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The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, March 24, 1877, Image 4

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Segl Journal of the Sate of I*miulaca.
4OIlla Journalof the City of New Orianus.
OMoo. 109 Orao.er Strest.
GEORGE W. DUPRE & CO..,
PBOPRIETOBB.
(EORGE W. DUPRE,
i . BIAHR.EY, JOHN AUGUSTIN,
ALBERT O. JANIN.
$H. REARSEY ............ EDITon.
BATAR OF rTnTBSIRIPTION.
The Daily Demoorat.
TwnB UNDlAY DEMOCRAT.
t n a de n nt r... t I d..............le voted to
Seyer M nths........ ............ . 0
The Weekly Demoorat.
irnl W l it furnisel to he iersnather t el
aluee Moa ths ................. 1
.OsTXOr--W65, tfor R no R nd fon w .als d
. ihes thsisrd hn eLA Demneru a 7ty
Obu 00b) per qWrs eill onser tion.
$aturday. March 94. 1877.
tea oef e of the New Oicrleans DEMO
£AT has been Removed from 4 Camp
oWete to 1009 ravler street.
AM$K5MkNT4 THIN EIYkNMl.Di
Ae Tm er Mimic - MDiton Nobles - " Dis
MrOas in the Rouah "
Our subscribers will confer a favor
upon us by reporting at this office every
desirous of achieving absolute exacti
tuge and punctuality.
THE PRESIDENT'S TITLE.
A Northern exchange before us
reiterates the statement that Mr. Hayes
cannot set Packard aside without im
peaching his own title. It is hardly
credible that Mr. Hayes will waste his
opportunities in vain and idle efforts to
anre the defects in his title to the
Presidency. The world is too well
acquainted with the detects of that
title, too familiar with the mass of
political fraud in.which it is based, for
Mr. Hayes to hope to give it even an air
of fairness and lagality. He cannot
make one crime rightful and innocent
by perpetrating another; he cannot
make the perjury and bad faith through
which the whole country was defrauded
in the matter of the Presidency, right,
anal just, and logical, by now using the
power of his high office to defraud the
people of Louisiana, in the matter of
their State government.
Mr. Hayes' title is already impeached
by the whole country, and it will be
condemned by posterity. There is no
law, human or divine, that can make it
good. The establishment of the Nicholls
government cannot damage it, nor the
recognition of Packard improve it. Its
weakness is in the fact that it exists in
violation of the constitution and laws
of the country, and the only strength it
em acquire will be in such tolerance as,
Sty wisdom and conciliation, its posses.
Sor can secure, for it from the people.
wr. Hayes should, therefore, if he
Wrishes to strengthen his title, so shape
the policy of his administration that it
will secure peace to the country and
give every section and State an interest
In the success of its measures; and if
he hopes to escape the most shameful
and humiliating judgment of posterity,
he must bestow some blessing upon the
country,which impartial history may set
against the crime by which he acquired
his high place and authority.
So far from Mr. Hayes being logically
bound to recognize Packard, such a
course on his part would be the height
of unwladom. If he were to attempt to
Justify the course of the rascals who
Stole the Presidency by recognizing the
lniquittlus pretensions of Packard, he
would whiten not a single stain upon ,
their records, nor add an iota of legality
to his $tle, while he would plunge one 1
State ihto bloodshed and ruin, likely
sonvulbe the whole country, wreck his
administration and cover himslf with i
faamy. .
W e hvre no idea that Mr. Hayes will I
ike any silly effort to validate his i
4le by recognizing Packard. The issue 1
a $10o longer one of title. Nothing the
.isidemnt may do can change that. The
* ily question is, has Mr. Hayes the sa
gacity and honesty to attempt to pacify
the country, heal its dissensions, and
gtie the South peace and a new career
rOt prosperity ?
SWe can conscientiously say tlhat we be
Shes this is Mr. Hayes'purpose, and that
Ae e will carry it out.
__;r
Major Burke telegraphed yesterday
* to a prominent gentleman of national
putation, who is thoroughly con
t with Louisiana affairs, and
ya the very best facilities for in
atlon, stating fully the apprehen
in the minds of the people as to the
t of the Commission, and in reply
S irved the following dispatch:
WArmHINGTON, March 23.
Oi F. A. Burke:
I have the best reason to believe
ything will come out right, but it is
impossible to hurry Hayes. There is
lo thought of any attempt to put in
Packard, but the exact contrary is the
e tled purpose. I believe the best
,tlaoy is to wait.
has seriously blundered in
IPoderal help.
