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The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, June 23, 1877, Image 4

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DAILY DEMOCRAT.
Oicial Journul o the State of1 LeiSmab
Ofitll Journal of the city of trlees 900
0*..s, 109 @w-vim St
GEORGE W. DUPRE N o0..
PROPDINTOIN.
Gn03me W. 1)11133
B. J. nJARSET. :033 AUGUOTI3,
ALBUST 0. JAN13.
H..?. flUARPSUT.............laDIior,
NEW O@I, ATEA, JUNE 33, 1SIT.
The New York SBts, more prompt than
other daily journals of that city, renders
full justice to our State securities and
to the wise and honest administration
which has attracted capital and induced
permanent investment therein. The
following reference to our consols and
financial system evinces the Sun's just
and intelligent View of this subject:
Not long ago the mmense natural r eource.
of tiuisiana were deesi d by a careful corre
spondent of the t,. With good government
gnd an honest flnanohI.|polJt . Lousiana oai.
harl r fal to prosper. We observe In some of
our Rtepubiiean contemporaries a dispositlonl to
ieprociate oulslana seurltles by clasing
them with the bonds of htates ehioh have made
no adequate provision for the payment of in
terest and the rode. ptlon of princlpal. This
ar~i.in either from tgnornnoe or from malfee.
The h.nded debt of the Htate is limited by the
constitution to 15i,000,00. In point of fa t it
is hardly over $11,u0O0,. By the prosent
funding system the only contltutional bonds
slsuable are the copsols, the Interest on
whlobh dons not depsnd up i any legislative
approprlation. The appropriation is alredy
made by aeonstitat l iprovision setting aside
for the purpose a tax, ent beyond
the reach of anyt or department of
the government T h. deposited, as soon as
ollectcd, with thbank whloh ot as the 8tate's
iscal Agent an whic has al ready guaranteod
_the payment of the Jay and January interest.
We ntierlal napprehension for the credit of
Loulslana. TIer ggreat natural wealth and the
economical an I honest administration of Goy.
Nicholls should tlie her securities good stand
ing in the markets. An auparent attempt to
bear those senuritie is the ooosslon of these re
marks.
The owners of houses, and all people
engaged in trade, complain of the hard
times and pathetically inquire when
there will be a change, a revival of
business and hope in this city. We
can answer this inquiry by saying
"when the stock subscription of the
New Orleans* Paclfio railroad Is com
pleted to the sum demanded to render
that enterprise a speedy certainty."
Considering that there are seventeen
millions on deposit in our banks,we mar
vel that a week's delpy should occur in
making up the comparativelysmall sum
required by the managers to fulfill their
pledges to the people to complete this
road in time to particlpate in next sea
son's business.
The mere assurance of such a result
will Impart new life to every branch' of
trade and business, attract new cap
ital, increase immigration and give
enhanced value to every species of pro
perty.
Capitalists and property holders of
New Orleans, rouse yourselves from your
lethargy and lend a hand to bring back
the trade which belongs to this city and
has been diverted from it as a result of
that lethargy and lack of enterprise;
go to the meeting to-night at St. Pat
rick's Hall and aid by all means in your
power the president and directors of the
New Orleans Pacific in their patriotic
efforts to build that great road.
It is decidedly refreshing for Presi
dent Hayes to intimate that he will not
interfere in any manner with the due
process of law in Louisiana in the mat
ter of the prosecution of Johnson and
Dibble. The Radical policy of central
izing all governmental power through
out the Union in the Federal govern
ment has been so vigorously pursued
since the war that the minds of the
people have become completely mud
dled upon the subject of the constitu
tional division of power between the
States, as qualified sovereignties, and
the nation, as the agent of those sov
ereignties in respect to certain well-de
fined purposes of government. But
the old Radical party, with all of its
"higher law" notions and State-destroy
ing schemes, has been completely
routed. The Republic has been made
fast to its old moorings, the constitution
is now in force in all of its pristine vigor
and Mr. Hayes and future presidents
will find that Louisiana, like other
Southern States, is as far beyond the
control of the Federal administration
as is New York or Massaohusetts; and
will attend to her domestic affairs and
prosecute criminals to her heart's con
tent without so much as saying "by
your leave."
