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The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, August 06, 1877, Image 2

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DAILY DEMOCRAT.
O cial Journal of the State of Loulslanl.
Oftlcal Journal of the Ulty of New Orleans.
Ofof, 109 Gravter treet.
GEORGE W. DUPRE 00,,
pBOPBRITOBB.
GEO1G1 W. .U11B3,
e. . HAItIBIY, JOHN AUGUSTIN,
ALUBRT 0. JANIN.
H. J. HEAIEBEY ............. EDITOR.
NNW ORLEANS, AUtGUNT 0, Ib67.
OUR ANNUAL STATEMENT.
Firrt of Meptember 1751.
On the let pf September the DEMOAItAT will
lbss a eorreot,.ooneise and comprehensive state.
muet of the commerose of the city of New Orleans
daung the panst year, made up and compiled by
,gatemeon whose tets and figures cannot be dis
puted by the omoineroial oommnnlty.
. This lluea will also contain several exhaustive
,peypI on Agrioulture, Railroads, Manufactories
and on eommeroe In general.
., We aineetly solipt the patronage of our friends
4, this oooasion, sad those of them who wish to
papers to their constituents would do well
. send in their orders an rson,u possible.
The advantage~rhioh the DEaOonAT offars to
Ns patrons in point of otIRULATIOn ANI PorI
Sarrr are seoQtid to those of no other paper In
New Orleans.
SAs an advertiolng medinum it is unsurpassed.
AN OPPOtWUNITY 'OR THE SOUTH.
" It is an ill wind that blows nobody
any good " Is an old saw that may find
application even to the labor strikes
that have recently occurred throughout
c~e North. Had these outbreaks been
confined to any limited section of the
oauntry, or to populations engaged in
.tny single industry, it might be as
Jumed that they were provoked by
special instances of oppression on the
part of employers, or of discontent
among the employed.
The trouble would have been local
-and the sources of it easily discovered
and remedied. In that case the dis
turbance at any one point would simply
have been a local and limited manifesta
tion that would constitute, in case of
violence, nothing more than a riot,
which could be summarily treated and
disposed of by the local authorities,
aided and sustained by the well regu
lated elements of society. But the wide
extent of this disturbance, reaching into
almost every important community in
the Northern States, and involving al
most every character of industry, proves
that the malady is anything else than
local, and that it can be reached only
by thorough and constitutional reme
dies. It is not Pittsburg nor Hornelle
ville, nor Buffalo, that is a failure, that
has accumulated an immense popula
tion which its industries and commerce
Qannot employ; nor is there any reason
to bellve that a spirit of communism,
or any other hurtful doctrine, has af
feoted these communities more than
others.
Were this the cause and extent of the
trouble, the results would be quite dif
ferent. Pittsburg, Hornelisville aid
Buffalo would be deserted and their
populations would seek more fruitful
ilelds of labor, or, in the latter event,
the Gatling "umoral" force could be very
quickly and successfully applied by the
local and State autorities. This, then,
is not L correct diagnosis of the case.
It is neither local nor confined; it ex
tends throughout the whole land and
permeates the whole fabric of society.
The causes which lie at the bottom of
it are just as far reaching and radical as
the evils that have sprung from them.
It is the organization of society that is
at fault, and all its economies, social
and political, are perverted, wrong and
baneful. Out of corruption, the first
and most formidable enemy of republics,
has sprung its legitimate offspring,
gross and flagrant inequality in the
fortunes and power of individuals, till
now all men are equal only in the wild
est figures of speech, and these are
"figures that always lie."
We have engrafted upon a republic
the flagrant inequalities that exist
among the subjects of a monarchy, till
the character of citizen is destroyed
and all of its distinguishing traits lost
and obliterated. The manners and cus
toms of a nation are so intimately and
indissolubly intermingled with the
elemental principles of the political
system of government that the
two are of necessity mutually de
pendent. The social condition of
a monarchy cannot exist as a
republic-one or the other must be de
stroyed. Either the social institutions
must undergo a change or the govern
mental system will eventually conform
itself to them. Statecraft is a science,
whose laws are not the mere dogmas
and postulates of theorists, but are rules
and often axioms, based upon positive
and authentic data derived from the
actual practical experiences of man
kind. These laws admit of modification,
but of nothing more; they cannot be.
abrogated with impunity. The ele.
mental principles peculiar to any of the
varied forms of government must be
preserved In fact, and when they become
mere fictions there must be a car
esponding alteration in the govern
mental establishment.
