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The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, August 22, 1877, Image 4

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DAILY DEMOCRAT.
OffleOij Journal of the State of Louislana.
OM itIl Journal of the City of New Orleans.
OMo., 109 Graver Street.
J DRGE W. DUPRE & 00..
PROY B BIE TOBS.
GIEOGI W. ý.UIRE,
H. 1. uEAUWOEZ JOHN AUGUSTIN,
ALBERT 0. JANI.
H. J. HEABSEY ...........EDITOR.
kATES OF SUBIYUSIPTION.i
The Daily Demoorat.
One Year.................$100 ,
Six Months..... 6 00
Three ots...........h... ! 50
One Month....................1 100
Payable in Advance.
The Weekly Democrat.
The Weekly Democrat, a large eight-page
e will be furnished to subscribers at we
toowln~weegrattes: `
SixMaonths...:.'.:.:..::.......:. 150
Three Months...............1
Payable in Advance.
NOW ORLEANS, AUEUST 32,1UI7.
OUR ANNUAL STATEMENT.
First of September, 1177.
On the first of September the DaxocSAr will
issue a correct. conoise and comprehensive
statement of the commerce of the city of New
Orleans during the past year, made up and
compiled by gentlemen whose facts and figures
cannot be disputed by the commercial com
munity.
This issue will contain several exhaustive
essays on Agriculture. Railroads and Manufac
tories, together with an elaborate and statistical
treatise on our
RELATIONS WITH SPANISH AMERICA.
We will publish a correct and artistic map.
prepared and executed specially for the DEMO
CRAT by that well known and accomplished
Civil Engineer, Ma. TaoauAs S. RAHina.1
THE MEROHANTS' MAP ...
-OF TEE
NEW ORLEANS PACIFIC RAILWAY
will show its importance to New Orleans as the
CoMMEacIAL Eroarxu and Bvarxase CENTRS
of the
Great Agricultural Region of the Southwest.
It will show the position of
EADM' JETTIES
at the mouth of South Pass, and also the pro
posed location and routo of the
EARATA*IA SRIP CANAL.
We earnestly solicit the patronage of our
friends on this occasion, and those of them
who wish toesend papers to their constituents
would do well to send in their orders as soon as
possible.
The advantages which the DEMocn CT offers to
its patrons in point of CIRCULATION AND POPU
LAnzITT are second to those of no other paper in
New Orleans.
As an advertising medium it is unsurpassed.
The City Delinquent Tax List will be
published for the second time in our is
sue of Monday, August 27th.
SHRINKAGE IN NORTHERN REAL
ESTATE.
Our correspondent, A. C. Buell, a
Northern man, whose interests, profes
sional and social, are in the South, has
on one or two occasions in the past few
weeks written for the DEMOCRAT letters
replete with eloquent and startling
revelations of the impending general
bankruptcy of the North. We print as
a sort of supplement to his letters,
especially that of Sunday, the follow
ing extract from the Chicago lribune
of Monday.
Chicago, like all other parts of the country, has
suffered from this terrible decline in the market
value of real estate. The decline in other cities
has been forced somewhat by the "deadness"
which first tell uron real estate in New York
city, and which u~mpathetically extended even to
Chicago. The tables published recently by the
bankrupt and failing insurance companies of t e
shrinkage of values of improved city
property in New York have had a
depressing effect upon like property
elsewhere. Property taken by insurance com
panies under mortgage in New York city-on
Broadway, seme of it-is not valued by disinter
ested appraisers at much more than one-third cf
the sum at which it was counted among the as
sets of the companies. Is it possible that the
New York Times has never had its attention
called to these revelations? Here is another
item which we clip from an exchange, which,
perhaps, may be news to that paper:
"In the proceedings in New York for the ap
pointment of a receiver for the Universal Life In
surance Company, an expert testified that the
real value of nine pieces of land in Rockland
county, on which the company had made loans,
was $85,000 less than the amount of the mort
gages. The taxes have not been paid for three
years, nor the interest on the mortgages."
