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The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, September 21, 1877, Image 4

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3DAILY DEMOCRAT.
srelhl Jaral ef the State of lLeAlsas.
adalI Jeardal e the City of New Orlans.
On., 109 Orawiar stest.
EO0aQE W. DIUPIE * CO.,
PBOPRIETORB.
GROnoe W. DUPRE,
3. ]. UgNr, JOHN AUGUBTIN,
aLB~rT 0. JANIN.
. ,. EA. EY ...............EDrrIT.
JlATh OF BUBG0BIPT1IONJ
The Daily Demorst.
ear..................
. .............. ....... .....
Parable in Advance.
The Weekly Dmas t. .
The Weekly Democrat. a large eight-page
pp will be furnished to subscribers at te
Payable in Advance.
3 3e OMIL@ ANS, SUPT lr 5 1, 1807.
Our fellow-oitizen, Judge 8. J. N.
Smith, has been taking a hand, and, it
seems, with telling effect, from what the
Xnquirer says of him, in the Ohio cam
pasge. At the opening of the Demo
sratio campaign in Cincinnati he was
among the orators of the occasion, and
the Enquirer, after giving a synopsis of
his remarks, says:
The Judgespo-for some-time n thisd vein,
and then painted in a most telling manner the
sufferings of the country occasioned by Re
publican misrule. He was frequently inter
rupted by applause, and the huzzas that
greted him at the close demonstrated that he
ehad captivated the hearts of his auditors.
To the tinkling of wedding bells and
the joyous heart-pulsations of hundreds
of friends in Louisville, on the 5th day
of September, our rising artistic genius,
Marshall J. Smith, Jr., was the happy
recipient of a prize greater than the
Cross of the Legion of Honor in his
wedlock to a lady as intellectual as she
Is beautiful, Miss Bettle P. Belknap, of
our city. That congratulations followed,
and that the happy pair received the
appreciated testimonials worth always
merits, we need not say. We tender our I
warmest devoirs.
The exigencies of the Ohio campaign
have proven too much for that modicum
of civil service reform intrusted to Mo
Orary, the War Office, and he has au
thorised the formal announcement of a
new interpretation of the President's '
order with reference to contributions to
political funds, so far as it relates to his
department. He says in an official, and
therefore ominous, way that voluntary
subscriptions on the part of clerks will f
not be regarded as in violation of the I
order. We have no hesitation in prophe- C
eying that this delicate intimation will C
be productive of an exuberant and en- I
thusiastic disposition to subscribe to I
campaign funds on the part of cautious I
and far-seeing clerks that was never
witnessed before.
Conkllng's man.Cornell, the Naval
Officer of the Port of New York in spite
pf his Excellency's civil service order,
has come in with a bid for continuance
in offoie in the shape of an economy of
$8000 under the recommendation of the
Jay Commission of $120,000 for current
expenses of his office. This is offered
as an oftset to the conclusion of the
Cabinet that it is to the interest of the
service that all of the Federal appoint
ments be changed at New York, and
was submitted ia a letter to Sherman
suggesting changes in the Naval office
which would out expenses down to
$111,000, and without even touching his
(Cornell's) salary. Perhaps Cornell was
enoouraged in the belief that this sug
gestion would counteract his diedbedi
ence and contumacy in refusing to re
sign the chairmanship of the Republi
ean State Committee by the declara
tion, on the part of the Cabinet, that
although the good of the service
required a sweeping change, that
this would not be enforced till
Congress met. However this may
be, people are very fast losing confi
dence in a civil service reform which
allows Cornell to retain his position of
chairman of a party committee till after
a campaign is over, in open opposition
to an imperative order which has been
enunciated as an arbitrary rule of the
service. For the Cabinetto say that the
removal of all the customs officers at
New York, incidentally including Cor
aell, but that this shball be done only
after the meeting of Congress, is an
evasion and a concesgion too palpable
for discussion. A rule, positive and
universal, has been laid down, and if
such conspicuous violations of it as that
of Cornell's are to be tolerated the only
conclusion that is permitted to the
people is that it was never meant to
Shpply to any one whose party work or
influence was of any considerable value.