The vast accumulations of corpora
tions and monopolies in the North, and
the consequent inequality in the division
of wealth, constitute one of these radical
divergences, and from them result a
social and political economy that is ab
normal in a republic. Such things may
exist among subjects, but not among
citizens. These immense accumula
tions of capital may be protected and
preserved, but they must be done by the
government, and so long as the people
are the government they cannot be ex
I pected to tolerate, much less uphold,
the very sources and instruments of
, their oppression and degradation: The
government may be made strong
enough to afford the necessary protec
tion by superior appliances of force, and
this is just what the capitalist demands
when he asks for an increase of the
army. But when the day comes that
the government shall be able to afford
this protection, it will be strong enough
to put down the people, and then the
republic is at an end.
From these facts we must deduce that
the whole organization of gociety at
the North is fundamentally and radi
cally wrong. It must be reconstructed
and remodeled from base to turret
stone. How shall this be done? here
11 is the problem, and it is one that must
B- appal the stoutest heart and the most
* confident intellect. The interests in
7 volved are-of such magnitude that a
* solution of it cannot be hoped, for that
shall be unattended by great tumults
and upheavals of society. There are,
naturally, numbers of men, in fact mul
titudes and whole populations, how
to ever, that would dosire to escape the
iI experiences that must attend these con
vulsions. How they may do this is a
to much-easier question to answer.
° Let them turn their faces to the fair
In and fruitful fields of the South, that lie
fallow beneath the most genial skies
that bend above the earth, ready to
laugh with the harvest at the caresses
of the husbandman. Here we have
y neither millionaires nor paupers, mer
d chant princes nor tramps. We want
a capital as badly as we want labor, and
t the latter may anywhere in our broad
n domain win independence-the first
e and proudest distinction of the citizen,
n and nowhere shall it be obliged to en
dure the proud man's contumely with
y out the right to rebuke and resent it.
e Now, it seems to us, is the time for our
t immigration commissions and societies
to do good work, and bring to the South
I the ill-paid and discontented labor that
i Is now in open rebellion against the
perverted economies of the North.
WHO IS HE 7
The Times, in a long article on that C
very stale incident of political history
relating to the circumstances of the
failure of Gen. Grant to withdraw the d
United States troops from the support I
of Packard's usurpation, has the follow
nlg allusion to Don )ameron's conduct
In the affair:
"There happened to be an old Louisi
ana college friend and classmate of
Cameron's in Washington. It was
known that the friendly relations be
tween the two had been maintained al
though the one was a Republican and
Secretary of War, while the other is one
3 of the most sagacious and far-sighted
I of Louisiana politicians."
The Times has grievously taxed pub
lie credulity by failing to give the
I slightest hint of the individual to whom
reference is here made. This is decided
ly cruel on the part of our neighbor. To
propound a conundrum so vexatiously
I difficult of solution at this unprece
dented virulence of Sirius' rabies ought
to be treated as one of those brutalities 1
which the society for the prevention of
cruelty to animals was created to arrest
and punish. To discover and establish
beyond all doubt or cavil who is even
"one of the most sagacious and far
sighted of Southern politicians," and he,
a citizen of Louisiana, will impose as
severe a task of perquisitlon, inquisi
tion and experimenting as ever
devolved upon the Laputian philoso.
phers of Dean Swift, who devoted all
their lives to similar, if not so difficult
problems.
The difficulties besetting the search
for "one of the most sagacious and far
sighted of Southern politicians" are so
vexatious and multifarious. First there
is the bewildering multiplicity of those
from whom to pick this peculiarly emi
nent person-of candidates and as
pirants at least, even in our State,
which has never boasted of any super
fluity of this product, there is a legion
who will shout a response similar to
that which Phcanix received from the
crowd on the wharf at San Francisco,
as his boat was leaving, and he shouted,
"Good-by, Colonel." There was a loud
and affectionate reply from every mas
culine of the crowd, "Good-by, old
fellow!"
There was not a chap among them
who did not regard himself as of this
high regimental rank in some service.
And so in any large assemblage of the
politicians of the State and city, we be
lieve that there would be an almost uni
versal showing of hands to any invita
tion for the most sagacious and far
sighted statesman of the South to sig
nify his presence and declare his esti
mate of his own qualifications. But
this would only perplex and embarrass
the search for "the one" for whom the
Times puts us on the quest.
