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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, February 02, 1871, FOURTH EDITION, Image 4

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TIIE DAILY EVENING TELKGIIAPII PHILADELPHIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1871.
PUBHOnKD EVEKY AFTERNOON
(SUNDAYS XCRPTKD'),
4.T THE EVENING TELEGKAPH BUILDING,
NO. 108 8. THIRD 8TKEKT,
PHILADELPHIA.
The Price I three cents per copy double sheet),
or eighteen cents per week, payable to the carrier
by tohotn served. Tlie subscription price by ma il
it A'ine Dollari per annum, or One Dollar and
Fifty Cent for (too month, invaria'ily in
advance for the time ordered.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1871.
TI1ENE W HE VENUE DISTRICTS.
At the last session of Congress a law was
passed authorizing tbo President to consoli
date contiguous revenue districts at his dis
cretion, as it might appear expedient. This
was a measure of reform, and its purpose was
to cat down the immense for jg of revenue offi
cers who are now living on the publio treasury,
and thus effect a material reduction in the
expenses of the Government. It is scarcely
necessary to state that the execution of this
law has been strongly resisted by the vast
army of collectors and assessors who are under
the direction of the Internal Kevenue Bureau,
and all sorts of gerrymandering has been re
sorted for the purpose of retaining certain
individuals in office who would otherwise be
obliged to earn their bread and butter in
Some other fashion. It is not too much to
say that the income tax has been continued
mainly for the benefit of the internal revenue
officers, and that the same influences that
Lave been exerted to burden the people with
an unnecessary and inquisitorial tax have
prevented in many instances the law autho
rizing the consolidation of the internal reve
nue districts from being carried into effect as
it should have been. The manner in which
the consolidation of the districts in this city
has been managed is an example in point, and
is highly suggestive of the influences, the
reverse of economical, that control in many
important particulars the actions of the ad
ministration. It was at first proposed to consolidate the
First and Third and the Second and Fourth
districts. By this arrangement one-half of
the revenue officers in this city would have
been retired to private life, perhaps to their
immediate disadvantage, but certainly not to
that of the public Under date of January
21, Commissioner Tleasanton wrote to Mr.
W. S. Stokloy, Assessor of the old Second
district, informing him of this arrangement,
and notifying him that the exigencies of
tho situation required' bis retirement from
the internal revenue service. General Plea
santon bore testimony to Mr. Stokley's faith
fulness and efficiency as an officer, and re
gretted the neoessity that existed for his exit
from office. Mr. Stokley, for his part, ap
pears not to have admired the arrangement
in the least, and he has succeeded
in pleading his case with such effect at
Washington that we are now informed that
the President, having reconsidered his first
arrangement, has concluded to consolidate
the First and Third districts and to permit
the Second and Fourth to remain as they are.
Tho impropriety of this arrangement will be
apparent from an inspection of the following
faots and figures: During the year 1870 the
infernal revenue from the First district
amounted to $2,910,305-47, and from the
Third, $818,003-75, which would make the
amount for the new First district $3,731,-309-22.
In the Second district the amount
collected was $ 1 , 7 14, G90 "CO, and in the Fourth
$1,401,737-00. The total of tho two amounted
to $3,11G,427-(JG, or considerably less than
that belonging to the consolidated First dis
trict. The tax on gross receipts has been
abolished, and the income tax is likely to be,
so if we deduct what they realized last
year, under the presumption that the
internal revenue for the cuirent year
will be about the same as it was
in 1870, the great impropriety of the actios of
the President will be more than ever appa.
rent. In the First and Third districts last
year the tax on gross reoeipts and incomes
amounted to $909,000, which leaves"$2,770,
80922 as the receipts from other sources.
Tn the Second district the tax on gross re
ceipts and incomes realized $911,000, which
leaves the sum of $803,090 as the receipts
from other sources. In the Fourth district
the tax on gross reoeipts and inoomcs
amounted to $073,000, which leaves $728,737
as the receipts from other sources. The in
ternal revenue taxes in the Second and Fourth
districts, less those on gross receipts and in
comes, amounted to $1,532,327, or only a little
more than one-half of what was collected in
the consolidated First distriot.
That this arrangement is a great wrong to
the overburdened tax-payers i.-j apparent at a
glance, as is also its why and wherefore. Mr.
