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The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, September 11, 1877, Image 4

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DAILY DEMOCRAT.
Oclal Journal of the state of Louisiana.
Ofllal Journal of the City of New Orleans.
OMoc, 109 Oravier Street.
GEORGE W. DUPRE & CO.,
PRBOPRIETOBH.
GEORGE W. DUPRE,
H, J. HEARSET, JOHN AUGUSTIN,
ALBERT O. JANIN.
H J. . EARSEY .............. .EDITOR.
BATES OF BTUBBCRIPTION.j
The Datly Democrat.
uon _ear............. ..... $1s 5
on ..t........... ....I. *
Meonths............... s60
Payable inAdvance.
The W.ekly Demoorat.
The Weekly Democrat, a large eight-page
will be furnished to subscribers at the
rates:
a...........................a N
IIW OILEa N , sIEPTmaDB 11, 1oll.
"Hell-wards by Hempl" is the latest
variation of "Jerked to Jesus!" as a
headline for a hanging.
"Shermanized," is what the Enquirer
calls the Ohio man when he goes 'into
bankruptcy.
Geo. W. Carter went to Washington
before Hayes got his seat warm to see if
he couldn't "get in" somewhere. He
did "get in," but it was in the station
house on a "down drunk." Yet we see
in a special from Chillicothe to the En
quirer that "Carter heartily indorses
Hayes' Southern policy." This is what
we call gratitude
"There, take an inventory of all I have,
To the last penny; 'tis the King's."
We see from El Comercio del Valle, a
paper pubhlished at St. Louis in the in
terest of the South American trade, that
the efforts of the St. Louis merchants to
have a lne to South America have suc
ceeded, and that the first steamer of
that line left Liverpool for New Orleans
August 15, and will sail from this port
to Savanilla, ZLaguayra and all other
south American ports.
THE SUGAR SHED COMPANY.
One week ago Dr. .D. W. Brickell
memorialized the City Council in regard
to the Sugar Shed Company. The
'exposure he made was complete,
and the arguments advanced were, and
are, unanswerable. After that paper
one would suppose that more need not
be said; but we live in peculiar times,
and must act, speak and write ac
cordingly, it we would right the
wrongs of the people. Therefore, it is
that we renew this subject of the Sugar
Shed Company on this day of regular
* meeting of the City Council.
A few points must be continuually
pressed on the attention of these serv
ants of the people.
1. The Sugar Shed Company was or
ganized under the general incorporation
law of the State, which authorizes any
six or more men to organize themselves
into a body corporate for the purpose of
darrying on any business not in con
flot with the constitution and laws of
the State, or the constitution of the
United States.
2. It sought and obtained land from
the city authorities which belonged to
the public. The city authorities had no
right to expropriate this land, as those
who alienated it knew full well, and as
those now appealed to know as well.
4. But even after it obtained land and
built sheds, it would be powerless or
profitless, unless sombody could be
forced to patronize it. The same venal
council that gave it land, usurped
authority and gave it power to tax
all sugar and molasses landed on
.he wharves from plantations. Our
present council cannot be ignorant of
the great outrage thus perpetrated.
5. The company have long been ex
ceeding even the power given by a venal
Council, and extorting without stint, I
until a public and formal remonstrance
against them has reached th3 Council.
Investigation proves that the remon
strance is well founded, and it Is even
discovered that they have forfeited
their charter, if they ever, really had
one.
6. They claim to have spent some
$$240,000 on improvements on the levee
when the Council knows that they have
done nothing of the sort.
7. They claim to be a great conve
nience to commerce, when it is well
known that they have ever been a mani
feet hindrance.
