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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, December 22, 1883, Image 2

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MThe State Journal.
pPublished every Saturday by l;
THE JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
e e i
e L
ThreoiMonths -« - - - - 80 * l
Bix months A e e $l.OO |
One Year, in advance, - - 1.50 |
o if not in advance, - - 2,00 :
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1883. 11
i g oy
We take dplcnsure in calling the atttfl\uox}
Lo T bartios whoadvertise in this
paper arve reliable, and should have our en-
B petona e Tey PR
toward us, and desire our patronage.
Please mention the JourNAL when you call.
State Journal, the only general
newspaper devoted to the interest
of the colored people in the State
of Pennsylvania, Published week
ly, at Harrisburg, Pa.
W
Kind of Reform Needed.
There has been a great deal of talk
about reform within the last year, and
politicians particularly have devoted
much time to the study of the subject.
Apparently everything is in need of
reform. National affiirs, State affairs,
municipal affairs, everything needs
reform. Somebody has even hinted
that our navy ought to be reformed.
Some one has whispered that it would 1
not be a bad idea to reform whiskey. ;
Even Governor Pattison was carried
into the chair in whicn he has rattled
about for the last year upon the reform |
idea. Oar leading colored men of the
State have caught the epidemic, and
all over the Stiate the cry goes out,
reform the Stste League. There is no
question but what the government of
any country, no matter how good,
can be improved upon, and while this
loud ery of reform goes up, let us
make sure that in the reformation
called for that the right kind of reform
will go into operation. This Govern
ment as controlled to-dzy is supposed
to have two great parties struggling
for supremacy. One has been tried
and fourd wanting, the other has
been on trial for over twenty years,
and is growing intoxicated with re
peated victories. Now, there is no
better place to begin a reformation.
than within or at home, and we hold
that there exists a great need for re
form in the Republican party, and
one of the greatest reforms needed i 3
for that party to place its arms around
all of its adherents, and give equal
representation and equal protection.
Another greatly needed reform is
among colored men. We need a re-
Somationas fa et oNR iersth WS
clap-trap. We need to reform our
leaders, and weed some of the selfish
ness out of them. There are, per
haps, many other needed reforms, Lt
we think the affairs of cur Govern
ment, both National and State, weuld
be much better were a few radical
reforms carried out.
SENATOR Epvunps does not want
to be the Republican candidate for
President, yet if the people want him
it would be policy for him to aceept.
He is a most fitting man for the ex
alted position.
LRy
'We are gatisfied that a colored man
will hold a portfolio in the next eabi
net, let him be Bruce, Douglass, or
some one else.
GoverNor Parrisox is now visiting
the country churches looking to their
reformation.
L L L
READ THIS
Then Show it to Your
‘Neighbor.
Why is it that some of our people
will pay out a large sam for newspa
pers that abuse and denounce them as
a people, and will not spare an insigoi
ficant trifle for a paper owned and
printed by their own color, an agency
where they can find vent for their
doings and become acquainted with
each others wants, learning of the pro
gress and intellectual advancement of
their race. We don't want you to
draw a newspaper color line. We
want you to learn of the ememy
through the enemy’s paper, but take
care of home first. Take regularly a
colored newspaper and your children
will not depart from the patriotie
teachings received in childhood and
youth — Bee.
el
The Exact Age of Sojourner
Truth.
Sojouraer Truth, the remarkable old
colored lady, who became famous
through pleading for her pecple in
bondage, died at DBattle Creek,
Michigan, at the ripe age of 107
years and 6 months. She was born
and raised a slave. She has always
made her owa living. In the latter
days of her life she was enabled to
make a fair living by selling her
photographs and a sketch of her life.
The latter reads like a romance.
a HG.
Every man, woman and chiid
should read the STaTe JoUurNaL.
COLORED PRESS COMMENTS ')
On the Topics of the Day. |
— |
Negp or Inpustriar. EpvcaTios.— |
There was never a time when educa |
tional effort was more needed in the !