Persons desiring elegant apartments within
a few doors of Canal street, in one of the most
desirable localities of the city, will be inter
ested in the advertisement in another column
headed "Furnished Rooms." Mingle gentle
men or families can be accommodateed at rea
sonable prices, in the most elegant manner.
Meals will be provided atprivate tableo, if de
alsired. Applications may be addressed to i'.
4 . Box 3010, or the Democrat office.
The attention of our readers is called to the
dvertement in another column for pro
losals for" the construction of the Bass levee,
Sthe parish. of East Carroll. This work is
. being located, and the plan will be ready
inspection i. the State engineer's office on
before October lst.
ts
MACOAHON'S MANIIfSTO.
President MaoMahon's manifesto to
the French people on the eve of their
popular election for deputies is appar
ently a very fair and oonservative state
ment of the condition of affairs which
has resulted from his administration,
and the facts which induced him to dis
solve the last Chamber of Deputies. In
the beginning he attributes the recuper
ation of the country from the disasters
of the war and his cordial relations with
the rest of Europe to his own personal
influence. This is an egoism that can
be understood and looked upon without
apprehension and resentment only
among such Republicans as those of
France-earnest and hopeful Republi
cans, doubtless, with whose every aspi
ration we deeply sympathize, but yet
men so long accustomed to such
expressions and self-assumptions on
the part of their leaders as
to see in them nothing unusual or sug
gestive of peril. He enumerates the
benefits that have accrued from his
administration, and they are just such
as may prosper as well, if not better,
under a personal government as a re
public. He alludes to the financial and
physical recuperation of France, under
unwonted burdens, from the effects of
the war, and dwells with peculiar gratu
lation on the peace and public order at
home, which are due "to the policy of
concord which brought around him men
devoted, before all things, to their coun
try."
Devotion to country is one of those
splendid phrases that have been used
in every age and by every bad as well
as noble -ambition as a- justifieation
of persecution and wrong, and in its
name as many crimes have been com
mitted as ever were in those of freedom
or religion. The prosecution of Guam
betta and Murat was, doubtless instig
ated by this same "devotion to coun
try," and is justified on that score.
Love of country is a grand and noble
sentiment, one of the holiest that in
spires individual heroism and sacrifice,
and there are no people on God's earth
that are more deeply imbued with it, or
who yield themselves with a more utter
abandonment to its generous and heroic
impulses than the French, and among
Frenchmen we doubt if there be one
who is truer to its dictates than this old
marshal of the empire, and President of
the republic. But there is a higher de
votion than this, the love of liberty,
which knows no confines and is bound
ed by no lines of conquest or limits of
States. It is broad and universal as the
common air, an aspiration that all
people may entertain, and all rulers
must respect. This aspiration the
French have not less than other people,
but they have never yet shown them
selves capable of understanding its na
ture or appreciating its benefits, and
for this reason we are not dis
posed to disparage either the sincerity
or wisdom of MacMahon in the
course of rigid and stern enforce
ment of constituted authority which has
marked his administration. We are dis
posed, rather, to believe he understanas
the people he has been called upon to
rule, and that, inspired by "devotion to
country," he has done the very best he
knew how for the good and happiness
of France. There is evidently among
the people no wide-spread and firmly
rooted popular sentiment that would
sustain a republic a twelve-month, and
in this conviction, which we attribute to
MacMahon, there is every justification
of his course. Without such a sturdy
and resolute sentiment among the
masses it must be plain that it would
but result in anarchy and national mis
ery and crime to yield to the clamors of
the radicals, who would again bring to
France another of those debauches
wherein license-wild, lawless, cruel
and ungovernable-was called liberty
and substituted as such in the place of
law and order.
The spirit or republicanism dwells
with "Freedom on her mountain
heights," and those who would woo and
win her must climb long and patiently,
and learn to breathe the atmosphere in
which she lives. It is related that when
Henry Meiggs, the great South Ameri
can railroad contractor, undertook to
build the road across the Andes, he
found that he could employ no labor
save that of the Indians who dwelt high
up on the mountain sides. In the rari
fed atmosphere of those great altitudes
the dwellers in the plains below sank
exhausted with the slightest exertion,
and became utterly incapable of any
continuous or arduous work. So it is
with the French; before they can ever
realize a republic they must rise to a
higher plane and learn to breathe a
different atmosphere, morally and men
tally, from that to which they have
been accustomed under the monarchy
and the empire. Until they give some
evidence stronger than any we have yet
seen of such a change of their national
constitution, MacMahop can but be
admired and applauded for the stern
and resolute determination he evinced
when he said :
As for myself, my duty would increase
with the danger. I could not obey the man
ner of the demagogues. I could neither be
come the instrument of radicalism, nor
abandon the post in which the constitution
has placed me. I shall remain to defend con
servative interests, with support of the
Senate, and shall energetically protect the
faithful public servants who, at a difllcult
moment, have not allowed themselves to be
intimidated by vain threats.
