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The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, August 23, 1877, Image 4

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DAILY DEMOCRAT.
Of doW Journal of the State of Loulsiana.
O(I.al Jourdal of the City of New Orleans.
OioE, 109 Orar..r streot.
003.OO3 W. PUPRE k 00..
PBOPBIEITO 8.
0GOBGU W. aUPD$,
3 5. I. AMar, JOHN AUGUSTIN,
ALHZU 0. JANIX.
H. J. HEAlSETY ..............EDITOR.
RATIES OF (U1JJNQRII'TIOINI
The Datly Democrat.
QOn year ...... . ...............1$1e
ree Months.....
e in Advance.
The Weekly Democrt.
The Weekly Democrat, a largeo eight-p age
mewill be furnished to subscribers at the
wng rates: • N
ear ........................... m
Mo ths .............. .
hres sNo ths... .. ........ *
Payable in Advance.
OW ORLMANeS, AUsUaT 2S, 15s1.
OUR ANNUAL STATEMENT.
Plat or September, 182l.
On the first of September the DuxocRAT will
lssue a correct, concise and comprehensive
statement of the commerce of the city of New
Orleans during the past year, made up and
uomplied by gentlemen whose facts and fligures
cannot be disputed by the commercial com
munity.
This issue will contain several exhaustive
essays on Agriculture, Railroads and Manufac
tories, together with an elaborate and statistical
treatise on on our
BILATIONN WITH IPANIHI AMERICA.
We will publish a correct and artistic map.
iepared and ekecuted specially for the Dawo
nAuT by that well known and accomplished
Civil Engineer, Ma. TxoMAs 8. HARDEag.
THE MEROHANTS' MAP
--O TE-
MNW ORLEANS PACIFIC RAILWAY
will show its importance to New Orleans as the
CdouanuIlM EuPomuI and BusItNas Jr4NTan
of the
Great Agricultural Region of the Southwest.
It will show the position of
EADW' JETTIES
at the mouth of South Pass. and also the pro
osed location and route of the
DARATARIA SHIP CANAL.
We earnestly sollcit- the patronage of our
fMends on this occasion, and those of them
who wish to send papers to their constituents
would do well to send in their orders as soon as
possible.
The advantages which the DaKoci&T offers to
Iti patrons in point of CIRCUIATION AND POPU
AZoTrT are second to those of no other paper in
New Orleans.
As an advertisilt medinm it is unsurpassed.
The City Delinquent Tax List will be
published for the second time in our is
sue of Monday, August 27th.
The boys at Pittsburg have had their
dance and now the fiddler must be paid.
The Suffererf by the mob devastations
nave set to work in a very systemhlti
way, according to our dispatches, to get
the necessary data for suits against Alle
gheny county for remuneration for the
property destroyed by the rioters. Com
mittees on the part of the Board of Direc
tors of the Pennsylvania railroad and
the Maritime Exchange have had a con
sultation and come to an agreement,
the substance of which i. that the
claims of private persons shall first be
prosecuted, and after adjustment those
of the railroad will be pressed. There
will be some lively litigation up there,
and the lawyers are doubtless hunting
up old clients and manifesting a deli.
eate solloitute in their affairs that does
great honor to human nature.
.There is a mysterious character, a sort
of "Nick of the Woods," going about
the country indulging a very peculiar
and diabolical propensity for cutting off
people's heads. The headless corpse
found in Bayou St. John Wednesday
morning is the sixth that has been dis
covered in this region within the past
few months. A singlar circumstance is
that in no instance has the headless
body been identified, and no one has
been missed in the communities where
it has been found; nor has the missing
caput ever been discovered; but the vic
tims always appear to be tramps. Per
haps this is some one of the new and
enthusiastic political economists carry
ing out his own peculiar theory of solv
ing the labor problem bygetting rid of
tramps, and he cuts off their heads in
order to leave his mark so that no con
scienceless editor can surreptitiously
lay claim to the credit of his work.