We have had occasion before to no
tice the eminent qualities of U. S. Grant
as a writer of English. We find, how
ever, that we have never done him full
justice. The recent letter of Mr. Grant to
Mr.Childs,descrlbing the workings of his
noble heart and powerful brain, under
the pressure of English snobbery, is
simply sublime. He says:
I love to see our country honored and respne
tod abroad, and 1 am proud to belleve that it is
by most all nat ions, and by some even loved. It
has always been my desire to see all jealousies
between England and the United 8tates abated
and every sore heated. They ara more power
ful for the spread of commerce and civiization
than all others combined and can do more to
remove causes of wars by creating mutual in
t'"rests that would be so much destroyed by
war.
Now, the touching patriotism which
glows throughout this eloquent expres
sion of condescending interest in "our
country," in one who has given so much
talent, self-denying labor and unre
quited energy to its service, is beautiful.
It even suggests an increase of salary,
a gift from the bankers, or some paid
up stock, you know. But when we are
given in the closing paragraph the
sweet picture of "jealousies between
England and the United States abated
and every sore healed"--as being "more
powerful for the spread of commerce
and civilization than all others com
bined"-we feel how great a thing is
the English language-when well used!
A PAYING INVESTMENT,
Yesterday an advertisement, signed
by a formidable 'list of New York
c apitalists, appeared in one of our local
papers, inviting those having funds to
- Invest to subscribe to the four per cent
funded loan of the United States. Op
portunities for profitable and at the
same time safe investments are growing
so rare that this four per cent loan is
quite popular, and a portion of it will
be promptly taken up in the different
olties of the Union. It would be singu
lar, however, if this offer should find
any takers in New Orleans, where an
opportunity is presented for a safe in
vestment far more profitable to the
subscribers and of inoalculable impor
tance to the welfare of our city and
IState. We refer to the New Orleans
Pacific Railway.
We have heard no well-informed per
son deny that this road, it completed,
would control a large trade for this city.
But it has been held, and still is believed
by some of our fellow-citizens that the
cost of building, equipping and operat
ing the road will be so great that invest
ors in its stock cannot derive as large a
rate of interest from their money as they
would if they invested in other enter
prises. We understand and concede
the soundness of the principle upon
which this objection is based, and if the
assumption were correct the road when
completed would certainly fail to con
fer the benefits expected from it. But,
unless figures are false, trade and geo
graphical relations incomprehensible
and human judgment deranged, the as
sumption that'the road will not pay is
utterly untenable.
COST OF THI ROAD.
We find that the most exaggerated
and, in some instances, the most prepos
terous ideas of the cost of building a
railroad from this city to Shreveport
and Marshall prevail. It will cost ten
millions, we are told, and we are referred
for proof of this exaggerated statement
to the cost of the construction of other
lines, and the estimates made for the
building of the Backbone road in the
flush days of railroad building and
squandering anterior to the great crisis
of 1873. But there is no sense in calcu
lating the cost of building a railroad in
1877 upon estimates made in 1873, or the
cost of work to be done by well known
and honest business men upon estimates
made for the same work by rings, spec
ulators and politicians whose purpose
was to make vast sums of money and
who expected the Legislature and Con
gress to pay their estimates.
Major Greene, after a careful survey
of the route of the New Orleans Pa
ciflo and months of observation, with
much of the heavy work progressing
under his eye, has furnished the pub
lie, through a report to the directors of
the company, with a carefully prepared
estimate of the total cost of this enter
prise, to which we invite general atten
tion. Major Greene is an eminent and
experienced engineer and certainly
would not be guilty of the folly of
making a grossly inaccurate estimate
of such a work and, by so doing, damage
his well-earned professional reputation.
The figures with which he furnishes us
in his report of the cost of this road
may therefore be safely accepted by
the public.