Unfortunately, we have not the figures showing
the amount loaned, and therefore cannot tell hcw
great has been the depreciation. Assuming that
the loans did not exceed 50 per cent of the value
of the land at the time they were made, and that
the land would now bring 50 percectof the loa..s,
the decline in.-teesalabie value of tue real estate
is over 75 per cent. That perhaps will be consid
ered by the Times as evidence that real estate is
both dead and stagnant. We suppose that no
mere melancholy evidences of the terrible shrink
age in the value of real estate, as measured by
it. rental or by the price for which it can be sold,
can be found anywhere than is furnished by the
city of New York. The decline in that city is not
confined to say class oBmproved city property,
but is found alike in 'Ihe warehouse, residence
and retali business districts.
Here is a full confession of one of
Bush's chief assertions, full proof that
these were correct, honest and truthful,
and not founded on any sectional feel
ing or animosity, nor written to create a
sensation. The South can find little
profit or pleasure in writing up the
bankruptcy of the North, for business
depression there must, more or less, af
fect us all. But it is, at the same time,
the greatest of folly to attempt to write
up a fotitious prosperity in newspaper
articles, or scare away bankruptcy with
journalistic prophecies of better times
next year. This the Northern papers
have been doing for the past five years,
and it is only occasionally that they
come out honestly like the Trihune and
admit the truth.
When a few years ago Louisiana cc
cupied somewhat the position these
States now occupy; when it was mnown
throughout the Union only as "poor
Lousiana;" when New Orleans was
styled in the smallest country papers of
the North a dead city; when Morton
prated of our stores to let and declared
the grass gýýw1g iu our streets, we
did not set up a denial of these facts,
or cry that this was sectionalism, but
we took the sympathy and pity ten
dered us as genuine and not hypocriti
cal. We expect now to exercise the
right to j omment on the critical condi
tion of the business, trade and prop
erty of the North, without being ao
cused of sensationalism or sectionalism.
The facts the Tribune relates of the
real estate of New York and Chicago is
a convincing proof of Buell's charge of
general bankruptcy in the North. The
value of real estate is a thermometer of
the general condition of affairs. Real
estate has suffered less in the North
than manufacturmng and railroad prop
erty, and suffered less in New York and
Chicago than in most other Northern
cities. It it, then, is worthless, what
must be the condition of other property?
The wide-spread ruin that overvalua
tion may cause is shown by some
of the particulars the Tribune cites.
A piece of property worth $200,000 is in
flated in value by the false system of
values prevailing in the North after the
war and rates as worth $1,000,000. It is
mortgaged for nearly this sum, and the
money spent in senseless extravagance.
The panic comes, the bubble is ex
ploded, the property falls below its true
value. The owner of the property is, of
course, ruined; but not he alone. The
insurance company or bank that has
lent the money on it on mortgage is
broken also, and a long list of mer
chants, etc., who are tied to this bank
or insurance company, go down with
it and complete the wreck one piece of
property has brought about.
It is impossible to estimate just now
the exact losses by this shrinkage of
Northern real estate. Boston admiti a
loss of $46,000,000 this year, while Chi
cago's losS is certainly greater than the
great fire brought her. If the real value
of improved real estate in New York
and Chicago is really what the Tri
bune asserts, between one-third and
one-fourth of its former value, and this
mortgaged, as that paper also asserts,
to its old valuation, there can be no
dispute that, as far as real estate is con
cerned, and the banks and corporations
dependent thereon, the North is bank
rupt. We do not think that it has ever
been denied that the railroads of the
North are wholly, and the manufactories
nearly, bankrupt. We think, therefore,
with these statements of the Tribune
and other papers before us, that we are
justified in asserting broadly, as Buell
asserted, that the whole North is bank
rupt, without being accused of any
other motive than a timely warning to
the South, to Southern planters and
merchants, not to become entangled in
this general ruin.
THE ASSESSORS AND THE ASSISTANT
ATTORNEY GENERAL.
The Assistant Attorney General, Judge
Egan, is giving close attention to the
assessment business. The State Asses
sors have a great manyquestions which
daily and hourly arise requiring legal
counsel and solution. These are sub
mitted to the Assistant Attorney Gene
ral, who carefully examines and de
cides each point submitted. The mul
tiplicity of these points of law grows
out of the loose and corrupt adminis
tration of the State government, and the
confusion of the statutes and of the
various judicial opinions which have
been rendered by the extraordinary
courts that have assumed to interpret
the laws and administer justice in this
State. These statutes and judicial de
cisions have not all been eliminated.