On the 29th of this month there is to
be a convention of the scientific men of
the United States at Nashville, which is
to be followed by a convention of the
different fire departments of the various
cities, on the 4th of September. We
are glad to learn that Col. Girard will
attend both of these meetings, where he
will submit his several processes of
discovering and extinguishing fires.
These inventions of Col. Girard are of a
character that must command attention
and approval, and we hope that
he will be able to demonstrate to those
whose approval will establish their
merit, the usefulness of his in
ventions. In St. Louis an allow
ance of ten per cent has already
been made by,the insurance companies
in favor of h in which his appa
ratus has been a oted, and we are sat
islfied the same will be done wherever
its merits are properly understood. It
is useless to say a word in behalf of
these inventions, which are of the sim
plest and most practical nature, and
whose clirns can be easily tested. But
of Col. (Girard we can !peak a word.
He is an old citizen of New Orleans, a
modestand scholarly gentleman, and
one of the most original of American
scientists.
O0NSTITUTIONAL OHABGEB.
Our country contemporaries, whilst
ubited in the ,reat need of amending
our State constitution, do not fail to ap
preciate the dangers and embarrass
ments of holding a convention for that
purpose. On the other hand, certain
of the journals present serious objeo
tions to the mode of amendment by
legislative acts. These are issues which
demand very thorough discussion and
calm deliberation. They should, in
their consideration. be elevated above
mere partisan influences. The de
mand for a change of temporary offi
cials in the State or parish offices
would be an insufficient reason in
favor of a convention. Far higher
objects and motives should be held
in view in the advocacy of that
measure. The changes demanded are
of a fundamental character and should
not be belittled by associating them
with subordinate and inferior ones, such
as relate more to matters of adminis
tration, to local interests and the selec
tion of the persons to administer the
offices.
These cardinal changes in the consti
tution are required to impose upon the
administrators of the political power
of the State, constitutional restrictions
and barriers which will be found far
more effective to prevent the abuses
and complaints that have so oppressed
and disgraced our people and State,
than will be found in the partisan or
personal character of the persons who
may command the suffrages of the
people.
Such restraints will operate to pre
vent even incompetent and ill-selected
persons--and such are not infrequently
chosen by the most honest and well
intentioned of parties-from all kinds of
malfeasance or misfeasance, and will
protect all from the allurements and in
fluences that too often corrupt and
mislead men of originally honest pur
poses and ambitions.
This is our great necessity. Constitu
tional restraints which will guard and
environ all offiolals and representa
tives against the approaches and
assaults of corruption, the temptation
to abuse power delegated by the people,
for their own benefit, to mere selfish
ends and emoluments. How is this to
be done, unless the fundamental law im
poses such restrictions as not only dc
not exist in our constitution, but are ac
tually condemned by its express encour
agements of the abuses which should
be guarded against, or by its silence
are promoted and encouraged.
Thus the Legislature, which has been
the source,. the cause, the agent, from
and through which all the corruption,
mismanagement and plunders of the
last ten years have been accomplished,
has been left with omnipotent powers,
and without those restrictions which
have been hitherto regarded as essen
tial to-preserve the reserved rights and
liberties of the people,
Under a judicial decision, the wisdom
and policy of which we have always
had our doubts, the Legislatures of the
States are regarded as having all pow
ers not forbidden or prohibited by the
Federal or State constitutions.
Hence the necessity of additional
constitutional restrictions and prohibi
tions to those which have failed hith
erto to check or prevent, the great ex
cesses and abuses of our Legislatures.
It was with this view that the late State
Convention of Pennsylvania was held.
That body embraced the ablest talent
and largest experience of the State.
Politics were excluded from its deliber
ations, and the main object was kept
steadily in view of imposing restric
tions upon the legislative and executive
powers, and thereby of guarding against
the abuses and corruption which had
produced such enormous evils and made
the government of the State a by word
for venality and corruption.
This convention produced a constitu
tion, the careful reading and study of
which will. demonstrate to our own peo
ple the urgent need and wisdom of
similar changes in our own constitution.
We propose hereafter to refer to and
elaborate the argument in favor of
these changes. For the present we
must be content with a copy of the pro
visions of the nco constitution of Penn
sylvania relative to the powers of the
Legislature and the restrictions thereof.