The road, when completed from Bayou
Goula to Shreveport and Marshall, will
be 288 miles in length. Major Greene,
estimating in detail the cost of the sev
eral divisions of the road, the grading,
bridging, superstructure laid down
complete, shops, stations, etc., sums up
the total cost of the completed road
from Bayou Goula to Shreveport and
Marshall at $3,537,600; estimating the
purchase price of the completed road
from this city to Bayou Goula at
$750,000, the completed line from New
Orleans to Shreveport and Marshall
would thus cost the company $4,287,600.
In his estimate of the cost of the
road from Bayou Goula northward,
Major Greene makes no mention
of rolling stock; but he includes an
estimate of $229,880 for shops, stations,
section-houses, etc., not more than half
of which will be required for these pur
poses until some time after the comple
tion of the road, while the other half
will be ample to furnish the road with
an equipment sufficient for all imme
diate purposes, and which can be in
creased as the business of the road
increases. The striking and irrefutable
fact then is presented to the public
that the New Orleans Pacific Railway can
be built and equipped from New Orleans
to Shreveport and Marshall for four
millions two hundred and eifght!,-seven
thousand six hundred dollars.
This road, completed at this price, will
be the cheapest railroad in the United
States, the average cost of building and
equipping our existing roads having
been twenty-eight thousand dollars per
mile. But the remarkably low estimate
of the cost of this road is easily ex
plained. The country presents
great advantages for railroad build
ing; much of the work has
been done and will continue to be done
by cheap convict labor; much other
labor will be required and employed,
but the cost of grading has been re
duced fifty or sixty per cent. Besides
this, the cost of material has been
immensely reduced. Thus, iron rails
formerly cost eighty dollars per ton;
now steel rails may be purchased for
fifty dollars per ton; the class of loco
motives which formerly cost $15,000 are
now worth only $8000; box cars for
merly cost $800, now the price is but
$400. Everything else pertaining to
railroad building has undergone a sini
lar reduction. It is very easy to see
from these figures how a railroad, the
estimated cost of which was ten mil
lions five years ago, may now be con
structed for about four millions.
WILL IT PAY?
Now, then, the important question
arises: Will the New Orleans Pacific
Railway, when completed, pay a fair
interest or profit on the, say, four mil
lions and a quarter, invested in its
construction? English capitalists were
tempted to invest vast sums of money
ia the rotten bonds of Turkey, capti.
vated by six per cent interest; the ruling
rate of interest in England is four per
cent, and English-Amerioan investors
are expected to subscribe heavily to
the four .per cent loan of the United
States. Eight per cent interest on a
permanent safe investment would be a
captivating scheme in any country;
shrewd business men will risk millions
on an investment which promises
ten per cent. At a very low esti
mate of the business of the New
Orleans Pacific, it will pay its stock
holders fifteen per cent on their invest
ments.
The last report of the Texas Pacific
Company showed that the net earnings
of their road from Shreveport, in
this State, to Dallas, Texas, were
in 1876, $*060 per mile. The net
earnings of the New Orleans
and Jackson road, we are unoffi
cially informed, amounted last year to
$2000 per mile. The Texas and Pacific
last season transported 050,000 bales of
cotton, 150,000 of whioh went by rail to
St. Louis and the East. The earnings
of a railroad from New Orleans to the
eastern terminus of the Texas Pacific
would certainly earn as much as the
Texas road. It would share four
fifths of the business of the Texas road
and draw a large trade from the coun
try east of Red River and an immense
patronage from southwestern Arkansas;
besides this, it w uld develop a large
business along its line. This is an im
portant item in the estimate, since
seventy per cent. of the business of
many roads is local business, created
along their lines. In this connection it
is important to observe that the New
Orleans Pacific, when built, can be
operated at a much less cost than the
Texas Pacific. Owing to the heavy
grades of the latter road, a forty ton lo
comotive can only draw a train of fifteen
loaded cars; while the engineers affirm
that the grades of the New Orleans
road will enable such a locomotive easily
to draw a train of forty-five loaded cars.