W. 8. Stokley desired to retain his position
as Assessor of the Second llevenue district,
and he had sufficient influence at Washington
to induce the President not to carry out his
original plan of consolidation. In other
words, the Second and Fourth districts, with
all their officers, are to remain as they are,
although if united tbey would only do about
half the business of tho new First distriot, in
order that Mr. Stokley may be ablo to draw a
good salary from the United States Trea
sury. President Grant commenced his admin
istration with many promises of eoonomy, and
bis reputation as President rests pretty much
on what he has done in that direction, but if
be does not do better with the other revenue
districts of the country than he has with those
of this city, the people will begin to lose
faith even in his economical principles. We
lave no doubt but that the President had a
vague idea that by retaining Mr. Stokley in
offioe he would in some manner, benefit the
Republican party in Pennsylvania, but
we ean assure him that in this he
has made a very great mistake. It
is possible that Mr. Stokley might do some
good service about election times, but the
Republican party will be stronger if it can
point to aotual reforms effected by Presi
dent Grant's administration than it will be
if it is forced to rely npon the electioneering
talents of certain Federal office-holders; and
the President commits a grievous blunder
when he refuses to effeot a reform that will
save thousands of dollars to the Government
for the nake of Rtrenglhening the party by
keeping certain individnals in office when
their services might easily be dispensed with.
WOMAN tiUFFllAGfl.
Tin: most imposing demonstration yet made
in the country in favor of female suffrage is
the movement which has culminated in the
minority report of the House Judiciary Com
mittee, advocating the broad doctrine that
women have a right to vote by the common
law of England, and furthermore that "this
right is included in the privileges of citizens
of the United States, which are guaranteed
by seotion 1 of article 14 of the amendments
to the Constitution of the United States, and
that female citizens, who are otherwise clas
sified by the laws of the States where they
reside, are competent voters for representa
tives in Congress." It is true that a majority
of the House Judiciary Committee unequivo
cally condemned this doctrine, but the fact
that a minority, consisting of burly Ben
Butler and Representative Loughridge, have
favored it, is no small feather in the eap of
the female suffragists. They have tricked
out their hobby in a semi-offioial dress at
last, and they will now ride it harder than
ever. We do not know thit General B a tier
has been a special favorite with the ladies
heretofore, as it is quite certain that Socesh
damsels have not admired him overmuch, but
he has now established such an irresist
ible claim to the gratitude of the strong
minded portion of the weaker sex, that if they
do acquire the right to vote he will be enti
tled above all other men to their suffrages
when he runs as a candidate for President.
Ben always did keep a sharp eye open for the
main chance, and a controlling influence over
half the votes of America is well worth look
ing after. Even the colored vote will be cast
into the shade by the proposed now consti
tuency; and the only thing left now as a
novelty is a soheme for making voters out of
the school children and the babes in arms.
The virtuous Josephs was severe on the
newspapers yesterday in a reference he made
to the Bteamship company bill. With lofty
dignity he declared that the newspapers were
wrong in censuring members for refusing to
pass the bill under a suspension of the rules,
and that if the newspapers wished business to
be done in this hasty manner, he could not
agree with them. It is astonishing how ab
solutely Spartan the virtue of Josephs is,
considering that his reformation is so recent.
At the last session he was somewhat noted
for doing a largo amount of business in just
the very Btyle he now condemns with such
lofty scorn. Circumstances alter cases, and
it just so happened that the particular bill
under consideration was likely to be made the
object of "tricks that are vain" by the
Josephs of tho Legislature in case it was re
ferred to committee, and as there was' no
good and sufficient reason why it ought not
to pass without controversy, the newspapers
of Philadelphia advocated it as a great
publio measure in which every citizen of
Pennsylvania had an interest. If it had been
some little matter about salting the tracks,
there would have been no great effort made
to refer it; and if the virtue of Josephs
would not permit him to vote for it, ho pro
bably would just step out for a moment "to
see a man," and thus avoid the neeessity of
opposing it. The virtue of our friend J osephs
can hardly be considered a first-class article;
but then it is necessary to remember that he
is a beginner, and it is scarcely possible for
us to expect him to reach perfection until he
has had more praotioe in playing the role of
an immaculate legislator.