SE.. 7. The General Assembly shall not
pass any local or special law authorizing the
creatilon, extension or impairing of liens;
regulating the affairs of counties, cities, town
ships, wards, boroughs or school districts;
changing the names of persons or places;
changing the venuei in civil or criminal cases;
authorizing the laying out, opening, altering
or maintaining roads, highways, streets or
alleys; relating to ferries or bridges, or Incor
porating ferry or bridge companies, except
for the erection of bridges *:rossing streams
which form boundaries betwee this and any
other State; vacating roads, town plats,
streets or alleys; relating to cemeteries,
graveyards or public grounds, not of the
Stat4e; authorizing the adoption or legitima
tion of children; hwating or changing county
seats; erecting new counties, or changing
county lines; Incorporating cities, towns or
villages, or changing their charters; for the
opening and conducting of elections, or fixing
or changing the place of voting; granting
divorces; erecting new townships or bo
roughs; changing township lines, borough
limits or school districts; creating offices, or
prescribing the powers and duties of ofll
cors in counties, cities, boroughs, townships,
election or school districts; clhagingg the law
of descent or succes'(ion ; regulating the prac
tice or jurisdiction of, or changing the rules
of evidence in, any judicial proceeding or in
quiry before, courts, aldermen, justices of the
peate, shrills, csri clns, issihnoners, arbitrators,
auditors. masters in chance'ryor other tribu
nals, or providing or changing metho sis for the
collertion of debts, or the enforcing of judg
ments, or prescribing the effect of judicial
sales of real estate; regulating the fees or ex
tennding the powers and duties of aldermen,
justi.ces of time peace, magistrates or consta
l,ies; regulating the management of public
s.ilo,ols, the building or repairing of school
houseis, and the raising of money for such
Ipurposes; fixing the rate of interest; affect
ing the estates of minors or persons under
disability, except after due notice to all parties
in intrerest, to be recited in the special en et
ment; remitting fines, penalties and forfeit
ures, or refulndiug moneys legallv paid into
the treasury; exempting property from taxa
tion; regulating labor, trate, mining or man
ufacturing; creating corporations, or amend
ing, renewing or extending the charters
tlthreof; granting toany corporation. associa
tion or individual, any special privilege or
immunity, or to any corporation, association
or inlividual, the right to lay down a
railroad track; nor shall the General Assem
bly indirectly enact sealh special or local law,
by the partial repeal of ageneral law; but laws
rrpealing local or special acts may be passed;
nor shall any law Ie passed granting powers
or privileges, in any Tase where the granting
of such 1)owers and priviloges shall have bien
iprovilded. for by general law, nor where the
curts have jurisdli'tiol to grant thile Due, or
give timhe relief asked for.
ME'. H. No local or special bill shall be
,nased, unless notice of the intention to apply
,herrcfor shall have tneen published in the lo
cality where the matter or the thing to be of
fictuxl may ie situatel, which noti(e shall be
at least thirty days prior to timhe introduction
into the General Assenmblly of such bill, and in
the manriner to be provihld by law; the evi
dence of such notice having umen published,
shall be exhibited in the General Asscembly
before such act shall ibe passed.
The indefatigable president of the
New Orlekns Pacific, some eight or ten
years ago, was at the head of a large
wholesale drug store in this city, which
at that time was doing a large business
with Texas. It was while in this posi
tion he realized, by personal experience,
the enormous value of this trade.
To give some idea of the extent of
that business then, we can state, as a
fact within our knowledge, that the
freight bills of some of our houses
amounted from ten to fifteen thousand
dollars a month on merchandise shipped
up Red river. This was in the infancy
of the development of Northern and
Western Texas, which has advanced
since with such amazing rapidity. What
would be the extent of this business
now if our people had had the enter
prise and sagacity to secure sure and
constant means of communication with
this growing and immensely productive
country? What incalculable loss and
injury to our commerce has resulted
from the withdrawal of this enormous
trade to St. Louis ?