Waily toight.
While w had rsgreetted as keenlyas
our fellow oftizens generally, the delay
in the final dispoaitfon of the little band
of insurrectionists which must be inci
dent to the visitation of a new commis
sion, we have felt no disposition to judge
the action of the President in the mat
ter very harshly. Subjected for eight
weary years to constant deceptions and
disappointments, our people have nat
urally grown morbidly suspicious of
the Federal power; and when the "new
Southern policy," which was expected to
break upon us like a revelation of peace,
was inaugurated by a resolution of the
President and Cabinet to send acommis
sion here, an apprehension seized the
public mind that the Administration
had abandoned "the policy," and gone
over to Morton, Blaine and Packard, or
that the President, taking advantage of
pur supposed helplessness and depen
dence upon the mercy of the general
government, proposed to exact from us
degrading and humiliating concessions
in considaration of the recognition of
Gov. Nicholls.
We have participated to but a limited
extent in these apprehensions. The
legal government of the State, indeed,
has appeared to us so firmly rooted, so
fully established, organized and recog
nized by the masses of the people, that
it seemed impossible to overthrow it
without provoking a terrible clvil con
vulsion, and we could not believe that
Mr. Hayes was so deficient in wisdom
as to provoke such an issue for the pur
pose of maintaining the miserable and
disgusting remnant of carpet-baggery
which holds its last lodgment in this
State.
That we have been treated to the ap
pointment of a commission to visit New
Orleans, instead of a prompt order for
the withdrawal of the troops, is certainly
to be deplored, since it prolongs a sit
uation disastrous to business and indus
try. But let us not yet denounce
President Ha;es as recreant to the
noble sentiments of his inaugural and
the pledges of his nearest friends, nor
assume that we are to be required by
this commission to purchase exemp
tion from Federal interference by a de
grading and ruinous compromise. The
Southern policy which Mr. Hayes has
promised the country is a great and
wise policy, but it is in direct antago
nism to the antecedents, traditions and
policies of Mr. Hayes' party, covering a
stormy period of seventeen years. It
is, in short, a strictly Democratic and
constitutional policy. To inaugurate
and carry out this policy is an
infinitely more difficult task' for
Mr. Hayes to accomplish than it
would have been to a Demo
cratic President. Early in the can
vass Senator. Morton uttered a
practical political truth when he said
that no man was stronger than his
party. Occasionally there appear in
public affairs men of power and intel
lect so great that they become excep
tions to this rule. But the average poll
tician or statesman is never stronger
than his party; it is an extraordi
nary event that we have fallen
upon an average \statesman whose
purposes are better than those of his
party. We have much to be thankful
in that, and instead of striking at him
when, in wrestling with the wicked ele
ments of his party, he falters, we should
rally to him and strengthen him.
We stand by President Hayes yet.
The DEMOCRAT was the first paper in
the South which came up to the sup
port of his policy. We believed at first
that he was sincere, and we are entirely
confident that he is sincere now. We
are opposed to the commission; we re
gard it as a violation of that principle of
local self-government to which the
President has pledged himself: we
know that in prolonging the period of
uncertainty it is causing our fellow
citizens the loss of thousands of
-dollars daily. Yet badgered by Blaine,
Morton, Sherman and that class of
men, the ablest and most powerful
leaders of his party, we can realize the
tremendous pressure and grave dificul
ties under which Mr. Hayes is prosecu
ting his Southern policy. The majority
of the people of the whole country;
those representing great commercial
and industrial interests, and even the
Conservative Republican leaders, are all
backing the prompt enforcement of the
Southern policy. But t;ere are Blaine
and Morton and Sherman, backed by
the fanatical crowds who
constituted the army of the
bloody shirt, moving heaven and
earth to defeat it. Let us, of the South,
then be patient with the President; let
us uphold and strengthen him, until it
is clear that he has succumbed to
the bad counsels and influences
of the worst men of his party.
That he will succumb, we have
not the slightest apprehension. We
are entirely confident, and our confi
dence is based upon reliable informa
tion, that Mr. Haye's commission will
dispose of Mr. Packard, and that no
compromise is expected on the part of
the Nicholls government. We are con
fident that Mr. Hayes will carry out his
pledges to establish in this State and
South Carolina local self-government.
But in the meantime, let our people
stand firmly and unfalteringly upon the
grounds they have assumed:
That the Nicholls government is the
legal government of Louisiana, and
that they will sustain it to the last ex
tremity, with their fortunes and their
lives.
