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The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, September 05, 1877, Image 4

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DAILY D)EMOCRAT.
Omcial Journal of the State of Louisiana.
Official Journal of the City of New Orleans.
Ofoe, 109 Gravier Street.
GEORGE W. DUPRE & 0O.,
PR OPRI ETOR U.
OEROGE W. DUPItE,
., ,. IIEARBEY, JOHN AUGUSTIN,
ALbERT (J. JANIN.
IL J. HEARSAY................ EDTOR.
IW O@aLaANM, mEPTEMBElUR , 1lli.
THE POOR PUPPET.
The report of the Commission on
the Custom-House in this city, made by
Gen. Barney, the general commissioner
of the government, by F. H. Hatch, a
former collector, and L. A. Sheldon, ex
Bepublican member of Congress, has
been approved by the Secretary of the
Treasury and orders given to the Col
lector to carry out all its recommenda
tions.
In this report the Commission speaks
with special approval of the Weigh
ers' Department, one of the most
important in the Custom-House and
says: "The records of the Weigh
er's office are well kept, the instru
ments are in good order, and the returns
made are correct, insomuch so that the
returns are made the basis of both sales
and purchases in preference to those of
city or private weighers. We have failed
to find an Instance in which any mem
ber of the force has received payment
for labor not actually performed or any
indication of lcollision with the city
weighers." Now the incumbent of this
office, Mr. Eiohholz, who appears to
have enjoyed a rare reputation for in
tegrity and efficiency, has been removed
by Collector King in order to make way
for a tax collector of St. Landry, a
friend of Tom Anderson.
Next the office of cashier was filled by
Mr. Simpson, whose official capacity
was in like manner recognized as of the
highest order, and he is removed to make
place for one of Anderson's members of
the Legislature, tngross and flagrant
violation of the constitution and the law.
Then the Auditorship having been vaca
ted by Mr. Aikman, is filled by the ap
pointment of Ben Bloomfield, a partner
and clerk of Anderson. Then removals
of tried and competent men, whose ad
ministration has been passed upon by
the commission sent here by the Seo
setary of the Treasury, and whose rp
Lention is recommended by that com
mission, which recommendation has
been ordered by the Secretary of the
Treasury to be carried out, have, to
gether with Champlin, the special de
puty, been removed to make places for
utterly untried, unfit and improper per
sons, who are the pets and dependants
of Tom Anderson, who have not a
single other qualification for these
most responsible positions, in direct
violation of the rules laid down by the
President and Secretary of~the Treas
ury, imperilling Ithe efficiency and in
tegrity of the; administration of offices
in which the interests of our commerce
and of the public are seriously involved.
Not even the ordinary pretext, though
expressly repudiated in the civil service
reform scheme of political and party
objects, can be set up in extenuation of
this miserable business. The men dis
placed were all Republicans who had
voted for Hayes, and those who sup
planted them are only known as An
derson's pets and tools.
Thus is demonstrated to the world the
truth of the charge that there has al
ways existed from the beginning of the
the Returning Board villainy a contract
between Mr. John Sherman and Ander
son and Wells that the wages of their
infamy should consist of the entire con
trol of the customs of this city, and that
Mr. John E. King was appointed to the
collectorship to fulfill this infamous
contract.
Upon such proofs as these will the
Senate of the United States be called
on to vindicate the honor of the repub
le by the rejection of the man who has
made these nominationsto consummate
a palpable fraud and place in office of
high trust men who have shown them
selves destitute alike of all honor and
manhood.
THE STATE TREASURY.
The testimony of Treasurer Dubuclet
before the committee charged with the
investigation of his administration, is
not calculated to confirm and justify
the high vauntings of that official as
to the stern fidelity and impartiality,
not to say integrity, with which he dis
charged the duties of his office. His
admissions and statements go far,
indeed, to confirm the truth and justice
of the charges of giving unlawful and
inequitable preferences to warrant
holders in the payment of warrants.
