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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, April 13, 1871, FOURTH EDITION, Image 4

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THE DAILY EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 1871.
toting df gtapli
PUBLISHED EVERT AFTERNOON
(SUNDAYS EXCEPTED),
AT THE EVENING TELEGRAPH BUILDING,
No. 103 S. THIRD STREET,
riULADELPniA.
The Price is three cents per copy double sheet),
or eighteen cents per week, payable to the carrier
by whom served. The subscription price by mail
is Aine Dollars per annum, or One Dollar and
Fifty Cents for two months, invariably in
advance for'jthe time ordered.
THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 1S71.
tw- The Evbnino Telegraph, from Its orlgtna 1
establishment, baa been in the receipt of telegra
phic news from the New Yore Associated Press,
which consists of the Tribune, Times, Jlcrald,
World, Sun, Journal of Commerce, Evening Pout,
Commercial Advertixer, and livening Express. The
success which has attended our enterprise Is, In
Itself, a sumclent evidence of the freshness, full,
ness, and reliability of the Hews which we have
leceived from this source. In March, 1S70, we
entered Into a special contract by which The
Etemno Telegraph has the exchiMve nseof the
sews furnished in the afternoon by the Associated
Press to Its own members, the Xorth American, In
quirer. Ledger, Press, Age, Record, and German Demo
crat, of this city, and the leading journals of the East,
N orth, West, and South; and hereafter The Tele
graph will be the only evenxno paper published in this
ity In which the afternoon despatches of the Asso
ciated Press will appear.
IVThe earliest regular edition of the The
Evening Telegraph goes to press at ljtf o'clock,
and the subsequent regular editions at t, 8, and
4X W henever there is important news of the com
plications in Europe, extra editions will be 'issued
after this hour, and before the regular time for the
early edition.
THE COAL TROUBLES.
The wonderful increase daring the last few
years in the productive power of the coal
mining districts of Pennsylvania, and in the
facilities for transporting anthracite coal to
market, has exercised an important influence
in engendering the troubles which seem to
occnr regularly every year. It is hard to
realize that twice as much coal was mined in
1870 as in 18G0, the aggregate last year reach
ing the enormous quantity of 15,849,89'.)
tons. This no doubt exceeded the
natural demands of the mar
ket; and the root of all the
difficulties is to be found in this over-production,
and in the desire of miners and opera
tors to check the tendency towards ruinously
low prices which springs from over-produo-tion.
If all the anthracite coal mines now
opened were worked to their full capaoity, all
the miners kept constantly employed, and if
the facilities for transportation possessed by
the existing coal-carrying railways were all
brought into requisition, the product would
immensely exceed the demand. Various circum
stances, and more especially the high prioes
paid for coal during a period of temporary
and partial scarcity during the war, have led
the master-spirits of the coal trade to stimu
late this over-production; and at the same
time the high prices paid during the war for
coal led to such an extravagant increase in the
wages of the miners that they have never
Bince been contented with a fair and reasona
ble recompense for their exertions. In their
philosophy the whole question is narrowed
down to this simple point: If they can en
force a suspension of operations, and
thus create an artificial scar
city, the price of coal will go
rap again to the old war prices, and they can
once more earn from five to ten dollars per
day with comparatively little labor. The great
Increase in facilities for mining coal, and in
Bending it to market, however, have in
creased, the difficulties of enforcing this sus
pension policy; and the present dead-lock
has only been produced by a resolute and
tyrannical combination among the miners
favorable to suspension, on the one
hand, and by a counter-union as equally de
termined, on the other hand, among the coal
carrying coal companies. Whatever may be
the details of the final settlement of this dis
pute, the object aimed at has been already
accomplished that is, the over-produotion
of the coal districts has been checked and
through enhanced prioes of coal the publio
will probably be obliged to foot the
huge bill run up by months of
idleness among thousands of miners
and by the inactivity of coal-carrying
railway companies. If about one-fourth of
the miners abandoned their present pursuit,
and a similar reduction were made in the
facilities for sending coal to market, all the
legitimate wants of the publio could still be
promptly supplied, and there would be no
neoessity and no plausible pretext for violent
and dangerous combinations and complica
tions. At the present day the Wyoming region
Bends to market nearly half of all the anthra
cite coal mined in Pennsylvania, its products
exceeding those of the Lehigh and Schuylkill
regions combined. The wonderful increase
of late years has occurred mainly in this com
paratively new Wyoming district, and the
coal troubles have been greatly aggravated by
the rapid rise of its comparative importance
and the relative decrease of the importance
of the Schuylkill and Lehigh regions. In
nearly all the disturbances a feeling of anta
gonism between the rival districts has exerted
an important influence, and increased the
difficulties of speedy and amicable settle
ments.