But we are pleased to learn that the
Assistant Attorney General does not
consider the decisions of the late Su
preme Court, on many of the questions
which it attempted to adjudicate, as
binding on the present State officials,
or as safe guides as to the interpreta
tion of the laws and the performance
of their duties.
Our new assessors have discovered a
large number of exemptions-from taxa
tion which the Attorney General de
clares are unauthorized by the consti
tution and law, but which have had the
apparent sanction of the Supreme
Court. These are the exemptions in
favor of large and rich corporations,
whose control over our late Supreme
Court was supreme.
The Assistant Attorney General is
very emphatic in his instructions to the
assessors, to recognize no other exemp
tions but those specified in the constitu
tion, as religious, educational and char
itable institutions, and even of these
the property exempted must be that
which is occupied and used for the pur
poses indicated. Certain corporations
enjoying lamge dividends will no longer
be permitted to evade their liabilities to
the State. They will be afforded an
opportunity of contributing largely to
its revenues.
THE BUSS AND THE TURK.
Great armies of these fierce belliger
ents now confront each other in Bul
garia. The lines are closely drawn
across the unfortunate province which
is the scene of the bloody strife. Each
army is gathering reinforcements from
every quarter. The Grand Duke Nicho
las falls back from his advanced posi
tion through! or in the Balkan passes
and assumes command of the whole
Russian force, and is preparing to bring
the great contest to a final and decisive
issue, which will determine which is the
stronger or the beat handled army.
There are able generals on both sides.
Russia has her best tried chieftain,
whilst the Turks, led by Osman Pasha,
Mehemet All and Suleiman Bey, will
be led by commanders who have given
the highest proofs of skill, energy and
bravery. It will be a mighty struggle
and we hope, for the sake of humanity
and civilization, will terminate a con
filet which is a reproach and disgrace
to our boasted era of Progress, civiliza
tion and refinement. ic would be vain
to speculate on the result. That both
nations and armies are in dead earnest
and will fight with great heroism and
desperation, we have little doubt.
Fortunately the world will be little
affected by the result. If both people
should emerge from the conflict with
more enlarged ideas of the duties of
humanity and civilization, it will be a
happy result of a strife which appears
to be prosecuted in the barbaric style,
and with the ideas, motives and spirit
of the dark ages.
Such a result will be all the glory
which can be achieved in the impending
conflict or all that can interest the rest
of mankind.
CHEAPER TRANSPORTATION TO NEW
ORLEANS THAN ST. LOUIS.
A very prevalent error is that which
assumes the cheaper rates of trans
portation and greater celerity to be
from Northern and Western Texas
to St. Louis than from the same
points to New Orleans, through
Bed river. We have made special in
quiries in Dallas, and other points of
shipment in ITexs, in order to test the
accuracy of these statements. A gentle
man engaged in the transportation bus
iness at Fort Worth and Dallas fur
nishes us with the following authentic
statement of those rates, which may be
accepted as entirely reliable:
Rates to Dallas, Fort Worth, or any other
town in Western or Northern Texas, on the
line of the road from St. Louis
First class freight, per ton ..............$1 50
Second class freight, per ton............. 90
Time-seven days.
From New Orleans to Dallas, via Red
river:
First class froight, per ton.............. 95
Second class freight, per ton............. 70
Average time-when Red river is navi
gable-six days.
Thus it will be seen that from all the
lower and distributing centres of Texas,
transportation can be effected at lower
rates and in less time to New Orleans
than St. Louis.
This assumes that Red river is nayi
gable for the boats usually employed in
that navigation. It can be rendered
navigable all the year round by the ap
plication of inconsiderable appropria
tions by the Federal government. A few
thousand dollars expended in closing
the bayous, like Tone's, which draw off
a large portion of the stream, and in
deepening the channel will afford good
navigation all the year round.
