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The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, August 15, 1877, Image 4

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')AILY DEMOCRAT.
'Iid- Junorai of the Estat. of Loubllana.
(3M 1s1 Jourmal of the City of NOW Orleanh.
Go... 109 .avi. r /tiat.
*OPO 4 W. DUPRE a CO..
PROPRIETOES.
G0U RGU W. XUPU3.
3. 5. gaNumy , JOHN LUBUNTIN,
ALBDUT 0. JANIII.
1. 1. E1 AII8IcX ...........D... .ToB.
RATES OF UBWllfU(liJUTIOM.J
The Daily Democrat.
a eeia ear ... ..............:...... D10
Motths .. .... oe
Mouths .. 3 a
Mont h ...
Payable in Advanee.
The Weekly Demaort.
Te Wky Demorat, a large eigpht- age
will furnished to subscribers at the
ssqwiugm rates:
e r ...........
Months i.................... 1
isyable in Adlvhnee.
NOW eELiANS, AteOUST 19, 1355.
OUR ANNUAL STATEMENT.
Pltat of September, IMWs.
On the first of SReptember the DvocsnAT will
essue a oorrece, conetse and comprelhensiv
statement of the commeree of the city of New
Orleacs during the past year, made up and
eompiled by gontlomon whose facts and flaures
cannot be disputed by the commercial cotm
iaunity.
This issue will contain sevewral exhauntive
esseays on Agriculture. ltallroads and Manufno
strien, together with an elaboerate aRlnd iItstiatl
reItise on our
uiLATIOwL WITH sPANISll AMERICA.
We will publish a correct and artistic map,
preptared and qxecuted sprolalyi for the DNMo
a&r by that well known and nacumpllihed
Civil| lgineer, Ms. THOMA ,H. HARD.nvE,
THE MEROHANTS' MAP
-OF THE
NNW ORILItIN PACIFIC. RAILWAY
iU llshow its importancr to New Oilerano as the
CoMMtnOuAL fI EI'onrIU and USRINERR (C'NTRS
of the
a.est Agrioultural Region of the Southwest.
It will show the pjoition of
IADh' JETTIES
at the mouth of South Pass1 and also the pro
soed location and roni-l of the
BARATARIA SHIP CANAL.
We earnestly r oliit ith lptrntnn.o ,I our
friends on hlis oceasion, aind thoser of tljom
who wish to send paporr to their constituents
would do well to send in their ordrers as soon as
pgaiible.
The advantages which the neMora tT ofTors to
Its patrons in point of otIIR'UL,ATIoN ANTID POIU
&arItY are second to those of no other paper ill
New Orleans.
As an advertisin g medilm i I unsurpassed.
THE REBELLION OF THE COLLEOTOR.
We referred last evening to the re
turn to the city of the two politicians
from St. Landry, who, by virtue of their
alleged sponsorship, managed to secure
the present Collector the office which
he is striving to fill. They are Ander
son (Tom) and Gantt, a veteran and
notable political chief from that very
pollfio parish of St. Landry. Forty
years ago Gantt was a Democrat of the
extremist sort. About the same time
Anderson was a Whig. They are now
St. Landry Republicans of a peculiar
breed, who have managed for some
years past to influence the politics and
run the offloes in their parish, with
large followings of both parties.
The present Collector was not very
deoldedly of either party, but had been
taken up by their chieftains to be used
In an emergency for their own purposes.
This appointment was claimed as a
conoession to Tom Anderson whose
notoriety in connection with the Re
turning Board made his own appoint
ment a dangerous and embarrassing
one.
His "next of kin" was, therefore, pre
firred, and Anderson and Gantt, the St.
Landry big dogs, were appeased. King
would do as well. He would belong to
them body, soul and boots, and so King
established himself in the granite
palace. A little time was given him to
look into things and digest his responsl
bilities and the President's civil service
soheme. His bond was promptly fur
nished him by his St. Landry sponsors.
Leaving him alone for a little while the
big dogs returned to St. Landry to
abide events.