It is reported that a system of arbitration
will probably soon be adopted which will
furnish the basis for a settlement of the exist
ing trouble, and we hope this report will
prove well founded; but it is exceedingly
doubtful whether a permanent settlement of
any kind wul or can be made before a con
aiderable reduotion in the number of miners,
number of mines in operation, etc., is effected
by a mutual understanding between all the
foal railway companies ana coal operators.
THE TOUNO MEN'S I10ME.
A very large number of the young men who
re commencing life in this and other great
cities are deprived of the influences of home,
and are thrust into the great world of busi
ness and pleasure just at the time when they
most need to be surrounded by those moral
and religious restraints .that belong to the
home circle, and it is not to be wondered at
that the best-intentioned go astray and fall
into evil habits simply because there has been
no one to give warning or counsel in the time
of temptation or danger. The great work
that the Young Men's Christian Association
has undertaken is to surround the young men
who are working their way in the world with
such influences as will tend to form their
characters and to encourage them in good
habits. It extends a cordial welcome to
all young men and introduces them into
circles of sympathizing friends who will take
an interest in their tern peral as well as their
spiritual welfare; and by providing pleasant
places of resort for leisure moments, it seeks
to prevent the haunts of vice from becoming
attractive. Many a young man has fallen into
bad habits and has become a pest to society,
not from any inherent depravity, but simply
because circumstances have thrown him
among demoralizing associations at a most
critical period of his career, when his charac
ter is forming, and when he has not sufficient
experience in the ways of the world to deoide
between good and evil; and there are thou
sands who become dissipated or vioious who
might bare been easily trained to walk in the
paths of virtue if they had at the commence
ment of active life been kindly taken by the
hand and enoouraged to select their friends
and companions from among the cultivated
and religious members of society. The Young
Men's Christian Association, with its pleasant
reading-rooms, its popular lectures, and other
appliances, has done and will continue to do
a great and important work; but it is obvious
that many young men will not be reached in
this manner, and that something more is
needed. The association, to carry out the
objects of its creation in the fullest manner,
must follow the young men to their homes,
and it must provide many of them with
homes where they will be made comfortable
and at the same time surrounded by the best
influences. The managers of the association
have recognized this necessity for a long
time, and they have now endeavored to pro
vide for it by establishing a Young Men's
Home, where, for a moderate rate of
board, respectable young men can be pro
vided with convemencies and comforts not
obtainable in ordinary hotels and boarding
houses, and at the same time where they will
be brought under good influences that cannot
but have a powerful effect in forming their
characters and in encouraging them to prac
tise religion and morality. For the purposes
of this Home the buildiDg of the Union Club,
on Twelfth street, below Walnut, has been
purchased. It will be necessary to make an
addition to this for a dormitory, and in order
that this may be done about $30,000 will be
required. There ought to be no difficulty
whatever about raising this sum, for the en
terprise is one that commends itself in the
strongest manner to the business men of the
community, who are direotly interested in
having the young men in their employ
brought tinder just such influences as those
exerted by the YouDg Men's Christian Asso
ciation. This establishment is in
tended to be a home in
the best sense of the word, and
as it will be conducted in an entirely unseo
tarian spirit, it is entitled to the support of
persons of all shades of religious opinion, as
well as of those who have no religious
opinions, but who are able nevertheless to re
cognize the moral value of the influences
which will be brought to bear upon the young
men who will reside in the home. The esta
blishment of a Young Men's Home is a practi
cal matter that requires no argument to de
monstrate its value, and we sinoerely hope
that the comparatively small amount needed
to make the scheme an entire suocess will be
forthcoming without delay.