"Who is he? "
Here is so darkly referred to the very
man we have so long been in search of, r
the man in the iron mask, the mysteri
ously vanished son of the Dauphin, the
little Charley Ross of our section and
State. And if we are to be driven to
the awful duty of distinguishing and
determining, in a judicial way, between
so many candidates and aspirants, by I
which rule and standard shall we shape
our decisions ? Whlat are the proofs of
title to this prominence ?
Exhibit them each and all of you. I
" First, show what have been your
achievements in statesmanship. Have
you nominated and elected your candi
dates? Have you carried into success- I
ful operation any of your programmes
and policies? Have you controlled and
influenced large followings, and led
them to great victories? Though rather
practical and material, these are pretty I
strong proofs of political sagacity and
farsightedness. At least in this age,
which with an unintellectual insensi
bility to beautiful schemes, theories
I and eloquent Eutopia, presented and
enforced with the most captivating
rhetoric, the raciest wit and the most $1
t unbounded exubetance of metaphors,
I analogies, historical and mythological
illustrations, as imperiously as Grad
grind demands facts, figures, tangible
results, to satisfy it of the wisdom
of the statesman and the value and
merit of the political programmes
which claims its approval and com
mendation.
Somebody and something that will
win is what is wanted. He who achieves
or originates the plan by which the re
suits is achieved, is the man for our
money and our votes, and he is the man
to whom the chosen must go, as the
most sagacious and far sighted of South
ern politicians. To him must be ad- wi
judicated the apple Pulchierrimae detur, on
and we have little doubt that when the an
Times will trot out its "dark horse,"
he will prove as formidable a candidate
and litigant as any other within the
range of our vision and choice. Still
there will be a great torture and be
wilderment of public curiosity until the I
Time. answers the inquiry with which 7
we have opened and will close these ob
servations, "Who is he?"
WAUONS I CANE CARTh! POKEs'?
IE. 1V. MOrLX.AL.
I8 and 20 USnion andi 15 and I Perdido iHi
at reetl.
Role Agent for the Clolnratpd "FTIT(i)F;JA- C
KEII' WA(IONH. ('AiRT' and HI'IIIN(l WORK an
of all kinds alld sizes.
Dealer in 'hiladlelhlr annd Western ('ann LF
Wiagons, Carts and IDrays; ''I'liuI,r Whol-Is: I
Wheelbarrows of all descrlitions: Spokes, Fifl
lo~s. ulll has. lafta.- ie. Wlholwrl Iht material. .
(Orders prompltly filled. All work warranted.
ar im 11
NSOUCIATION ARMY OF TENNE.SEE.
Persons wishing to .ipllyCfor membershilp in
this association are inotilled that pr nted frms
for tIhat purpose cnll I hI'ln on applintin Ito
the undersigned, or at the ])EMOIAT hbusiness4
offle, or to Capt. N. T. U. Ii(rBINBOiN. City At
trney's offlre. City Hall. Applicants and others
will please inllose their contmintlllle nltn.s to
P'ostoflloe oinx No. 24:15, ntlr.'ssntd to the Assn,
elation Army of 'rl'nness.o.
The requirntents ate to have se.rved honor
ably in the (Confetderatt army, south of Virginia
and eastof the Mlssipsippi river till honorably
discharged or parted, to have enlisted from
Louisiana, or to hIave srvedl as nibov.i from an
other State, and to be a resident of Loislant at
tisl thime.
.JAME IJNOAN. In
First Vieo Prstlnt. A'ting ]'roside!nt.
.1vo. C. (ioI,lINO, Serctlary. inut 2w
SPECIAL TO COAL DEALERS.
Oplrct JlOARnD .4t'iooL 1)REc'TORs, )
:it JIurgrllldy tr rect.
New Orleans, Aug, :, 1877.
Sealed proposals for furnishing the 'Publil
eSchools (aceordingti o spt'iileationms now on file
in this offile) witlh from thre. , o tour thIusand
barrels of conl, will be reelived at this ollice unl
til the Ilth Inst.
Proposals must he iAddressed to the Committee
on Furniture. Pn'rohattits aiid lupplies.
