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The Opelousas courier. (Opelousas, La.) 1852-1910, August 26, 1905, Image 2

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THIl [PLOUSAS COURIER
Published Every Saturday.
OPELOUbAS, - - Louisiana
International Correspondence School
Scranton, Penn.
Will train you for any Fpeeial line of worl
during your spate time, without detelitiot
from your employment, at. ai small cost anl
without extra clharnLe i.,r jboks.
Belpw ig a! part i.l li t of poitlons fcr whie:l
we can help .ou tot q ,lify.
Mark I before tu .y you are interested it
and mail to uis.
Ad Writer Ir.n h,German Spni
iThow-Card Writer i. h, with Edistn Re
Window Trimmerr pl.ting P'oonograpi
Newspaper Illutr-tr.tor Nt.rin* Engineer
(Ganeral Illustratlor 'Iraction Eagineer
Blookkeepe.r G ,e Enineer
tStenegrapher It. fr giralor Engine
Carpet D) signer i. ehunieal Engint.ei
Linoleum ])esigner 1'tl;l..hn. D-usijter
Wallpaper Designer . 1,t.hanicnl -I)raftmut
Book-cover Designer Ar.hitet
Perspective Draftsmniu 'Conil r\. *r & lBilhd'
Hign Paintor. 1I tit & 'Ventt En-lne.
Texiile Expert luittlung Inspietur
Navigator Civil Ewng.er
Oceoa nand.Lake-Ppot Brllg. Engineer
Cothinercial Law Municipal Engineer
Civ.l Service Exam's Ilyilraulie Eugineer
Eleetrical Egnlueer 1l. I . Constr'ion Eng'i
Dynamo Foreman :: ve. or
Dyna~to Tendier piiing Engin er
ElectrioLightihngSnpt M a Sureyr
Electrio Itailway Supt Minu Foreman
EeCetriclan' .lin.l Boss
Wfireman Fire Boes
Tglephone kihgincer lleta:lurgist
Str aiuary Engiuneer Assavor
Orantnental DusigneTr Artmitiectural Drf 'mni
EI'tric-Maluchxe )est'r Ilutli ug luspector
- Chtnmist etc , etc.
Name .................................
Occupstion .......................Age....
Address ..............................
C:ty . . ..... ....... ........State...
A. MI. HAAS.
7 DEN'TIST.
O ffice. on, Market ';treet, formerly
Dr. V. K. Irion. -
All Work Promptly Attented to
ELBERT C. SANDOZ
S 8URVEYOR
!fkainage, Land Furveying, Mapp
.. ing, Irrigation, Etc.
Offce .i -Baillio Bldg., up stairs,
lBellcvue St.
P. O. Box No. 75. OPELI'OUSAS
HOT..L Da~N~.C.AUD,
- Carondelet and Perdido Stree's,
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
American Plan $2.00 and up per day.
Europ3en Plan $1.01 and up per day.
J. .F. BENECHAID, Proprietor.
T. C. GIBBENS,
WASHINGTON, LA.
Dealer In Cypress and Pine Split
and Sawed Lumber.
Shingles. Boards. Flooring Cistern Lumber,
"Oeling, Door., 8ash, Blinds.
Bills sawed to order on short aotice.
PEYTON R. 8ANDOZ*
All civil and criminal business wil;
be eiven prompt and careful attention
Officoe over St. Landry State Bank,
Main Street, Opelousas, La.
Wa S. FRAZEE,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR
AT LAW.
Civil, Commercial and Maritime Law,
dvlce Reasonable. 514 Hibernia Bank &
rust Oo. Bulldinag. corner Carondelet and
iravler Streets. Phone 4509,
NEW ORLEANS.
L. L. DANEL,
Dealer in
Staple and Farncy Orocerles
also Charooal.
'Garland's Addition. Cumberland Phone 55.
Bertha Phone l13.
GEO, T, EDWARDS
NOTARY PUBLIO.
Offe with Lewis & Lewis.
esialtrbet, OPELOUSAS, ta.
Ameriean Tonsorial Parlors.