Considering the facility with which
this can be done, the vast importance
and value of the trade, the enormous
amount of produce that comes through
ehis river, Congress cannot fail to per
ceive how much stronger is the claim of
Red river for a liberal share of the ap
propriations for internal improvement
than the many petty rivers and lakes
upon which so much public money has
been expended.
Louisiana and Texas have no greater
interest in any public improvement than
in that of Red river. When it is rý
membered that one single company
has over sixteen steamboats built for
this navigation, and that that company
has a contract for the transportation of
17,500 bales of cotton, saying nothing of
the various other commodities and the
large up-freight, some idea may be
formed of the great importance of this
stream to producers and merchants, to
agriculture and commerce.
There was a case before Judge Tissot
on Tuesday which involved a novel and
embarrassing question. A gentleman
who had a violent case of small-pox sent
for a notary to make his will. But of
course there was no readiness or promp
titude on the part of most of the nota
ries, who were requested to attend the
sick man's couch for the performance of
this duty, and it required a search
among a hundred or so of these useful
officials before the adventurous notary
could be found who was willing to un
dertake the duty. He was found, how
ever, and proceeded heroically to the
sick man's chamber, drew up the will
in proper form and had it signed by
the testator ! In due time this will
was probated, and the notary handed
in a bill for drawing the will of the de
ceased and attending his couch whilst
affected with a violently contagious dis
ease; and this bill was for $500.
Now, this being above the rate allowed
by the law regulating notarial fees, the
question which perplexes Judge Tissot
is, whether the notary could charge for
the risk and alarm he incurred, this
large fee.
The notary backs up his claim with
the deposition of innumerable lawyers
and other notaries, who swear that they
would not have incurred the risk for
double the sum. One of them, one of
the most diligent and reliable of our old
notaries, remarked, "No, Judge, hard as
the times are, I would not have gone to
that man's bedside and breathed the
air of that room for five thousand dol
lars." ___________
DIED:
GIBtiON-At Lexington, Ky., on Thursday.
August i8, 1877. Emily Aberdeen, infant
daughter of Tobias Gibson, of New Oileans,
aged eleven months and twenty-two days.
WAGONS! CANE CARTS! SPOKES
gE. N1. amorL=Em.A
18 and 20 Union and 15 and 17 Perdide
streets.
Sole Agent for the Celebrated "STUDEBA
KER" WAGONS, CARTS and SPRING WORK
of all kinds and sizes.
Dealer in Phildulelphia and Western Cane
Wagons, Carts and Drays; Timber Wheels;
Wheelbarrows of all descriptions; Spokes. Pel
loes. Hubs, Shafts, et". Wheelwright material.
Orders promptly filled. All work warranted.
au2 im
PROSPECTUS
-OF TIHE
New Orleans Pacific Rail
way Company.
Thi NEW ORLEANS PACIFIC ILATIWAY
COMPANY was organised Jun. 1875, under a
charter from the State of Louisiana, authoria
log it to constr04t a railroad from Now Orleans
to Shreveport acd Marshall, in Texas, divorg.
lug at Keachi for Shreveport.
The route has- boon surveyed for the entire
distanee, 311 mitrs, flion Now Orleans, via
Donaldsonvllle and Alexandria, to a volnt of
connection with the Texas and Paclic ladlway
at Shreveport and Marshall, Texas, where the
road will form coannetions with Dallas, Sher
man. Fort Worth, Jefferson, Texarkana, and all
Northern Texas and Arkansas, Missouri and
Kansas, and furnish a new highway for the
trade of that section of the country.
At New Orleans, the road will connect with the
New Orleans and Mobile railroad for all South
ern points, and with the New Orleans. St. Louis
and Chicago railroad for all points in the North
and East. At the port of New Orleans direct
connections are also made with steamers and
sailing vessels for all points on the Atlantic
Boast and Europeap countries.
It is proposed to place upon the line a First
Mortgage, not to exceed $12ee per mile. Bonds
to boar 6 per cent interest, payable semi-annu
ally and to run for forty years: say on the 361
miles of road $4,332.000, of which are now offered
to the people of New Orleans $e7s,0eo-proceeds
of which will enable the company to grade,
bridge and cross-tie the entire line, which,
when done, the balance of the bonds will pro
cure the superstructure and equipment, and
complete the line ready for business.
