OCR Interpretation


The New Orleans daily Democrat. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, October 26, 1877, Image 2

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83026413/1877-10-26/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

iu C"tlAL ANl Itbl e11M'IAL ,11
iat, UOt@NrleS AI H1188$.
A flper Read blefore the Ketlal seleae
AseeeitilOn by 1x. +WN. L. 'T'renheilm
of mouth Cnarellna.
It is honorable to hothl the patriotism and the
ga ,ty of lbil4 soeltinl t ihat it should recog
a d.resetpot.l, tll the prevaleut desire of the
popn peolt to know each other batter.
popular mind tIs fixd in the belief that a
r .i .uaintance between the nertions would
yav.. terd the late war, and that the perma
rely of o ir national unity dopend. more Ipon
3nt intereourse and lose permonal and tius
relatons among the te peole farthest apart
each other, than it pon political arrange
or CongresP ional lrglsllatin. lAurtng
Spee the war t he eoplo h outn have
l mu4anbout Uelr Northern brethren
e at ited a k uole.gei of the .tl
Ill ustrl a natrlw eti rtts of the North
Oh dannot fal to is of use in their present
tlaiatlnees' it r mal ns for the neopie of the
Si~o tnie fo a ilke 'in l.randtnof Mouth
tr , in order that harmonyl and pros
tit me y reign tfigli ut thltie land. It Is
al stly Ilmposit.aleon ti oeral ion to niter
Lti drtala. nor tis that neceýssary in order to
, Os t bsts for useful disetuslon: the pur
1n view will be attained If we select for
iiideration only those traits of sotlal and
tital develipinent which, haIng found
here else, eonstitute the charnoterstis of
Ur onth. 'nese distinguishing traits are all
y defined they stand out in thold relef
ýg the surfap! of Amerloan bistoiry antil so
Sand are strongly eontlrasitl with the types
tobreness prevailing elsewhere.
fHl ICOLATION OF THr soUTH.
'e lcry ending In 140o witnessed wonder
tlopl and industrlal hang.es all oyver the
r own revolution n those in France,
ltpol onto! ware and their consequene.es,
cteated almost a new worhl for the lower
rt of society everywhere, enlarginig their
tand elevating their position,i while the
r classes previlously idle were grtdually
Swt In the expanding efrleaof industrial
v, Invention. inner anti the arts had
!iy put a new fare upon the eartht the di
saot labor had angtnentel the Iroduciigel
city of the masses and mull l iled their Rin
S ent and neeids, stmlluilating trade and
litolitllience. The goild of California
,atralint. together with the improvements
iathion and inland transportation, pro
lverenl illt ivity in commerce and trade
Irl and rush of this enelllntnsed the
on every side; she came Into contact with
vevty point of her extended Interests and
tvry line of her develo ment; sIhe felt its
Supon her industr es and tasted its
i er expandingwealth. Yet alone itn all
orl she stood unmoved by it; it, govern
t $, soel ety. in employments. In labor, the
ft he touith in t lta were shstnantally
thly alad beet in lino, when tithe abolition
sve trade had impresc I upoun their
ch it seemed usledpt hile. Not nlyha
ntth remained unchanaed during al thi
hit hll -od of nintigrlation which pour
I t rest of the country had lassed her
il lons of men and women front every
b of Europe passed a ong the whole ex
fher nlorrn border, br oliIngnl with them
dn trial secret of every qit r'te of the
llnd attrrying ItI r skill tndl thrift to the
lst wis I of itei West; they nassed within
oint net of the fertile soil, untenanted
i untouched resouroes of the Mtouth,
eh beside the roads, bridges and railroads
lready built, cities andi towns alreadv
lihe churlies and schools alreadly ex
b trt they would not crime in. The con
s t snd Isolation of the Mouth Is thie more
hable ncouse th century was so tull of
hla progresen, ani hecatine the Amerlean
have ever taken the liad in explorlng
ola and trying new methods.
S I~3tf 1l 800tAli AND ItlSUtTatAL FOaMs.
that very age and that very cointry
tttea stool inwatid In immobility,
litdre . are they oilig to tilt mostt
In ho nman society and adhered
et mehode of Indietry. Blind to
wealth of their hills, detaf t the
nfails which would have guidd any
1 to great manutac iring achieve
o bopie of the tiouth concentrated
Sefforts upon the pro' uction of . ot.e
in tiat pursuit they sought
aid of mahinery no r the counselof
the lutlaestio s of thrift were dis,
e podIetio n o work animals and
tltonled to the noighoriln tt lates.