SAN LA NASA, Proprietor.
jamdry St. between Opelousas Mercatl
Co's BraneL and Winsberg & Bio's. sr "r
Best equipped Barber Shop in town.i
Shawing, Hair Cutting, Shampooing, Etc in
the Highest Styleof the Art. Hot and Celd
Bats. ' Give sme a call. Satisfaction
Guaranteed,
PROPERTY- OWNERS
List your property with the Picket
Real Estate Agency. I. have timber
lands, both in Oypress and Pine, for
sale. 0a11 or address
A. B. PICKETT.
WILLIAM J. SANDOZ,
Attorney at Law
and Notary Public.
Opeloia, - - Louisiana.
Will pmBcUoe in all the Courts, State and
Federal and before the Patent and Pension
tese asington, D. . Speciael altentlon
giveno t ollection. Ofdce on Landry St.,
Ogpnttecolrthesse.
OTrTON SEED MEAL,
OILS AND HULLS,
_The Bsmldt most economical Stock Nee
sad Pertlimer. Appl] at the Mill.
ON Y(Z TO LOANR
.. . - O omsa a i.
4 4 '" d s"t .oordin too
"s the
p, F t os
TWO FUTURJE KINGS.
tut ..1 lie I'
c.;·
. - 4
is -
'fI It'
Th era C~nPrne n itl V iccLtiloll v5on"1 li lryb
Hito · ai ra heltl Irni s rl(Ilno hem dRn
Oto. Th yt·u`_ as ta -' t tttl't
A DRAUGHT DETECTCR.
IIow many tiues in the wecek do yo
Liear your parents sayV: "I believe I fet
A draught"' Doubtless a" great n1ny
lld then there is always an argulilu
CO
! j
NITTINCG
NEtDLE
aum
PLAN OF CONSTRUCTION.
Is to where the draught comes from
s there not? And sometimes it Is nea
t draught at all, but just inigilnation
Still, It is a very simple imatter t(
miake a little instrument which wil
find the draught if there is onie ant
besides show you pretty nearly whevi
t conles from.
Get a knitting needle, three largi
•orks and four small ones, eight hair
pins, four. bits of cardboard, anid iT
>rdinary button. The diagram shoue
'ou so plainly how to put thleu to.
;ether that t .:'etf°o use descrilbin
how it is done' The top eeork i th(
rnly thlinag *hich is not perfecttlysim
pie.
Make a hole all the way thioutgh the
top cork from top to bottom. A h:aila
,in will answe.r to drill this hole with.
Now make two or three more holes
beside this first one and very near it.
Run ".your haIr in briskly through
,hese'bloles-until thefr sides are worn
tway and then form one hole. Now
run a small tube of macaroni or :a
luill toothpick through the hole. This
is so that the knitting needle which
'ierees the top cork anid acts' as a
frvot for it to turn upon will have a
oose socket and will Irernit the cork
'o lahib-ewasily.
W When any one says "draught" get
aut this little draught finder, says the
Chicago Iuter Ocein, and put near
lie place where the draught is sal
posed to come' from. T'Iie slightest
THORNS IN THE CUSHION.
" -
4. 4
itii
Owea. 4{ The Tatler.
to t
k ý d '
breath of air will set the sails in lii
tio anid the direction in whiclic thI"
move will inidicate lpretty clcarly 'wiier'
U the current of air o01cs.' front.
-
rt SUMMER ICE ECONOMICS,
Saving of ice is the chief hlonuselho:,
eCOinomly in sunIilnr, taklog th~e place
of the winter problltm of ecollnomic coli
sumption or coal. When it is relmenll
,--I--~
SAVES THE ICE.
bhred that water from melting ice has
just the siie temperature as the ice it
self, although a large amount of heat
has been ablsol.ed in cltangil g the
physical form of the valpor, it will I;e
seen tlhat this water, which is just at
the freezing moint, is a good refriger
ating mediun itself, and should be util
ized. The dllticulty Is that all refrig
erator designs disregard this fact, ani
allow the cold water, derived from the
melting of the ice, to flow away to a
drain or waiste pipe. By equipping the
refrigeratoe c(uipartment('With a reser
voir preseinting a large surface armea,
and collecting the drip water therein,
the.melting ice is reduced to a mini
Inmum, the water absorbing a large
anmlount of heat that would otherwise
he comnsumed inl tranlsformingi the ice
into water. Means, of course, should
he provided to carry the cold water to
the bottom of the reservoir and to per
nlit the surplus water to escape from
the surfaee.-Philadelphia Record.