South than at present—education that
will prepare the boy and girl for the
seriousdaties of manhood and woman
hood. The flowery education, be‘
education which develops the mental
but neglects the physical man, is not ,
what we ceed most at this time. Col |
leges for higher education are good
things, and necessary, but they pre
suppose by their existence conditions
auxiliary and consonant, conditions |
of the highest civilization which give
encouragement and support to the
polished man. College preparation
presupposes conditions such as do not
obtsin among us; bence the large
number of educated failures amcng
us.— G'lobe.
Wirar o Desocrars Wien Have
A Cuance 10 po.—lt now looks as
though the Democrats will have ample
opportunity to translate some of their 1
promises to the Negro into perform
ance, or show their horns and cloven
foot. Which will they do? Another
such guestion will “spile .”" “he ple
ology” of our colored independent
friends with the long pame ! — Hub.
Oxty A Few Avesves Orex.—
There sre few avenues open to the
colored youth. The number who
have capital is limited; and necessity
forces them to take menial places ia
hotels, on railroads, in stores, and in
private families.
The great danger that threatens the
future of the Negro is the forced ig
noracce of the youth as to trades. It
must be met and overcome.— Bulle
tin. i
Ix tie Name o Tue Soup fouTH.
—Twenty- three years ago in March
last the Soath withdrew to fight for
the overthrow of the Government.
Defeated in war it joined hands with
the Northern Demogracy to regain its
old position in Congress. Thus far it
has contented itself with giving life
to that party, and in order to more
sarely prolong that life. it has far
nished votes to the general cause and
yielded the places of homor to the
Northern Democrats, But Soutbern
men have tired of this, aud with the
cry that they are the Democratic
party they have concluded to cccupy
its offices and possess themselves of
its patronage. And to-day, in the
name of the Solid South, they have
seated themselves in this high place
of the Nation and opened their Na-
A e 17 o 3
good as any other place from which
to nominate the next President of the
United States.—Afro- Amertean.
| Dericurep.—We hail with delight
‘the appoiatmeut of colored men on
very many of the Largest Journals
published in the North and West, in
a reportorial capacity at good sa'aties.
—Lancet.
JOURNAL CLIPPINGS
Concerning the Race in all
Parts of the Country.
Ellen Evane, a young colored wo
man, who has led a reckless life for
some time, committed suicide on
Wednesday night by taking mor
phine. She was found dead in bed
on Thursday morning and buried on
Friday. — Jacksonville (Fla.) F'ree
‘ man's Journal.
| The Catholics of the Cincinnati
|diocese have raised over $2,000 for
the support of mission schools among
Ithe colored people. The Pope at
Rome made the order for collection
in pursuance of a well defined plan of
prosetyting the colored race.—Chi
cago (Ill.) Conservator.
We learn that the Rev. Matthew
Anderson, pastor of the New Berean
Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia,
has written three sketches for Dr.
Alfred Nevin’s Encyclopedia of the
Presbyterian Church. The subjects
of the sketches, which are necessarily
brief, are Drs, Blyden, Reeve and
Garnet.—G'lobe.
Among the contributors of the
Weekly Medical Review of Chioago
is found the name of James E? Hen
derson, M. D. The Review is one
of the leading journals in the medical
prof: ssion, and among its coutributors
are the leading physicians of the
country. Dr. Henderson is the only
colored contributor, and is the only
one of our physicians who Lelongs
to the Chicago Medical Society.
Mrs. Lottie Minn, living on Beeier
street, has had quite an unusual expe
rience. In the dark days of slavery,
nearly twenty-five years ago, when
about nine years old, she was sepa
rated from her mother. Since that
time she had never heard from her
and supposed her to be dead, until a
few weeks ago she and her husband
visited the Louisville exposition,
when she learned that her mother
was alive and living in Missouri.
Mrs. Mion wrote to Missouri, and in
due time an answer was received from
her mother. Mrs. Minn will leave in
about two weeks to visit her mother. ‘
—lndianapolis (Ind.) World.
Tariton Arteburp, who died lastl
week, left his entire estate, valued at x
$30,000, to his colored child, Mary |
Eliza Arteburn. Arteburn was for]
many years betore the war the
leading slaveholder in this city or
State, and made a fortune of about‘
$1.000,000 in dealing in human besh.