Yesterday a bill to incorporate a company
to construct a tunnel or tunnels under the
streets of Philadelphia and Camden was re
ported favorably by committee to the nouse
of Representatives. We presume that this
is Mr. W. F. Smith's great pneumatio
scheme in a new shape, end we request the
Philadelphia members who really have the
interests of the city at heart to pay some atten
tion to it and prevent it from becoming a law,
in case it has any resemblance to the great
boring bill that has been so frequently de
nounced by the press of Philadelphia. We
are unable to imagine any legitimate ends,
which a majority of the citizens of Philadel
phia will approve, to be accomplished by the
construction of tunnels of any description
whatever under the streets; and while un
willing to oppose any enterprise of real
value, we have, without being informed with
regard to the details of the bill reported yes
terday, no hesitation whatever in protesting
against its passage. Mr. W. F. Smith
and his friends will never be permitted to
dig up the streets of Philadelphia after the
fashion proposed in his great pneumatio
scheme; and it will save trouble to all parties
if the Legislature refuses to countenance
anything of the kind.
It seems to be generally understood that a
loan ef $500,000 to construct a new pave
ment on Broad street will be authorized; and,
in that event, the citizens of Philadelphia
should rigidly insist upon a wise expenditure
of this money. The pavement should be laid
down in the best manner that can be devised,
and the whole subject of modern pavements
should be fully investigated by competent
authorities before a contract is given out
It will not do to waste this money in a foolish
and extravagant experiment. The whole city
ought to be repaved; and if this gigantic un
dertaking is to be commenced on Broad
street, the appropriation for that famed
locality should be expended in an especially
judicious and effective manner.
T1IK PORTE.
Oood KiTrrt oftlir Rrnulta of the Confer
cure The Sltuattou aud Froupcrts.
Constantinople March 18) Cor. London Kcfio.
The result of the deliberations of the con
ference has been received with a general feel
ing of relief; for although the main point at
issue was known to have been virtually settled
some weeks aero, still apprehensions existed that
some contingent question might crop up, tiat
come difficulty as to the details of the treaty
might arise, vtblch, if It did not actually lead to
war, would maintain yet longer the state of dis
quiet in which wars and rumors of wars have
beld tbis country for eight months past, to the
great detriment of its commerce and financos.
Turkey does not, it is true, reap any very sub
stantial benefit from the treaty, yet the future
dangers to which it exposes her are remote and
less vital than the peril of present war would
have been with an empty exchequer and allies
only half-bearted in her cau?e. But the incident,
which the treaty culminates, has not been with
out moral advantage to this country and Gov
ernment; it has thoroughly justified the outlay
of an Iron-clad fleet, for which the Porte has
often been severely criticized in financial cir
cles at home; and it has also shown that the
Turks know how to make the best of their posi
tion; that tbey possess political wisdom and
foresight, and can play the only card in their
hands, which in this case was their naval
strength, to the best possible advantage. This
ability on their part bas staved off war when
Western Europe was craving for peace, and
England should not be backward In recognizing,
by increased consideration and confidence, the
statesmanlike qualities which have preserved
peace without any sacrifice of national dignity.
KArOLEON.
The Bonapartist Programme,
The London Obnerver of the 2Gth ult. says:
The following statement of the programme
adopted by Napoleon has been communicated
to us:
The arrival of the Emperor Napoleon in Eng
land bas given rise to a variety of rumors which
have no authoritv whatever. Napoleon III may
not be so solemnly reticent as he bas been re-
I i resented to be, but certainly he will not explain
lis views and intentions to every enterprising
person who, per fas out nefas, gets into CamdeA
House. It bas been asserted that the health of
the Emperor is very bad indeed; but we are
informed that, on the contrary, there is a
marked improvement in his health. The story
of the National Guards of Paris being bribed by
Bonapartist gold is sufficiently refuted by the
facts that Bonapartist gold is very scarce, and
that the Belleville men and their adherents are
and have been in urgent need of money. The
ex-Emperor will not sanction intrigues on his
behalf. Whenever he deems it necessary he will
address the nation openty, as he did on the eve
of the elections and after the anti-Imperial vote
in the Assembly. Napoleon HI, it is stated,
will not depart from the passive attitude he
has maintainnd since his departure from France.
NOTICES.
Children's Fancy 8triikd Suits.
oniLDREN's Fancy Striped Suits.
Children's Fancy Stkipsd suits.
Boys' School Burrs.
hoys' School Suits.