WAGONS I CAMn EAiI's ! SPOKES
E..1, N. mOsIA.
1s and SO Unton and 15 and 17 Perdido
streets.
Sole A.gnt for the Celebrated "STUDEBA
KEit" WAGONS, CARTS and SPRING WORK
of till kinds and sizes.
Dealer in Philadelphla and Western Cane
Wagons, Carts and Drays; Timber Wheels;
Wheelbarrows of all descriptions; Spokes, Fel
Loes. Hubs. Shaft, etc. Wheelwright material.
Orders prompy Alled. All work warranted.
seem i
l.WIRAL NOTIOE.
Resiqwatesa pattey Cy FVit Resiment
Louislana Field Artlllery,-The Offloers and
members of this command are hereby or
dered tom assemble at their armory (Mechanics'
Intitute) at 9 o'clock THIS (Friday) MORNING.
in fell uniform, to attend the funeral of our
ex-First Lieutenant and late member, FRANK
(REIG.
The funeral will take place from his late
residence, No. 81 St. Philip street, at 10 a. m.
By order. E. 4. GUIBET, Captain.
L. CABocaHE, Orderly Se geant.
The officers and members of companies A
and B. Louisiana Field Artillery, and the mem
bers of the late Gibson's Louisiana Brigade,
Army of Tennessee, are respectfully invited to
attend. -,, se21 lt*
PROPOSALT FOR CONS'TRUrTION OF
BASS LEVEE.
STATE OF LOUISIANA,
Executive Department.
New Orleans, Sept. 20. 1877.
Sealed proposals will be received at this office
until 12m. on SATURDAY, the 5th day of Octo
ber next, for the construction of the BASS
LEVEE, in the parish of East C arroll.
Said levee will contain between four and five
hundred thousand cubic yards, and must be
finished on or before the 15th day of December
ensuing.
The work is now beingfinally located;and the
plan and profile, together with specifloations,
will be ready for inspection, in the State Engi
neer's office, on or before theist day of October.
Suitable security must be given for the faith
ful performance of the c)ntract.
The Board reserves to itself the right to re
ject any or all bids.
Proposals by mail or otherwise must be di
rected to the undersigned and endorsed "Pro
posals for Bass Levee."
FRANCIS T. NICHOLLS,
Governor and President of the Board of State
Engineers. se21 toes
NOTICE.
OFFICE OF CHIEF SUPEIINTENDENT
PUBLIC SCHOOLs,
New Orleans, September 20, 1877.
A cnmnptiltve examlnattin of annlioants for
positions in the city schools will commence on
MONDAY, 24th inst., at 9 a. m.
The attention of all parties interested is
drawn to the following programme of this ex
amination:
On MONDAY, Soet. 24, applicants for po
sition in the Academic Departments, or City
High Schools, will be examined at the Franklin
School-house, St. Charles street. Applications
for these departments must have reference to
one of the four courses of study embraced in
the curriculum of the High Schools, namely:
1. English Language and Literature. 2. Natu
ral Philosophy and Chemistry. 3. Algebra and
Geometry. 4. Latin and French Languages.
On TUESDAY, 25th, and THURSDAY, 27th
Inst., the Examination will be for Grammar
Grades. Positions filled by Principals and
First Assistants.
On WEDNESDAY. 24th, and FRIDAY, 28th,
the Examination will be confined to Primary
Grades. Positions known as Second and Third
Assistants.
Applicants for either Grammar or Primary
Grades who have registered their names, from i
A to L Inclusive, will be examined in the
Franklin School-house. The other applicants,
whose names are registered from M to Z irclu
sive, will be examined, at the same time, in the
Marshall School-house.
