of CROSSLEY'8 ENG.
1 J It 11 TArESTKl BRUSSELS, AT LOW PRICES,
at me uui b x ain u.
PEACODY & WESTON,
No. 723 CnESNUT STREET,
9 10 smw3mrp PHILADELPHIA,
PLATED WARE.
MEAD k BOBBINS,
MANUFACTURERS OF
SILVER-PLATED WARE,
Hard Metal (Nickel Silrer),
Have now the largest and most attractive stock of
Silver Hated Goods that they have evir offered la
New and Elegant Designs.
All descriptions of Sllver-Plated Ware constantljC
on nana, suuaoie ior
WEDDING PRESENTS.
Tea Sets a a Low as S20.
N. E. Cor. NINTH and CHESNUT,
10 8stuth3m PHILADELPHIA.
OARRi AC E "sTeTOT
1870. FALL.1h70,
WM. D. ROGERS,
CAIUIIACE BUILD Ell.
Phaefoiis, Drags and Light Wagons A
V0B
UOAl A!l 1A1II DltlVnU,
Of Superior Finish and A'ewest Styles,
Built to order and for sale.
Manufactory and Iteposltory,
Not. 1009 and 1011 CHESS UT Street,
9 8 thstu2mrp PHILADELPHIA.
COAL.
COAL 1'fclt TON OF S'i40 I.BS. DELIVERED,
LEll'UH. Furnace, f77fi; Ktove, fcs-ot; Nut,
;00; bl Hl 'VLKlI.I.. Furnace, 16-75; Stove, $7-00;
Nut, 5 7B; SUAMOK1X, Grate, f t'25; btove, IT-SHj
Nut, St! W.
EA8TWICK A BROTHER.
Yerd, No. aK WASHINGTON Avenue. Oitlte, No.
I jws IKX'K Street, 8 JiSrp tf
R
MTU fc KM 121 Ac 91 AN.1.1 i,
l.t:illGII AND H( llTVMvll.I. CU IU
D(p.t N. E. Corner NINTH and PIASTER,
OilUts,
13 South THIRD Street,
SANSOM
1) 11 U

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