Here, then, is a combination in I
our midst possessed of the public
levee for private purposes and hold- r
ing its title from a Council who I
never had the right to give it. Here,
then, is a combination of men regularly
taxing the products of their fellow men
without the shadow of right to do so- n
their authority to tax being derived c
from a City Council that could not legally
confer such authority. Even the State
itself, which has conferred limited pow- fi
ers on the city to tax, could not confer 1
such power on these men calling them- e
selves a company. Besides this, this n
combination of men are found exceed- tl
ing' even the illigitimate authorityn
claimed, and are delinquent in their as
sumes pecuniary obligations to the
city-thus forfeiting even the charter b
under which they claim to live and act. b
Our Mayor has unreservedlyacknowl.
edged the correctness of the premises
assumed, even to the forfeiture of char- i
"tEr. He will undoubtedly use his power ai
to force the monopolists to the same d
courts that are the inevitable resort of
the individual citizen. We assert now
and forever that the City Council is not
a court of arbitration as between the
people and violators of their law, and
the past and present disposition of such
authorities to constitute themselves
courts of this kind is one of the great
est curses of our time. The proportions
that this evil has assumed are justly ap
palling, and when we see a Council
fresh from the throes of a people who
have suffered as we have, called upon to
tread right along in the beaten path
which has just received the solemn con
demnation of the ballot, we confess
that we are both alarmed and deeply
disappointed.
A week ago Dr. Brickell, as one hum
ble man, appealed to the Council; we
now appeal to them as representing the
sentiments of thousands of men, and
those the men who, by the exercise of
the highest privilege of the American
citizen, put them into the offices they
now hold. We tell the Council now that
the eyes of all honest men are on them.
This is but one phase of the great con
flict that is going on between the money
power and industry-between the drones
and workers in the great hive of hu
manity. All along the road that this
city has passed over are strewn the
wrecks of honest toil and honest hope
in the great struggle with monepoly
and the money power.
This paper came into existence amid
the cries and groans of an oppressed
people. It came to fight the battle of
right as against wrong. It has helped
to the full extent of its ability to drive
from power the worst set of villains that
ever cursed a people, but the work is
pot yet done. The people have put
their own chosen men into place and
power for the great purse of sweeping
away the parasites that Badicalism had
put upon them, and they expect them
to do it. If they betray the peo
ple and raise an arm of protection over
the head of wrong and oppression, then
is our duty plain and we'll do it, We
repeat, and we want all men to hear and
understand us, that in the conflict be
tween industry and oppressive money
power, we are now and always on the
side of the former.
Can we too often say to the Council
that the whole history of the inception,
organization and progress of the Sugar
Shed Company is one of outrage on the
prime rights of men. The company
stands out before the eyes of the people
a huge monopoly without the right of
existence, a collector of subsidy from
the products of the toiler without the
shadow of right to levy or collect.
There is, then, but one plain duty be
fore the Council, and that is to lay
their official axe at the root of the evil.
Sophistry cannot evade this proposi
tion.
THE MININE TROUBLFA.
r The Spirit of Cdmmunlsm and Lawless
r ness spreadlns.
[Ohiosgo Times.]
7 WILKESBARRE, Pa., Sept. 6.-All hope
- of an early resumption in the Wyoming
region died out to-day. The offer made
by Mr. Parish on yesterday was indig
nantly refused, and the loudest demon
Istrations against a return to work un
less the 25 per cent. advance was con
ceeded were made. It is certain that
the companies will make no further
compromises, and the look-out is, there
fore, firmer than ever, and no ohe can
prophecy when it will end. In the mean
time the spirit of communism and law
lessness is active, and the disposition to
theft, intimidation and riot is increas
ing rather than dying out. From all
over the country the farmers loudly
complain of the raids made upon their
crops and live stock. Having obtained by
solfcitation all that the farmers were able
to spare them, the men who started out
to ask provisions as a favor soon de
scended into footpads and demanded
property of various kinds. Oftentimes
the farmers were powerless to resist and
complied with the demands; but when
a determined resistance was made the
thieves resorted to other meas
ures. By waiting until darkness
covered their deeds the fields, out
houses, and. pastures were robbed of
their crops, cattle and anything else
portable. Violence, too, is growing
more frequent, and almost daily come
reports of engineers and pumpmen who
have been visited, sometimes in the
night, by masked bands, and at other
times in broad day, and not only com
pelled to desist from work by threats,
backed by pistols and clubs, but
they have also been cruelly beaten.