The loweb branch of the State Legislature
yesterday unanimously agreed to the appoint
ment of a committee of six to superintend
the printing of the wrappers for the Legisla
tive Reoord. When the proposition was first
made it was objected to as too small a matter
for legislative supervision, but it turned out,
on inquiry, that $13,888-00 had been paid
for printing these wrappers in 1808, and
$12,083 in 1809; that is to say, the State has
been taxed about one hundred dollars for the
wrappers used by each member of the House
and Senate in sending Legislative Records to
his constituents. The trae value of the paper
and printing actually consumed for this pur
pose would be muoh more nearly represented
by an allowance of one hundred cents
for each member than one hundred
dollars, and tho extra ninety-nine dollars is
made np mainly of pickings and stealings.
Really, this is too heavy a percentage even for
HarriBburg thieves ! They ought to be satis
fied with charging the State ten dollars for
what costs them one, and some people would
even be satisfied with a bare profit of "one
hundred per cent., and we are not astonished
that a charge of one dollar for what costs
about a cent has at last shocked even the dull
legislative sense of justice and propriety.
However, while Bergner continues to flourish
at the State capital what can the people
expect ?
Congress yesterday agreed to modify the
test oath so as to let up on the Rebels. Since
the iron-clad guarantee against treason has
thus been destroyed, it would be well to have
additional guarantees against dishonesty and
peculation creatod. Let each member swear,
for instance, that he never ha's connived at,
and never will connive at, a swindling mis
appropriation of the publio money, and let
him be punished for perjury by imprison
ment, if it can be shown before a proper
court that this oath has been violated. The
people need at this moment, above all other
things, better protection against robbery by
their servants in Congress and in executive
offices of various descriptions; and if any
form of oath can promote this desirable end,
it cannot too speedily be devised. We are
safe enough against treason, for a time at
least, but in perpetual danger of unnecessary
taxation. ,
It ArrFAns by the report of the Philadel
phia Gas Works IhRt it paid out about fdx
hundred thousand dollars last year as wages
to laborers, mechanics, men employed in
laying mains, inlaying pipe, netting meters,
etc, and to stokers and others employed in'
manufacturing gas. It would be curious to
know how much of thin money was used, in
cidentally, to reward layers of political pipe,
controllers of delegate elections and conven
tions, etc; but the Gas Trust is too close a
corporation to blab such secrets.
The Empbkss Euoenih disdainfully and
indignantly refuses to consent to the dis
memberment of France. We scarcely know
whether to laugh at her folly or to admire
her plucV; but it is quite certain that the
Germans will not take much pains to sooure
her ratification of a treaty which is at onoo
acceptable to them and endorsed by a French
National Assembly. Eugenie and her son
must take back seats, for tho present, with
the Bourbons and Orleaaiuts, for, in a
political sense, there are none left to do them
reverence.
Gamhetta still lives, if we may judge by
the proclamation he is said to have issued on
the 1st inst., calling upon the people of
France to continue the instruction of their
young troops and to resist a shameful peace.
If verbal appeals could have driven away the
stubborn Germans he would have Bent them
whirling back over the Rhine long ago; but
martial deeds, not words, are needed, and
nothing short of a miracle can now rescue
France from the unchallenged dominance of
the invader.
SINATOR HILL.
The Flrnt Krcoimtrnrted Henntor from (irnraia
lion. Joshua Hill, who was rjestcrday admit
ted to a scat in the Senate, after a loop- period
of tabulation, is a native of South Carolina,
and was born on January 10, 1313. Ia 1857 he
was elecUd a member of the House of Repre
sentatives from the Seventh district of Georgia,
by a majority of 275. lie was the candidate of
the 60-called American party, his
Democratic opponent being Linton Ste
phens, the brother of Alexander H.
Stephens. In 1859 he was re-elected, and during
his second term, which expired on March 4,
1801, served on the Committee on Foreign
Affairs. In January, 1801, ho withdrew from
the House with his colleagues, on the secession
of Georgia. He did not, however, take any
part in the Rebellion, but suffered during the
war a great deal of persecution on account of his
opposition to it, while el ill maintaining his
ground and refusing to leave his home. In
1800 he was appointed by President J ohm on to
the position of Collector of the Port of Savan
nah, for the acceptance of which he was thor
oughly abued by the unreconstructed Rebels.