The Board reserves thet, right, to reject nly iand
niall bildst.11. FElt(IUi(N,
Chairmllan Committee on Furnitulre, I'lurc'hases
a. nid Sitpplt,tit,. a.til at
NOTICE TO BONiIHOLDERS.
STATE O. LOUTIRIANA, P
J onard of Lihquhlation.
NeW Orleans. August 4. 1577.
A meeting of this Board will be held on MON- Lc
DAY. the ,eth inst., at 12 o'clock m.. at the BS'ak- co
or's Room, Statb Hous,. Int'ersted parties are 01
re'quested to atte'nd. p
ALLEN JULMEL,
Auditor adld ex-ofllilo Sec'retary of the Board. at.
au4 3t ln
ir
do
No
SE
CALEB A. PARKER & CO.,
oil
10 ............... Union street .............. I 2
NEW ORLEANS. LOUISIANA. Ti
ty
GENERAL AGENTS FOR Wi
B1
Alabama, Georga, Georgia, Tennessee, Louisiana, tin
Mississippi and Texas, in
ot
FOR to
H. W. JOHNS
Manufacttutrer of
ASBESTOS MATERIALS, su
be
Asbestos Paints in white and all known tints; gi
colors mixed ready for use. unequalled in the h
market for durability and beauty.
AUBERTOR ROOFING,
Untqunalled for durability; no retention of Nc
water on the roof, equal to Slate Sti
on that account. thi
Asbestos Root Paint, Asbestos Fire
Proof Coating, Asbestos steam
Packing, Steam Pipe and FG
Boller Coverings.
TESTIMONIALS:
NEw ORLEANs. October 4, 1876.
Having made use of the Asbestos Paint manu
fact ed by H. W. Johns, of New York. and for
war d to min by C. A. Parker, Esq., 1o Union
street. New Orleans, to be tested. I take pleas
ure in saying I have found thent to be in every I
respect as represented. I can confidently
recommend them to builders, owners of real
estate and ship captains as being much stupe
rlor. in my opinion,to any mixed paints in this
or any other country, and in fact. , beyond com
parison with any (lead) in this narket.
T'HOMAS I). CARtEY.
Chemist and Painter. Washington and Mlagnolia
streets, New Orleans.
NEw ORLEANS. April 20,1877. w
Caleb A. Parker & Co.: Al
Sirs-lHaving used II. W. Johns' Ashestos fill
Paints andl li otling. I cnsider thiem the best I j
have ever used. lRespectfully yours.
it. SINNOTT.
Captain of Steamboat New Bart Able. ,
REFERENCE-Mesers. H Dudley Coleman &
Brother. 12 Union st reot. New Orleans. . o
Send Circular and Price List. 3y15
EQUAL TO THE BESF. col
-- to
Marais Street Steam Brewery, to
86...........Marals street..........6
Between Conti and St. Louis.
H. F. STURCKEN, Proprietor,
jylo cm NEW ORLEANS. I
DRY GOODS AT PANIC PR1ICEI
UP TO nEPTEUBER 1.
$100,000 Worth of Dry Goods to be Sold
l(egardless of Cost from Monday,
Aimust (f,
PI'EI'N & ilOUSS A II),
1I .... ...... CINAL T'r I| r.... ..........1.
Witlte IlIlldlng. corner liar oane.
Wiihiirg to rnake room for now Ipnr allot,.. wo
will ll from MONDAY up to Hoptomber I ,or
nntiro Ho mminr Stock ,fi Dry or(iR, al o Fril
andi Winter (ioods remaining ,n homd. at
FIFI Y CENTS ON THE DOLLtI.
Hplc iul D.artnill in
BILACKI (TIIENADINEH., BI.ACK ALPAOAH.
LINEN LAWNS.(IIRAY LINEN H(UITINtiH.
Whitcr IIltlH LINENH. Pillow 'rvmr i,LNENH.
IB(lINET and MUSLIN for liaor.
bMarselloA QU IL'H, Nottinghuaml IAC('ES nam
White (loodsu of all di.lriptionl.
..- A f,1o-
HOUNE KEEPING GOOD01.
Anh n a'i n)lfll k. T'owolm . Nalpkin '. ('r, th.
Hi notI ni g. tn.
Our Dormetlio DllpartmI nt i now ompll,
and we will oill t th b st tranll of Cotton at
ILE M THAN l MANUFAiCTIURIER'N PI3iCE .
aunl toil
IRON COTTON TIE
IMPORTANT
SPECIAL NOTICE.