The agents of our houses, who go to
Texas, are everywhere met with this re
mark of the resident traders and farm
ers, ')Vhy don't your people in New
Orleans give us access to your city for
our produce? We all prefer to deal with
you; to buy and sell to you. It is to our
advantage, but you won't help us to get
to your city, and drive us to St. Louis.'
The fact we have referred to, of the
large freight bills of his own and other
houses, furnishes the key to the intense
zeal and absorbing earnestness of that
gentleman in urging upon our mer
chants and capitalists the duty and
necessity of subscribing to the small
amount demanded for the early realiza
tion of this most important of all the
enterprises ever undertaken in this city.
The same experience ought to be
brought home to all our merchants,
traders, and in fact to our whole pop
ulation, every class and individual of
which is subjected to loss from the
want of this road, as every one would
participate in the profits of it when it
shall be established.
In view of this fact and argument it
would be the most lamentable exhibi
tion of lethargy and insensibility to our
true interests and duty if our citizens
hold back or delay their subscriptions
to this enterprise.
We do not believe that there is an hon
est man in America who has the slight
est respect for Garfield, yet he is such a
magnificent specimen of the good old
machine Republican that we must sub
mit the following observations of his,
delivered in a recent interview on the
subject of the President's recent. order
forbidding the recipients of government
pap running machine politics. He says,
and there is a certain pathos in his way
of putting it:
"I think it has given us more of a backset
than the Southern policy, and awakened more
distrust. The argument I hear against it is
that Hayes, after receiving from the ReIpibli
can party all it can bestow is now endeavor
ing to destroy all the methods by which the
party has kept itself in vital organization.
This feeling does not prevail alone among
machine politicians out is often expressed by
the best class of 1epublicans. If it gains
ground, Hayes will break down.
There is something touching and
pathetic in this piece of honest gush.
Probably it is the first time that Gar
field has ever been honest and ingenu
ous, and we may be doing him a great
injustice and spoiling his whole plan of
existence and theory of life by publish
ing it-but we can't help it; the thing
is too sensational for any modern jour
nalist to overlodk.
It is unnecessary cruelty to say that
we entirely agree with all he has said.
The whole statement is so graphic that
comment would only obscure it; but we
must be pardoned for attracting atten
tion to the delicate and characteristic
way in which he puts it-"the argu
ment I hear," etc., etc.
The "delicate Italian hand" of Stan
ley Matthews is nowhere when the true
blue puritan hypocrisy and equivoca
tion of Garfield comes into play.
It was about twenty-five years ago that
our respected fellow-citizen, Mr.Musson,
who is still in the vigor of his admira
ble administrative faculties, filled the
office of Postmaster in this city-filled
it, too, as it never was before or since
has been filled. During his term Mr.
Musson had to make up the mail for
Texas, including the whole correspond
ence of that State with the outside
world. This mail then did not quite
fill a small-sized cigar box. Now several
of the largest express wagons are re
quired to transport that mail from the
postoffice to the boats and railroads,
through which it is distributed and de
livered at the various points of delivery
in that vast and growing State.
The last accounts from Howard repre
sent him as still pursuing Joseph. "On
the 16th," says the dispatch, "the In
dians crossed the stage road near Dry
Creek station, and Howard was not far
behind them in pursuit." At the time
of Gibbon's fearful fight he was only
eighteen miles behind. Weeks have
elapsed since then, but the remorseless
Howard still pursues them, and appa
rently holds his own, for he is "not far
behind." Howard never fights-that is
not his idea of a campaign. Gibbon
may fight, even with the memory of
Custer's experience at that sort of thing
before his eyes, but none of that for
the wily and pitiless Howard--he pur
sues. What a figure-head for relent
less, eternal pursuit he affords. Let us
not speak of destiny, of "unmerciful
disaster," without using Howard as an
illustration. ': Nemesis Howard, or the
Pitiless Pursuer of the Plains," what a
title for Beadle's most vigorous and
thrilling ink slinger.
DIED.
EH(!LAI'ON-At Lake I'rovldence, La.., on Au
gust 17th, 1977, Isidore Victor, ,son of Vlc
tr Esclamon and J. B. Marshall. aged ; ycars
and s months,
WAGONS I CANE CARTS T S1POKE I
*S. N. itO O I.A..