Ott#u iatts Whnich itpiplled the world
Ia, in lane. only one hundred and I
f ctories out li ten hundred and i
hIe in the United itates-less than ten
ittl-lnd thtir consumption of raw mia
only s-van and one-half per centum.
tvattsm so except onal and con spiu- e
e an offense to tlie' spirit of progress I
Wt he r, at of the worli it was unlntel
an d therefore intioll ahle. Tltus tihe
e to be senarated from the rest of the
Stpaths and feeling as well as in in
6ad xp IrtLentce. II is ott vious t hat such
Otold ialy Riehtotn plrod uIceml iyll ts
ptiial f tree tanl prslstienlt. No orr
iun les cerltainly lo melre Ituratl
Ind, e uhl have with.stoodhlie onsit
n Dprogress, tihe tdl solicitailons of self-in
e Drptmtings of eupidity, I hlie tege atnd
lnt of outede uile opinion to
SthMouth was so long and so ion.tantlly
nor, on the otirhant dcould any
or s loeaml.hiues hlavl kept out of I
ve a country the imigrant who
y e"loitanters cold, ihunger, thirst andi
mati tlg his hotme in tli loneily lprat
must, of iourere, lok for the Irime
southern pOtuliarities it its pi~.iuliar
nl African slavery, anid then we must
Sand observe tlhat under this form of
'r be mines ttlultalyta. ; the labor of
I vldual is throwln Into a common
I consti etlr a labor oaiital tossea
s power rf labor anti I the mobility of t
OUTSIDE FORMIR.
detiny of the Mouth Ina always b'n
rore over which her own people had
t. Her history during the century
L a 1.n0 was wholly controlled by a seriwe
- a oncurring outatde her own territory.
Were, bctWeen 17T and 1775, the Imtprove
ade In cotton machinerly by ltargrca~ve.
t and Compton In iEnland; Watt's
nof the stteann engine and its auImse
- plication to cotton macrhinery. In 179
ie'e invention of the cotton gin. In
natIoduc iot of ,tnamboats. In I8ss the
n of the slave tradeo. In s189 Roberts'
ameto in cotton spinning macnhinery in
JIan and Il31 the introduction of
he co0tton gin made cotton plant
:ftable; the English demand arising
- vrorrd machinery stimnulatd its rapid
the abolition of the slave trakeocut
pln isof imported labor for this purpose.
the st.rttit upion the labor already In
tay. The tnoltlilty of this labor and the
moving It to the hst soils caused a con
- Dart of the populllation to Ihn incessant
trapldlv th anllor:ed from place to place
of the new taenncles uptiled by steam.
o population of the original slave States
. prematurolv distributed over an area
Sextended for advantageous oeupa
sba mall a number. ReIeiving hardly
lons from without, Virginia. the uaro
Georgia have peopled the rePater
t eterritory betwo-on the Rio Grande
thirty-ninth pat allal cf latitude.
1,. RtINkRANOB To IMMIGRATION,
this spreading out of Is. original popu
r a vast, area which chiefly dlttin
tI I or territorial development from
and the causes which produced this
t lso obs'ructed European immigra
otherwise hindered material progress.
ous omary to ascribe the hindrance
causes to speak of the "Instincts of
" and other supposed sentimental ob
but such explanations are un hilo
and untrue. Immigrants had cor
a tau ht, by the experience of those
tried t, that the Mouth was not the
them but the causes that excluded
ere physcal, and not moral; they were
tend not sentimental: they arose not
any obloquy attaching to labor at the
ttt from the fact that here slavery mo
the laboring popultlin and enabled it
itna&'d together in large force, to be rap
mOve from place to place. and to occupy
d rich soils just as soon as these bhcame
bie to immigrants. Under ordinary
oos the native population of a
is permanently seated: attachment
soil and the ties of family retain
its density btwcomta exonesive. and emi
is embraced as the only alternative to
Sovorty. If such conditions had ob
at the South. or if slavery hert had not
OntampDoraneous with tilhe extramrdlnary
es for transmigration which t he present
has Introduled, the original slave
would - robab. v have oontaned to-day
eeven millions which constitute the South
opulation. and kuropean immigration
lont since have filled up all the rest of
resent territory. But when the whole in
of the South was intent upon discov
e best and richest soils, when its whole
was available for their acqui.ition and
tdabort in poulation ready to ocupy
immligrat found himself at a hope
va e. Without oapital oreitº
ta competition w~th the capitalist
tm.vesthnd iOntd the bat e
l .+ rr: .i K ,d+4
g ýa 11mea d fwtww a4 dou.m
IriltMbiltti otr tilnP lalrO. ar
oanr me ll m iato l ttlgate o now terr tory
atndprem orey di antedthi la oring potu
laton f te o ler but in tne rotter
Slaves came massed tongether as the compet
tloi of tire rtiber states of the Mouthwest carni
to he more and more felt there. Thuse profltabtl
plantlng required Iarg. capital, and small pro
prfeto r were at a dsladvantage. Free labol
was t' expensive for both la rrer and em
plover, hence many of the whItes were forced tr
emigrate; so extensive was this emigration thil
the cetnus of isoe showed that of the white per.
sone then living In the United States, whto Iha
beenborn In South Carolina. 27t7.INt1 only re
s mained at home, while ilRiM n were plWrmianentll
Ssettled in other htates; NIrt Ctariltna retanitne
- r4.000 and had parted with 272,(tin: Virgini.