Thus, if our figures and statements are
correct, and we believe they are, it is
evident that the New Orleans Pacific
will earn as much per mile as the Texas
Pacific; but let us say in round num
bers six hundred and forty-five thousand
dollars., or about two thousand dollars
per mile, or fifteen per cent on four
millions and a quarter of dollars.
We present these statements and
figures to the public because we believe
them to be fair and reasonable, and we
do not believe they can be refuted. In
deed, we think they do not tell the
whole truth. We believe the road will
pay a much larger profit than we have
worked out; but we would rather make
an under-estimate than an exaggerated
one. Be that as it may, our facts and
figures are before the public for exam
ination, and we hope that every man
who has the progress of New Orleans
and the prosperity of the State at heart
and a dollar to invest, will examine
and scrutinize this article and talk to
the engineer, the president and direc
tors of the road, and with his fellow
citizens, about this enterprise. The road
is essential to the commerce and growth
of New Orleans and it offers an oppor
tunity for the profitable investment of
several millions of dollars. Why, then,
should it not be built ?
PRESIDENT HAYES AS OLIVER TWIST
What Mr. Joseph Pulitzer means by
his elaborate and very peculiar letter
descriptive of President Hayes' policy
(printed in the DEMOCRAT of yesterday);
whether it is written in bitter irony to
expose the President's ingratitude and
inconsistency, or in covert commenda
tion and approval, will puzzle all inge
nious minds. We think, however, that
the President's champions may be able
to deduce from the statement and the
conclusrons of this mystical German a
logical process through which the force
of much of the satire of Pulitzer is
greatly weakened.
Pulitzer's main proposition is that
Hayes got into the presidency through
the fraud of his own party; that he
is the conscious receiver of sto
len goods; that he has administered
these goods in the interest of the party
from which they were stolen ; that he has
made a "dead corpse" of the principal
thief and has, while excluding Samuel
J. Tilden from physical possession of
the place to which he was justly enti
tled, installed therein the spirit of
which that eminent citizen was the in
adequate embodiment. He has done
more than that; he has expelled the
chief perpetrators of the fraud of the
party in the electoral villainy; has bro
ken the spell of the bloody shirt and
silenced the cry of "rebel," etc.
To all of which the supporters of
Hayes have this ready and logical
answer:
The President of the United States
does not receive the office, nor does he
administer it, as a mere personal gift,
purchase or endowment, nor is he
expected or required by any ethical
law to recognize any obligations of grat
itude towards the party or towards indi
viduals who may have aided in elevat
ing him to this position, by whatever
methods. His highest and strongest
obligation is to recognize and carry
out the will of the majority of the
people of the United States; the
office he has obtained, by what
ever means, is a trust or agency
which he must administer with fidelity
to the expressed will of his mandatories,
who are the majority of the people.
That majority declared itself in favor of
the installation of the spirit and body
of Samuel J. Tilden in the White
House, but the body of Samuel, small as
it is, had not the spirit to force itself
therein, and Hayes, having been shoved
through the window on the shoulders of
Morton, Conkling and the rest, takes
possession and concludes to stay and so
administer the property that Tilden's
friends shall have no grounds of com
plaint. The rascals who used him as
Bill Sykes, old Fagan and the rest did
Oliver Twist, when they pushed him
through the transom that he might
open the door to the "big burglars,"
should be foiled in their felonious de
signs. Little Oliver turned traitor,
as did Hayes, peached on his principals,
and sought to condone his involuntary
agency in the burglary by assisting to
defeat and punish their nefarious plot.
Now, was not such treachery a moral
duty of Oliver and President Hayes ?
How else could he repair the wrong
done to the people and prevent the de
feat and the diverdion of the trust which
Mr. Tilden was entitled to but failed
to assume and discharge, unless he
administered the" same in the spirit
in which Tilden was instructed to ad
minister it? And was it not the first
requirement of his mandate that he
should make corpses of the gang of
which Morton, Blaine, Butler, Cameron
et al. were the Bill Sykeses and Fagans ?