WH. O. ROGERS, t
se2l BSuerintendent of Public Schools.
THlE LOAN OFFICE,
17........... BARONNE STBEET ..........I1
Delinquents will take notice that all unre
deemed pledges of February and March, 1877,
whereon interest has not been paid, will be of
fered for sale without distinction from and
after October 1, 1877.
Liberal deduction on back interest will be al
lowed if paid promptly.
se21 3t OTTO SCHWANER,
A CARD.
The undersigned having, at the succession
sale of Arbo's Saloon, No. 143 Common street,
purchased all rights and Interests appertaining
thereto. beg to announce to the public that they
will hereafter conduct the business at that es.
tablishment in their own name and for their
own account.
Thankful for past favors of public patronage,
they hope to merit a continuance of the same.
None but FIRST-CLASS WINES and LI
QUORS will be kept.
A FINE LUNCH SET DAILY.
se21 It MILLER BROTHERS.
NOTICE TO TEACHERS.
OFFICE CHIEF SUPERINTEN'T PUBLIC SCHOOLS.,
New Orleans. Sept. 18. 1877.
All applicants for positions as teachers in the
City Schools who have not yet recorded in the
Superintendent's office their names, residences
and the grades for which they wish to be ex
amined, are required to do so, either personal
lyor by written communication, previous to the
examination appointed for MONDAY. 24th inst.
WM. O. ROGERS,
Superintendent Public Schools of New Orleans.
se19 4:
CARPETS.
All the latest and most elegant designs in
CI .A. E PP 'i I T C..
Brussels, Three-Ply and Ingrain,
Axmlnster Velvet Carpets,
Office Mattings, 0il Cloths,
from six to eight feet wide.
WINDOW SHADES and CORNICES,
Curtains and Upholstery Goods,
- ALRO -
Wall Paper, Mirrors,
Frames and Monuldings,
At the Lowest Market Price.
HEATH. PIPPEY & LARA,
se 20 2dp 3m 97 and 99 Camp street.
BLA('KMAN'S COMMERCIAL COLLEGF.
181...... .orondelet street ......131
Open day and evening the entire
year. Instruction private. Terms
reduced.
Call for circular.
J. W. BLACKMAN, Proprietor.
s018 im 2ndp
CARPEL3ETS
ELKIN & CO.,
168 .........Canal street ............16.. 8
Are receiving new and elegant styles of
AXMINSTER, VELVET,
BRUSSELS. THREE-PLY and
INGRAIN CARPETS.
OFFICE MATTINGS
WINDOW SHADES and CORNICES,.
CURTAINS and UPHOLSTERY GOODS.
OIL CLOTHS, from six to eighteen feet wide,
At the Lowest Prices.
sel2 im2dp
F. NEWHALL,
Importer and Dealer in
Wall Paper and Window Shades,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
No. 40 Camp street.
Prices to suit the times. sei 1m 2dp
THIl IEW OBRLAN4 PACIFIC RAIL.
WAY COMPANY *
Have removed their office to the commodious
ground floor of the building No. 159 Common
street, formerly occupied by the New Orleans
Gaslight Company.
In making this announcement they desire to
express their thanks to those of their fellow
citizens who have thus far extended their aid
to this great enterprise, while again appealing
to the entire community to promptly come for
ward and subscribe in accordance with their
means, in order to e)able the directory to push
with renewed vigor the work already so far ac
com plished to completion,
Every facility will be given, on appliation at
the office, to Impart the information required to
convince every one that the success of the road
is assured as soon as the sum of $675,000 is
reached, either in subscriptions to the first
mortgage bonds or to the stock of the company.
In order to place their securities within reach
of all classes of our people, the company have
issued scrip limited in amount to S50,00o, and
made receivable either for stock when presented
in sums of $100oo, or for freight or passage on
completion of the road. This scrip is divided
into notes of $50, I20, $10 and $5, transferable by
bearer, thus enabling all to aid this immeasur
ably important work, the success of which will
largely redound to the interests of every man,
woman and child in this city.
With regard to the first mortgage bonds, no
one can doubt their being a first class invest
ment, apart from the collateral advantages
which will be derived by the residents of this
city; and that they will be so regarded by our
moneyed institutions the company refer to a
recommendation made a short time since by
the presidents of nearly all our banks and In
surance companies of the second mortgage 7
per cent bonds of the company, when such an
issue was contemplated.