The stoning of trains has passed into
a chronic amusement. The latest de
monstration which shows the necessity
of troops occurred a day or two since at
the Briggs shaft, in Kayset valley, about
half a mile back of Hyde Park. An
other occurred on yesterday at Carbon
dale. At the former place the two
pumpmen were returning from their
work when they werb assaulted by a
large crowd of armed men and outrage
ously beaten. Troops were sent over
to the disaffected point, and found a
mob collected about the shaft, who were
armed and drilling in regular military
form. Supporting these were the im
mense throng of women, men and boys,
who hooted and derided the soldiers,
threatening to capture them if $hey.
made any movement. The captain
in command seized eight of the
ringleaders and brought them to Scran
ton, where tbey had a hearing. one be
ing held in $1000 bail and the others in
$300 each. At Carbondale the mob,
numbering about one hundred men, pro
ceeded yesterday morning about 2
o'clock to Forest City, and visited each
of the men employed by the Erie Com
pany, and with threats forbade them
from going to work again. Not satisfied
with this outrage upon the personal lib
erties of men who desire to work, they
next turned their attention to the wan
ton destruction of property, by opening
the switch at the Erie breaker and run
ning all the cars on the siding down the
incline into Carbondale. The greatest
appehensions exist concerning the
future, for wholesale arrests are soon to
be attempted by the military, when
bloodshed will certainly follow.
Magiinat All Mirsakhan, a nephew of
the Shah of Persia, has joined the Rus
sian army as a lieutenant colonel. There
are now five Sheeah princes servinsgun
der the Russian flag.
PREPARING (FOR A RETR. AT.
[N. Y. Times.]
The Russians are far from being easy
in their minds, and five new bridges are
being constructed as rapidly as possi
ble: two by 'the Roumanians at and
above Nikopolls; three by the Russians
at Batin, at Simnitza and Meca. Osten
sibly these are to facilitate the arrival
of the, reinforcements which continue
to pour into Bulgaria, but in reality a
retreat in a great hurry is the eventu
ality most in view, and the feverish
activity, after so many weeks of
comparative apathy, displayed by
the Russian Intendance shows the
magnitude of the danger which
is apprehended. Every possible vehi
cle has been hired or requisitioned.
The cost of transportation of men and
material by the Roumanian railways
alone amounts already to 6,000,000
francs, of which only one-third has as
yet been paid to the company. The
carts and wagons used for the commis
sarlat and quartermaster's stores cost
still more. The number of teams em
ployed, at a fixed daily hire of 25 francs
each, is 25,000, of which 18 000 have been
brought from Russia and 7000 requisi
tioned in Roumania--so that the regular
outlay for the "equipage train" is 500,000
francs per diem. We are only in the
second month of active hostilities, and
the total of the war expenses exceeds
3,000,000,000 francs.. This, indeed, is one
of the considerations whioh are work
ing most potently on the mind of the
Emperor in favor of pushing forward
matters on a grand scale in order to
win such a splendid victory that he will
be able to offer terms of peace so mild
that even the Turks will not hesitate to
bury the hatchet; particularly if it be
true, as is asserted, that the Sultan is
equally anxious to put an end to the
war. This last question is, in reality,
the one on whose solution rests the
whole affair.
The lady voters at Cheyenne, Wyom
ing, are hereafter to have separate poll
ing places.
An agricultural college is soon to be
opened in the city of Vera Cruz.
The Philadelphia combination to ex
tend trade with South America now em
braces sixteen firms, in as many differ
ent lines of business, representing over
$25,000,000 capital.
WA(ONS ! CANE CARTS.! SPOKES t
sE. 117. MBOZl.XA.,
Is and 20 Union and 15 and 17 Perdldo
streets.
Sole Agent for the Celebrated "STUDEBA
KER" WAGONS, CARTS and SPRING WORK
of ll kinds and sizes.
Dealer in Philadelphia and Western Cane
Wagons, Carts and Drays; Timber Wheels;
Wheelbarrows of all descriptions; Spokes, Fel
loes. Hubs. Shafts. etc. Wheelwright material.
Orders promptly filled. All work warranted.
se2 1im
GEO. J. FRIEPRICHS,
DENTAL SURGEON,
Has returned, and can be found at his rooms,
IS at. Charles street, cor. Gtrod.
see lot 2p*
DELINQUENT TAXPAYERS.