His failure to keep a record of the war
rants paid by him, and his habit of
paying warrants with checks payable
to bearer, are very suspicious facts,
which he fails satisfactorily to explain.
They can hardly be accounted for by
the plea of ignorance of mercantile
usages or the neglect of subordinates,
seeing that the subordinates of Mr.
Dubuc!et, upon whom he would throw
the responsibility for all the malversa
tion in his office are competent and ex
perienced men. It is very easy, how
ever, to see how such a mode of book
keeping would obstruct an inquiry such
as the committee are engaged in prose
outing as to the parties whose warrants
have been paid. It is, too, very unfor
amme for the Treasurer's vindication
against the charge of having given
preferences to certain parties, who are
charged with having had access to the
interior of his office and obtained pay
ment of their warrants when others
were barred out.
There are other admissions of this
official which are in like manner em
barrassing to his defense. His conclu
ding request that for further informa
tion his deputies be called on to testify
is a repetition of the standing apology
with which the Treasurer has evaded all
inquiries into the mode of conducting
his office for the last three years. This
suggestion will hardly avail to call off a
committee of the Legislature from fol
lowing up the trail which they have
struck. Now that by the payment of
Judge Tissot's warrant a judicial inves
tigation has been prevented, that of
the committee will be prosecuted with
the more vigor and thoroughness. We
think that the conclusion of the inves
tigation by this committee will fall
considerably short of the prediction of
the Picayune's "worthy old citizen,"
whose weighty refut tion that journal
so zealously indorses, of "a farce de
signed to hoodwink the public."
THE DEATH OF TRIERS.
In all the world there was not a single
human life upon which so much de
pended as upon that of Adolph Thiers,
the patriot, statesman, orator and his
torian of France. In his death France
has suffered an irreparable loss. At any
period during the past fifty years this
would have been a great calamity, but
never could the bereavement have fallen
with more crushing force than at this
crisis of her national history, when all
honest and patriotic Frenchmen were
looking up to the veteran patriot and
statesman to rescue them and their
country from the perils which environ
them. It is almost impossible now to
foretell the dangers to the existing in
stitutions of France, and even to the
peace of Europe, which are involved in
this sudden calamity.
It is the snapping of all restraints
apon the revolutionary spirit, the de
struction of the one solid and sub
stantial barrier against the heretofore
inevitable coup d'etat, the fatal end of
all French aspirations for republican
liberty and -constitutional freedom. It
was his great and honored name, and
the profound reverence he elicited even
from the commune, which kept in
abeyance that license which was too
often mistaken for liberty, and which
justified the Napoleonic epigram, l'Em
pire c'est la paix / It was in the curbing
of this mistaken and unwholesome
spirit that the Republic was made pos
sible, by being disassociated with the
horroxs of the commune, and at the
same time a security and confidence in
popular rule created, which attributed
to the schemings and plottings of all
who opposed it an unusual peril.
This was the great conservative in
fluence which Thiers supplied to France,
and his death gives the reactionary
party the chance to raise the old cry,
"The republic is anarchy-the empire is
peace!" Or, at best, "Choose ICtween
Gambetta and MacMahon I"
It is barely possible that we may at
tribute to the death of M. Thiers a
greater significance than is due. But,
however this may be, he was a man
whose place cannot be filled, aind his
loss is one that his country must deeply
feel at this particular crisis.
France has lost at a fateful time the
largest brain of the civilized world,
which for sixty years has thought and
toiled with ceaseless activity for her
glory and success, a stout heart that has
ever thrilled with fervent love for his
native land, and a tongue of unequaled
eloq".ence and a hand of steel which
have never tired in the vindication of
his nation and people.
THE RUSSIAN DISASTER.
The Russians have certainly reaped
no laurels from the war into which
their Emperor precipitated them with
such pomp of preparation and grandeur
of force. The results of their move
ment against Turkey are not of a char
acter to correspond with the swelling
notes of their preparation and their
manifestoes. In fact, they have been
disastrous and disgraceful. They at
tempted the part of Patroclus in the
Iliad, who indued himself in the armor
of Achilles and rushed to meet the
Trojan chiefs who' had shrunk before
the mighty arm and invincible courage
of the illustrious Grecian. One blow of
the mighty Hector laid him sprawling
in the dust, a victim to the rash con
fidence of impetuous youth.