THE WAR IN THE EAST.
As far as we can jadge, from the ob
scure accounts which reach us from the
scene of war around the Black Sea, the
Turks are having a hard time of it. On
the extreme left of their extended line
they have had a terriblydisastrous time
with the Montenegrins in the attempt
to revictual Nicsic, where a Turkish
garrison has been long cut off from com
munication. This was a vigorous at
tempt and indicated both dash and mil
itary skill in the Turkish leaders. There
are different accounts of its result.
Some say the Turks succeeded; other
accounts represent it as a disastrous
failure. All agree that the Turkish
forces were fearfully cut up by the
hardy and agile Montenegrins, the best
fighters in that whole region of coun
try. But whether successful or not in
their immediate object, the Turks are
certain to be worsted in the end. Their
victory will not only draw the Montene
grins, but also the Servians, into this
promiscuous fight. And the Servians,
backed by Russia, clamor to Austria to
come to their aid. These countries lie
adjacent to Austria, and her Belavic
populations are very impatient under
Austria's neutral and timid policy.
On their right flank, east of the Black
sea, the Tu*s appear to have had
nothing but disaster and losses. Now
and then they kill many thousand Rus
sians and repel assaults on Kars and
other fortified places with murderous
effect. But these reports are quickly
followed by others of retreats, aban
donments of position and the cutting off
of detachments sent to flank advancing
bodies of Russians, who appear in the
end to be slowly and surely enveloping
the whole of Armenia.
It is the old story of our war and of
the French and German war.
Gen. Pillow, after the first day's fight
at Fort Donaldson, telegraphed us:
" We are driving the enemy before us
with the bayonet."
The next telegram was to this effect:
"Our whole army capitulated to
Grant. Floyd and I escaped."
We fear that the Turkish Moukhtars,
All Pachas, Suleimans and Mehemets
are very much of the too sanguine and
ardent temperament of our old friend
Pillow.
The Russians, on the other hand,
command our respect for their adhe
rence to the Gradgrind philosophy:
" Facts, gentlemen, facts is what we
want."
TO THE SUMMER TOURIST.
Those of our citizens who are fortunate enough
to to able to setk respite from the laborsof the
business season Just closed, and to recuperate
their energies at some of the many delightfu
summer resorts to be found mn the Northern
States and Oanada, will be glad to learn that the
old favorite Jackson route, under a vigorous and
efficient management, has become one of the
very best traveling thoroughfares in the country.
Hundreds of thousands of dollars have been
expended, as we are crrdibly informed, during
the past twelve months for new iron and steel
rails, new orces-ties and new bridges, and to.day
it may be safely said that no road south of the
Ohio river surpasses the great Jackson route in
smoothness anl prfect safety. We have had
occasion, during the past few weeks, to travel
quite extensively over that road, and we can thus,
from actual experience. hear witness to its ex
cellence in every particular which goes to consti
tute a good road.
DIED:
T)E AMIMAN-Yesterday evening, at 7 o',loek,
Martine Augustine Marchand. wife of Michael
de Armas. a native of France, aged 57 vears.
1Her fri,nda and those of de Armas, Villarru
bia. Dueros and d'Hemecourt families, are re
spectfully invited to attendr the funeral, which
will take place at 4'; o'clock To-Day, from her
late residence. 488 Riyal stract, betweon Spain
and Lafayette Avenue. Third D'sRrlet.
THE Pit K IlICS.
This Club, composed of some of the most
prominent citizens of this community, have the
pleasure of announcing to their many friends
that their First Complimentary Entertainment
will take p'ace, as delignated, June 30. Ap
lplications for invitations will he promptly at
tended to by the genial Secretary of the Club.
Mr. EUG. D'HERETE, at No. 4 St. Ann street.
j'23 ShIp
' HE ROLL OF HONOR,
I:EVISEI AND COMPLETE.
Price 1o cents. Now ready. For sale at all the
Book stores. je23 2t 2p
JEWELRY AT AUCTION1
-mlVld]i.P ~tr M. l I^ T D P·r1 W. ]D.XL.'7'.