Suddenly unfavorable news reached
them. Their Colleotor was panning out
badly; was detected in talking and
writing a great deal of nonsense about
civil service reform, cutting down, and
holding to tried and experienced officers
and leaving out the promised ones in
dorsed by his makere. This thing must
be stopped. So there was a sudden de.
scent of these chiefs and their staff from
Mt. Landry upon the verdant, experi
mental and sentimental Collector.
An interview was had at the lodgings
of the Collector on Canal street. The
sponsors were fierce, emphatic and
mandatory.
What does this mean ? exclaimed the
vigorous and autocratic Gantt; "You
were appointed through our influence
and under an engagement to do our
biddlng. Your salary of seven thou
sand dollars was to be !our(s. Your ap
pointments and patronage were o(lrs.
We gave bonds for you, put you in the
place you occupy and now you are
prating your nonsense about reform,
5appointing Tom, Dick and Harry and
rejecting the persons we have named,
and doing many other things without
our sanction and approval.
In a mild, gentlemanly, lisping, argu
mentative strain the Collector deliver
ed himself of one of his old-timed Whig
speeches, replete with patriotic senti
ments in vindication of the President's
policy and of the non-partisan distribu
tion of patronage, etc., etc.
Tut! Tut! was the contemptuous re
sponse. We have no time to listen to
such old Whig fudge. Appoint our
men or we go for you, take our names
from your bond, and leave you as you
were before we took you up. The Presl
dent will either have to withdraw your
name or the Senate will reject you. We
will give you a little time to reflect on
our proposition. And so the sponsors
returned to St. Landry. It is useless to
deny that the Collector was thrown into
a meditative and anxious mood, and
that a stir and bustle were created
around the Custom-House, and new
combinations and plans were projected
and ambassadors dispatched to Wash
ington to meet the emergency of the
withdrawal or defeat of the Collector.
Meanwhile the Collector was aroused
from his lethargy and set to work to
resist the conspiracy of his old friends,
now his bitter foes. He wrote eloquent
and elaborate letters to the Secretary of
the Treasury, eulogistic of the Presi
dent's policy and demonstrative of the
entire success of his administration;
backed himself up with the commise
sioners' report, and referring to the
complaints of his too exacting and par
tisan friends, requested that he be
allowed to change his bonds, so as to
substitute other names, and qubmitting
his case to the Secretary and President,
was content to abide their judgment.
The President and Secretary replied
in the most cordial and satisfactory
manner, expressing their full approval
of his administration, and begging that
he would remain and continue to dis
charge his duty, and assuring him that
he would not be rejected by the Senate
for any such cause or by any such influ.
ence as was referred to. This corres
pondence relieved the anxiety of the
Collector, and accordingly when his St,
Landry sponsors visited him yesterday
he received them with great affaibility
and manifested a warm interest in
thealselves and families. After a pro.
longed interchange of their courtesies
and friendly manifestations, the grave
old St. Landry chief at last came down
to business, with the inquiry if the Col
lector had not, after the reflection of
two weeks, seen the propriety and ne
cessity of following their directions and
submitting to their suggestions as to
the distribution of his patronage.
The Collector, with his left, hand
closely pressing the letters of the Secre
tary and President, calmly replied that
his reflections had confirmed him in
the course he had before indicated to
them, and in his resignation in meeting
all the consequences thereof.
What followed cannot now be fitly
described. No enraged Taurine chief
tains leading large flocks of St. Landry
cattle ever bellowed forth their wrath
more loudly, tossed their horns in the
air more menacingly, pawed the
ground more vigorously, and were
more thoroughly disgusted than were
the Collector's St. Landry Warwicks at
this extraordinary response.
There is only one parallel to the in
tensity of their astonishment and be
wilderment at this incomprehensible
display of spirit on the part of their
hitherto mild-mannered aIW submissive
protege, and that was the overwhelming
emotions of our own Boss Packard
when Hayes cut shot his supply of bay
onets and left him all alone and naked
to the tender mercies of the victorious
Democrats.