Boys' School suits,
youths new Style chesterfields.
Yuths' New Style Chesterfields.
Youths' New Style Chesterfields.
Youths' Striped Cassimerb Derbys and Suits.
Youths' Striped Cassimehe derbys and Suits.
Youths' Stiped Cassimerb Derbys and Surra.
Perfect Neatness in Gents' Spkinu Suits.
Perfect Neatness in gents' Spring Suits.
Perfect Neatness in Gents' Spring burrs.
Beautiful Spring Overcoats.
Beautiful Spring Overcoats.
Beautiful string Overcoats.
An Examination of our Stock will Prove
that we have TnK Largest, the Most Complete,
and tub iiandsomest as well as thb cheapest
Assortment of Gents' and Boys' Clothing in the
City.
Wanamaeer & BROWN,
Oak Hall,
The Largest Clothing Housb in America,
S. E. Corner Sixth and Mareet Streets.
OROCERIES, ETC.
MAPLE HONEY,
Received Direct from
Vermont.
E. BRADFORD CLARKE,
(SUCCESSOR TO SIMON COLTON & CLARKE,)
S. W. Corner BROAD and WALNUT,
1 81 tuthstMp PHILADELPHIA.
PIANOS.
fiSteinway & Sons'
Grand Square and Upright Ptanoi.
Special attention is called to their
Patent Upright IManos.
JH Altl.Kt II I, AMI US.
WAREROOMS,
, No. 1006 CHESNUT STREET,
418tfrp PHILADELPHIA.
S C II O M A C K E R Si CO.,
Nl
CIIAXD SO.VAIIE AND UPRIGHT
PIANOS.
Tiiey possess the Highest improvements of any in
struments maae, aud are unrivalled lor tone and
UlUBUUlk.T. . ,
Also, tole Agents for the celebrated
Bl'ItDETT OllttAN.
SC1IOM ACKER &, CO.,
4 13 tm4p No. 1103 CUES NOT Street.
PIANOS AttDQRGANS.
j- PIANOS,
HAINES BROS',
AND
MASON AND HAMLIN'S CABIVET ORGANS.
GOULD it FISCHtilt,
No. 923 OHKSNUT Street,
jr. s. oould. No. 1018 ARCH bireet.
wm. a. riMCHEX. i it t!4p
Grand,Eqnare and Upright fianos.
GREAT REDUCTION.
FIXED PRICES.
DUTTOK'S PIANO BOOMS,
I28lm4p Nob. 1126 and 1H3 CHESNUT St.
TJARLOWS INDIGO BLUE IS THE CHEAPEST
Xj and best article in me uiarKei iur
It does not couulu auy acid.
It will not Injure the llnettt fabric.
It Is put up at
Wl ITBERCIKR'M DKl'D NTIIKR,
No. 233 N. SKCOND Street, PUIiadelntiia.
And for sale by most of the Grocers and DruKirmts.
The peuuiue has both HAKLOWs and wll.T
I!KI; Hit'tt name on the label ; all others are COUN-
TUtFEIl. BAKI.OWH"BMTBl
I will color mora water tn&u lour limes the um
J weight of indigo. I i tutUuim
E23
No. 904 CHESTNUT STREET.
FRESH CHINA MATTINGS.
WHITE RED CHECK, AftD FANCY
STYLES.
50 PIECES FRENCH AXMINSTER,
$3 25 PER YARD.
CLOTH IN Q
APRIL! f alt, "1 APRIL!
MAY! i into 5- MAY!
I ONE
JUNE! I J JUNE!
i?"The sudden and wonderful arrival
of warm wea'her nat.irally
leads people to examine
their wardrobes, and see
If they are provided
with thin Clothing.
SEE!
Great Brown Hall
Is well stored from
pit to dome with ail
varieties of One rai
ment, of every desirable
degree of thinness and
thickness, suitable for the
early dew of the Spring morn
ing I Suitable for the lively
heat of the April noonday I (Suit
able lor thecDlihug damps of even
ing! Choice selections of every Idea
in Heady-made Clothing await you,
gentlemen, at QRKaT BKoWN HALL.
Endless variety of American and imported
Fine Woollen Goods in our Custom Depart
ment. OUR PRICES ARB SO LOW THAT
NOBODY IN TOWN CAN UNDERSELL US.