That they will enter into no bargain
or compromise for the adjustment or
satisfaction of any of the pretensions of
S. B. Packard and his gang.
That we are a free people, with a well
organized republican government, and
I we deeiifatý *o v ia ; º9 E the
7.gea 4*Q OOE
represent us in Oongress.
That in carrying out his Southern
polioy, and in all other wise and just
public measures, we will give the Presi
dent a cordial support-holding our
selves ready, if he attempts to impose
upon us another usurpation, to protect
ourselves against the foul wrong, even
if it plunges the country into civil war.
COU 10N EXCHANfGE.
The meeting hold at the Cotton Ex
change yesterday at 3:30 p. m. was the
largest ever held in this city.
The object of the call was to express
the sentiments of all the operators and
dealers in this great commodity, of all
who were connected with a trust and
interest of the value of one hundred
millions of dollars, in regard to one of
the most brazen falsehoods ever dis
patched from this city.
This was the statement telegraphed
by Packard that his miserable fraud of
a government was recognized by the
representatives of the commercial
classes of this city.
The answer to this atrocious false
hood will be found in the very emphatic
resolutions published in another col
umn, which were unanimously adopted
and ordered to be telegraphed to the
President of the United States.
There was an earnestness and enthu
siasm manifested at this meeting which
cannot be fully described in words.
The idea that so shameless a falsehood
should be sent forth in the presence of
a sentiment so unanimous, and with a
knowledge so universal that not a sin
gle person of any standing or repute in
the mercantile classes has any other
feeling but that of the profoundest con
tempt for the gang of vagabonds and
bummers collected at the St. Louis Ho
tel and salling themselves the govern
ment of Louisiana, gave peculiar force
and effect to the deeol . tions of the
Exchange.
The Chamber of Commerce and the
Merchants' Exchange will hold meet
ings, and give utterance with like
unanimity and vigor to the same senti
ments.
In addition to these manifestations,
a list of the leading merchants of the
city, representing many millions of
capital and property, was made up in a
few hours, subscribing to a telegram to
the same effect as the resolutions
adopted by the Erchange.
The Nrew Orleans D6uoRAT and also the r'wa
yuweseem to be ot opinion that the Goneral Asseni
bly have performed a most wonder full feat inl the
pas-age tf Morgan's Louislana and Texas Itlilrd. ad
and Steamship Company bill. It does look a litil,,
s.tpendons on paper, and smacki very strongly
of a sale of the Mta.e to Mr. Charles Morgan. We
presume, however, we had as well g.ve Mr. Mor
gan a bill of sale of onrselves, as any other mil
lion lre and bond holder. It smel a like a job,
but, of course, we cannot say positively. [ lans
field Reporter.
We would be much indebted to the
astute editor of the Mansfield paper if
he would point out the section of the bill
which "smells of a job." It is the mis
sion of the DEMOCRAT to oppose all
"jobs," and we believe that the mem
bers of the Legislature who managed
the bill are incapable of jobbery. We
may remark to our snarlish contempo
rary that the highest virtue does not
seek its constant manifestation in sus
picions of the integrity of others.
DILD.
TWOHIG.--On Fridey, March 23, 1877 at 2 pV
m., WILLIAM TWOHIIU.a native of this, Iry,
aged 26 pears and 2 months, oldest son of the
late Bartholomew Twohig and Catherine Shh:a.
The funeral will take place at 3 o'clock THIS
EVENING from the residence of his mother,
No, 196 St. Thomas street, near Orange. 'Ihe
friends of the family are respectfully invited to
attend. *
Notice to Tax-Payers.
City taxes of 1877 paid this day at five per cent
discount by HENRY BIER.
mh22 2dp tf No. 9 Caronndolt trnnt.
M'ME OLYMPE,
144 ..............Ca al treet.............. 144
SPRING AND SUMMER GOODS
RECEIVED TO.I)AY.
Leghorn, Rice, Tuscan and Creole HATS.
100 COSTUMES-SIlk, Barege and Silk Gren
adines, Linen. Cretonne, Zephyrs.
Muslin, Nainsook and Batiste MATINEES.
Chinese Crape 'and Lace POLONAIBES.
Dora and Briton Country SUITS, ttc.
FLOWERS, FANS, BELTS, Etc.,
mh24 25 27 28 2dp
CARPET WAREHOUSE.
1........Charres stpet.......Cha....
We offer at Reduced Prices our Large St k of
CARPETING of all kinds.