I retained 10no ,Otl anid had rsenlt off 4).0(,i of het
native whitee population. The name canse)
pt raeically prothibited manriufaletresa , hecanlet
manulactures eveii more than agriculture dei
1 Dald upon fixity of popnlatlon. Clheapnlles o
living, un formity and regularity in the saulppl
of Ihe necessaries of life, are codlitins wiilet
Stuast be in exitelnce in every locality befori
I manufacturing Iecomee ptesible there. Th.es
I conilitiate r nnrot obtain where populattion ii
shlilting, inor will eapitatl tonseent. if termanent
investment whiere values fluctuatte with the
tIovenients of nomllladie labor.
THE MARRA Of UANRRAT.
TiIls mobility of po)ulation stitmlated tirl
territorial expansion tof Houtheilct inettltitutlons
but, it impressed upon the people and the lane
I marks of unrest that remain ti ttit day. A
large part of the poputlation was alr on the.
Smove, and another large part lived, nxo ta.
Stion of moving. Honrte ll fliminesetaS of the
hebases, farm buildings anitrtences. the rtdeneeF
of their tillage, the untidiness of their flie d
hence the dead cttimps and trunks tolerated frt
years, the "old fields" abandoned for noe
lands, the habit of sufferinh Inconventence and
dleolmfort, of adopting makeRhifts and employ
ing temporary expidlenta All these traits, andt
more wnlich need not be parttcularizPtl, charat,.
torize a i. eople In a stano of unrest ra to the
present and uneorta ty as to the futulnre-a pet
pin who doi not eonse eily tossess tlle soil they
live on, who do not know whet her or not they
are at home for life. While this condition of
thirge existed at the Month the Northern people
rapldly filled up their older itatens- labor sought
new occiupation at home nllstead of saking new
fields elsewhere. Hence Industry betamec diver
sitfld, and the structure of rbeltety obtained
greater amnplexity. The development t at the
North partook iof that of the rest of the world;
the development at the Souith was g,,,I ewri.ns.
Industry and society at the North were horti
alorng in the general current of prol.)geP at the
Roulth they were fixed ll itn mim vatble cinserv
attsm.
sTRatl'TURAL AND FtrIUNTtONAL DEVELOPMENT.
The dilfference ltetween Northern anlld Honth
ern indll-trlal devEIloVutitent si-etsii to biP l iilo
iotn to the difference deserthed by naturalistse
tletween structural and fucutionial develop
meet in animal oirganlsms. Northiern tr strlln
tural develotloent proceeds toward ronniltlxlty
of struceture-that is, multiplicity of luntions,.
by sihnpllfy-inlg each funetion, specializing each
organ. The divlision of labor accomplishes
tils notl Ilduitrially-for twenty m)-n are em
plyedI dllversely to make by their unitetd pro
teeaes 'llre pin. It is evident that the pin fiettilry
growe more ctolmplex, bllt the fullnolon of eath
artisan is more flnl li; and his capaciti s con
Pequcently become more highly cpelialized. On
the other Ihand Southern or functio, al dtevelop
ment ni apart from change or strrcture, Ii re
lares wholly to enlargemeut of eapaelty,growth
of polwer in the direction of comprehunsvre
nlse., On a plantation employinug live hundred
hands the master is alpitalist. landowner,
miulistrate anid lll itlal rplresentatlve. Hte
cupplit-le n Iti cneumption and tietIpoes of the
prodUllctl of ithe whole eontlmintlty. In a word,
he' in 'vorything and everything is hin. On the
other hml.I, Inl a manulfiacturing vileage, fur
nishing Ive httundred hlands to tlih mill, ,Tilo of
these empltoymentsn will otn lpr a dilTerent ipIr
son or oet of persorns; whit the mill will
protiably be owned iby a joilnt stock tint
pany, it will obtain its commereial
capital froim a bank and hire, the labor
it needls. In the lattercasethe indusitrial strur
turie iscomplex; there are many tper.ons em
braced in it, anti the function of cacnh is slmple
and special. In the former ease the Industrial
triurture Is simple: the master if the only per
soetn oneerped, for the slaves are his, and con
seqtently thelr work and th-Ir internets are hles,
tint his funeti ns are complex and general.