Thus it was with Russia. She sought
and made grand preparations to follow
in the tracks and imitate the great mil
itary qualities of the German army of
Von Moltke, which invaded and subju
gated France. The Russian Emperor
burned to show himself the worthy
nephew of his uncle, the great Emperor
of Germany. He had as large resources,
an even numerically greater army and
a far inferior adversary. What was the
effete, half savage Turk, with his scant
and discordant population, more than
half Christian, compared with the most
active, spirited and distinguished na
tion and race in Europe, which in less
than a half century before had overrun
and subdued all Germany, indeed all
Europe.
But Germany triumphed in the most
brilliant manner over the French with
the army which Von Moltke organized
and directed, and which the Emperor
led in person, with his Chancellor by
his side, and dictated the terms of peace
to prostrate France. Why should not
Alexander achieve a like victory? Why
should he transmit his sceptre to his
successor, after a reign of a purely civil
and political character, without a ray of
military achievement or warlike enter
prise? Doubtless these were the queries
which have moved the Emperor of Rus
sia to this gigantic undertaking to ren
der conspicuous the closing decade of
his reign by the consummation of the
long cherished hope and ambition of all
the Russian rulers for more than a cen
tury-that of the expulsion of the Ma
hommedan from Europe and the re-es
tablishment of the supremacy of the
Cross from the Bosphorus to the Atlan
tic. This was the aspiration of Alex
ander when he hurled his whole mili
tary force on Turkey, and placed
In command of his magnificently
equipped legions, his numerous Grand
Dukes, his brothers and sons and his
famous Generals, and ordered them to
overwhelm and subdue the barbarous
Turk and extinguish Mahommedan rule
in Europe.
And thus far there has been a giant
effort, an enormous expenditure of
valor, of treasure and of blood, to com
pass the most sterile and inglorious
results which have in modern times
crowned so gigantic an enterprise. De
feats, disasters, and failures of the
most mortifying character have on all
sides attended their progress. The
Turks, considering their vastly inferior
resources, have shown themselves as
they did four hundred years ago, the
superiors of these vaunting champions
of the Cross in all military, intel
lectual, moral and physical quall
ties. As strategists their command
ers on both sides of the grand arena
of the great conflict have foiled
and barred the Russian progress and
repelled their invasion. Their chief
tains have won laurels, which the Rus
sians -have lost in nearly every battle
and movement. '1 he invader has be
come a defender, and is more anxious to
secure a retreat than to push his ad
vance to the objective point of the cam
paign, which was opened with so grand
a flourish of trumpets. He now quivers
on the ragged edge of extreme peril and
uncertainty, as to the safe exit of his
army from the toils into which it has
been so rashly and unwisely hurried.
And how has. this extraordinary fail
ure been brought about? Why has
Russia failed so signally to re-enact the
grand drama of theGerman invasion of
France? The answer is a simple one.
Russia and the Russians are not Ger
many and the Germans. The victory
of Germany was due to the intelligence,
the science and art of her people, to
the recognition by her government of
the full dignity and rights of man to
the discipline and self-control and na
tional spirit, which come of large intel
lectual and moral discipline and
thorough training in all the social du
ties and arts of Christian civilization.
The Russians fail for the lack of all
these qualities; neither their govern
ment nor people have emerged from the
condition of stolid serfs, semi-savages,
who have scarcely advanced beyond the
state of enlightenment and progress in
the arts of freedom and civilization of
their Scythian ancestors of a thousand
years ago, and whose government has
never regarded them as entitled to
aspire to any higher sphere of social
intelligence and enlightenment than
that of mere vassals and insensate serfs
of a political and hierarchical abso
lutism. In this age no such govern
ment or people can successfully cham
pion any cause, least of all that of a re
ligion which is the source of all the
grand intelligence, social elevation, en
lightenment and progress in the arts
and sciences, that have given such power
to all the nations and peoples which
have practised and illustrated the noble
and refining precepts and morality of
the Christian faith.