VIRGINIA POLITICS.
The nomination of Col. Holliday for
Governor of Virginia seems to have al
layed all the threatened schism in
the party, of which we heard so much
prior to the meeting of the convention.
On the first day of the convention the
country was given a lot of sensational
dispatches to the effect that the Mahone
party opposed the pledging of all nomi
nees to the support of the platform to
be subsequently adopted, with a view to
a bolt and an independent canvass with
Mahone at the head of the ticket.
We were not disposed to put much
faith in these dispatches, and are now
glad to see that they were entirely with
out foundation. Gen. Mahone withdrew
from the contest while he was yet the
leading candidate, and thus proved him
self entirely without any unworthy per
sonal ambition in his quest for the dis
tinguished position of Governor of the
old commonwealth. Col. Cameron, the
manager of Mahone's campaign, in
withdrawing his name expressed a per
sonal preference for Col. Holliday, "the
sleeveless hero of the Shenandoah
Valley," and this secured his nomina
tion. The canvass for the nomination
was very close and excited, several of
the candidates bringing into the con
vention strong and devoted supporters.
Among these John W. Daniel and Gen.
Mahone had, perhaps, the strongest and
most pronounced adherence.
Col. Holliday is a gentleman of abili
ty and high character, and entirely
worthy of the honor conferred upon
him by the Conservatives of Virginia.
Upon the debt questions he expressed
himself as opposed t) repudiation. In
this connection he used the following
language:
I would )o more have suich a st igma upon
my St:ate than I would upon mly private farm'.
But, whilst I anlll thus oc olt tu) repudiation.
I' for the samie 1'Cre.on I alll in favor of some
spieiIy sett llleumet of the debt---honorable to
our S'tate and satisfactory to the cireditors. I
have not sought tihe high oflheo of Governor
with, at this tilme' its trelenllous riesponsi
hiliitis.. My friends have done mne a great
honor by thinking me worthy of It; but if the
I{N)pl' oIf Virginia are now resolved to go
ack upon ia renlown hitherto uatarniished by
the repudiation of her plighted faith, they
muIlllt fiiud some other than myself to do their
bidding.
The following short sketch will show
that in her selection for Governor-for
his nomination is equivalent to an elec
tion-Virginia has chosen wisely. After
graduating with high honors at the
University of Virginia, Col. Holliday
entered the bar, and was soon made
State's Attorney for the counties of
Frederick and Winchester. At the first
sound of the late conflict he abandoned
everything and went with the first
troops to Harper's Fetry. He was after.
wards a captain in the Thirty-third Vir
ginia, C1l. Cumming's "Stonewall" Bri
gade. At the reorganization of the
army, in 1862, he was made a field offi
cer; and after g ing through the battles
of Winchester, Port Rpublio and
around Richmond, he lost his arm at
Cedar Mountain, never having missed a
battle or been absent a day from his
command.
He was held in the highest estimation
by Stonewall Jackson, who offered him
a position on his staff, and desired to
make him a brigadier, but he was dis
qualified for service by his wounds.
After the war he resumed his profes
sion, but he has always taken a deep
and active interest in politics, and has
repeatedly been urged to accept a
nomination for Congress, but has al
ways declined all political advance
ment. His canvass during the last cam
paign was very brilliant and effective
so much so, indeed, as to provoke com
parison with that of Gov. Wise during
the Know-Nothing campaign before
the war.
What a contrast is presented in such
gentlemen as Col. Holliday and Gov.
Nicholls to the miserable wretches who
preceded them as Governors of South
ern States since the war. Who no#'can
have a doubt of the future that is before
us, when we see the true representatives
of a gallant and noble people being
placed in charge of their public affairs?
Whatever mistakes of judgment such
men may make in the administration of
the high trusts confided to them, they
will always command the respect and af
fection of their fellow-citizens, as well as
their unbounded confidence in their hon
esty and purity of purpose. But the high
est praise that can be spoken of these
men is that the greatest power may be
entrusted to them without apprehension.