To show the confidence felt by those institu
tions in the proposed road, their officers recom
mend the second mortgage bonds of the New
Orleans Pacific Railway Company as a "first
class 7 per cent per annum interest paying
investment." and say "they will be received by
their several institutions as security for loans
with as much readiness as any other 7 per
sent security of the State of Louisiana: they un
hesitatingly commend those bonds for invest
ment."
With this Inducement supplemented by the
assurances that the company can obtain q11 else
necessary to place the entire road in working
order when this seemingly small sum shall
have been provided for, and further, that in
stead of second mortgage, first mortgage 6 per
cent bonds are substituted, can any citizen, who
really desires the prosperity of this city, which
has been so long retarded by the simple want of
proper communication with the almost inex
haustible resources of Texas, Arkansas and
Northern Louisiana fail to respond promptly to
this appeal ?
E. B, WHEELOCK,
President New Orleans Pacific Railway Com
pany. 8018 m2ddp
8SCHOOL BOOKS.
y Having been awarded by the State Board of
n Education a majority of the bids for furnishing
a the public schools of the State, and having ar
rangements with publishers, we are prepared to
furnish the following books at prices named.
' Column No. 1 is lowest retail price adopted;
column No. 2 exchange price, for first introduc
tion, when books of similar grade in actual use
are taken in exchange:
No. 1. No. 2.
Watson's Independent Speller . 20 11
Watson's Primary Reader- .... 2o 11
Wa'son's SeMond header ....... 40 21
Watson's Third Reader....... - 55 :80
Watson's Fourth eaer ........ 70 a
Watson's Fifth Reader ....... 1 n 54
Watson's Sixth Reader........... 1 20 60
SSteele's Philosophy, Astronomy,
each............................ 1 20 67
Stoele's Chemistry. Geology.ea'h 1 20 67
-teele's Zoology ................. 1 20 67
Private schools will be allowed same prices as
public sc'hools.
Other lists will be published hereafter.
LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO THE TRADE,
J. C. EYRICH,
BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER,
1 ... .. .. ....Canal street ...... .......130
NEW ORLEANS.
sel5-1m2dp
W. W. CLARK, JNo. W. NonMas. D. TYLER,
President. Vice President. Secretary
and Treas.
DIEBOLD SAFE AND LOCK CO.
tA.F'ýI- .
The Leading Safes in the world. Have never
failed to preserve their contents against
FIRE OR BURGLARS,
though tested housands of times. Parties es
tablishing themselves in business will find it to
their interest to give me a call before purchas
Ing elsewhere. Over twenty Second-hand Com
bination Look Safes on hand, for sale very low.
A. ROY,
Agent New Orleans branch Diebold Safe and
Lock Company,
au22 2dptf 27 Canal street.
Establlshed 18869. P. O. Box 701,
WHITE'S GINNERY,
Office 26 Union. near Carondelet street
TO COTTON FACTORS AND PLANTERS
GINNING TERMS--THE SEED.
BAGGING, TIES, TWINE and DRBAYAGE
furnished FREE since 1876.
Parties wishing to know the average yield o6
Cotton ginned at "WHITE'S GINNERY" last
season will please send to the undersigned for
circulars.
D. PRIEUR WHITE.
aul0 6m 2dp
New Orleans Savings Institution,
No.156 Canal Street.
TsvsTEES:
A. MOULTON, E. A. PALFREY,
CARL KOHN, T. L. BAYNE,
DAVID URQUHART, GEORGE JONAS,
JOHN G. GAINES, THOS.A. ADAMS,
THOS. A. CLARKE, CHRIST'N SCHNEIDIT
CHAS. J. LEEDS, SAMUEL JAMISONI
Intorest Allowed on Deposits.
u. URQUHABT. President,
OCAs. KILRSAW. Treasurer. aopl lys p
Ar. CABBIERBE. O. CARRIEBE.
L. L. CABBIEBa. OaS. J. CArsmua
A. CARRIERE & SONS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Corner Royal and Customhouse.
Liberal Advances made on Consignments kt
our friends in
LONDON. LIVEBPOOL,
ap6 S9m2dp IAVBB and BOIDJAU,.