In view of the constantly Increasing popularity
and demand for the
CELEBRATED ARROW TIF,
The universally -
reogniAd favr- r,1 F.RC'W 4
ito Tio of 1Plant
er., Cotton Press I
men and Ship
Vowsi of CJotton
generally; the
tAmori'an Cotton
Ti io Company.
Lirnited.:rle pro
priertors antn
manulftlllflurers of (aid Tie. com
.nanding iunnoqlalled faclllties.
hI ave, In bllitlin to their larga
stock now on hand, contracted
for increased quantiti.ls, suffm
ltont to meet tlhe largest demand
for Cotton Ties.tocover the entire
erop of the coming season, and
now, through tilhr agents encrally, offer the
POPULAR and IIIRREPEEISIBLE
ARROW TIE
At $2 50 Per Dundle
Less 23) per cent discount for cash, in bundles
complete, LESS THAN THE MARKET VALUE
OF PLAIN HOOP IRON; and it belng the pur
po() of the Company to merit the continured
ptatrontage of tihe Pan' Iting community and to
defy all comnlpe.tion that may arise, their Agents
are intrullctel to contract with Dealers, Factors
1and(1 Coluntry Morchants at llhe ablove named
irlice and ternms for fluture delivery iup to the
iret of AIugus t in quIlantitits as mItay bti reu1llired
fromt tioe to timei, settlemenlts being male on
detlivry.
No competition arrests the Progress of
the ARROW TIE. It Is ever onward
In its course as Streams flow
to the Ocean.
SEE THE FOLLOWINO ('ERTII'ICATES ADDRERRED
TO COMPANY'S AGENTR.
Genflemrn--It affords me great pleasure to
present you with this statement, as evidence of
our high aporeciation of tihe value of the AR
ROW TIE, as a fastening for Cotton Bales.
We have used it constantly in our Presses
since its introduction, having found no other
Tie that can compare with it in utility. durabill
ty and strength, and from our own experienne
we can safely recommend it to planters as the
BEST TIE we have seen.
Pressing from five to seven hundred hales per
day, when running full time, we find It to our
interest io purchase tih ARROW BUCKLE from
you for the purpose of replacing any other
buckle that may be on the bale, taking the
others off and throwing them in the scrap pile
to be sold as old iron.
Yours truly
(Signed) A. P. LUFKIN. Supertlntendlnt.
Southern Cotton Preos Company Presses.
FAOTORS' COMPRESS, )
MERCHANTS' iGalveston.
NEW WHARF
I take pleasure in stating that since my
superintendency of the Planters' Press, we have
been constantly using the ARROW TIE. It
gives entire satisfaction, and our pressmen
prefer the Band and Buckle to any that they
have ever used.
I am yours very truly,
(Signed) F.. LUBBOCK.
Superintendent.
The above is indorsed by Cotton Presrsmen of
New Orleans, Mobile, Savannah, Charleston,
Norfolk, Wilmington and Petersburg.
Thanks to planters throughout all the Cotton
States for the liberal support and patronage of
the ARROW TIE.
R. W. RAYNE & CO.,
General Agents,
j'y92p 2m d&w NEW ORLEANS.
FANCY HAY. SEED RYF. OATS.
2,0(1 Bali's Fancy Timothy HAY.
200 Sacks Choice Seed RYE.
1,00WSacks Red Rust-proof OATS.
Apply to GEORGE HECK & CO..
Corner Poydras and Tehoupitoulas streets.
jy29 1m 2dOl
R. F. LEARNED,
DEALER IN
ALL KINDS OF LUMBER,
Corner Calliope and Foucher streets,
NEW ORLEANS.
Yazoo Cypress, Oak. Ash, Poplar, Yellow and
White Pine and Walnut, Ceiling and Flooring.
A full supply always on hand. Ordiers promptly
fill-lt. IBox 21 Mchaniei' Exchanne
jy22 1m* F. H. WE.4T. Agent.
UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL,
Eagle Hall, Prytanla street, cor. U.rania.
The Fourth Annual Session rof this school
for Boys will oplen on MONDAY. October 1,1877.
The principal will be assisted by a full corps of
competent teachers. He refers by permission
to the Faculty of the University of Virginia and
to his tatrcns the past session, whose names
may be found in the circular of the school.