FLOOR OIL CLOTHS, of all widths an al
ities.
MATTING, Table and Piano COVERS.
WINDOW SHADES Cornices. Bands etc..
CURTAIN AND FURNITURE MATERIALS,
of all kinds and qualities, etc.
Also. BURLAPS by thebale or niece.
mhl8 2vDRMoSa a. RRnT7RR A Tr Rnw.
Wood-Wood-Wood-Wood.
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
HONEY ISLAND WOOD and OO AL YARD,
No. 373 Jnlla street, New Basin, near Mag
nolia Bridge.
Postofflce address, Lock Box No. 1oso.
Delivered to all parts of the city,
PRICE- FOR THIS WEEK.
Ash woad, ver cord.....................~ 50
Oak wood per cord.................. 5
Ash and oak mixe t, p-r cord........ .. 6 00
Liberal discount made to dealers.
a ' faution giuarant'ed.
mh17 2dptf m&e P. RAD LA'T, Acent.
DUCONGE DRUG STORE
A. CARKOUCIIE,
89 Chartres Street,
Products of French Pharmaceutic,. received
by steamer Hannover.
A complete assortment of
FRENCH PATENT MEDICINES,
most in vcgune, such as Elixir Bonj'au. Dooros,
Pepsine, Sylphium Cyrenaicum, Dehaut's Pills,
Oroesnier's Anti-Neuralgla. Blaneard & Leroy's
Preparations. Dr. Churchill's, Laville's. eta.
For s#ae br.
--j
e
"'01II ONIISI[IOd
One Whole Set of Irons In One.
1 ONE IRON, WITH TWO PLUGS. WILL DC
ALL TIlE IRONING AND FLIQTtNG
ONE HAND CAN DO WITH ANY
NUMBER OF IRONS.
It is a Nickel-plated case Iron, with a wooden
hand piece, heatoel and continually
kept hot by two east-iron plugs.
ITS ADVANTAG(ES.
First
Saves one
h ia l or
more of the
fuel orrli
niartly used
J in ironing.
Second
Saves three
I, fourths of
thei, walk
S ing and
III, ( o ban tho ofd
i I flat iron
It p lrocets.
Third
Can be heated with oflther coal or wood fire
stoves or gratens.
SFourth-We us nnll sides of the iron and utll
ize all the heat, thus gaining one-half on the old
L process.
Fifth-Always cleon; never rusting, never
being enxosed to soot.
I 1xth--On single heat will iron frIm thirty
minutes to one hour, according to weight and
moisture of the goods.
Seventh-The fire you cook with can be used
for Ironing, even while the stove is coveretd
I with vessels, thus saving the entire amount of
fuel use I ordinarily in Ironing.
rEighthi
Does better
work. im
parts more
tmoothnes
and gloss
from the
nickeled face
and rounded
glossing heel
than any other iron in the world.
Ninth- Haves time, fuel and labor: thus saves
money: is the only praetital Patent Iron on the
market, anti will eventually take the place of
the old one-faced irons.
Canvasser Now in the City,
Taking Orders.
GREEN OR BLACK TEA
Worth 40c. we sell at asc.
GREEN OR BLACK TEA
Worth 50o. we sefl at 400
GREEN OR BLACK TEA"
Worth ooec. we seel at oc.
GREEN OR BLACK TEA
Worth 70., we sell at o00
GREEN OR BLACK TEA
Worth $1 we sell at 750.
GREEN OR BLACK TEA
Worth $1.40 we soil at $1.
TRY OUR I1 OOLOaG.
TRY O9R $1 IMPERIAL.
TRY OUR St GUNPOWDER.
TRY OUR 81t ENGISH BREAKFAST.
Something never before offered in the South is
Our 81.25 Grade
in Oolong. Imperial, Gunpowder. Young Hyson
and English Breakfast Teas.
r.b
Gunpowder. Youn yon, Uncolored J
pan. Oolong. English Breakfast and Pekoes.
We have choice Teas from the East Indies.
We guarantee our Teas to be perfectly pure.
This Company deals in all grades of
COFFEE.
GREEN RIO Goc.; parched or ground 25c. All
finer grades equally cheap.
This Company has now on hand some very
choice OLD GOVERNMENT JAVA, very scarce.
Our Goods are Sold at New
York Prices.
PIPER-HEIDSIECK.
-And
II. PIPER & CO.'3
"CARTE BLANCHE SEC."