DIED.
DOBELM'MANN-On Ser t'mbhr 4, 1877, at 1:25
p, m., aged :3 years and 1to months, wife of Fred.
The funeral will take place on Wednesday. at
4 oclock p. m., from the residence, No. 338sz
Jackson, near Dryades streets. The friends
and acquaintances of the Eichholzand Herwig
families are respectfully invited to attend. *
HYATT-On Tuesday, September 4. 1877. at
4:30 o'clock p. m., after a lingering illness, E1
ward Clarence Hyatt, aged 32 years and 4
months.
The friends of the Vanketel family, and of his
mother and of his brothers, F. J. and A. W.
Hyatt, are respectfully invited to attend his
funeral, on Wednesday, September 5, 1877, at 5
o'clock p. m., from his late residence, No. 193
Camp street.
Mobile and St. Louis papers please copy.
DUFFEL-At Donaldsonville, on Monday
morning. September 3, 1877, at a quarrertoe 10
o'clock Mary Corrinne. youngest child of Fred
erick Duffel and Clemence Comes, aged 5
months and 1 day.
WAGONS I CANE CARTS ! SPOKES?
•E~r. N. I>O .IL.A.,
18 and 2S Union and 15 and 17 Perdido
streets.
Sole Agent for the Celebrated "STUDEBA
KER" WAGONS, CARTS and SPRING WORK
of all kinds and sizes.
Dealer in Philadelphia and Western Cane
Wagons, Carts and Drays; Timber Wheels;
Wheelbarrows of all desQclptions; Spokes. Fel
loes. Hubs, Shafts, etc. Wheelwright material.
Orders promptly filled. All work warranted.
se2 1m
Established 1869. P. O. Box 707,
WHITE'S GINNERY,
Office 26 Union, near Carondelet street
TO COTTON FACTORS AND PLANTERS
GINNING TERIS--THE SEED.
BAGGING, TIES, TWINE and DRAYAGE
furnished FREE since 1876.
Parties wishing to know the average yield of
Cotton ginned at "WHITE'S GINNERY" last
season will please send to the undersigned for
circulars.
D. PRIIEUR WHITE.
aul0 6m 2dp
FACTORS AND TRADERS'
INSURANCE COMPANY,
87 ............ Carondelet street ........... 3.
Paid up Capital, $1,000,000.
Assets April .80, 1877, *1,282,908 66.
ISSUES POLI(CES COVERING FIRE, RIVER
AND MARINE RISKS
-AT
LOWEST TARIFF RATES.
ED. A. PALFREY. I'resident.
JNO. CHAFFE. Vice Presidrent.
TIIOS. F. WALKER, SHcretary.
John I. Noble. T. Lytt. Lyon,
John Chaffe, Harnuel H. Boyd,
Ri'hard Milliken. Jo~seph McElroy,
J. I. Warren. Win. . J. Behan,
It. T. Buckner, B. F. Esehleman,
Ham'l Friedlander, Win. C. Black,
A. A. Yates, Chas. Chaffe,
John I. Adams, L. C. Jurey.
Isaae8ehorek. Wnm. Hartwell,
R. M. Walmsley. C. J. Leeds.
A. H. May. A. T. Janin,
8. H. Snowdon, Jos. Bowling,
A. M. Bi.ckham. sl1
ROYAL CANADIAN INSURANCE CO.
OF MONTREAL,
DOUGLAS WEST, Manager,
Department of Gulf States,
195 URA VIERI TREET,
NEW OBLEANH. aR:nl Im
P. A. BARKER,
General Insurance Agent,
No. 58 Carondelet street,
NEW ORLEANS.