They know how to lay aside the gaudy
renown of the soldier and take on the
higher but more sombre attributes of
the civilian when duty commands them
so to do. There is not in all this land a
more splendid specimen of the Southern
soldier than our own Governor, and
none have a right to look back with
more pride on the history of his achieve
m3nts in the field. It would be a fault
easily pardoned had he carried into his
executive administration of affairs some
of the habits of thought and manner
isms of the soldier, but all such things
have been laid aside and are buried
with his good arm at Winchester and
his leg at Chancellorsville.
WHERE THE SWAG COMES IN.
We some time since thought we dis
covered that the Calcasieu log war was
nothing more than a squabble between
two rings of mill-men, one of which
was trying to obtain an advantage by
the vigorous enforcement of the law,
and the other endeavoring to do the
same thing by raising a clamor about
the sufferings of the log-men, and for
this reason we have avoided the expres
sion of any sympathy with either party
to the fight, and confined ourselves to
the legal points of the controversy an d
the urging of whatever might relieve
the people, the only sufferers really en
titled to any sympathy.
The seizure of the logs no doubt
operated almost universal suffering, but
the Itwo rings of resident mill-men are
scarcely less responsible for this than
the government, and infinitely more so
than the marshal, upon whose devoted
head a very large amount of unneces
sary and undeserved abuse has been
heaped. We can readily perceive how
the government agent all along could
have had a fat thing in pressing the
rights of the government in the interest
of these rings. Yet, so long as he was
merely enforcing the law, over-zealous
ly and with unnecessary rigor perhaps,
we could not pass criticism except such
as we have passed, upon the government
and the folly and wrong of its policy in
regard to the disposal of the public do
main. We could not see any tangible
suggestion of peculation in the seizure of
logs, so long as they were held subject
to the orders of court and disposed of at
last by judicial award. We can very
readily appreciate, however, how there
might be a good deal of it in the arbi
trary release of these loge. There it
precisely where the Rwag comes in, if
there is any to be made out of this busi
ness by an abuse of the forms of law.
We do not propose to do more than
suggest this fact and that it is kept con
stantly before the eyes of the public.
These reflections are suggested by a
peremptory order from Mr. Carter, the
special agent of the Interior Depart
ment, to whom the conduct of this
matter is corfided, to the marshal to
release 1200 of these logs belonging to
certain ones of the persons interested.
This order the marshal declined to
obey, until he had been further in
structed by the district attorney. In
this he was perfectly'right, but there
can be no doubt that he was equally
right in releasing them when ordered to
do so by the district attorney. There
can be no doubt of the power of these
representatives of the government to
release whatever pcrtion of the proper
ty seized they may see fit, but we cannot
see the wisdom or necessity of such
partial releases at this time when the
acceptance of the bonds is pending and
the release on security is imminent.
We have been awaiting, and we may
add, expecting, some such event as this,
and we shall keep a very close eye on
whatever releases may be ordered other
wise than on bond and in the regular
way.
GEN. JOHN G. ANGELL.
A few days ago we announced to many
anxious friends that Gen. John G.
Angell's health was rapidly failing, and
to-day it is our sad duty to record his
death. Gen. Angell was one of nature's
noblemen, whose pillar of smoke was
duty and whose pillar of fire, honor.
He was kind and generous toa fault and
brave to temerity. When barely twenty
years old he leaped up in arms
at the voice of the Southern Confed
eracy calling her sons to battle, and
left this city for the seat of war in May,
1061, as orderly sergeant of the Cres
cent City Guards. HIe had scarcely
been in the field a few months when he
was elected captain of the company,
and whilst occupying that rank he
many a time acted as colonel, and led
the gallant Fifth Louisiana IRegiment
to the charge.
After the war he settled down to the
practice of the profession for which he
had been educated, and acquired quite a
reputation as a dentist and physician.