FOR SALE EVERYWHERE.
mh2o Im
RECOGNIZED OFFICIALLY
AND BY PUBLIC OPINION THAT THE
Steinway, Knabe and Pleyel
-Are the -
LEADING PIANOS
Of the World.
Convince yourself by calling at the General
Agency at
GRUNTEWALD HIALL,
Where you will find the Largest and Beet Be.
lections of all kinds of
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AT LOWEST PRICES and EASIEST TERMS
Brass Instruments, 8 rinss, Accordeo-s,
Music Boxes, Music. of my *ow
Importation, at
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
It is in your interest to call on me before por
phasing elsewhere.
LOUIS GBUNEWALD,
In this C1t7, freum Twenty to Forty Yearl S n ouuftart IJe, aw r
Hardly a P'art (riterioq of .lhe HICK * RI 0 PsANOS
That Are New Bring Manufactured.
The New Sel1 Upright (:hickerig Pioan is a Ie;Ir .P'2C'r MODELI,
Be Sure Yu., &.et uln e (hli'kerint if You WaVt5
the Bl,,'1' PIANO
I FOI1 'ALE 1sY
PHILIP W`ERLIN,
N ,a. 7,4 and I )O ! Ironne ~ttwct,
On Monthly Payments Liberal Discount for Cash.
mhl7 tm
----_. O _.,I I)l. '. . [ A :'. .T1- A C-iL IY R . R
L OLD I'1i0N MATA IA UL 'IURAl ER.
NO. 86 ST. CHARLES ST.. INEW ORLEANS, LA.
Exact S.Rs auiid Price of my i E.rtr (io'd Pen;:
No. 10 No. a No H No. 7 No. No.N. 4 Nm. No S NI
$5 11340 *3 *x.,0 O Q12 5 $2 SIGOl. 5 1 II e
Theso Pons have hben unnd throulholr,t thu Ponth and W' rt fr Ite ptt twontJ yOeas.
They nar Polid O(nld. DI)'mond P'ointed, and warrIanted. If any 1', p:ov +.s dfutective, Iwill re.
plaeo it with another one free of charue.
I will take broken or worn out (eo,,l P,'rfn in x,'htanmc for new oni., a' th. rfollowing prioaer
Ramen sizes na NO. 1.2 and 3.25 centsH: No .. 4 and 5. IS ~cents; N ,.v .( eanl 7, ,, L'rt; sor. a, 70 centf ;
No, 9, st ; No. 10. $1 no.
]UITBIER PO'CKET HOL,DERR. f.r any aizeo exceDt Nom. I and 10. $1
OOLD-MOUNTEI) POCKE'T Ii)LI)ERiM. forNos.3, 4, r, :4.anV 7, i.
Hont by registered mail, qt my rlsk, on rEel'.it of pric,e, or by Ett r'ms C, . 0, i.
GOLD RING SI'1tCl ALT'Y. :;00 IIFFEI ENT STYLES.
A. i. IILL, JEWELER,
NO. W6 ST. CII.tRLES STREET, NEW OIRIEATS, LA.
MY PRICES ARE ALWAYS THE LOWEST.
DIAMOND RINGS FROM $16 UPWARDS.
AMETHYST RING'i. the largest stock in the Houtb. All sizes, shapes and styles $4 to $I.
ItAME) RINGS. The best as.ortmrnt of flney stones in the city. PI1I'tE4 LOW.
P.:ARL AND GAP.NET r'NG-. Single stones and clusters in gr"'rt sarl ty.i
INITIAL SEAL RING". (Pink Onyx.) Medium size ,. largo siz, ls1. ANY LETTER. .
Also, a cometlete assortment of alisdlm' and gentlemen's Peal Fings nf h blood stone, topes,
mons agate, pink, red. gray, black, white. purple and green onyx sottitng+, at prinoes from $8 for
small rings, to $5 , $ a . 10, si and upwards for the finer qualities.
PLAIN GOLD ItING -I always keep a full stock of these rings and can furnish any size,
width or quality. Prices vi to $20. Orders filled same day rec'iv, d. Initi:li or inscriptions en
graved at 6 .ents a letter. In ordering rings measure the largest joint of the finger with a narrow
strip of stiff paper and sen'l it to me.
25 different styles solid gold buttons, $1.1 st 50, $2,2 250, :1 anl Ss.
SLOXalD GOI.sDi. aJ * TTD P.
e00 sets, all new designs; Diamonds, Pearls. Aretllhyvts, ( :,rnts,. Fmeoratll. Opals, Aqua
Marine J, ti, Turquoise. Cameos, Coral, Plain Goll. Engravgec (io,l. E:miunilcd Gold, Bom I
Gold. Etruscan. Blood Stone. Onyx. &0. Prieas $t ro, $2. sa t and ulpwa dls.