No Strain on Hlis HFye,.
"You must take a nap this afternoon,
for we want to go to a hand concert
to-night," said mluntina to her little
three-year-old.
"But why do I have to take a nap?"
he answer~;. ."I will hear the band
with my ears."--Mrs. Louis Thei1nanmn,
in little Chronicle.
The "Tainted Money"
Issue.
By Dr. fArtemas Jean Hay.tes.
'_ JESUS were here in the world today the few who have
made themselves strong out of the many, those who have
have robbed the poor by trading upon public privileges for
private gain, who have bought and sold lawmakers and those
set to administer laws, who have openly defied every state
and federal authority and prostituted those institutions on
which free government rests-those men, if Jesus were here
in the world, would find a great gulf fixed between themselves and the Christ;
they would find it utterly impossible to get into any sort of alliance with Him
tUitil they had become penitent.
But what evidence have you that Mr. Rockefeller would fall into this class
of the few concerning whom you have spoken? may be. asked. May you not
be doing him great injustice? Did not our Lord say, "Judge not," and have
you, a Christian minister, any right openly to violate that command? Let me
answer by saying, "Yes, our Lord did say judge not," but Ho also said "By their
fruits ye shall know them."
The fruit of this man's life and work is in ten thousand homes today, and
it is exceedingly bitter to the taste. No legal judgment, men say, has been
passed upon him, therefore you should wait. But what are we to wait for?
What are juries and judges and courts and legislatures to this man? They
are but the playthings of an idle hour. More than a dozen state legislatures
anld the federal government itself are today investigating charges against the
company of which he is the head. What will it all amount to? Nothing, until
the people speak.
The courts can be bought, but the American people cannot be bought,
The legislatures can be bought, the churches can be bought, but the American
people cannot be bought. The plain people are used to giving blunt names to
things, and they call this man a robber.
Great heavehld is there nothing certain in this world until some court of
law has passed upon it? I have not the lawyer's mind, but I do have the in
telligence of the average man, and for seven years since I read Mr. Lloyd's
"Wealth and Commonwealth" to the tifie of closing Miss Tarbell's:vivid story, I
have studied this man's company and its methods. If this man has not per'
jured himself no man ever did; if this man has not robbed the people, no man
ever did; if this man, through the company which he dominates, has not brok
en the laws no man ever did.
It would almost seem that Provid2nce had arranged this offer of $100,000
In order to give the Congregational church an opportunity to take the high
moral ground which would enable it to speak with authority the message that
this age requires. No other such opportunity has ever come to us as a church.
Above all other men in our American nation this man is despised. His
membership in the Ch-rist an church and his alliance with religious organiza
tions have done more than any other single influence to alienate the working
man from the church. Gcd has given us our chance to strike, and to strike
in the place where the blow will cut the deepest. What is the extension of
our educational work when measured against the opportunity of speaking the
fine, clear word that might have been spoken?
How shall we answer such a blunt old proverb as this? The answer is as
bad as a thief. We cannot answer it.
Th e Right of Suffrage, t
+and Domesticity
By Charlotte Perkins Gilman. ,r+
t*IH !.+++.+ T SEEMS to me that the honest objection of most people to
woman suffrage is that it would not be good for the world
it would not be good for the race, It would not be good for
mothers.
We know that in all nations the level of civilization it
always on a plane with the level of womanhood, that no
matter how intelligent and free and strong American men
. .+.I.p are if they had Hottentot wives or Turkish wives they
would not have as fine children. The development of the
woman is necessary to the birth of strong brains.
America today is going forward to a world position such as no nation has
ever had, and we need bigger brains. We need the power to see things as a
whole, to get the entire drift of affairs. Everywhere in government people fail
for lack of breadth of mind, the power to balance all the considerations, to see
far ahead and all around. We shall need it mope and more as our range of
p-awer increases.