When usurpation had laid a heavy
hand upon Louisiana he was foremost
in joining and organizing that nucleus
of a militia whose brave hearts and
ready weapons at last succeeded in free
ing the State from oppression. He con
tracted the terrible disease that carried
him away, on the nights of the 13th and
14th of September,when his regiment was
in line to repel the hired metropolitans
of Kellogg, and his attendance at the
heavy guard duty which followed the
binth of January last, greatly contrib
uted to break down hil already shat
tered health. He may really be said to
have died, as he lived, in the perform
ance of his duty. No nobler epitaph
can adorn a citizen soldier's grave.
The presence of W. P. Kellogg in this
city to supply information and respond
to inquiries respecting that large hiatus
in the receipts of the tax, collector of
the First District is as necessary and
important as that of Fulton. Mr. Pack
ard, too, might throw some light upon
the disposition of the warrants paid in
by tax collectors, or which were in the
hands of the Treasurer or Auditor when
he was so hard pressed for funds to pay
his police mutineers.
The Auditorial Committee has a her
culean labor, which it is performing
with zeal and earnest devotion, but its
effective work is hardly begun. It has
got on the trail, but has a long chase
before running to the earth the various
varnmints that have been depredating on
the State treasury. The present admin
istration will not have redeemed its
ple'iges and fulfilled its duty to the
people until some of these rascals are
brought to jistice.
DIED.
ANGELL--At his residonen. No. 162 Julia
strlet. in this oity, on Tiutsnaty, Aug. 14. 1877
it 1:0o it. n . Dr. .olni (I. Angell, Ilnto ('aphDtiln
e'ompnev A Fifth Itlgimtnit Ifays Brigade. A.
N. V.. (G. H. A..) and Brigatller lIniralI LoIrs
i)rnmi o'ati' Militia, a native' of MiPsi-sippi lnr,l
ar resident of this oity for Ilhe past twenty-tlire.e
years. in thie l'il year of his ai;g'.
His friends and those of his family, those of
O. W. Rcpcr, his father-in-law, the mombers of
i0 BelOnnvol int, Assoriation of fnuisRhinnu Itvisl
ion of tli, Army of Northern Virginia, andi of
his regiment, "Louialana's Own." of the Htitto
Militia, are respect(fully invited to tt. nd Ihis,
funeral, which will take place from his late re
Idencee , No. 152 Julia stroot, at in o'lo,',k it. in.,
Weidncesday, August 15, 1577.
LOUINTANA DIVIHION ARMY (F NORTH
ERN VIGCINI %, I:ENEVOLENT AH4OCIA
TION--The members of this Asoeilation will
attend the finral of of our late comra'le and
brother. Capt. John (I. Angell. Co. A. Fifth Ttrg
imont Louisiana Volunteers., Hays' Brigadle. A.
N. V.. whilh will take plneo from his latt resi
d'nlie. No. 152 Julia street, on Wedn,,sday. Au
gust 15.1577. at to o'clock a mI.
By order of the President.
W. B. KLEINPETER. e'roetary.
I. (. G. T.-HTONEWAL1, LODGE NO. to,
INDEPENDENT ORDER OF GOO(D ''EM
PLAItS--'lTh offleors and members of this
lodge are hereby notified to meet at the Hall.
No. 1t: ('amp street. THIM IDAY (WEDNEH
DAY ). August l. 15.77, at s o'clock a. m.. to pay
the last sad tribute of rsipeet. to oul r deeatled
Brother and P. W. (!. T., Dr. JOHN G. ANGELI,..
Members of Hister Lodges and of the Gra(nt
Lodge of Loulsiena are invrited to at t'lend.
Ity order of A.J.. 'AltIDY, W. '. T.
C. (rHA)IiLtIa, W. M.rretary.
1.0. G. T.-q-RANI) LODGE OF LOUIHIANA,
INDEPENDENT ORDER OF GOOD TEM
P'LAIRH--The offlmrs and members of the Grand
lodge ae are hereby notifIed to mee t t the Hlall
N,. 1io; Camp strot, THIS DAY. Wednesday
August 15. 1877, at a o'clok, to assiot at the
funeral eoremonies of 1h16e latt Grnnd Wortlhy
(Counsellor of Louisiana, Bro. JHTIIN (;. AN
By order of THOMAH Hf. JONEN.