Now, since ite worid at large has p, ogressed by
structural development. complexity of strut
ture has become the coiventional gauge of
progream while permanence of outward form is
generally aepted as evidence of social and itn
dustrial stagnation. Hence it it that Southern
development has been misuntierslood and its
vitality has been utder-estimated. Manured
by the eotnvaitional standards the Southern
Mtates appear to have stood still, because their
growth has been internal, not external. The
causes already deseribed confined tihe activitlee
of thie Southern people wilthin a rigdt cIrcle.
and slavery stamped upon sll their Institutions
ites own Imlnln ltiy of form: hence to enti
mate aright the influelnce that modern ellture
hla haid uipol theI -oth we must atpply toit
standards ottier than the conventional.
ROMAN AND sOUTHitRN RLAVERy.
fItructurally, slavery in iouth Carolina In
toni was subsI'antialily whal it wits in Rotme h.e
fore thie Christitan ra. In externtal form, In ther
,lvil staltus of the slave, the legaI l aluii cionven
timnal rights of the mastelr, the relation of mae
ter and slave to the htaie, there was lihttle dif
lornene between the ancient and modern Insti
tution: whereasm in organtlic development. In
funttlional complexity, in eeonml,' value and
it sochtal 'effet the ilifference wits immense. In
RometheIlave was a luxury of the rich--the
totrronal servant (5mtr-usl), attendant. and minis
b 'r to the wants, eonmforts and lntulgen'oes of
his master. Even thefatm ileti rti.lt-ia, which In
,ludndthlo farm hand+. produced nothllna for
sale. Thi produce of the farm went no further
Ihan the mnater's table. In the South. on the
other hand, the number of slaves employed in
ti rsonal service Was insignificant; the greet.
+,yrlirf enigagred-' elldijstously, aw - ednctitet.
tedt te prniurna tnottile of the whole product ive
nycterm if the ctommnunlty. It is well known
how nrarvellously the laIbor thui orgmniantrzed r
silSltnedl to the demande made upIoU It by the
otittn tradei of the world; how ratplidly t ex
pandued nI) ar to embrace the immense territory
It etvered in 1ie0: with what Intelligencet the
moot advantagitoun polnts In that territory were
se'lncted, andt with what celerity trhey were occu
NORTHtRN AN!D SOUTTl.EN TYPTWR.
Pl'rpot' sedI as most, mllnds are with conven
tionitl types of progress, it reqllire some elffort
to recpdniae the importance of the hHoutllern
type. he dimffculty is Increandl by the faet
that Eur oean immigration was more vnInable
and enriching to the North than cotton was to
the South, but if the North had had no immni
gcrationl ltl advantlage in the race would have
en non the other side, and we should then ter
hapts have discovered utilities in the Prinluple
of functional devel(opment which would have
been obscunred by .1 he Iroximity of the dazzling
Northern type. The most striklng dliftereno
between the two mods s of development, as re
gards their social etfolt, is that the Northern
at.ets lchiefly the greater number, the llborer
clas ; the Southern affects altogether the mas
ter c·lis. While Massachusetts was subdivdl
ing the processes of labor and special
hling the capacities of the laborer, Houth Caro.
lina was miultlIolying the functions of the mas
or and teneralizing his capacities. The North
ern problem was how to increase and cheapen
prodcetion by division of labor; the Southern
how to attain the same ends by concentration of
labor. The Northern method was analytical,
and its aim perfection of details; the Southern
was synthetical, and its aim augmentation of
the gross produet. The former tended to pro
due, intellectual acuteness, to stlmulate inven
tion, to foster speculation; the latter to develop
the judgment, to enlarge the powers of com
bination. anl to st rengthen the faith.
The one best prelpares the hand to perform;
the other best trains the head to plan and di
rect, and the heart to endure.
Got your kid gloves at Kreeger's.
Read Navra's Invitation to the China Palace.
Lava figures in great variety, at Offner's 144
Canal. opposilte Varieties Theatre.
CHIA. LACOUIE,
Wholesale and Retail Liquor Dealer,
58 ST. CIIARLES STREET,
Near Gravder street, Now Orleans, La.
Sole Agent
For Goldsborough. Forater & Co.'s celebrated
BAKEt RYE, and W. W. Johnson & Co 's OLD
KELLAR ROURBON. Both of above Whiskies
are distilled expressly for C. LACOUME: also,
have on hand numerous other brands of fine
goads.
Bar, grocery and family trade supplied.
Also, proprietor of
st. Charles Bar and illiard eRooms,
Under St. Charles Hotel.
BRANCH BARS.
13 Carondelet street-IM Bourbon street.
ad deaer ins 0o0021DBji OODS
sosiom
IIOTICE.
OrrFli of TAX COotL.aro. I
e Parish of Orleans, Third District.
1. Instructions from the Auditor require the
te dellnquentliet for 187i to be returned oin the let
of Novemblr. The taxpayers of thitl llltriot will
r please take notleo.