In addition to advancing money for the pay
ment of taxes, under act 96 of 1877, we will pay
city taxes of 1875 and prior years at a LARGER
DISCOUNT for cash than is usually offered.
We will sell scrip orders in sums to suit any
bill at lowest prices.
CITIZENS' SAVINGS BANK,
aull lm 2p 22 Baronne street.
W. W. CLARK, JNo. W. NORRIS. D. TYLER,
President. Vice President. Secretary
and Treas.
DIEBOLD SAFE AND LOCK CO.
The Leading Safes in the world. Have never
failed to preserve their contents against
FIRE OR BURGLARS,
though tested thousands of times. Parties es
tablishing themselves in business will find it to
their interest to give me a call before purchas
ing elsewhere. Over twenty Second-hand Com
bination Lock Safes on hand, for sile very low.
A. ROY,
Agent New Orleans branch Diebold Safe .and
Lock Company,
au22 2dptf 27 Canal street.
P. A. BARKER,
General Insurance Agent,
No. 58 Carondelet street,
NEW ORLEANS.
REPRESENTING :
.Etna Fire Insurance Company,
of Hartford, assets-............. 7,037,0s.,
Hartford Fire Insurance Com
pany, of Hartford, assets....... 3,270,000
Home Fire Insurance Company,
of New York, assets........... 8,104,000
Continental Fire Insurance Com
pany, of New York, assets ..... 3,040,000
Franklin Fire Insurance Com
pany, of Philadelphia, assets... 5,~82,000
Ma-sachusetts Mutual Life In
surance Company, of Spring
field, asses ..................... 6,425,000
sel1m
Establirsed 1869. P. O. Box 7Se,
WHITE'S GINNERY,
Office 26 Union, near Carondelet street
TO COTTON FACTORS AND PLANTERS
GINNING TERNS-THE SEED.
BAGGING, TIES, TWINE and DRBAYAGE
furnished FREE since 1876.
Parties wishing to know the average yield of
Cotton ginned at "WHITE'S GINNERY" last
season will please send to the undersigned for
circulars.
D. PRIEUR WHITE.
auol0 m 2dp
New Orleans Savings Institution,
o. 156 canal Street.
'UsTtEs:
A. MOULTON, E. A. PALFREY,
CARL KOHN, T. L. BAYNE,
DAVID URQUHART, GEORGE JONAS,
JOHN G. GAINES, THOS. A. ADAMS,
THOS. A. CLARKE, CHRIST'N SCHNKIDUB
CHAS. J. LEEDS, SAMUEL JAMISON
ateamt Allowed on Deposita.
D. UBQUHRT. PreaPdeLt.
aas. EInsukw, Treasurer. ap5 lyap
FACTORS AND TRADERS'
INSURANCE COMPANY,
8. ............ Carondelet atreet............ '5
,Paid up Capital, $1,000,000.
Assets April 30, 1877, $1,282,908 66.
ISSUES POLICIES COVERING FIRE, RIVER
AND MARINE RISKS
-AT
LOWEST TARIFF RATES.
ED. A. PALFREY, President.
JNO. CHAFFE. Vice President.
THOS. F. WALKER, Secretary.
John I. Noble, T. Lytt. Lyon,
John Ohaffe, Samuel H. Boyd,
Richard Milliken, Joseph McElroy,
J. I. Warren, Wm. J. Behan,
R. T. Buckner, B. F. Eschleman,
Sam'l Friedlander, Wm. C. Black,
A. A. Yates. Chas. Chaffe,
John I. Adams, L. 0. Jurey.
Isaac SBherek, Wm. Hartwell,
R. M. Walmsley, C. J. Leeds,
A. H. May. A. T. Janin,
S. H. Snowden, Jos. Bowling,
A. M. Bickham. eel
SEPTEMBER 14.
The officers of the various commands which
participated in the actions of September 14, 1874,
and January 9, 1877, having determined upon a
public commemoration of the approaching an
niversary of the FOURTEENTH OF SEPTEM
BER by a public parade, the undersigned, in
accordance with their resolution, earnestly and
cordially invites all civic and military organiza
tions in this city to unite with them in an appro
priate celebration, and requests these bodies,
through their proper officers, to signify to him.
at as early a date as possible, their intention to
take part in this celebration, in order that they
may be assigned proper positionsin the pro
cession.