UEI'RERWENTIN( :
IEt Firoe Insurance Company,
of Ntford, assets ............- $,087,000
Hartford Fire Insurance Com- 8
vahy. of Hartford. assets. ... ,2 ,000
Homo Fire Insurance Company.
of New York, assets............ 6,104,00
Continental Fire Insurance Com
pany, of New York. assets...... 8,040,000
Franklin Fire Insurance Com
pany, of Philadelphia, assets... 1,852,000
Mas~acit~ettAts Mutual Life In
surance Company, of Spring
field, assets ........................ ,42,0
eel Im
W. W. CLARH, Jso. W. Nonas,. D. TYLER,
President. Vice President. Secretary
and Treas.
DIEBOLD SAFE AND LOCK CO.
The Leading Safes in the world. have never
failed to preserve their contents against
FIRE OR BURGLARS,
though tested thousands of times. Parties es
tablishing themselves in business will find it to
their interest to give me a call before purchas
ing elsewhere. Over twenty Second-hand Com
bination Lock Safes on hand, for sale very low.
A. ROY,
Agent New Orleans branch Diebold Safe and
Lock Company,
au22 2dptf 27 Canal street.
CERTRAL DEPOT
- OF -
-oF
Animal Vaccine Matter.
VACCINATION.
DIRECT COW POX.
The necessity for establishing in this city a
central office for vatcinating directly from the
cow is felt and admitted by all, in order to ar
rest the ravages made by the small-pox on our
population. This is the motive which has di
rected me in creating it. confident of its good
result. and from its having been sanctioned by
experience. I have the honor to offer to an en
lightened community my service.-, at No. 1 Ca
rondolet street, corner Canal, where the virus
taken directly from the cow on the spot will be
applied to those who honor me with their con
fidence.
Vaccination and revaccination applied in this
form is the only or presenting no danger, and
the only preservative of conceded utility which
insures preservation and exemption from
small-pox. It is, at the same time, the most
salutary method adopted by enlightened peo le
to effect a speedy termination of the epidemics
affecting them.
Persons not vaccinated can become so at any
period and during all seasons, Those who have
been so for seven years or more should be re
vaccinated, the more so as it has been demon
strated that vaccination taken from the arm is
not permanent. Children ft om their earliest
infancy and even in the period of teething are
exposed to no peril in being vaccinated, and
during an epidemic should be so five days after
their birth.
Ladies will find in my establishment an apart
ment reserved rexclusively for their accommo
dation, where they can be vaccinated in most
respectful privacy.
On MONDAY, August 13, at 12 o'cleck, the
office will be opened to the pub.ic.
Vaccinating Days.
MONDAY and WEDNESDAY for Ladies.
TUESDAY and THURSDAY for Gentlemen.
Between 11 and 1 o'clock. Price, $1 each.
The asylums and charitable institutions
gratis.
aulO 2dplm* DR. J. DE ZAYAS.
New Orleans Savings Institution,
No. 156 Canal Street.
TRUSIEES:
A. MOULTON. E. A. PALFREY,
CARL KOHN, T. L. BAYNE,
DAVID URQUHART, GEORGE JONAS,
JOHN G. GAINES. THOS. A. ADAMS,
THO. A. CLARKE. CHRIST'N SCHNEIDNB
CHAS. J. LEEDS, SAMUEL JAMISON
Interest Allowed on Deposite.
D. UBQUHABT. President.
Clas. Kusnuw. Treasurer. avls 175p
ANT. CAEBEZar . O. CAmzanzL
E. L. CBnazasz. CHas. J. OaZs3a
A. CABBIERE & SONS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Corner Royal and Customhouse.
Liberal Advances made on Consignments it
our friends in
LONDON. LIVERPOOL.
apse 4mdp HAVYB and BOEDEAU1.
JEWELRY AT AUCTION!
I. C. LEVI, Auctioneer,
108............................Canal Street .................106
WILL OFFER, TWICE A WEEK, HIS
LARGE AND ELEGANT STOCK OF JEWELRY AT AUCTION,
And remainder of daysre will sell at Private Sale as usual, from FIVE to TWENTY-.IVI P13
CENT LESS than any other establishment which advertises daily.