JEWELRY AT AUCTION!
I. C. LEVI, Auctioneer,
108 ........ ..... .................. ........"..n1
WILL OFFER, TWIOB A WEEK, HIS
LARGE AND ELEGANT STOCK OF JEWELRY AT AUCTION,
And remaindeofTS days will sll at Private Sale as usual, from FIE to TWIEN-tXVJ Kq
IUT LE~S thn any other establishment which advertise daily.
Watches Repaired and Diamonds ereet
Only by skillful workmen. at the lowest rates.
Jese gm I. O. LEVI, los Canal srnlu
ALBIN ROCHEIEAU. EIER1RE &IvJM"
CHARLES T. DUGAZON.
A. ROCHERICAU & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF
RtO & COIPAiNT'B
CHAMPAGN1 E.
IMPORTERS OF
BRANDIES, WINES, VERMOUTHS, OILS, ETC.,
S South William St., New York. Isand 18 St. Louis Street, New egues.
aul9 am
PHILIP WERLEIN,
135 CANAL STREET, TOURO BUILDING,
LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF THE SOUTH,
DEFIES ALL O4PPaIg.Cn
Best Pianos and Organs,
Lowest Prices,
Most Liberal Terms,
Largest 4osert
i Ever OfferZed im he zSatL
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE WORLD-RENOWNED CHICKERING PIANOS,
The Best and Most Perfect Pianos Made,
ALSO, FOR THE ELEGANT UPRIGHT HARDMAN PIANOS,
In tone and touch superior to the Pleyel Piano.s, of equal durability and selling $100 lees. War
ranted to give good satisfaction or the money refunded. Bold on small monthly payments, or
very low for cash.
Sole Agents for the Celebrated Mason & Hamlln, Estey and New Eng.
land Organs,
JUST RECEIVED PEB STEAMER ALICE,
aFive Ca.mem Muuiool Inmtru~zrent-,
The Trade Supplied below Northern Prices.
se17
GRUNEWALD HALL,
TIlE LARGEST MUSIC HOUSE IN TIlE SOUTH.IL
GENERAL AGENCY OF THE
LEADING PIANOS OF THE WORLD,
STEINWAY & SONS, W. KNABE & CO., PLEYEL, WOLFF & CO.,
(PARI, )
And the Finest Parlor and Church Organs,
Reduced Prices. Accommodating Terms.
DIRECT IMPORTATION OF
Musical Instruments for Bands, Strings, Accordeons, Music Boxes,
At Wholesale and Retail. Special Prices to Country Merchants.
Sheet Musio Below Publishers' Prices,
And at corresponding low figures to Professors. Schools, the Clergy and Country Merchants.
TRIAL ORDERS SOLICITED. ESTIMATES FURNISHED AND CATALOGUES MAILED TO
ANY ADDRESS.
LOUIS GRUNEWALD,
sel Grunewald Hall, 14,16, I1, S and 33 Daronne street, New Oelea.
REMOV AL. REMIOVAL .
-0-
TO OUR NUMEROUS CUSTOMERS, FEIENDS AND THE PUBLIC.
--o-
Having leased for a term of years the large and beautiful store in the
MORESQUE BUILDING,
forming the corner of Camp and Poydras streets, we will take posseesion of the
same during the
MONTI OF SEPTEMBER,
--with one of the
LARGEST AND BEST SELECTED STOCKS
-OF
EVER OFFERED TO THIS COMMUNITY, CONSISTING OF
PARLOR, BEDROOM, DINING-ROO, LIBRARY, HALL AND OFFICE
FURNITURE
OF EVERY STYLE, DBSIGN AND QUALITY.
FINE FRENCH PLATE MIRRORS.
AND 4 LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
COMMON FURNITURE,
OF EVERY GRADE AND PRICE.
- --0--
In the meantime we will REDUCE OUR PRICES on our stock in Armory Hall to obviate the
expense of moving. Parties wishing to take advantage of this reduction should call before
we move.
Thanking the Public for their generous patronage during many years past, we hope by strite
attention to business and upright dealings, to merit a continuance of the same in our new
Quarters.
R. M. & B. J. MONTGOMERY.
N. B.-We will RETAIN ARMORY HALL for er AUCTION MART.
wh3 at

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