Come and examine for yourselves.
ROCKHILL & WILSON,
Git EAT BROWK 1IALL,
603 and 605 CHE3NUT STREET.
fifiBtLriiGMercstf
iNDEH THE J
'PHILADELPHIA! PA
TAILORS.
Fancy Coatings,
Exquisite
Shades and Designs
in
French and English
Pantaloon Cassimeres.
Diagonal Coatings
In great variety of
Pattern and Color.
Plain Cloths
Of beautiful finish and hue.
Ducks. Marseilles. Ducks,
Fancy Linens.
WESTON & BROTHER,
TAILORS,
S. W. Corner NINTH and ARCH Sts
PHILADELPHIA.
A fall assortment now In store
OF THE CHOIOEBT NOVELTIES OF
THE SEASON
FOR GENTLEMEN'S WEAK. 1
A SUPERIOR GARMENT AT A REASONABLE
PRICE. .,. t 8 8mrp
WATCHES.
XSstablislied iu 1854.
f
WATCH EG.
EVERGOING ',
STEM-WINDERS, !
KEY-WINDERS,
QUARTER SECONDS,
MINUTE REPEATERS,
ETC. ETC. ETC.
C. & A. PEaUIGNOT,
No. 608 CHESNXJT STREET,
3 SO thstut 1 PHILADELPHIA.
WINDOW BLlfMDS, ETO.
WINDOW EILINDS.
i
Lace Curtains, CtUrtain Cornicei,
HOLLAND SHADES,
PAINTED SHADES of tie latest tints.
BLINDS painted and trimmed.
STORE 6H&DES made and leVtered.
picture Cord, Tassels, Etc, Repairing promptly
attended to. "V
D. J. WILLIAMS. Jr..
No. 16 NORTII SIXTH STREET,
8 T tntheSin PH 1 L ADELPHI A
'H I L ADELPHI A
CLASS.
WINDOW
A large stock of very superior WINDOW GLASS,
comprising
AMERICAN .Nl) FRENCI .
Single, Extra, and Double Thick ENO JSH CRYS
TAL SHEECT.
FRENCH PLATE AND MIRRORS, SKYLIGHT
AND FLUTED QLASd. For sJle by
iiij. ii. siioiiUAEki:u,
1 NO 5 W. 809. SU N. FOURTH Bt.
Fj)UI
JEWELRY AND SILVERWARE.
A N OTHER ARRIVAL FROM NAPLES.
Just received, a fresh Invoice of
Pink Coral Jewelry.
Also, Just opened,
Now Styles in
Yellow Gold Jewelry.
J. E. CALDWELL & CO..
JEWELLERS,
No. 902 CHE8MUT Street,
8 13 stuthg
PHILADELPHIA.
ART GALLERY.
ltstnbliisliecl in 1703.
Art Galleries and Warcrooms,
No. 9IO CHESNUT Street.
Oil Paintings,
Itlirrors.
Tables,
Frames,
Cornices, Etc.
All Cbromoa reduced 80 per cent, on former
prices. ' 4 1 Btuth 6mrp
INSURANCE.
STATEMENT
07 TBI
COIMITilTION
OF THB
Andes Insurance Co.
OF CINCINNATI,
JANUARY 1, 1871.
CAPITAL STOCK
PAID IN
CASH - - $1,000,000
ASSRTS.
Cash in hand of Agents, la course of
Transmission SIOLBM-QT
cash in city Banns lBO.ioo 10
Catth on Hand 7tM'68
Loans secured by Bond and Mortgage,
being First Lien In Real Estate 14,081-M
United States Bonds, par 1 182,1 00 194,974-83
Alabama State bonds, par $10,000 ,7M'U0
Ohio city and county uoucis, par I'JO.ugi . . w,uiaw
Loaned on collateral security 6,660-00
Accrued Interest, not due 8,017-69
Bills Receivable 11,659-73
umce furniture, ana fixtures ana bud-
plles 7.598-13
Amount dne from Insurance Co.'s 858-60
Premiums uncollected at House Oillce. . . 637 -14
Total Assets tl,803,420-6S
LIABILITIES.
Losses reported and being settled 824,796-86
Amount due to Insurance Co.'s l&o-oo
Liabilities 822,876-86
INCOME.