18 and SO Union and 15 and IT Perdldo
streets.
Sole Aent 'for the Celebrated "STUDEBA
KER" WAGONS, CARTS and SPRING WORK
of all kinds and sizes.
Dealer in Philadelphla and Western Cane
Wagons, Carts and Drays; Timber Wheels;
Wheelbarrows of all descriptions; Spokes. Fel
loes. Hubs, Shafts. etc. Wheelwright material.
Orders promptly filled. All work warranted.
au2 im
NOTICE TO TEACHERS.
Ni-w OrEANs. August 22, 1877.
Such graduates of Normal Schools or depart
ments, and such white or colored teachers of
capacity and experience as desire employment
In any of the rural public schools, are requested
to communloate. IN WRITING. THROUGH
THE POSTOFFICE, their color, names and
address. with the names of the parIshes or
towns with which they are best acquainted.
Address Postofflee locked box 202s. ausl 4t
W W. CLAPRK JNo. W. Nonals, D. T.R.,
kresideut. Vice Presldent. Secretrary
and Trens.
DIEBOLD SAFE AND LOCK CO.
The Leading Safes in the world. Have never
failed to preserve their contents against
FIRE OR BURGILAR9,
though tested thousands of times. Parties es
tablishing themselves in business will find it to
their interest to give me a call before purchas
Ing elsewhere. Over twenty Hecond-hand Com
binatlon Lock Hates on hand, for sale very low.
A. ROY,
Agent New Orleans branch Diebold Safe and
Lock Company,
au22 2dptf 27 Canal street.
100 CANAL STREET.
---oN
ACCOUNT OF LIQUIDATION.
--AT
NET COST PRICES.
GOLD BAND CHINA,
FRENCH WHITE CHINA,
Crockery,
GLASSWARE,
--AND
House Furnishing Goods,
JAPAN WARE, CUTLERY, Etc.
1 00 .... ...Canal treet .........100
a2i3 lot .1. C. GAINES, liquidator.
OFFICE OF TiE
New Orleans Pacific Rail
way Company.
At a meeting of the Board of Dirnetors of the
New Orlcans Pacilf~ Railway Company. held this
(lay. It was unanimously resolved:
That whereas, the Board of Directors of the
New Orleans I'acifle Railway Company have
satisfactory assurances that the company can
procure, by means of first mortgage bonds, al
the necessary rails, spikes, fish-plates, locomo
tives, cars, depots, water stations, turn tables
and other necessary improvemernts, after the
road shall have been graded, the bridges built
andi the cross ties procured, for the entire line.
and
Whereas, when the sum of se,,o.0 Fhall have
been subscrlbed, said company will he able to
compnltoe the entire line, ready for the rails and
rolling stock; theretore,
Resolved, ' hat the President of this company
be and is hereby authorized to issue in the
name of the New Orleans Pacific Railway Com
pany, bonds on its entire line from New Or
leans to Shreveport. La., and Marshall, Texas
at an amount not to exceed $12,(0)0 per mile. pay
able in forty years, and bearing interest at the
rate of six (6) per cent per annum; and to so
cure the payment of said bonds, in both princi
pal and interest, the said President of said com
Spany is hereby authorized to execute a first
mortgnage and nat of pledge on all the railroad's
capital sto:k, corporate franchises, and real and
personal property of every kind of said New
Orleans Pacific Railway Company, either now
owned and possessed by said company, or here.