At present half of our citizens, the mothers of the country, the people who
do more to build brains than anybody else, occupy their minds all their lives
hong with small private affairs. They do not spend time thinking and caring
about large private affairs, They do not participate in matters of public in.
tere.t, and they can neither bear nor rear as broadminded, as public-spirited,
as able children as if they were abler themselves. It takes strong, wise, able
wolmen to make strong, wise, able men.
Now, if women have the right of suffrage and think aboul
public affairs, feel the responsibility of them, give their minds to
thyeip, turn their consciences on them, it will give us a breed of people better
able to take the large pace of which I have spoken, having the larger honesty,
not the small man to man honesty, but the public honesty that is so bitterly
meaded everywhere, and for the lack of wihich Russia is going to pieces.
I believe that will come to the human race much sooner than otherwise by
eflowing the women to share the responsibility of government, to *exercise
their minds and their consciences on the duties they owe to their cities, to the
states, to the country and to the whole world.
The right of suffrage does not interfere with wifehood or motherhood or
Jomesticity. That is proved by the experience in the states that have it.
We, as a nation, are standing where if we, as people, as individuals, can
rise to the demands of our time we can make a bigger place in history than
has ever before been attained-a wiser and stronger and nobler power than
the world has ever known. But you cannot do that with little people-you
maust have big men and big women.
Chief Obstacle to
Philippine Progress
By James AG. Le SRoy.
HE chief obstacle to social and political progr'ess in the Phi
ippine islands is "caciquism," the term by which "bossism
in the United States, is, however, not an accurate transl;
tion of the Philippine word. A "cacique; in those islands '
a combination of our political "boss," the schoolmaster 1
Goldsmith's "Deserted Village," the old Virginia landlor,
and the leader in a local "four hundred," or the husband c
such. One may glean indications of the existence of such
jamily, or of a few such families, in the life of quiet rural villages of New En
land in faoner times. But the picture one may imagine of such rural "bos
ism" will not quite fit the Philippine conditions. One must introduce sonm
thing of the color of "the south before the war," even partially to realize i
Imagine a rural community, secure in the political dominion of one "selec
man," or of one or two families of "selectmen," and at the social wink and n<
of the unofficial "manor house;" but picture that sort of leaders'hip set up in
community where only two, four or twelve families out of a population of t<
thousand or more live in stone houses with wood floors, and the rest in cal
shacks; dependent on those above them for employment, or a piece of land
till, or the money advances inevitably needed each year to till it; finally, tran
Ter yotrr .manor"- to the tropics, where fertility of soil and enervation of e
mate breed laziness and inertia, above and below in society, and you may hai
gUme conception of what Philippine taciquism is in Philippine rural life.-TI
Atlantic.
Atlanutc.
Where He Fell Down.
'I haven't heard of Snagswell for
leng time. What has become of him?
"He has quit. Don't you remembe
he got in the way of an automobile ,
year or two ago and was injured t
such an extent that the owner of th,
machine finally had to give it to him
to s4tisfy his claim for damages?"
"Well, he tried the same game attei
ward on a loeomotive. and It didn'
work,"-- go Tribung.
Play Ball.
a "So your grandmother is dead, <
Johnnie?"
r "Yessir; may I git off?
a "Sure. I love to go to funerals in
0 self. Who's going to be in the box f
e the home team?"-Houston Post.
The Bank of Japan, in conjuncti,
with the Japanese department of f
r- ance, is establishing a bank in Me
t churia, with branches in China al
Corea.
Allen T. Sandoz & Bro.,
DEALERS IN
Staple and Fancy Groceries, also Shoes,
Hats and Clothing.
We e handle the famous ROBERT, JOIINS()N & RA.\N ) SHIOES
o which was awarded the Gold Medal at the St. Louis EIxlos ti n, 1905
a _________
n Special attention WELCOME SALO)ON
is called to, our
near the Railroad. Landry Street, Opelonusa, which is strictly
first-class in every particular, where the finest of Whisis. Wines
and all kinds of Liquors can be had at very reasT,,nable qrices.
JUG AND FLASK TRADE A SPECIALTY.
e Colored Saloon in Connection. Prompt Attention to all Caders.
Local and Long Distance Phones: Picket Phone No. 142. Cuv:.