On the 29th of July, 1808, he was elected to the
United States Senate lor the term ending March
4, 1873, his competitor being ex-Governor
Joseph Brown, and the vote standing
110 to 94. The action of the
Legislature 60on after, in oustiug tho colored
members, served to retard tho reconstruction
process, and Mr. Hill failed to obtain his seat
until yvstcrday", or more than two years and
a half after his election. When tho State was
taken in haHd by Congress, and again subjected
to the reconstruction process, the election
of Messrs. Hill and Miller to the Senate
was Ignored, and In February, 1870, another set
of Senators was elected, II. P. Farrow being
selected for the term for which Mr. Hill had
been elected. The Senate has, however, recog
nized the first election as valid, aud only refuses
Mr. Hill's colleague, Dr. II. V. Miller, a seat, be
cause his political disabilities have not been re
moved. Senator Hill will doubtless bo found
acting in harmony with the Republican ma
jority. OBITUARY.
ItfV. Thomas II. feklnoer, l. D., 1,1 II.
This distinguished Presbyterian divine died at his
residence In New York city yesterday, having nearly
completed his eightieth year. He was born near
Harvey's Neck, In North Carolina, In March, 1791 ;
graduated at Princeton College, New Jersey, In
1S09; and was licensed to preach the Gospel at Mor.
rlstown, N. J., on the 16th or December, lfiia. On
June 10, 1813, he was ordained and Installed pastor
of the Second Presbyterian Church of thi3 city, as
colleague to Dr. Janeway. In 1S16 his labors were
transferred to the Fifth Presbyterian Church of this
city, of which he remained pastor until 1339,
his labors in tho Philadelphia pulpit thus
extending ovef a period of nineteen years. During
this period, Dr. Skinner attalued great popularity,
and when ho left Philadelphia, In 1832, to become
Professor of Sacred Rhetoric In the Andover Theo
logical Seminary, he stood in the front rank of his
culling. In 1985 be resigned Ms professorship at
Andover to become pastor of the Mercer Street
Presbyterian Church, New York city, in the pulpit
of which he labored for fifteen years, with great
success. In 1S48 he resigned, and was appointed
Professor of Sacred Rhetoric, Pastoral Theology,
and Church Government In the Union Theological
Seminary, a position which he retained up to the
time or his death, "dying in the harness," as he
was accustomed to say was his desire. The Imme
diate cause of his death is said to have been a severe
cold, caught on the occasion of hla recent visit to
this city, to participate in the funeral services of the
late Rev. A lbert Barnes, his life-long friend, whose
Illustrious pastoral career commenced, like his own,
In Morrlstown, N. J.
Dr. Skinner was a profound theological scholar,
aRd contributed largely to the literature of the
Chnrch. His published works were "Religion of the
Bible;" "Aids to Preachlug and Hearing;" "Reli.
gious Liberty;" "Hints to Christians;" "Thoughts
on Evangelizlrg the World;" "Religious Life of
Francis Markoe;" "Vinet'g Pastoral Theology ad
Homlletics," which he translated and edited with
notes; "Discn salons In Theology;" and occasional
sermons. He received the degree of D. D. from
Williams College In 1826, and that of LL.D. from the
College at Marietta, Ohio, In is8.
llrv. Rlenxer T. I'ltcli, D. I).
This prominent divine died at New Haven on
Tuesday evening. He graduated at Yale College in
1810, and from '817 to 1858 was Professor of Divinity
In that Institution. Tho degree of D. D. was con
ferred npon bun by the University of Pennsylvania
iu 1S29.
NOTICES.
Tnn bist Clothino Made,
TUK UhfeT C1.0T1IIKO MADK,
Tue Bkt Clothing Madk,
IS
Wanamarrk Si Brown's.
Wanamakkra Bkown'm.
Wakauakkk a Uhowm's.
Tns Lowest Pricks
Tub Lowest Pkicks
TUKLOWKST PfclCKS
Oal Hall,
Oak Hall,
Oak Hall,
Thb Pbohlb's Popular CixvruiNO Houbk,
b. E. Coumkh Sixth am Makiit bTKKura.
lr tour TnitOAT is Soke, or you are annoyed by
a constant Conphf nse promotly Dr. Jaync's Ex
pectorant. It will relieve the air passages of all
phlegm or mucus, all y lnlUminUtin, and so giro
the diseased parts a chance to heal. No safer
rtmedy can be had for all Coughs and Cdlds, or aay
complaint of the Throat or Lungs, and If taken In
time a short trial will prove Its emcacy Sold everywhere.
WINES.
SHERRY WINE,
HIGH AND MEDIUM GHADE,
VERY CHOICE, FOR GENTLEMEN'S USE.