after to be acquired, and that said President be
authorized tooffler and obtain subscriptions for
m67rosar of said first mortgage bonds in the city
of New Orleans. It is further
Resolved, That the proposition to issue second
mortgage bonds on said road is hereby with
drawn, and parties having subscribed thereto
are hereby authorized and entitled, on applica
tion, to have their subscriptions changed to sub
sc"riptions to first mortgage bonds. It is further
Resolved, That subscriptions for said first
mortgage bonds will be rn,.,ived at the office of
the co"mpany. and payable in monthly install
mnts of twenty per cent,
E. B. WHEELOCK, President.
E. L. RANLETT, Secretary.
August 16, 1877. aull 2p7t
OFFICERS AhD MEN
-or
ALL COMPANIES
Who served under
MAJOR GENERAL FRED. N. OGDEN,
Can he supplied with
CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE,
-BY
GEO. ELLIS & BROTHER,
jy311 m2p 82 Camp street,
JEWELRY AT AUCTION
m1DTT 'ERY WETAIBMSDA. AL.%D 3lr XD3AL"Y r
I. C. LEVI, Auctioneer,
108 ....................... Canal Street............................10n
WILL OFFER, TWICE A WEEK, HIS
LARGE AND ELEGANT STOCK OF JEWELRY AT AUCTION,
And remainder of days will sell at Private Sale as usual, from FIVE to TWENTY-FIVE FM
CENT LE$B than any other establishmoent which advertises daily.
Watches Repaired and Diamonds Rerset
Only by skillful workmen, at the lowest rates.
jeoso am I. C. LEVI. Ie OCanal street.
ALBITN IVLCIEOEA4IT PIERTTE CRABIFER,.
CIIARLES T. IWDUAZON. EIRNEST MERILH.
A, ROCHEREAU & CO.,
COMMIHNION MEPdCHANTS,
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF
ZL YTT &, COM PONT'S
CHAMPAGN E.
IMPORTERM OF
BR ANDIES, WINEP, VERMOUTHS, OILS, ETC.,
s South William mt., New York. 16 and IS at. Louis street, New Orleaim.
hll19 3m
GO TO GRUNEWALD HALL,
-FOR
THE BEST PIANOS,
Buch as the world-renowned pianos of
STEINWAY & SONS, W. KNABE & CO., PLEYEL, WOLFF & CO.,
THE LEADING PIANOS IN THE WOULD,
and unsurpassed in this climate for DURABILITY. Sold on EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTB. at.
LOWER PRICES than asked elsewhere for an inferior Piano.
Parties anxious to secure a reliable, swoot-toned, durable piano. AT A MODERATE PRIOR
should buy no other but one of the
Newly Improved Uprllght FISCHER PIANOS, or One of the Very Popular SQVUAIMB
HAINES PIANOS,
Recommended and warranted In every respeot. THEY ARE PERFECT GEMS.
Go by all means to ORUNEWALD'S OLD RELIABLE HOUSE known all over the country for
fair dealing an'd liberality' and at the HEAD OF 'I HE MUSICAL BUSINE'8.
DIRECT IMPORTED MUSICAL MERCHANDISE, of all descriptions received by almooteverv
European vessel. and sold, at retail and wholesale, at THE CLOSEST FIIGJUREE.
Bend for catalogues to
LOUIS QRUNEWAL3,
jell7 ranewald Hall, 14, 16, 16, 20 and S2 Baronne street, New Orfleam.
PHILIP WERLEIN,
78, 80, 82 AND 90 BARONNE STREET, AND 122 CANAL STREET,
LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF THE SOUTH,
DEFPIES AVL COMPETITIO..
Best Pianos and Organs,
Lowest Prices,
Most Liberal Terms,
Largest Assortment,.
__ -L. Ever Offered In the ScnIt.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE WORLD-RENOWNED CHICKERING PIANOS,
The Bent and Most Perfect Pianos Made,
ALSO, FOR THE ELEGANT UPRIGHT HARDMAN PIANOS,
In tone and touch superior to the Pleyel Planos.of equal durability and sellin $100o less. War
ranted to give good satisfaction or the money refunded. Sold on small monthly payments, or
very low for cash.
Sole Agents for the Celebrated Mason & Hamlln, Entey and New Eng
land Organs,
JUST RECEIVED PER STEAMER ALICE,
P·ive C.moem . miMuioal XInztrw.meitm.
The Trade Supplied below Northern Prices.
II • I 9 INM I lla
Establirhed 1869. P. O. Box 70I,
WHITE'S GINNERY,
Office. 2 Union. near Carondelet street
TO COTTON FACTORS AND PLANTERS:
GINNING TERIS--THE SEED.