FRED. N. OGDEN.
set E&M td is Union street.
NOTICE.
To Steamboats, Steamships, Ships and other
Sea-going Vessels:
MAYORALTY OF NEw ORLEANS,
City Hall, October 13, 1875. I
[No. 3271-Administration Series.]
Resolved. That the dumping of clinker, bal
last and all other substances of like character
into the river within the corporate limits of the
city of New Orleans, be and the same is hereby
strictly prohibited.
Resolved, That each and every violation of
the provisions of this ordinance shall subject
the offender to afine of $100. recoverable by the
city before any court of competent jurisdiction.
Adopted by the Council of the city of New Or
leans. October 2, 1875.
CHAS. J. LEEDS. Mayor.
A true copy:
J. H. HARDY, Secretary.
From this date the above ordinance will be
strictly enforced. Captains of steamboats,
steamships and other vessels are requested to
deposit their clinker and substances of like na
ture on the wharves, so that the lessees may
have the same removed.
EAGER, ELLERMAN & CO.. Lessees.
New Orleans, September 5, 1877. eso 1w
ROYAL CANADIAN INSURANCE CO.
OF MONTREAL,
DOUGLAS WEST, Manager,
Department of Gulf States,
193 GRAVIER STREET,
NEW ORLEANS. au31 Im
CENTRAL DEPOT
- OF -
Animal Vaccine Matter.
VACCINATION.
DIRECT COW POX.
The necessity for establishing in this city a
central office for vaccinating directly from the
cow is felt and admitted by all, in order to ar
rest the ravages made by the small-pox on our
population, This is the motive which has di
rected me in creating it, confident of its good
result, and from its having been sanctioned by
experience. I have the honor to offer to an en
lightened community my services, at No. 1 Ca
rondelet street, corner Canal, where the virus
taken directly from the cow on the spot will be
applied to those who honor me with their con
fidence.
Vaccination and revaccination applied in this
form is the only one presenting no danger, and
the only preservative of conceded utility which
insures preservation and exemption from
small-pox. It is, at the same time, the most
salutary method adopted by enlightened people
to effect a speedy termination of the epidemics
affecting them.
Persons not vaccinated can become so at any
period and duringall seasons, Those who have
been so for seven years or more should be re
vaccinated, the more so as it has been demon
strated that vaccination taken from the arm is
not permanent. Children from their earliest
infancy and even in the period of teething are
exposed to no peril in being vaccinated, and
during an epidemic should be so five days after
their birth.
Ladies will find in my establishment an apart
ment reserved exclusively for their accommo
dation, where they can be vaccinated in most
respectful privacy.
On MONDAY. August 13, at 12 o'cleck, the
office will be opened to the pubic.
Vaccinating Days.
MONDAY and WEDNESDAY for Ladies.
TUESDAY and THURSDAY for Gentlemen.
Between 11 and 1 o'clock. Price, 1 each.
The asylums and charitable institutions
gratis.
aulO 2dplm* Da, J, DEZAYA8.
ROWING TOURNAMENT
AT THE
NEW LAKE END.
THE SINGLE SCULL SHELL,
Offered as a brize by the N. O. C. R. R. Co. and
Major Chas. Hoyt, is now on exhibition et the
popular hostelric of the latter named gentleman
at the New Lake End.
The Shell was built by the celebrated WA
TERS, of Troy. 1. Y.; is of paper; has nickel
plated outriggers, and all the latest improve
ments. and is of the minimum weight.
The public are respectfully invited to inspect
this wonder of naval architecture. se9
AIT. CABanEaE. O. CARRERE.
S. L. ARBBIE&E. nCHA. J. OCARRB
A. CARRIERE & SONS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Corner Royal and Cnstomhonse.
Liberal Advances' made on Consignments It
our friends in
LONDON. LIVEBPOOL.
aM Im dp RAVRE and BOBDNAUL
JEWELRY AT AUCTION
BT'mVrY Tx1UmBADAY alT PXRDdA* .
I. C. LEVI, Auctioneer,
108......................... Canal Street ...........................