(Irand Worthy Chief Temnl,ltr.
W. HIENIY MArTIN. G(ratld HOCre;taI'y.
STATE OF LOUISIANA,
ADJItTANT GEiNEIAL's O1rrii(:.
New Orltant.,. August 14. 1t77,
(''neral Orders No. 1.1
I. The Commander ia-Chief llannounaes withb
(ld('p Isorrow the death at New Orleans. August
14. ,f Brigadier (Gen. JOHN G. ANGEL,. conm
mnrlding Seconld Brigade, Louisiana btate
Militia.
ConlDi'rtlts almong thost. .'ve'r ready to re
spond to the Icall of duty, h, leaves beh~ind him
the recordl of a itare.r which adorrlrd th' or
gunizationl of which he waR so prominlent it
nihmember, and Ia name of which his sorrowing
family may well he proud.
II. The HSionwl oRegiment Infantry. L. 8. M..
will form the funeral estort.
BIy order tof the (Governor.
ill4 I. W. IPATTON. Adiutantt General.
M,'(iNNIM--Matthlw .f. MeGinnis. sfn of A.
.. If' til, ill and Mars Hloran, at 4 6'16 k I. Ii..
August 14. 1677.
The fLerlll' will itak pla'r I. iv~ i ng. at
o',l,'k, fronm the r,,ld, "oi , hi' - n rnts. N,,.
S . Loui. Dnepaer.i pl'a4~ ~tr,.
RUGiELEY -Satirdl v. 1,,. , o77. at ('.,"ov.
Matagrd,:t no n v. T .:at. EIllr :,ar,,lir, Kiw ~
Ioy. inf.nt, d u: ht,'r .,f -nith 1',i ".l.-, and 11;r;
K.Ca( tznz n, g I h ,Fli1 '2-2 ti 4.
WAGONS ! CANF CART. ! SPOKES Z
S1. r. MOR A.,
18 and S2 UnIon and 15 and 17 Perdldo
streets.
Role Agent for the Celebrated "STUDvBP,A
KER" WAGONS, CARTS and SPRING WORK
of ill kinds unIl 5i7.'4.
Dealer in P'hil.,elolphi and Western Cane
Wagons, Carts and Lrays; Timber Wheels;
Wheelbarrows of all dweriotions; Spokes. Fel
lo.s. Hubs, Shafts. rtc. Wheelwright material.
Orders promptly filled. All work warranted.
au2 lm
JEWELRY AT AUCTION!
I. C. LEVI, Auctioneer,
108 ......................C.. anal Street ..............................
WILL OFFER, TWICE A WEEK, HIS
LARGE AND ELEGANT HI'OCK OF J EWAiLKY AT AUCTIOIN,
j And remainder of days will sell at Private Bale as usual, from FIVE to TWENTY-JrITY PEr
CEN1 LEI8 than any other establishment which advertises daily.
Watches Repaired and Diamonds Reset
Only by skillful workmen, at the lowest rates.
je'3 fm I. C. LEVI, tlos anal sta.t,.
GO TO GRUNEWALD HALL,
--POR
THE EI3LS'T PIANOT,
Sulch as the world-renowned pianos of
STEINWAY & SONS, W. KNABE & CO., PLEYEL, WOLFF & CO.,
THE LEADING PIANOR IN THE WORLD,
and unsurpassed in this cllmate for DURABILITY. Bold on EARY MONTHLY PAYMIENTB0, at
LOWERI PRICEt than asked elRsewhere for an Inforlor Piano.
Parties anxious to secure a rellable, sweot-toned, durable piano, AT A MODERATE PRIOR
should buy no other but one of the
Newly Improved Upright FIMLCHIR PIANOR, or One of the Very Popular RaUM11A
HAINER PIANOM,
Recommended and warrante(d in every respect. THEY ARE PERFECT GEMS.