I. C. LEVI, Auctioneer,
108 ............................Canal Street............................ 18
WItL S ERI TWICE TW A WEEK, HIS
LARKGE AND ELEGA1'fT STOCK OF JEWELrtY AT AUCTION,
And remainder of dare will sell at Private Sale, as usual, from FIVE to TWENTY-fIVI P]I
CENT LE8B than any other establlshment which advertises daily.
Watches RepaIred and Diamonds Reset
Only by skillful workmen, at the lowest rates.
apd 2m OI, . LEVI, log Canal street.
JULES MUMM & CO.,
CEAM(PAG-NTS.
The Rest Wines Now Refirre the(. Public.
ZURIfRBIER & BERAN, Agents,
Corner Telhnupltoulas and Common lsreeta. sh
jnle itm
UPRIGHT CHICKEIUNQG PIANOS,
Whioh are presented to thn Dublic as the most peuRft fetlanos of their clase fin the world. The
Manufacturers, by utilizing all the improvements devetlotori during the Ist flit years. have sueo
oeoded in making a piano, which in tone. touch and durabil ty, surpasses al) p.anos made either
in Europe or this country, and offering It to the publei as Iw se any good Upri'tght Piano mada
I haves full assortment of the same on hand, and invite the public to examoin thlem.
I have a low-priced Upright PIANO, made by
HARDIDMAN & CC).,
in New zork, who use the hbest French antion, with the American Iron double frame sstem., alvinlg
them the touch of the bOst Fronch. and the fullness of the Amerlcan Pianos. Their price rangep
about $100 less than the PleycI Pianos, on account -of eblng mado hero, and paying no duty.
Bold on monthly payments, or rented with the privilege to purchase.
Fifty second-hand Pianos on hand, and for sale, at a bargain. Pianos tuned and repaired.
Mason & Hamlin's Organs, nine stops, only $114.
PHILIP WTERLEIN.
Tlie Leacd.inig PIano Dealer,
je20lm 78 and 90 B IHONNE STRIEET. N. O.
DISEASES OF THE EYE AND EAR,
DR. C. BEARD,
OCULIST AND AURIST,
142 CANAL MTREET,
Lock Box 1817. New Orleans, La.
felo ly d&w
TO bTEAMBOATMEN.
TH E UNITED OII, MILL4 OF NEW OIRLEANH
-known as the
COTTON SEED ASSOCIATION
call for Ib's to convey from 80,000 to 100.000 tonll
of Cotton Mend. Iby contract, from Memphis and
all points bolow, and from the tributaries to
New Orleans. Address
11. ANDREWS, President.
No. 10 Union street,.
Cincinnati (Gazette. Louisville Courier-Jour
1nal and St. Louis Reipubllean will copy for one
month and send hills to the Association,
jet?7 In
HilHTH ALL bItEN :IHIItT
1411I TTH HII IT
SHIIRTS MHIIITHI
8HIRTS -AT- I[IRtT8
SHIRTS SHIIRTH
SHIRTS IHIlRTS
fiT, B. T. WALSilE'S, iIRTS
*HIHTS SHIRTrH
HHIRTSH HIRTS
SHIRTS 110 Canal Ntreet. SHIRTS
nHIR'TS RIHIITH
SHIIITM I ...... I IHIIIrt
HIRTIH HHIRTS
SHIHTS' A SPECIAL CONSIGNMENT IHIr.