WILL OFFER, TWICE A WEEK, HIS
LARGE AND ELEGANT STOCK OF JEWELRY AT AUCTION,
And remainder of dape will sell at Private Sale, as usual, from FIVE to TWENT!-lF!M P.3
CENT LESS than any other establishment which advertises daily.
Watches Repaired and Diamonds Reset
Only by skillful workmen, at the lowest rates.
je3o sm I. C. LEVI, 10o Canal 0,eF
ALBIN ROCHE1IEAU PIERRE CRIABITEO,
CHARLES T. DUGAZON. ERNEST MERILEL.
A. ROCHEREAU & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF
ZRU0 & COMPA 17'B
CHAMPAGNE.
IMPORTERS OF
BRANDIES, WINES, VERMOUTHS, OILS, ETC.,
8 South William St., New York. 16 and 18 St. Louis Street, New OSlemsb..
aul9 3m
GRUINEWALD HALL,
TIIHE LARGEST MUSIC IIOUSE IN THE SOUTH
GENERAL AGENCY OF THE
LEADING PIANOS OF THE WORLD,
STEINWAY & SONS, W. KNABE & CO., PLEYEL, WOLFF & CO.,
(PARIS,)
And the Finest Parlor and Church Organs,
Reduced Prices. Accommodating Term..
DIRECT IMPORTATION OF
Musical Instruments for Bands, Strings, Accordeons, Music Bexes,
At Wholesale and Retall. Speclal Prices to Country Merehaut.
Sheet Music Below Publishers' Prices,
And at corresponding low figures to Professors. Schools, the Clergy and Country Merchbaa~
TRIAL ORDERS SOLICITED. ESTIMATES FURNISHED AND CATALOGUES MAILED TQ
ANY ADDRESS.
LOUIS GRUNEWALD,
eel Grunewal Hall, 14, 16, 18, 20 and 2S Baronne street, New O4emie.
PHILIP WERLEIN,
185 CANAL STREET, TOURO BUILDING,
LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF THE SREET,
DEFIES ALL COEPII.PrlI ,
Best Pianos and Orgams,
Lowest Prices,
Most Liberal Ters,
Largest Assrtmealt
: - - _ - - _ , __ Ever Offered in the
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE WORLD-RENOWNED CHICKERING PIAlOS,
The Best and Most Perfect Pianos Made,
ALSO, FOR THE ELEGANT UPRIGHT HARDMAN PIANOS,
In tone and touch superior to the Pleyel Pianos. of equal durability and selling .0o lees. War
ranted togive good satisfaction or the money refunded. Sold on small month y paymenti. or
very low for cash.
Sole Agents for the Celebrated Mason & Hamlin, Estey and New Eng.
land Organs,
JUST RECEIVED PER STEAMEB ALICE,
Fi Te Traes MuPIe eia l InrtrurP ente ,
The Trade supplled below Northern Prices,
".y17
REMOVAL. I1,EEM4WA.L .
---.-
TO OUR NUMEROUS CUSTOMERS, FBIENDS AND THE PUBLIC.
--o
Having leased for a term of years the large and beautiful store in the
•MORESQUE BUILDING,
forming the corner of Camp and Poydras streets, we will take possession of tip
same during the
MONTH OF SEPTEMBER,
-with one of the-
LARGEST AND BEST SELECTED STOCKS
-OF
VTRNIT RM,
EVER OFFERED TO THIS COMMUNITY, CONSISTING OF .
PARLOR, BEDROOM, DINING-ROOM, LIBRARY, HALL AND OFFICE
FURNITURE
OF EVERY STYLE, DESIGN AND QUALITY.
FINE FRENCH PLATE MIRRORS,
AND A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
COMMON FURNITURE,
OF EVERY GRADE AND PRICE.
O
In the meantime we will REDUCE OUR PRICES on our stock in Armory Hall to obviate th
expense of moving. Parties wishing to take advantage of this reduction should canl keoe
we move.
Thanking the Public for their generous patronage during many years pest, we hope by srlet
attention to business and upright dealings, to merit a continuance of the same in our new .
quarters.
R. M. & B. J. MONTQOI[MY. Y.
N. B.-We will RETAIN ARMORY HALL for our AUCTION MART,
mh3 tf

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