Also, our well-known Table Sherry,
In casks or 80 ga'lons, at i-59 per gallon, or 12 -75 by
the five-gaUon demijohn.
E. BRADFORD CLARKE,
(SUCCESSOR TO SIMON COLTON & CLARKE,)
S. W. Corner BROAD a.d WALNUT,
1 31 tuthstf4p PHILADELPHIA.
OLOTHINQ.
1X"H tSIVOAV TIME
BUT
IT'H NO TIME
To go without a supply of Good Winter Clothes.
It's a FINE TIME to go to ROCKHILL fc WfL
SONTS. The Winter Stock is going off oheap at ROCKHILL
& WILSON'S.
Improve the opportunity at ROCKHILL & WIL
SON'S. FINE CLOTHES for a trifle at ROCKHILL &
WILSON'S.
EXAMINE THE STOCK.
EX.ELLENT CLOTHES
NOW RUSHING OFF
C3EAP.
GREAT DROWN HAW,
G03 and 605 CHE3NTJT STREET.
ROCKHILL & WILSON.
J Qjf $94, -CHESTNUTST;
MERCHANT TAILORS
AND
Eealen io Ready. made Cloihlag.
CUSTOMER WORK
Done in the very best manner, at unusually low
prices, out of a tteck complete In every way,
and with
CUTTERS
Of acknowledged excellence and ability.
CLASS AND QUEBMSWAREi
& o o , o o o
WORTH OP
CHINA,OLASS and EARTHENWARE
IO BE CLOSED OUT, REGARDLESS OF COST.
Gay's China Palace,
No. 1012 CHESNUT STREET,
Are obliged to close out their immense stock, in con
btquence of the bulldiug they occupy having been
tolti. The entire stock mast be closed out by the 1st
of April, as they are obliged to vacate the premises
by that time. Below we quote prices of a few lead
ing staple goods. Fancy goods are at a still greater
dtticouut fiom former prices.
White French China Dining Sets, 12T pieces... 118-00
White French China Tea nets, 44 pieces 675
White French China Tea Seta, 40 pieces 6-75
S one China Dining Seta, 98 pieces 7-78
Stone China Tea beta (cups with handles) 44 ps 8 50
fctone China Tea bets (cups with handles) 40 ps 3 00
Sttne China Cups and Saucers,per Bet 12 pieces 50
Stone China Dining Plates, per dozen CO
Table Tumblers, per doeeu 50
Table Goblets, per dozen 75
Glass Tea Sew (4 articles) 49
Bohemian Cologne bets, 8 Bottles and Puff Box 90
Bohemian Liquor bets, a Ulasaes, Walter and
Bottle BO
An endless variety of Fancy Goods, at an Im
mense reduction from former prices.
86 capks of Parian Marble, Leek, and Majolica
Ware, all new designs, just landed from steamer
Helvetia, will be Included In the sale.
Goods to go out of the city will be packed and de
livered to transportation oince free of charge, and
InKurrd against breakage to destination.
fcHOW ROOMS OFKN TILL O'CLOCK AT
NIGHT.
STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE. 1 13 atuthlm
WATCHES. JEWELRY, ETQ.
KLW YORK WATCH COMPANY'S
WATCHES,
(Factory, Fprlngileld, Mass.)
In presenting their Watches to the American pub
llc.we dojo with the knowledge that in poluc or finish
and time-keeping qualKles they are superior for the
price to any Watch made In this country.
For sale by
ALEX. R. HARPER,
Successor to John M. Harper,
No. 308 CHESNUT KTIIEET,
SECOND STORY, 18 3 gairp
Salesroom of the American Watch.
BOARDING.
-MQ1 QIRARD 8TRBET, BETWEEN ELE
i 1 1 1 tenth and Twelfth and Uhesnat and Mar
ket streets. Vacancies for Families and Single Gen
tlemeo. Also, a suit of rooms on the second floor,
furnished or unfurnished, with flrst-claaa board.
Also, table board. 10 Mtf
V
ACANT, SECOND-STORY ROOM. WITH
lioard, at rtO. n oi uuva auoev. xmBuut
i'PHlLADELPHIA: PA
INSURANCE.
FIRE ASSOCIATION.
Incorporated March 27, 1820.
No. 34 N. FIFTH St.,
INSURES
Buildings,
Household Furniture and
Merchandise Generally
FKOM LOSS 15 Y Flit 12,
(Iu tte city of Philadelphia only).