Watches Repaired and Diamonds Reset
Only by skillful workmen, at the lowest rates.
je0o am I. C. LEVI. 1e Oanal street,
ALBIN ROCHEItEAU PIERRE CRABITEB.
CHARILES T. DUGAZON. ERNEST MERILH.
A. ROCHEREAU & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF
ZRtG & COMPANT'S
CHAMPAGNE.
IMPORTERS OF
BRANDIIE S, WINEP, VERMOUTHS, OILS, ETC.,
8 South William St., New York. l6 and 1s St. Louis street, New Orlseas.
aul9 am
IREMOAL. ItEM4LOVAL.
-0
TO OUR NUMEROUS CUSTOMERS, FBIENDS AND THE PUBLIC.
-o
Raving leased for a term of years the large and beautiful store in the
MORESQUE BUILDING,
forming the corner of Camp and Poydras streets, we will take possession of the
same during the
MONTH OF SEPTEMBER,
-with one of the
LARGEST AND BE1ST SELECTED STOCKS
-OF-
N T I1T RI
EVER OFFERIED TO THIS COMMUNITY, CONSISTING OF
PARLOR, BEDROOM, DINING-ROOM, LIBRARY, HALL AND OFFICE
FURNITURE
OF EVERY STYLE, DESIGN AND QUALITY.
FINE FRENCH PLATE MIRRORS,
AND A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
COMMON FURNITURE,
OF EVERY GRADE AND PRICE.
- o------
In the meantime we will REDUCE OUR PRICES on our stock In Armory Hall to obviate the
expense of moving. Parties wishing to take advantage of this reduction should call before
We Imove.
Thanking the Public for their generous patronage during many yoears past, we hope by strict
attention to business and upright dealings, to merit a continuance of the same in our new
Q1 uarters.
R. M. & B. J. MONTGOMERY.
N. B.--We will RETAIN ARMORY HALL for our AUCTION MART.
mh:i tf
PHILIP WERLEIN,
78, 80. 82 AND 90 BARONNE STREET, AND 122 CANAL STREET,
LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF THE SOUTH,
DEFIES ALL COMPETITIOW.
Best Pianos and Organs,
Lowest Prices,
Most Liberal Terms,
Largest Assortumt,
Ever Offered In the South.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE WORLD.RENOWNED CHICKERING PIANOS,
The Best and Most Perfect Pianos Made,
ALSO, FOR THE ELEGANT UPRIGHT HARDMAN PIANOS,
In tone and touch superior to the Pleyel Pianos,. of qunal durability and selltn $100 less. War
ranted to give good satisfaction or the money refunded. Sold on small monthly paymenta, or
very low for cash.
Sole Agents for the Celebrated Mason & Hamlin, Estey and New Eng.
land Organs,
JUST RECEIVED PER STEAMER ALICE,
Five C'aimeM .ldtLnAoal Instrumaentm,
The Traue Supplied below Northern Prices.
jy17
GRUNEWALD HALL,
THE LARGEST MUSIC 110 USE IN TIHE SOUTH.
GENERAL AGENCY OF THE
LEADING PIIANOS OF THE WORLD,
STEINWAY & SONS, W. KNABE & CO., PLEYEL, WOLFF & CO.,
(PARIS,)
And the Finest Parlor and Church Organs,
Reduced Prices. Accommodating Terms.
DIRECT IMPORTATION OF
Musical Instruments for Bands, Strings, Accordeons, Music Boxes,
At Wholesale and Retail. Special Prices to Country Merchants.
Sheet Music Below Publishers' Prices,
And at corresponding low figures to Professors. School:s the Clergy and Country Merchants.
TRIAL ORDERS SOLICITED. ESTIMATES FURNISHED AND CATALOGUES MAILED TO
ANY ADDRESS.
LOUIS GRUNEWALD,
se. Grunew8ad Hanll4, 1s , s, ansed 22 arose asees, New olemmi.

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