Much of the grading having been previously
executed, the work done at the several points
upon the line represents two-thirds of the ag
gregate reqaired to complete the road-bed,
The following estimate, prepared with care by
the Chief Engineer, is herewith submitted:
GENERAL EaTIMATE.
From New Orleans to Marshall.;.......3t6 miles
From Keashi Junction to Shreveport.. 25 miles
Total......... .............61 miles
Graduation and bridging............... $1.3392.703
Superstructure laid down complete.,, 2,274,300
Shops, station and section houses,
wood and water stations, and sid
ings...... .................... 25.80e
Engineering and superintendence,
contingencies and general office ex
penses, 73 percent.................. 291,4383
Total, exclusive of rolling stock... $4,249,200
800 Cars of all classes at c500... 440,e00
3o Locomotive engines at $7,500 225,000- 625.W3
Total, inclusive of rolling stock... $4,874,200
Equal to $lse30 per mile-average cost of whole
road completed and fully equipped.
City subscriptions paid ............ . .u .ec0
Subscriptions in parishes available... 440,000
266,720 acres of land in Texas, estimated
at twenty-five cents per acre.... 71.100
First mortgage ;bonds offered in New
Orleans ..... . ................. 675,010
First mortgage bonds on 331
miles at $12,0)) per mile.. $4,332,:
Less above... ............ 075,0(0- 3,657,000
Total.. . . ...................... .$.5,168.60
With reference to the ability of the road to
`earn the interest upon the bonds, attention is
called to the following estimate of the business
that can be safely depended upon, and any one
familiar with the country traversed by the New
Orleans Pacific Railway and the cotton and
sugar growing region tributary thereto, and the
advantages of New Orleans as a cotton market
will bear us out in our statements.
The estimates of earnings for the line will
appear low, but even at the following moderate
figures an ample margin is left, above the inter
eat on these securities.
The earnings for the first year after comple
tion of the road, estimated thus:
250,000 bales of cotton at $2...... ---. $500,000
3,000 car loads of stock at $40...... 120,000
6,000 car loads of grain at Sot (repre
senting about 2,000 000 bushelsl-... 210,00
U. S. Mail, $100 per mile per annum..". 36,100
Express and miscellaneous freight by
passenger trains....... . ...... 20,000
Through and local passenger trafflc- ... 1s0,0oe
Merchandise, supplies and general
freight ................ . 300,000
Gross earnings ............. $1,366,100
Operating expenses and taxes, 60 per
cent ... ....................19,060
Net, applicable to interest. .$54,440
Annual interest charge on llrst mort
gage, $1,332,ooo at 6 per cent ... 259.920
Net, applicable to sinking fund and
dividends...... ..~...........1- - 2986,520
-SaSuWe~u 2dp
OFFICE OF THE
New Orleans Pacific Rail
way Company.
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the
New Orleans Pacific Railway Company, held this
day, it was unanimously resolved:
That whereas, the Board of Directors of the
New Orleans Pacific Railway Company have
satisfactory assurances that the company can
procure, by means of first mortgage bonds, al
the necessary rails, spikes, fish-plates, locomo
tives, cars, depots, water stations, turn tables
and other necessary improvements, after the
road shall have been graded, the bridges built
and the cross ties procured, for the entire line,
and
Whereas, when the sum of $675,000 shall have
been subscribed, said company will be able to
complete the entire line, ready for the rails and
rolling stock; theretore,
Resolved, 2hat the President of this company
be and is hereby authorized to issue in the
name of the New Orleans Pacific Railway Com
pany, bonds on its entire line from New Or
leans to Shreveport, La., and Marshall, Texas,
at an amount not to exceed $12,000 per mile, pay
able in forty years, and bearing interest at the
rate of six (6) per cent per annum; and to se
cure the payment of said bonds, in both princi
pal and interest, the said President of said coin
pany is hereby authorized to execute a first
mortgage and act of pledge on all the railroad's
capital sto k, corporate franchises, and real and
personal property of every kind of said New
Orleans Pacific Railway Company, either now
owned and possessed by said company, or hers -
after to be acquired, and that said President be
authorized to offer and obtain subscriptions for
$675,000 of said first mortgage bonds in the city
of New Orleans, It is further
Resolved, That the proposition to issue second
mortgage bonds on said road is hereby with
drawn, and parties having subscribed thereto
are hereby authorize) and entitled, on applica
tion, to have their subscriptionschangedto sub
scriptions to first mortgage bonds. It is further
Resolved. That subscriptions for said first
mortgage bonds will be received at the office of
the company, and payable in monthly install
ments of twenty per cent.