- . 1. PROOTOR, Colletor.,
o024 7t 17 Eplanadle street.
SNOTICE TO DELINQUENT TAX PAIEiRS
It OFFirE RTATE TAX COLLECTORl, FTReT DteTRTr'T
47 (nJaondelet street.
PNew (Irlane, Ootober 1., 1977.
Attention is invited to the Iprovisions of Act.
3e No. 23, approv+vd Mlaroh 1, 1977:
"That all cenatlties presentlli l for the
I non-payment of dellntm .U It A artSh
taxes he aud the sm h ereny reRlititd:
prorit, id thie said taxes ihil n or before the
SIrset day of l)eno.rnber. 1177: tln4 prlormidc
e firtlhr, that nothlng herlin be dnettrlled so as
is to prevent the enfo reetnent by tat collneitmrs of
it the ptlymnt if delinquent taxe bl foro tý said
In det1, (i lt ptylmeull, whern so enmfrtedt, any
ease. Shall be free of penalties as abt pro
vided."
E. A. BUIRIKE,
o.nso ,ot tate Tax (ollector, First DIitri
A MUNICIPAL ADVERTIIBlMETNTU.
Ir BALIED PROPOMAIA.
r DEPARTMetWT oF FIeNAN'r. CITY tHAtL,
1 New Orleans. O'tculher 23, 1877.
Sealed proposals will he reoelved at this Do
ll partment until MONDAY. Ortohlor 29, 1577. at
11 a. nl.. for the sale to the city of TEN WHARF
IMPRJVEMENT DBN D14.
The city reserves tlhe right to reject any or all
y bids J. C. IhENI8,
f o.33 td Administrator.
it NOTICH TO BAKERa,
MAYotALTY oF Nsw ORLEANS, I
City Hall, October 29, 1877.
The average priceof fresh flour being this day
seven dollars and fifty cents; In accordance
with said valuation the price of bread for the
week commencing on MONDAY, October 2, ,1877,
will be:
Sixty ounces for twenty cents.,
Thirty ounces for ten cents.
Fifteen ounces for five cents.
Bakers of bread are required to use only the
best flour of the above value per barrel, and the
use of damaged or inferior flour in bread offered
for sale in this city is prohibited. Consumers
of bread are requested to report to the nearest
police station any violation of the above ordi.
nance either In variation of weight or quality of
material.
eell ED. PILRBURY. Mayor.
- EDUCATION.
UNIVERSITY HIWIH 8C0OOL,
Bagle Hall, Prytania street, ear. Uranla.
The Fourth Annual Session of this school
for Boys will open on MONDAY. October 1.1877,
The princlpal will be assisted by a full corps of
competent teachers. He refers by permission
to the Faculty of the University of Virginia and
to his patrons the past session, whose names
may be found in the circular of the school.
OCircular can be had at the book stores.
For further information address
GEO. C. PREOT, Principal.
jy 1rm P.O. Box 452.
JUIIO,
PORTRAIT PAINTER.
No. 8 Carondelet Mtreet, New Orleans.
Portraits from life
or from pictures of
the doceased (in oil or
rnayon). from $92 to
$150.
My ART GALLERY
is a ple e of frpe to
sort, and the publli
is invited to visIt it
at leasure,
o00 tnoo4
GOAL. COAL.
The understgned has on hand a largo qlan
tity of first quality I'ITTHBURG COAl, wllich
he is willing to ditspse of at. pricns thant are in
dependent of reanot nombinations among regn
lardnalnrs. Will take orders during tne nnxt
ten dlays for supplying families and dealers.
Delivery at pturcasers' convenience. and pay
ment not required Ibefore delivery. All com
municatlons promptly answered.
EDGARI) BOULIGNY.
oc4 tf Demoornt ofiloe. No. loe Gravinr street.
GARDEN SEEDS
JUST RECEIVED.
NEW OROP OF TURNIP SEED THIS YEAR'S
GROWTH.
Also, a full assortment of all REASONABLE
SEEDS, including large late Flat Dutch
and Drumhead Cabbage. superior
quality.
For sale at the NEW SEED STORE.
E. BAKER,
]ama...a Xs .T mrans,
No. 5 CAMP STREET,
NEW ORLEANS.
Beed sent by mnil. postage paid. All orders
promptly attended to. anti 8m
F. BUSUH,
GUN AND LOCKSMITH.
No. 28 Commercial Place, New Orleans.
DELL HANGING, IRON RAILRINGS, AND
General House Work attended to at short
otiee and reasonable prices. Air a Vaults,
and CoPying Presses reva.red: duplicate
eys of all descriptlons made. Safe repair
In a a recsialty mvi '7
REOPENING
The undersigned begs to inform his friends
and the public that the
RESTAURANT
attached to his Confectionery on Canal street.
corner Carondelet having been refitted, will re
open on TUESDAI, the l6th Inst.