Go hby all means to ORIRUNEWALD'R OLD RELIABLE HOUSE, known al over the country lot
Ifair dealing en iberdlity: and , t the HEAD OF I HE MUNICAL ItUNINF S.
DIRECT IMPORTED MUHICAL MERCHANDISE, of all descritiiti'ns r-eleved by nlmorteveoyf
Europenn vessel, and sold, at retail and wholesale, at THE CLOSEST FIIOUBEB.
Bend for catalogues to
IA)l . RUITNWALD,
jell7 Grnewald Hall. 14, 16, IS, 20 and 25 Baronne street, New Orleas.
PHILIP WERLEIN,
78, 8D. 82 AND 90 BARONNE STREET, AND 122 CANAL STREET,
LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF THE SOUTH,
DEFIER ALL CONMPWrRTn9]./
Beet Pianos and Organs,
Lowest Prices.
Most Liberal Terms,
w Largest A sortmeat,
Ever Offered In the Sonot,
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE WORLD-RENOWNED CHIIlKERING PIA:NOt,
The BRet and Most Perfect. Pianos Made,
ALSO, FOR THE ELEGANT UPRIGHT HARDMAN PIANOS,
Tn tone and touch ,prior to th,, l'l,'yi I'ianos. of rl ial durability and selling 1ine I.n.. War
ranted to givegood sati, faction or Iti iony r.orund'i. H.olt on small monthly payrments, o
very low for eIash.
Role Agents for the Celebrated Wason & Hamlin, E.tey and New Eng.
land Organs,
JUST IRECEIVED PER BSTEAMER ALI IE,
Pive C'amensi Muinical tnsmtrutmentms.
The Trade nlpplied below Northern Prices.
jy27
Establl*hed Is9o. P. O. Bot 707.
WHITE'S GINNERY,
Off,'e 21 Union. near r:nrondel,'t street.
TO COTTON FACTORM AND PLANTERS:
GINNING! TERMS--THE SEED.
BAGGIfNG, TIEH, TWINE and IRAYA(IE
furnlshed FREE since 1s7;.
Parties wishing to know the average yield of
Cotton ginned at "WHITE' (GINNEIRY' last
season will pleasOe snd to the undersigned for
cir,.ularps
1). I'IIEUR WHITE.
.aullio IIl 2dp_
VAUDRY RIFLES' ENTERTAINMENT.
The entire programme will be published in
this paper THURSDAY MO)NING. ti lt th
inst., and will he one of the most attractiv., wver
presentedI to the public. The membruhr of our
local military companies are respectfnully re
'insnllted to attend in full uniform. u114 2t2p
DELINQUENT TAX PAYERS.
In addition to adnvnnetng money for the pay
ment of taxes, under ant .tu of 1s77, we will pay
city ttax. of 1X75 Iandl prior yearU at n LARIER
DISCOUNT for .esh Ihan Is asually olffereud.
We will sell serip orders in sums to suit any
bill at lowest prices.
CITIZENS' SAVINcGS BANK.
RI"ll Im 2D 22 liuronnu .t r'et.
OFFII┬žERS Al)D MEN
-OF
ALL COMPANIES
Who served under
MAJOR GENERAL FRED. N. OGDEN.
Can he supplied with
CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE,
GIFA. ELLI. & BROTHER,
jy:1 l1m2p M2 Camp street.
FANCY HAY. SEEID .Y1t. OATS.
2,(s0 Bales Fancy Timothy HA Y.
200 Hacks choicr, Hoed RYE.
1,)000 Hacks Red Rust-proof OATH.
Apply to GEORGE HECK & CO.,
Corner P.,ydras and Tehoupltoulms streets.
jy2'! tm 2do
W. W. WASHBURN,
ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER,
113 Canal street.
Opposite Clay Statue. New Orleans.