BAGGING, TIES, TWINE and DRAYAGE
furnished FREE since 1876.
Parties wishing to know the average yield of
Cotton ginned at "WHITE'S GINNERY'" last
season will please send to the undersigned for
circulars.
D. PIRIEUR WHITE.
...u. r;m 2dp .
DELINQUENT TAXPAYERS.
In addition to advancing money for the pay
ment of taxes. under nat w, of 1877, we will pay
city taxes of 1875 ,and prior years at a LARGER
DISCOUNT for cash than is usually offered.
We will sell scrip orders In sums to suit any
bill at lowest prices.
CITIZENS' SAVINGS BANK.
anll 1m 2P 22 Baronne street.
FANCY aiY. SEED IRE. OATS.
2,000 Bales Fancy Timothy HAY.
200 Sacks Choice Seed RYE.
1,000 Sacks Red Rust-proof OATS.
Apply to GEORGE BECK & CO..
Corner Poydras and Tehoupitoulas streets.
jy29 Im 2dp
H. H. HUSSIANN & P. BUHLE1,
PROPRIETORS OF
EAGLE ODORLElN APPARATUS
FOR CLEANING VAULTS.
Office. No. 25 Exchange Alley.
Orders left at 102 Calliope st.. New Orleans.
iy22 lm*
New Orleans Savings Institution,
No. 156 Canal Street.
TRUSTEES:
A. MOULTON, E. A. PALFREY,
CARL KOHN, T. L. BAYNTE,
DAVID URQUHART, GEORGE JONAS,
JOHN G. GAISES, THGS. A. ADAMS,
THOS. A. CLARKE, CHRIST'N SCHNEID3B
CHAS. J. LEEDS. SAMUEL JAMISON
Interet Aloraedl o Deposit..
D. UBQURABT. President,
Cz.s. ntesnw. Treasurer. sPin 17p
CE1TRAL DEPOT
- OF -
Animal Vaccine Matter.
VACCINATION.
DIRECT COW POX.
The necessity for establishing in this city a
central office for vaccinating directly from the
cow is felt and admitted by all, in order to ar
rest the ravages made by the small-pox on our
population. This is the motive which has di
rected me in creating it, confident of its good
result. and from its having been sanctioned by
expe rience. I have the honor to offer to an en
lightened community my serviee-, at No. I Ca
rendelet street, corner Canal. where the virus
taken directly from the cow on the spot will be
applied to those who honor me with their con
flden.e. *
Vaccination and revaccination applied in this
form is the only one presenting no danger, and
the only preservativ- of conceded utility which
insures preservation and exemption from
small-pox. It is. at the same time, the most
salutary method adoptesd by enlightened people
to effect a speedy termination of the epidemics
affecting them. "
Persons riot vaccinated can l ercme so at any
period and duringall seasons, Those who have
been so for seven years or more should be re
vaccinated, the more so as it has been demon
strat.ed that vaccination taken from the arm is
not permanent. Chiliren from their earliest
inft ney and even in the period of teethig are
exposed to no peril in being vaccinateqand
dluring an epidemic should be so five days after
their birth.
Idtlites will find in myestabli.shmcf tanapart
merint reserved exclusively for their acommo
lation, where they can be vaccinated in most
resptcctful lriva'y.
On MONDAY. August 13. at 12 o'leck, the
office will be opened to the pub.ic.
Vaceinatlng Days.
MONDAY and WEDNF8D4Y for LTwlies.
TUEHDAY and THiUItIAY for Gentle,men.
Between 11 and i o'ri ,k. Price, $1 each.
The aylums and charitable institutions
gratis.
auO 2dplm* DL. .J. DE ZAYAA.
ANT. CABREBz. O. CAKmaNs.
I. L. C$aBtEas. OCs. J. OA_. __a_
A. CARRIERE & SONS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Corner Royal and Customhouse
Liberal Advances made on Oonsignmoenfs
our friends in
LONDON. LIVZBPOOL,
alsp 9m2dp HAVBE and DOEDNALZ,

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