L B. WHEELOCK, President.
E. L. BANLETT, Secretary,
August 16, 1577. au1T 2S7t
JEWELRY AT AUCTION!
ýTTV'ERY WTiT~llr.A Y ANAT W LX A. V
I. C. LEVI, Auctioneer,
108............................Canal Street............................tOS
WILL OFFER, TWICE A WEEK, HIS
LARGE AND ELEGANT STOCK OF JEW1+LRY AT AUCTION,
And remainder of days will sell at Private Sale, an usual, from FIVE to TWENTY-FIVE P13
CENT LaaS than any other establishment which advertises daily.
Watches Repaired and Diamonds Reset
Only by skillful workmen, at the lowest rates.
jeio am I. C. LEVI, le5 Canal street.
ALIlTN fHOCHE';tEAU VI(ETIERECRABTTES,
CIAIILEM 7'. )U(IAZ')N. J E1NEST MERILH.
Aý ROCHERICAU & CO.,
(OMMIMMION M1ER(;HANTMi,
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF
ZRUJ0 & ýOMPA1TS
CHAMPAGGN E.
IMIOllTEUiRS iOF
BRANDIIS, WINES', VEUMOUTHS, OILS, ETC.,
N South William Mt., New York. 16 and 18 Mt. Louis Street, New Orlems,
aull im
GO TO GRUNE WALD HALL,
-FOR
THE BEST I'rANOS,
Such as the world-renowned pianos of
STEINWAY & SONS, W. KNABE & CO., PLEYEL, WOLFF & CO.,
THE LEADING PIANOS IN THE WORLD,
and unaurpassed in this climate for DURABILITY. Sold on EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS. at
LOWER PRICES than asked elsewhere for an inforior Plano.
Parties anxious to secure a reliable, sweet-toned, durable piano, AT A MODERATE PBIO0
should buy no other but one of the
Newly Improved Upright FISCHER PIANOS, or One of the Very Popular SQUAHN
HAINES PIANOS,
Recommended and warranted in every respect. THEY ARE PERFECT GEMS.
Go by all means to GRUNEWALT)'S OLD RELIABLE HOUSE known all over the country for
fair dealing an" liberality: and it the HEAD OF 'i HE MUSICAI BUS1NESS.
DIRECT IMPORTED MUSICAL MERCHANDISE, of all desrriptions received by almoste egv
European vessel, and sold, at retail and wholesale, at THE CLOSEST 1tIGURES.
Send for catalogues to
LOUIS GRUNEWALD,
jel7 Grunewald Hall, 14, 10, IN, 20 and 22 Baronne street, New Orleans.
PHILIP WERLEIN,
78, 80, 82 AND 90 BABONNE STREET, AND 122 CANAL STREET,
LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF THE SOUTH,
DEFIES ALL COMPETITION.
Best Pianos and Organs,
Lowest Prices,
Most Liberal Terms,
Largest Assortmest,
Ever Offered in the South.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE WORLD-RENOWNED CHICKERING PIANOS,
The Eest and Most Perfect Pianos Made,
ALSO, FOR THE ELEGANT UPRIGHT HARDMAN PIANOS,
In tone and touch superior to the Pleyel Pianos. of equal durability and selling I1o0 less. War
ranted to give good satisfaction or the money refunded. Sold on small monthly payments, or
very low for cash.
Sole Agents for the Celebrated Mason & Hamlin, Estey and New Eng
land Organs,
JUST RECEIVED PER STEAMER ALICE,
Fi Th C Tadsea ISluppieal N ensPrumontas.
The Trade Supplied below Northern Prices.