As heretofore, he will execute orders for Balls,
Marriages, 8otrees and RIeceptions, with the
tset our market affords.
N. KUNTZ, corner Canal
wle0 m and Carondolett streets.
PHILIP HIKRSCH,
C 0 0 PEl,
so, 52, 54, s56, 5s and 60 North Peter street.
Manufactory--Corner St. Louis and Miroe streets,
New Orleans.
Has for sale choice greon Hogshead and Bar
rel Poles; also new Sugar Hogsheads, Molasses
Barrels. Half Barrels and Kegs, all sizes.
Prices moderate. Satisfaction guarer teed.
s67 3m d&w
T. A. BECK,
omee and salesroom, No. 27 Peters Rt.,
Manufactory. Carondelet Walk. between Roman
and Prieur streets. New Orleans.
Has constantly on hand Hugar Hogsheads,
Molasses Barrels. Half Barrels. Kegs and Flour
Barrels., new and second-hand.
Orders for Hoop-poles filled at the lowest
market rates. Particular attention paid to
trimming. seos md&w
GAS FIXTURES FOR SALE,
Below New York Wholesale Prices,
EITHER TO THE TRADE OR PUBLIO GEN
ERALLY.
Also a large supply of English Pipe Hooks
Gas litters' Tools and Malleable Fittings can
be bought. for eas, at les than featory Quot
tioms atiso Cam street.
eastle. 4955 e. asessag Uamem
A. RBOCHIR AU & 00.,
OOMMISSION MfhIOitHANTS.
SOLE AGUINTS FOR THE SALE OF
ZR'J T & 0O MPAN7'S
CHAMPAGN E.
IMPORTERS OF
BRIANDIJT , WINEI, VEelMOUTHIS, OILS, ETC.,
I South William St., New Tork. 18Nand IN .t tAuis Street, New Orleans.
aulI tm
JNO. JEWETT & SONS,
(1OH 11DE )IitrSe
wfmO ALEAD ,
-AND- BLINSIENT,
CIIUSIEII.ERS A OL
fU I . Or- NOTNT .
LINSEED,
LN 14 1V W Y JIt 1i
Tihe abovi LEAD sy atri tly I tR. The y have manufactured only this quality fir th innrt
twenty reaor. Guarante'd an giooId any mnnde in this country. and the abovr 0(l its WAR
RANTED to he I'EIIirECTLY PIURE. Fir aA hvby
W. INt . ABIATI, , No. th Peters Street,
024 n.m BOLE AGENT FOR NEW OIIEANS.
GO TO GIRUNE WALD HALL,
-FOR TInE IDEST
PIANOS AND ORMANT,
SHEET -1IUSI(C
-AND
BR1 ASS INSTRUMENTS,
WHICn ARE OFFERED AT
Than at any other Mluire Hloue In this Country.
A MAGNIFIC'ENT BTOCK OF THE OCELEBRIIATED PI'ANOS OF
St elnwv . Ifsnube, I 'loyel mid 1 pi-eher
ALWAYH ON HAND. AND SOLD ON EASY. ACCOMMODATING TERMS.
Get My Fsatimates Before Pnrcehasing Elsewhere.
Special attention paid to REPAlItR ON PIANOS, which are done by skilledl workmen at mod
orate pries. anld using only the TREFIT MATERIAL,
Buying ever;tthlig for CAFII, and having no H110H CANAL STREET REN'I' to jay, I can Iell
my goods MUCJ(II LOWER, alnd lot my enatomere have thec beneflt of it.
Your patronagein it rI pstfull y ariliiitai.
LOUIS GRUtlNEWALD,
oe2t *rnnewald Hall, 14, 16, IS, IS adl II Saronne street, New Orlians.
PIHILIP WERLEIN,
NEW MUSIO AND PIANO STORE,
NO. 135 CANAL STREET, TOURO BUILDING,
THE RENDEZVOUS OF THE MUSICAL WORLD.
The Hleadquarters of the Piano and Mueic Trade of New Orleans and
the ~iouth.
The honsk "Werleln." tl renowned for its LOW PRICES AND AOCCOMODATINr TERMR. and
for the SUI'PEIIIII QUALITY of its instrunments. At his Mammoth Warerooms can bo found
an asaortmrnt of
200 PIANOS AND ORGANS,
CONSISTING OF THOSE UNEQUALED AND PERFECT
CHICHERINI
Upright, Ronuar and Grand Plano
Thu nlogant UpJright
IIARDMAN Planos.
Th standalrrd ENTRY Organs,
MASON &t HAILIN
S.. anrl NEW ENGLAND Organs,
Also fifty naoond hand Pianos and Organs at prices to suit nvoryonn. Evory
Instrument sold is fully warranted.