Circulars can be had at the book stores.
For further information address
GEO. C, PREOT, Principal.
jy313m P. O. Box 425
JEWELRY AT AUCTION!
31VTIRY TTM.jga.Y AF .TD ~R ED~AY.
I. C. LEVI, Auctioneer,
108 .......................... Canal Street ........ ............108
WILL OFFER, TWICE A WEEK, HIS
LARGE AND ELEGANT STOCK OF JEWELRY AT AUCTION,
And remainder of days will sell at Private Sal, an usual, from FIVE to TWENTY-M7/T PE1
CENT LE8_. than any other establslhmont which advertises daily.
Watches Repaired and Diamonds Reset
Only by by skillful workmen, at the lowest rates.
j,.o am I. U. LEVI, 108 Canal street,
GO TO GRUNEWALD HALL,
-FOR-
rrilE ItET PS [ANOS,
HIo"Ih ns the worldl-renowneld piTineos oI
STEINWAY & SONS, W. KNABE & CO., PLEYEL, WOLFF & CO.,
TIHE I NPBAIIN PIANO4 IN T'IIE WORLD,
and nnr,rtnsseil in this ,,llmate for DURABILITY. Hold on EAHY MONTHLY PAYMENTS, at
LOWERL PIIGEH than asked llsewhere for an Inferior Piano.
Partrli, anxious to sneurn a reolable, sweet-toned, durablle piano, AT A MODERATE PRICE
Rthonlld buy no (other but one of the
Newly Improved I'prllht FISCER PIANOS, or One of the Very Popular Sq11A31
IIAINEW PIANOS,
or'onmmendledl and warranted In every respeot. THEY ARE PERFEOT GEMS.
Go by all mnans to ORUNEWALID'H OLD RELITABLE hOUHE. known all over the country for
fair dealing an liberality: a.rn at the HEAD OF THE MUHICAL BUHINE.H.
DIRECT IMPOIRTED MUr$CAL MEJtCIHANDItIE, o. r all descrlipttilns r'eclved by almowteverp
European vessel. and sold, at retall and wholsnelo at THE cLOSEiT IGOUlRES.
Send for cat.alogunes to
LOUllI RUNIIWALD,
jel7 Grunewald Hl1ll, 14, 16, IS. 20 and 22 Raronne street, New Orleans.
PHILIP WERLEIN,
78, SI). .1' AND .)1) BARONNE STREET, AND 1i2 CANAL STREET,
LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF THE SOUTH,
- DEFIEN ALL COMPETITIOIN.,
Best Pinnos and Organs,
Lowest Price ,
Most Liberal T'erms,
I anrgest Asqortmeatiet
t- glP _-__ - -ý Ever Offered In the Routh.
SOLE AGENTS FOR TlHE WORLD-RENOWNFDl CIl(ICKERING PIANOn,
Tile Ille* (and Most Perfcrt I'lnlloe Mlade,
ALSO, FOR THE ELEGANT UPRIGHT HARDMAN PIANOS,
In tou mnl tfou,'h Cu;'rirr to t il',, w Pinol m ian e.' u ial diurnrhLility and sr'llng $tri l'n.. War
ranteid to giv ' o'" xsatit ' tti if ti 4 ioyr t mo iyivli. sol i riiint ob n u ll ily l in Y 'ay llmnt4. or
very low for .anh.
anole A'ente for the Celebrated alnuon & lamlnlin, Ertey and New Ena
land Organe,
.JUST IEGEIVED PER STEAMER ALl E,
Vivo C remos nI Mumioal nrstrumr onts,.
Tea Trade Suppllerd below Northern Prlrres.
jy27
JAMES I). EI)WA lRDS,
(Successor to Daniel and J. D. Edwards.)
STEAMBOAT, RAILROAD AND ENGIN
EERS' SUPPLIES,
Manufactulreor o(, 1t4 most improved
r STEAM TRAINS FOR MARING SUGAR,
And evcry des1rriptlon (o
Copper, Brass and Sheet-Iron Work.
Dnaler in Iron Pipe and Fittings for Stenm.
Water or Gas; Brass and Iron Valves; Cocks;
Oil Globes: steam and Water Gauges; Boller
Tubes; Bolts and Nuts; Punched Nuts; Log
Screws: Washers: Rivets; Cistern, Well and
Force Pumps; Brass and Iron Wire Cloth; Rub
bhr, Lubricating and Hemp Packing; Rub
ber Hose: Belting; Lubricating, Lard, Signal.