Solidc Golcd Eleoevo 3iuttonasr.
In almost ns grr'?t variety as Studs. Priees from $2 50 inpwardi.
INITIAL CUFF UT'rlON`, No.1, line gold and blacik in ,m n!1: letter.............. $
2. . . rai e' letter .......................... M $
tIbts Iner....... .... IS 9M s
4, " " v.ry l~ar anyl tlegant... O16 K
Any artilel sent safly by reolitered mail at my risk on r.cei tt of pri !e, or C. O. D. by E1.
Dress, with privilege of examination if desired. Auidrs.s .s .itabovc.
mhil
THE AMERICAN WATCH CO. OF WALTHAM.
Announce that they have been awardld nt Phlla l,!pht!lin four nmdanl, vil:
FOR WATCHES FOR WATCH MAKING MACHINERIY, FOR A SYOBA3EO
OF WATCH MAKING, AND FOR GUOLD) ANDi SILVERl WATCH OCASB.
AMERICAN WALTHAM WATCH AGENCY,
A. M. HILL, Jeweler,
86 St. Charles Street, Corner of Commercial Place,
'NEW ORLEANS, LA.
REVISED AND REDUCED PRICE LISTS
The following watohes are all patent lesd
615 jeweled, same size as the illustration. and sold
unaer full guarantee:
Solid bilver Watch, same as cut........... .
The same. but open face and flat glass.....,. Ii
Solid Nickel Watch, very strong asae...... t
Solid Silver Stem-Winder, no key required.. .
The same, but open face.................... -w
a o. Slilver Stem-Winder.............., U
Solid Gold Watch. 2 oz. 14 karat case........ :
Same. but 18 karat ease................ . i
Solid Gold 2% oz. 14 karat, Stem-Winder....
The same, but 18 karat ease ............ . S '
Ladies' Gold Watch..................... .
The same, but Stem-Winder........... ..
In addition tothose styles Ihave a oomp u ,
assortment of Waltham Watehee. from the aboy
prices to (50o.
For the plantation. farm or a Workiao mantr
$15 Watch or 25 Stom-Winder will prov ae1at
is required.
I will send Watches. Gold or Silver CGalas
any Article of Jewelry, by Express. 0. O. D..p. .
mitting buyers to examine the article belt
paying, and, if not suited, to return it,
SADDRESS AS ABOVE.
__..~..... .... __...... ...... . . .. .. d.
Diseases of the Eye and Ear.
DR. C. HEARD,
OOULIS F AND AURIST,
142 Canzal Street,
Lock Box 1817. New Orleans, La.
felO 1y
WV. W. WASHBURN,
ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER,
113 Canal street.
Opposite Clay Statue. New Orleans.
Mr. WASHBUBN is himself an artist of
twenty-flve year+ experience, and is supported
in each department by a 1-orps of assltaD
who have no superiors la this or the Old WorHo
He is the master of his business.
materialsand manes the best work on
Ntnent. Yon my call this
"BLOWING HIS 0OWN O "
"d hj rgYI *0tLI: " ;I:tf~;m~ii~:
PREMIUM BONDS
ALWAYS ON IhAND AND FOB SALE IS
SUMS TO RUIT.
N vxt Drawing 15th of April.
Ni ll 1O,.L4 I.EIlfr.,IATIVB WARRAIPI #,
PI'urchasR by A. LaMOBE,
nmhi Iot Letter D, Oaliier Court.
FORt SALE.
A FIANDI)OM PAICE IP TWO AOREB front
on the beatulfl rimv.r Tohe. eomprtslnt g
acres of excellent. neWly-fo'..ced land, of t.Wo
lo are admlrttbltY altnOl to the cultivationoL
ullgar, netton, or "orn: the balance consl
of a magnifltcent m--ldow in which the res
iA situat"d. The whole property will be
conlsttlng of the land above mentioned,
resldence, kitchen, ablins, stable, vegetble s
Irit gardens, and all necessaryapDurtenanles.
This offers an excellent opportunity to any es`
wishing to raise stoet, or to eulivate dotton
stgat on a small Ncale there being a c j
a sugar mil m in tiet nelgbborho.t
.-oprtr has neveor ibet mindte ..
4w beWna-house is embortablt f'urnlahe4
sold .i th or wltbontj
3g ...eu

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