I berland No. 180. P. 0. Lock Box 305.
SIFREE DELIVERY TO ALL PARTS OF THE TOWN
it Pa-t- _ --r
n ADVERTISE IN
SYour Home. Paper
FOR GOOD RESULTS.
SIF IT'S ::: ARWA E WN
it- -_ - - WN HARVE
A large stcck Just received, Tools, Cutlery, Firearms,
Stoves, Paints, Wire Fenoing, Steam Fixtures, and In.
e fact everything usually kept in a First Class Hard-
I! ware Store. Plumbing, Pipe Fitting, etc., done on
e short notice. Gall and see us at.
Blacksher'. Old Stand. Ch'ILDS & WILSO
DAVID ROOS, President. J. J. PERRODIN, Cashuh
THE PEOPLES' STATE BANK,
OF OPELOUSAS, LA.
Capital, . - * $25,000.
YOUR ACCOUNTS AND COLLECTIONS SOLICITED.
Directors--David Roos, Isaao Rooe, J. W. Castles, Lewis Goldstein, ji
a J. A. Haas.
Officers-David Roos, President, Isaac Roos, Vice-President, J. J3 PNirbod
Cashier, J. A. Haas, Assistant Cashier.
OPPELOUSAS ICE AND BOTTLING WORKI
Manufacturers of Ice and Carbonated
. . .Fo s -- - _ -- -- - -
Drinks. Ice as Cheap as Anywhere in
.................. ...the W orld .... ..............
Pure Water Used. ANDREW MORESI,
Careful Attention to Orders.
I ninlr Tjlivirv in thw Clit.y TAimnits- Preudm
CUMBERLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH. I
(nicoRnoult) /
L r Long distance lines and telephones of:
this Company enable you to talk almost,
r anywhere in Southern Indiana, Southern
y and Louisiana. We can put you in quick
and satisfactorycommunocation with the
people of this great section of the country.
: We solicit your patronage. Rates reason-=
able. Equipments and faollitiesunsur.
passed.
"iNue E. cALDWELL, \ : . , LL.AND HUM.S;- . D.-. o. WES;
President OGen'l .m... r. bee. a Ass't Gem'1 Mgr. - Tres
II
WE LEAD IN LOW PRICES, OTHERS FOLLOW.
A. C. SKILES, ; ."o.
NEW LU R YARD Near Southern Pacifio
Depot, where a full and
... complete stook of ..
Atchafalaya Red Cypress and Long Leaf Yellow
Pine Lumber, Shingles and Siding ....... .
Also Sash, Doors, Blinds, Mouldings, Coal and Sand. We only atl
make you our figures and your better judgment will do the rest.
i ~~ ~ ~ - ' - ---illil ...
YOU NEED IT WE DO IT'
JOB PRINTINC
NEAT WORK LOW PRICES
d
r......I. THE HORS
...ON...
AND HIS DISEASES
e
25 CENTS, POSTPAID,
Containing an index to diseal
which gives the symptoms, cause a
the best treatment of each. A tal
giving 'all the principal drugs ui
for the horse, with the ordinary do
effects, and antidqte with a poist
A table with an engraving of I
horse's teeth at different ages, wi
iules for telling the ages. A va
able collection of redeipta and m,
' ther valuable ilformatiogp. Both
a English and Geamqn. (10-page bc
a ei postpaid to any address, for
, cents Address
ACADEMY OF THE
IMMACULATE CONCEPTII
OPELOUSAS, LA. ,
Eunder the Directoion ofthe Sisters -X
of Holy Cross.
Offers to young ladies every fiWi
for acquiring a thorough christiS(
ucation. Constant attention is'
in home and sooial culture. I
es are given in music, painting and
ud neefue arte. The sisteors also -
le charge of the boys' school. Tho O
ed of instruction is two-fold-.I1
e, tory and Commercial. Fr
ni taught in the two courses. For P
e tioulars, address U
th S18TER SUPR~4,
oh When you visit Orowley stop at tM
i DARBONNE HOTh
S Opposite the Court ouse.
Board and Lodging by thet
Week ad Month.
- f lavpn f MRQ RnARf

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