Established 1869. P. O. Box 707,
WHITE'S GINNERY,
Office 26 Union, near Carondelet street
TO COTTON FACTORS AND PLANTERS:
GINNING TERMS-THE SEED.
BAGGING, TIES, TWINE and DRAYAGE
furnished FREE since 1876.
Parties wishing to know the average yield of
Cotton ginned at "WHITE'S GINNERY" last
season will please send to the undersigned for
circulars.
D. PRIEUR WHITE.
aulo 67n 2dp
DELINQUENT TAXPAYERB.
In addition to advancing money for the pay
ment of taxes, under act 96 of 1877, we will pay
city taxes of 1875 and erior years at a LARGER
DISCOUNT for cash than is usually offered.
We will sell scrip orders in sums to suit any
bill at lowest prices.
CITIZENS' SAVINGS BANK,
auli lm_20 22 Baronne street.
FANCY HAY. SEED 1 Yk. OATS.
2,000 Bales Fancy Timothy HAY.
200 Sacks Choice Seed RYE.
i1eee Sacks Red Rust-proof OATS.
Apply to GEORGE HECK & CO.,
Corner Poydras and Tehoupitoulas streets.
jylO 1m 2dp
HL II. HUSS1ANN & P. BUliLER,
PROPRIETORS OF
EAGLE ODORLEMS APPARATUS
FOR CLEANING VAULTS.
Office, No. 25 Exchange Alley.
Orders left at 102 Calliope st.. New Orleans.
iy22_lm*
New Orleans Savings Institution,
No.156 Canal Street.
TRUSTEES:
A. MOULTON, E. A. PALFREY,
CARL KOHN, T. L. BAYNE,
DAVID URQUHART, GEORGE JONAS,
JOHN G. GAlIES, THC&.A. ADAMS,
THOS. A. CLARKE, CHRIST'N SCHNEXIDU
CHAS. J. LEEDS, SAMUEL JAMISON
Interest Allowed on Deposits.
D. UBQUHABT. President
CGas. KnaUAW, Treasurer, aplS 1729
W ITRAL DEPOT
Animal Vaccine Matter.
VACCINATION.
DIRECT COW POX.
The necessity for establishing in this city a
central office for vaecinating directly from the
cow is felt and admitted by all, in order to ar
rest the ravages made by the small-pox on our
population. This is the motive which has di
rected me in creating it, confident of its good
result. and from its having been sanctioned by
expf rience, I have the honor to offer to an en
lightened community my services, at No. 1 Ca
rondelet street, corner Canal, where the virus
taken directly from the cow on the sp$ will be
applied to those who honor me with their con
fidence.
Vacyination and revaccination applied in this
form is the only one presenting no danger, and {
the only preservativ- of conceded utility which
insures presetvation and exemption f-E
small-pox. It is, at the same time, the y cu1
salutary method adopted by enlightened p, -
to effect a speedy termination of the epid e s c
affecting them.
Persons not vaccinated can become so at any
period and duringail seasons, Those who have
been so for seven years or more should be re
vaccinated, the more so as it has been demon
strated that vaccination taken from the arm is
not permanent, Children from their earliest
infancy and even in the period of teething are
exposed to no peril in being vaccinated, and
during an epidemic should be so five days after
their birth.
Ladies will find in my establishment an apart
ment reserved ,-xllusively for their accommo
nation, whlire they can be vaccinated in most
respectful privacy-.
On MONDAY, August 13. at 12 o'cleck, the
office will be opened to the pub.ic.
Vaecina$Iug Days.
MONDAY and WEDNESDAY for Ladies.
TUESDAY and THURSDAY for Gentlemen.
Between ii and 1 o'clock. Price, $1 each.
The asylums and charitable institutions
gratis.
auO 2dplm* Da. J. DE ZAYAS.
ANrT. CAEEIEBa. O. CARRIEBE,
L L. CAauIEsL Oaks. J. OC azzas
A. CARRIERE & SONS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Corner Royal and Castomhouse.
Liberal Advances made on Consignmena to
our friends in
LONDON. LIVERPOOL.
aP26 9mndp HAVEE and BOIDIAD .

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