Statement of the Assets of the Association January
1, 1871, published in conformity with the provisions
of an act of Assembly approved April 5, 1842:
Bonds and Mortgages on property In
the city of Philadelphia $1,550,967 S3
Ground Bents in the city or Philadel
phia S,990-83
Real Estate Office, No. 84 North Fifth
street 60,99 Wt
Furniture and Fixtures of Office 6,03it
United Mates 6-20 Registered Bonds... 45,000-00
Cash on hand 84,441-63
l,705,:il9 0r
Trustees.
WM. II. HAMILTON,
JOHN CAUROW,
GKOKGK I. YOUNU,
JOKPU R. LTNDALL,
LKVI V. COATS.
OIIAHLK8 P. BOWER,
.iit!sa uuaTFoor,
ROUBKT HHOKMAKHU.
PKTKK AKMUKUSTKK,
MAIIIvON H. DICKINSON
SAMUEL 8PAHHAWK.
l ETGft WILLIAMSON,
JOSEPH E. SOU ELL.
WM. H. HAMILTON",
PRESIDENT.
SAMUEL SRA1UIAWK.
VICE-PRESIDENT.
WM. T. BDTLElt.
1 31 tuthsSt 8ECHETART.
JEWELRY AND SILVERWARE.
MM. A. WIEDEKS111M
I Tills laj- Admitted
A PARTNER IN OUR FIRM
. BOBBINS. CLARK & BID OLE.
February 1, 1871.
2 1 wthsst
DRY GOODS.
1871:
"AT TH0R1S LEY'S,"
EIGHTH AND SPRING GAUD EN STS.
Having got through with our annual stock-taking,
we now open np a splendid stock of "BLACK
SILKS" very much under regular prices, and of
most EXBELLENT QUALITY.
Good Black Qros Grains for 11 -CO.
Rich black Qros Grains for $1 75.
Very Rich Beautiful 8ilks for 39-00.
Heavy, Smooth, Soft Flossr Bilk, 32 50.
Puhlime Quality Rich Lyons Fliks. S3 00.
Superb Black Silks. Queenly, 33-60.
Moat Magnificent Black Silks for 1 4 60.
We know that the above goods cannot be excelled
In the "UNITED STATES" for quality and cheap
ness. We also offer a full line of colors in
J3est Kid Gloves,
Every pair of which we warrant, and if through
any mishap they rip or tear In put lug on, we at onoe
give another pair instead.
JOSEPH H. TH0RDLEY,
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
EIGHTH and BPEINO OABDEff 8U,
8 8 thstnl
PHILADELPHIA.
Established In 1853.
727
CHESNUT STREET.
POPULAR PRICES
KOR
DRY GOO DR.
STRICTLY ONE PRICE.
727
ALEXANDER RICKEY,
3 10 tnths No. T27 CHESNUT Street
COTTON.
CAKLI8LE CO.'S
il 1
SILK FINISHED SPOOL COTTON,
FOR HAND AND M1CHINE SEWINQ.
WARRANTED 800 YARDS.
THE BEST TURKAD IN THE MARKET.
CALEO.J. MILNE,
SOLE AGENT,
No. 118 CHESNUT STREET,
1 80 6t4p PHILADELPHIA.
CTXlXaZIT'S
PLUM ULTRA
Minced Meat.
Unequalled for Quality.
CAUTION Be ware of all Imitations, a there
bat one W RIGHT in the market.
DEPOT,
SOUTHWEST CORNER
SPKINQ GARDEN and FBAVELIB
SOLD BY ALL GROCERS. 13 IS Urp
tWINQ MACHINES.
T " K
WHEELER & WILSON
ivwinu MAcnini:,
For Bale on Easy Terms.
NO. 14 CHESNUT STREET.
4 nwat rUILADKLPHIA.
PIANOS.
GEORGE STOCK A CO.'S
(fl PIANOS, ts3
GRAND, PQUARB AND UPRIGHT.
HAINESIBROS.' TIANO?,
BRADBURY'S PIA.NOS,
MASON AND HAMLIN'S .CABINET ORGANS,
An Elegant Btock at Greatly Reduced Prices.
GOULD & FISCHER,
No. 923 OnKSNUTStroet.
N-o. 1018 ARCH Street.
1 IT tf4p
J. K. OOOT.D.
WM. O. VIHCDBR.