Mr. WASHBURN Is himself an artist o
wenty-five year. e.perlienre. and is supLorter
n each devartment by a ,orps of assistants
vho have no superiors in this or the Old World
3e is the master of his business. Besides
,mploying the best artists he uses the bes
natralsas and mattes the best work on the Oon
rtnent. You may call this
"BLOWING HIS OWN IE RN."
but for proof he refers you to his thirty thous
amd patrons and to his work. which may be In
OLIVlEK H. LIE,
B ROKER.
6..............Carondelet street..............
Near ('anal, New Orleans.
Partlcular attention paid to the SETTLE
MENT 1,F BACK TAXES. Bonds, At eks.
notes, cit / and State securities bought and sold
exclusively on commission. au12m
CENhTRAL DEPOT
- oF -
Animal Vaccine Matter.
VACCINATION.
DIRECT COW POX.
The necessity for establishing in this city n
central offime for vanc.inating directly from the
cow is felt and admitted by all. in order to ar
rest ithe ravages mrai-e by the small-pox on our
population. This is the motive which has di
rected me in creating it, confident of its good
result. and from its ha.ing been sanctioned by
exop rienee'. I have the honor to offer to an en
lightened community my service-, at No. 1 Ca
rndelet street, corner Canal, where the virus
taken direct!ly from the cow on the spot will be
aeplied to those who honor me with their con
fld nce.
Vat.,ination and revarelnation aoplied in this
form is the only one presenting no danger, and
the only preservativ " of co,n,.de.l utility which
insures preservation and exemption from
small-pox. It is, at the same time, the most
salutary method adopted by enlightened eopDle
to effect a speedy terminttlion of the eti 'temi'
affecting them.
Persons rot vwacinated can hewomre so at any
period and durig gall seasons, Those who have
been so for seven years or more should he re
vaccinated, the more so as it has been demon
srrate.l that vaccination taken from the arm is
no,t perrmanent. Childrren from their earliest
Inf nry and even in the period of teething are
exposed to no peril in being vaccinated. and
during an opidemic shrould be .-4 five days rLft'r
their birth.
Ialies will find in my ,etablish*rnnt an apart
nlnat re"-rverld cxi'lusivcly for their ae:omrnlto
iutilonr., whare they can be vaccinatrle in rmt-"
r t-petfuli p aivry.
On MONDAY, August 13, at 12 o',let-k. the
office will t~, opened to the pub it.
Vaccinatlng Days.
MONDAY and WEDNHD4DAY for I.0lin-.
TUEI)DAY and THIUtHDAY for .Gent.lemen.
Between 11 and t o,'e..ck. Price, $1 ,owrh.
The Iasylums and charitiable in stitutions
gratis.
anul a2dplm Da. J. Dni ZAYAH.
COUNTERFEIT NATIONAL BANK NOTES
With full instructions how to dot,}t them. Rem
vised and corrected to date. Albo how to detect
spurious coin, etc.
Free on application In person or by matil to the
CITIZENH' SAVINGS BANK.
(A bank for small sraving.,)
jy14 Im 2dp No. 22 Baronne st., Now Orl.,ans
ANT. OAnax$za. O. Ca.mtanZ.
. L. CARBIKBE. CHAS. J. 0AA*mm
A. CARRIERE & SONS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Corner Royal and Customhouse.
Liberal Advances mrnle on Constgarments to
our frienkds in
LONDON. LIVERPOOL,
a426, 9m2dP HAVRE and RBORDEAT7X,
New Orleans Savings Institution,
No. 196 Canal street.
ThUHTKEE:
A. MOULTON. E. A. PALFR.E Y.
CARL KOIIN, T. L. BAYNE,
DAVID URQUHART. GEORGE JONAS.
IOIIN G. CAI 1.9. Tif S.A. ADAMS,
('HoB, A. CLARKE. C{RIST'N SUEHNZD=
(HAS. J. LEEDS, SAMUEL J&MISUZ
Intrewt Allowed on Dem odta.
D. UEQUHABT, Presde .
CEMe. KLEA.&w Treasurer. pis IA

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