DIRECT IMIPORTATION OF
MURTCAL INSTIRUMENTS, Strings to., LECOMTE'M and other BRASS
INSTRUMENTS. sold at Wholesale and IRetall, at prices to doefy all com
optition.
SHEET MUMIC -THE LARGEST STOCK IN THE MOUTH.
PIANOS REPAIRED. TUNED. HAULED OR STORED AT REASONABLE
PRICES. OLD PIANOS TAKEN IN EXCHANGE.
'-17
1EMWO V AL. IREMOV AL.
-0
TO OUR NUMEROUS CUSTOMERS, FBIENDS AND THE PUBLIC.
-o
Having leased for a term of years the large and beautiful store in the
MOfRESQUE BUILDING,
forming the corner of Camp and Poydras streets, we will take possession of the
same during the
MONTH OF SEPTEMBER,
-with one of the-
LARGEST AND BEST SELECTED STOCKS
-OF
FURNITUR Ev,
EVER OFFERED TO THIS COMMUNITY. CONSISTING OF
PARLOR, BEDROOM, DINING-ROOM, LIBRARY, HALL AND OFFICE
FURNITURE
OF EVERY STYLE, DESIGN AND QUALITY.
FINE IFRENCH PLATE MIRRORS.
AND A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
COMMON FURNITURE,
OF EVERY GRADE AND PRICE.
----0---
In the meantime we will REDUCE OUR PRICES on our stock in Armory Hall to obviate the
expense of moving. Parties wishing to take advantage of this reduction should call before
we move.
Thanking the Public for their generous patronage during many years past, we hope by striot
attention to business and upright dealings, to merit a continuance of the same in our new
quarters.
uarters. . M & B. J. MONTGOMERY.
N. B.-W.wB mSTAIiN ARLMOY HALLf.or eor AUCTION MART,
.*IMhtt·
TM as t " l 1TO aItX
Via LousJ Ni tvia lt %and II f012
Trains arrive a d depart from Depot, fot of
Canal street, as follows:
DIPART. I ABalw3.
Expres ...... 7:.i a. i. I Express...
Express ..... 5:0p. Im. Express ..... 9:80P. M.
Coast tlatiur- C,.et (Mon
day. only) 8:16;P. m. (Inv only).. 9:20i. tt
Pullman Pala<' Cars rtally to Clneinnatl,
LouisvIlle, Nashville, t. L ouis Washli gtfl
Baltimore and P'hlndaldt,ha awithout eS
and only one change to New York and Eastern
cities.
Ticket office, corner of Camp and Oommbo l
street. opposIte City H-tel.
D. 1. IIOtIIN.MON, Superintendent.
mhl J. W. COLEMAN. Tic ket Agent,-
pONTOHARTRAIN RAILWAY
Derot at thee had of Elysian Fields street, near
the Leoe., '1 hird LDistrict.
Exenrsion to or from the Lake and rettrat
same day, 20 cents. COhldren under twelve
years I0 cents.
Trains will leave as follows:
From the City. From the Lake.
6 o'clock .......a. . . 7 ,cl'ln k ........, in,
734 o'clock ....... . in. R o'cloc5 k ... ....., m.
9 o'clock ......a. m. to o'clocik ....... at,
103 o'clock ........a, mt. 11 o'c.lock .......a, m.
12 o'clock ........ m. I o'lock ........ m
2 o'clock ........ .nm. 24 o'elock ........p, m
8 o'clock "......t. m. R3 o'clock ........ Fo
4 o'lock ........p. i. 4 o'clock ........ l',
5 o'clock ........ p . i 5. o'clock ....... .g
e o'clock ......P. m. 76 o'clock ....... p.
7 o'clock ........ m. 7m 4 o'clock ........p. me
9 o'clock ........ p n. m R1 o'clock ...... ,l,
9 o'clock ...... inp . 9 o'clock ........p.M
10 o'clk ........ in. o o'clock ......p.m.
On Sunday the trains will te run overty hi
hour from 2 o'clock p. m. On Sunday morm .
Ings the trains leave the cIty at 6 o'olo0k for the
accommodatIon of sportsmen.
Passengers for (entilly must notify the eon*
ductor prior to the departure of train,
aul '77 ly D. . ROBlNSON. Receiver.
THE ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
PASSENGER ROUTES TO ALL POINTMd
NORTH AND EAST.
Reorganised for the summer of I$*Ww
Working out of New Orleans via the $p, 0. ad
M. R. B. and presenting the following atratir
lines to thf attention of all North-bound Totrs
Ists and Travelers:
Route NOe. I-All Rail.
Via Montgomery Columbus. Macon, Angillt,
Wilmington, nichmond.
SI onurs, New Orleans to New 10rk.
The same time always as by any other line.