STEINWAY & SONS'
Grand Square and Upright Pianos.
Special attention Is called to their ne
l'euenft Upright Pianos,
With Double Iron Frame, Patent Kenor.ator, Tubular
Metsl Frame Action, etc., which are matchlosa tn
Tone and Touoh, and unrivalled In durability.
I'lIAltlJUti III.AHIlJIf,
WAKEROOYS,
No. 1006 CHESNUT STREET,
IStfrp PHILADELPHIA.
HOLIDAY GOODS.
HOLIDAY GOODS.
Sprins; Horses,
Rocking Horcea,
Children's Carriages,
B0Y&' SLEDS, WAG0HP,
VELOCIPEDES, Etc Etc
H. J. 8HILL,
Factory, No. 226 DOCK Street,
P BELOW EXCHANGE.
FIRE; EXTINGUISHER.
THE UNION FlilE EXTINGUISHER.
OVER FIVE MILLIOU8 (15,000,000) OF DOLLARS
WORTH OF PROPEKTY IN THE UNITED
STATES HAS ACTUALLY BBEN
SAVED BT THE EXTIN
GUISHER Within the past three years; while la Philadelphia
alone twenty-live llres, endangering property to the
extent of HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF DOL
LARS, have been extinguished during tho past year
by theeame means. Our Machine is the IMPROVEO
CAKBONIO ACID OAS FIKE EXTINGUISHER,
and Is Indorsed and nsed by M. Uaird & Co., Henry
Dlseton & Son. Benjamin Uallock'a sons, Morris,
Tanker & Co., Alan Wrod i Co , Laoey & Phillips.
Bromlpy Brothers, 8. J. Solms, Charles Eneu, John
son &Co Rimby & Madeira, Francis Perot & Sons.
George W. ChUds, Pennslanla Railroad Company,
Philadelphia and Boston Steamship Company, Phila
delphia and fcouthern fcteamahlp Company, and
many other of onr leading business men and corpo
rations. CAUTION. All parlies In this community are
warned against buying or soiling "Extinguishers"
except those purchased from us or our agonu, under
penalty of immediate prosecution for infringement
Our prices have been reduced, and the Machine is
now within the reach of every property balder.
N. B One style made specially for private resi
dences. Union' Fire Extinguiiher Company,
OFFICE, I123stutfrp
No. 118 MARKET 8TKEET.
FINANOIAU.
DREXEL & CO.,
No. 34 SOUTH THIUD STREET,
American and I'orelgrn flanker
DRAWS EXCHANGE ON LONDON AND PRI.
CIPAL CITIES OF EUROPE.
DEALERS IN
Government and Railroad Securities,
Drexel, Winihrop & Co.,iDrexel, Ear jet A Co.,
No. 18 Wall Street, No. I Kuo scribe.
New York. j ParH.
CLOVES, ETC.
500 DOZEitf
LADIES', GENTLEMEN'S, AND
CHILDREN'S GLOVES.
'La Belle" Eid Gloves, f 1 86 per pair.
"Bartley" Kid Uloves reduced toll -as.
Jout In clotting out at f 1-46.
Joseph Glove, 11; best f I Ulove Imported.
Children's "La Belle" Eld uloves leduced to 8TO.
Children's Cloth Oloves, all colors and sizes,
ladles' Cloth Uloves, 5, 81, 84, 44, 60 t3 76c
dents' Cloth Uloves, 44, 60, 66 to 7 Ac.
Ladles' Castor Gauutlets, 11-25.
Gents' Underwear, closing out.
Ladles' Underwear, 75, f 1, $l-5 up.
A lot slightly soiled Kid Gloves of all brands and
All sizes, at 760. per pair, to close out quick, at
BARTHOLOMEWS'
Great Eld Glove Emporium,
No. 83 North EIGHTH Street
1 6 thstutf
H URN ACES, ETC.
ESTABLISHED 1825.
FBBBh T. MXCCK. H. J. DBAS
XX. J. SEAS 6l GO.,
NAHITFACTUUVUS OP
Warm Air Furnaces
AMD
Ooolcintr H.a.n-es,
Portable Heaters, Low Down Grates, Plate Man
ttuth Boilers, Registers and Veuiitatora.
No. I I I North SEVENTH Qt.,
PHILADELPHIA. ttuttuetuxy
JOBB1NQ PPiOMFTLY ATTENDED TOw

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