Cash premiums premiums received 1243,992 -83
Premiums not paid in cash 81,602-17
Interest received on investments 82,677-10
Total Income 8299,331 0
J. D. BENNETT, PRESIDENT.
DUY & WOODS,
AGENTS,
No. 300 WALNUT Street,
It PHILADELPHIA.
FINANCIAL.
JJAVING BEEN APPOINTED AGENTS
FOR THE SALE AND EXCHANGE
OF THB
h'EW UNITED STATES L0A,
We would tender our services to Investors or hold,
era of old loans desiring to make exchange.
DliEXEL & CO.,
Ho. 24 BOUTH THIRD BTREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
SEWINQ MACHINES.
U B
WHEELER & WILSON
For Bal$ on Easy Term:
NO. 914 Oil ESN UT 8TKEKT.
I BW PHILADELPHIA
DRY GOODS.
1871
SINCE
1853.
SILKS, SHAWLS,
LINENS, CASSIMERES, ETC. ETO.,
. m mrrnnvT TTT'r
OLD-ESTABLISHED CORNER.
A LARGE BTOCK,
A FINE ASSORTMENT,
VERY MODERATE PRIOES.
To enumerate the varied and extensive stock of
such a House as ours In a readable newspaper ad
vertisement would be Impassible, but to all readers
or I nn Tkleoraph we extend a cordial Invitation
to look through and examine, and we shall feel
gratified and obliged.
Beapectfully and fraternally submitted,
JOSEPH H. TH0RSXET,
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
EIGHTH and SPRING GARDEN 8U.,
1 8 thstnl PHILADELPHIA.
rJfgY CHESNUT STREET.
ALEXANDER RICKEY,
Importer, Jobber, and Re-
taller of Dry Goods,
DEPOT FOR THE SALE OF CHOICE FABRICS
IN DRY GOODS,
AT POPULAR PRICES,
STOCK DAILY REPLENISHED
Wuh the CHEAPEST and CHOICEST OFFERINGS
of this and other markets.
ALOXANDER RICKEY,
8 SI tnthstf
No. 72T CHESNUT Btreet.
DIAMOND-MESH
HERNANIES.
We have received an Invoice of these Desirable
Goods, for which there was so great a demand
last season.
PERKIFJB & CO.,
No. D South NINTH Street,
8 S9 tuthsSmrp PHILADELPHIA.
, N. B. Every variety of HERNANI In stock.
SILKS, SHAWLS AND DRESS GOODS
ononan riu:Eit,
No. 910 CHESNUT BTREET,
Invites attention to his stock of
SILKS OF ALL KINDS,
INDIA AND OTHER SHAWLS.
Novelties In Dress aud Fancy Goods,
INDIA, PONGEE,' AND CANTON CRAPE IN
SHAWLS AND DRESS GOODS. 413 8mrp
QUR ENTIRE NEW STOCK, COM
PRISING ALL THE NOVELTIES IN
Spring and Summer
NOW FULL.
ELY, HUNSBERGER & ELY.
No. 1126, CHESNUT STREET,
41Uuths3m PHILADELPHIA.
CURTAINS AND SHADES.
WALRAVEN,
MAOONIC HALL,
No. 719 CHESNUT St.,
Offers some new designs for
CURTAINS AND LAMBREQUINS,
FRENCH CRETONNES,
STRIPED TERBT, and
COTBLINE8.
Also, GIMPS AND TRIMMINGS of entirely new
patterns.
An assortment of LACE CURTAINS of especial
elegance and cheapness, some as low as 1 100 a
window.
BHOCHB TAPESTRY PIANO AND TABLE
COVEKS are offered greatly below Intrinsic values,
with a large assortment of BMBROIDKRED CLOTH
PINOAND TABLE COVERS. 8 16 thstn3mrp
HARDWARE. ETpT
CUMBERLAND NAILO
S4'C5 Per Keg.
These Nails are knows to be the best In the market
All IValls), no waste, and cost no
more titan other brands,
Each keg warranted to contain 100 pounds of Nails.
Also, a large assortment of fine Hinges, Locks, and
Euuba. Salld lirouae, suitable for nrst-claas build
ings, at the great
CleapforCafch Hardware Store
OF
J, II. ffllAPINOIV,
1 14 tuths; No. 1008 MARKET Street..

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