Pullman Bleeping Cars to Opelika.
Solid Day Trains thence to Anusta, i
Pullman Sleeping Cars attached at Maeon fý
Wilmington.
Throu train Wilmington to Biehmnotd as4
New York with elegant Parlor Cars attaehed
Richmond-thence Pullman Sleeping Oar t
New York.
ALL COANGES AT PIEASONABLN ,HOU.0It,.
AND INTO CLEAN AND PROPERLY
VENTILATED CARS.
Route No. S-B-ay Line.
Over the same lines to Wilmington asby
No. 1. Thence by Speeial Parlor Oars to Pots.
mouth, Va. Thence, at 5:o0 p. m. daily (
Sunday) by the magnificent steamers of
BAY .LIAE to Baltimore. Thence by New TOlk
Express, arriving in New York at 2:06 p. n.
A sixty-nine hours' run-only seven hours il
excess of all rail time, with the advantage of At
undisturbed night's rest and superior aoooIn
modatilons upon the Chesapeake Bay.
Route We. $-The Old Dominlio Line.
The same Lines to Wilmington and Porte.
mouth as I4outes I and 2. Thence, on Mondas,
Wednesdays and Saturdays at 6:810 . V. by
magnificent sldewheel steamships of the Oo
DOMINION OUMPAN. , whl.h invariably arc
at their New York wharves at 4 p. m.
A through run of 7t hours~ combinig the.
essential elements of Cheapness, Speed and
Comfort.
Passengers should leave New Orleans Satus'
days, Mondays and Thursdays to connect clotse
ly with this Line.
For Tickets, Checks, Time Cards an'l all In
formation apply at the office of the New Or
leans and Mobile Railroad.
A. POPE, General P.ssenger Agent.
J. H. WHITE, Southern Passenger Aget.
H. W. FOWLER New Orleans Agent, corner t.
Charles and (lommon streets. my4t
(R MEAT JACKSON RO1UTh.
NEW ORLEANS i'b, LUR AND 0ICAGO
DOUBLE DAILY THuOUtiB TRAINS,
will depart anid arrive as follows: from OCalIOp
street depot from July 15. 1R77:
DVAWI.. ABaftns
press No.1.s:so. in. Express No. 6.10:s0 ama
Epress No. 8.6:15aI. m. Express No.4, 81:#p
. 1 and 2 run daily, a and 4 daily exte
ndULLMAN PALACE SLEB G s
through to Cincinnati, Louisville, chiO
re and Milan, Tenn., without change, and
Louis a sleeper is taken on at Milan. eerzaYSt
passengers to go through without leaving i
train,
Friday evening's train makes no 0onnecotf
at Du uoin for Chicago.
A ommodation trains between New Orili
and MoComb OCit:
Leave New Orleans 8:O0 p. in. Saturday: att
7:8~a, ir. Sune.day.
Arrive 9::o p. m. Sundray, and :e3 a. m. mon'
daj okets for sale and Information veu s
Camp street, oorner Common. undt Ot H/olra
J. C, OLAnaE,
Vice President and General Manager. mh
CONSUMPTION
Positively uwred.
All sufferers from this disease who are9.0p+jlý
to be cured should try DR. KIs IKER'5EwlL
BRATED CONSUMPTIVE POWDERS. Th,
powders are the only preparation known tat
will cure CONSUMPTION and all diseases o te
THROAT AND LUNGS-indeed, so strong l
our faith in thornm, and also to convince you tat;
they are no humbug, we will forward t.qe'r I
sufferer, by mail, post paid, a p ru
BOX.
We don't want your money until you art
perfectl satisfiled of their curative powers,
If your Hlife io1rth saving, don't delay Inxivin
these POWDI a trial, as they will surely our
Price, for large box as. sent to any part of the
Unteld States or Canada hv mall on reBsipt Of
price. Address ASH ,t IROBBINS,
ap.e ly see Fulton street. Brooklyn. N1.
Tile CELEBRATED
"E. CARVER"
COT'TOXNv ca-IN.,
All Sizes and Mlotlen, and Duplisate Prts,
FOR SALE AT REDUCED RATES BY
OGDEN & BELL,
DEALERS IN BAGGING AND TIES,
eNo. 11 nnstn ret. ei2mn
Souther-n Shoe Factory
OF JOn03 HANSEN
I asad l5 Canal street, New Orleans.
TO ALL SOUTHEBN CITIZENIS.
I am of the same oDinion as yourselves any
am determined to help build up the manufac
turin interest of our native State in order to
he! the laboring classes and keep the money
which would othewise go to the North. at home.
About ayear ago I started my Factcry, and by
using the b material and Dayina m
Iromptly. lhave been enabled to my
usiness and supipo e women d
that would have otherws le
.:·- =: j· ~~, -1-·l-I·

xml | txt