Linseed and Headlight Oils; White Lead ; Ct
ton Waste: Cotton Stem Packing; Gas Pipe
Stocks and Dies: Pipe Cutters; Tongs:
Wrenches: Pipe, Vises; Jack Screws; Flue
Brushes; Flue Scrapers. etc.
Agent for the
CAMERON SPECIAL STEAM PUMP
-For
PUMPING JUICE AND SUPPLYING BOILERS.
Send for Price List.
JAMES D. EDWARDS.
22. 24. 20 and 28 Front and 21, 23, 25 and 27 Delta
street. Now Orleans. je 21'77 1l
WM. H. SEYMOUl,
UNITED STATES PASSPORT AGENT,
NOTARY.
Commissioner for New York and other States
79 Customhouse Street.
19 tf
OFFICERS AND MEN
-OF
ALL COMPANIES
Who served under
MAJOR GENERAL FRED. N. OGDEN.
Can be suppli ed with
CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE,
-BY
GEO. ELLIS & BROTHER,
jy.1 Im2r', $2 Camp street.
COUJNTERFEIT NATIONAL BANK N OTES
With full instructions how to dlt,"t them. Re
vised and (correetced to 9lato. Also how to detect
spurious coIn. (tc.
Free on application In person or by mail to tb,
CITIZENS' SAVINGS BANK,
(A bank for smull avings,)
jylt Im 2(10) No. 22 Iaronne' st., New Or!,an.
W. W. WASHBURN,
ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER,
113 Canal street.
Opposite Clay Statue. New Orleans.
Mr. WASHBUBN is himself an artist of
twenty-five years experience, and is supported
in each department by a corps of assistants
who have no superiors in this or the Old World.
He is the master of his business, Besidee
employing the best artists he uses the best
materials and mares the best work on the bon.
tinent. ou may~call this
"BLOWING HIS OWN HDBN."
but for proof he refers you to his thirty thous
and patrons and to his work, which may be in
spectd at hie Art Gallerry. fee em2dp
CITIZENS' SAYINGS BANK,
(A Bank for Small Savings)
ORUNEWALD HALL,
22........... Baronne street..............22:
SPECIAL LEGISLATIVE CHARTER.
This Ravings Bank will receive on deposit and
pay InterePt at the rate of 6 per cent. per annum
on such small sums of money as may from time
to time be offered therefor by meshanies, clerks,
minors and others, thus securing protection
from robbery, accident or fraud, and also afford
Ing a means of profit on savings by the semi
annual interest paid.
By special provision of law. married women
and minors can deposit money in their own
name, and it can be drawn by themselves only.
Such deposits cannot be controlled by hus
bands parents or tutors.
Apply for Charter and By-Laws.
J. L. (IUBERNATOR. President.
M. BENNER, Cashier.
DIRECTOa :
J.I,. GUBERNATOR, E. W. HUNTI OTON
E. P. CHAMlIN M, BEJNNRB,
CA UI6 G1RUNEWALD.
myv2 lyp . . . . .
IH. H. HUS 3IANN & P. BUInLEB,
PROPRIETORB OF
EAGLE ODORLESS APPARATUS
FOR CLEANING VAULTS.
Ofice. No. 25 Exchange Alley.
Orders left at 1o2 Calliope st.. New Orleans.
1y22 Imn*
New Orleans Savings Institution,
No. 156 Canal Street.
TRUSTRER :
A. MOULTON, E. A. PALFREY,
CARL KOHN, T. L. BAYNE,
DAVID URQUHART, GEORGE JONAS,
JOHN G. GAINES, TIIGS. A. ADAMS,
THOS. A. CLARKE., CRIST'N SG8UNftID D
CHAS. J. LEEDS, SAMUEL JAMISO.I
Intereut Allowed on Deposita.
D. URQUHART. PresideaL
CHAS. RILTa.u+w. Treasurer. aRa 51y2p
ANT. CARRTEEE. O. CARRaR-a.
E. L. CARRIERE. CnAs. J. CABIur1
A, CARRIERE & SONS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Corner Boyal and Customhouse.
Liberal Advances made on Consignments to
our friends in
LONDON. LIVEBPOOL.
ap28 9m2dp HAVhE and BOEDIAIL.

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