MHITM SHIIRTS
SHIRTS SHIH''TS
MHIRTS bIrish Made," SHIRBTM
HHIR I'M HHIRTS
HHIItI ALL LINEN, ALL SIZES, ,HIITS
HIRTH SHIRTH
SHIRT'I'H 11 I8
MHIRTH -AT- HHIRITH
HHIR fSH HIRTS
MHIRTH HHIRTW
HIItTHi $36 per I)ozen, SHiR~T
SHIRTS SHIRWIS
-HIRTSH sHIRTS
MHIIRITS And everything else for MHIRTS
SHI81TS 811 1HIRTS
SiHIItS (i('s Ii-eI(.II.l SHIRITS
SHIRTS SHIRTS
MHIIRT' SHIRTH
RHSITH IHRfTSTH
HHMILTH I cHlltleln ' I~re t [IRPT
lITM ET(liQU ALLY IO.1F, HIIII(tTH
HHItT'r - AT-- HH IlTH
SHIRTHi 4HIIRI'S
1HIII r'SI IIIILRTS
MHIRTS 1M 11 SHIIRTS
je3 Im2D MAE
MATTINGS, OIL CLOTHS, CARPETS.
ELKIN & CO.,
168...........Ganalstreet.........168
Are receiving now styles of
FANCY CANTON MATIINGH, BRUSSELS
and INGRAIN CARPETS and FLOOR
OIL CLOTHS,
All at the Lowest Prices. je8 1m2do
W. .W. WASHBURN,
ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER,
113 Canal street.
Opposite Clay Statue, New Orleans.
Mr. WASHBUBN is himself an artist of
twenty-five years experience, and is supported
in each department by a corps of assistante
who have no superiors In this or the Old World.
He is the master of his business, Besides
employiag the best artists he uses the beet
materials and maxes the beet work on the Con
tinent, You may call this
"BLOWING HIS OWN HORN."
but for proof he refers you to his thirty thous
and patrons and to his work, which may be in,
pt-eted at his Art Gallery. fee 6m2dp
OCTAVE FORMTALL,
DEALR IN
BUILDING MATERIALS,
NAVAL STORES, PAINTS, OILS AND
BRUSHE S,
O8 Natchez street, New Orioan.
e3 lm2p
THE BEST PIANOS.
AT
GRUNEWALD HALL.,
AT LOW PRICES
AND
EASY MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS.
Steinway & Sons
Achieved a double victory at the Centennial
W. Knabe & Co.,
Pleyel, Wolf & Co.,
The Leading Planes of the World and Unsur
passed for the Southern Climate.
PARLOR AND CHURCH ORGANS,
Of the Most Popular Makers.
Direct importation of all kinds of
MUSICAL INSTRTUMENTS
and PUBLISHERS OF SHEET MUSIC.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
orders solicited and satisfaction guaranteed.
Spoeimens of oSeond Class Pianos, which can
be sold from $1oo to $160 lower than a PLEYEI.
are alwass on hand for inspection and comparl
son.
LOUIS GRUNEWALD,
14. 16, 18, fO and 02 Bareame Bsres.
fo sdlply
ANT. OARRatrB. O. CAnRItns.
E. L. CABRIERE. CHAs. ., OCABImBa.
A. CARRIERE & SONS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Corner Royal and Customhouse.
Liberal Advances made on Consignments to
our friends in
LONDON. LIVERPOOL,
ap26 9m2dp HAVRE and BORDEAUL
New Orleans Savings Institution,
No. IS6 Canal street.
TRUsTEPIs: *
A. MOULTON, E. A. PALFREY,
CARL KOLIN, T. L. BAYNE,
DAVIDURQUHAKT, GEORGE JONAS,
JOHN G. GAINES. TII S. A. ADAMS,
THOS. A. CLARKE, CHRIST'N SCHRiETIDR
CHAS. J. LEEDS, SAMUEL JAMISON,
Interest Allowed on Deposits.
D. URQUHABT. President.
CHAS. KILSHAW. Treasuror. apis ly. p
Wood-Wood-Wood.
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
HONEY ISLAND WOOD and OOAL YARD,
No. 375 Jolla street, New Basla, mear Mag.
-ells Bridge.
Postofflce address. Lock Box No. i0s0.
Delivered to all parts of the city,
PRICES FOR THIS WEEK.
.sh wood, per cord............ ........$ 00
Oak wood. per cord..... ...........
Ash and oak mixed, per crrd...... ...... 6
Liberal discount made to dealers.
Satlsfactlon guaranteil.
mhl7 2dott m&e P. BADELAT, Agent.

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