After freedom his cccupation, like
Othello’s, was “gone indeed,” and his
great fortune began to dwindle urtil
the time of his death, when he was
worth about $30,000. It is but just
that Miss Mary Artcburn, kis daugh
ter by a colored woman, should now
own the ground where Arteburn’s
slave pen once stood.—Louisville
(Ky.) Bulletin.
Robert R. Church isthe wealthicst
colored man in Memphis. e has
about $75,000 worth of substartials.
He has a big saloon and has “mixed”
in politics some.— World.
An ex colored member of the Lou
isville Legislature stole three turkeys
“and sold them for §450.
‘ During the last year 74.157 white
:nd 98,938 colored pupils attended
} the public schools of North Carolina.
There is only one negro in Mon
tague, Texas, and he is the porter at
the hotel.—ZLancet.
The recogrized leaders in the house
of the Mahoneites are Duff Green, of
| Stafford, and R. G. Banks, of Nor.
l folk, Harris, the negro lawyer, from
Dinwiddie, is looked upon as the
i leader of the negro members. Harris
takes a delight in talking on every
i question that comes before the house,
‘and ‘‘when Africa is assailed” be
' does double duty.—State.
Mr. Willis J. Rosg, a gradaate of
Gain’s Iligh School, Cincinnati, is
| writing a book. The title is not yet
| known.
| Miss Cora Bean and Mary W,
! Trapp, two young colored ladies, are
! teaching in Cleveland’s mixed schools,
L and have for a year «r more— Ga
g zelte.
The Cincinnati College of Music
claims that iis Southern patronage
1 has fallen off, because it allows a
| young colored man to enter as a pupil.
| The objection is chiefly manifested by
the young white ladies, from the
; Sunny South. The young colored
' man referred to is Prof. William IL
i McKandlass, who was at one time as
| sistent superintendent of music in the
' public schools of this city. There is
% at present a young colorgd lady from
| Xenia in the College.—Cincinnati
| (0.) Afro-American.
‘1 It is ramored that Judge George
by ISUTI A 8 DEEn eneered tne posl
l tion of Resident Consul for the Gov
| ernment of San Domingo at the Port
: of Boston.
| Mr. Robert Brown, son of George
W. Brown, Esq., formerly of this city,
but lately of Chicago, has been en
gaged by the Pinkerton’s Detective
| Agency in that city for about two
! months. So great is the ekill of the
| young dectectlve in ferreting ont
| crooks that he has been transferred o
l the great agency of Allen Pickerton,
| New York. Mr. Brownis now in the
city visiting his parents, preparatory
to leaving for New York.
A negro woman went crazy in
Chattanooga, Tenn., the other day,
because she lost a pair of bracelets
which were given her by her dead
gister.
William Wardlaw, colored, of Ab
beville county, S. C., has named a
child Guiteau, in honor of the assas.
sin of President Garfield. Wardlaw
ought to go off and die.—Zu.
Miss Addie Lawton, of Cambridge,
Mass., a teacher in the Sumner build
ing, Washington, was severely as
saulted by Mrs Margarct Wilkins,
because she punnished Mrs. Wilking'
son with a strap for being absent.
The court fined the belligerent mother
$2O for an example to people to let
school teachers alone. On account
of the above assanlt Miss Lawton was
compelled to remain in the house a
few days.
st
[Communicated. ]
Yorx, Ps, Dea 19.
Epiror State JourNar:—l see that
a joint meeting of the National and
Executive Committee of the Union
League has been held at Washington
to consider and deeide upon the policy
of the League in overthrowing Bour
bonism in the Southern States, or, in
other words, to protect the colored
voters. The Republican National
Committee also held a meeling at the
same time and place, and among other
propositions discussed was one from
Mr. Frye, of Maine, submitting a
proposition to reduce the number of
Representatives from Southern States
at the next National Convention and
increase the number from the North
ern States. The convention adjourn
ed with the usual stereotyped resclu
tions: That this committee vizw with
regret and indignation the recent at
tempt to suppress human rights, &e.
Every year, just preceding a State or
National election, the colored people
of this country have been sootbed and
T L T(0
‘quieted with bon-bons in the shape of l
just such resolutions, while the infer |
nal Rebei Democrats of the Soath |
‘have addressed themselves to the
more serious but determined purpose
of overcoming the large Republican
majorities in the Southern States by 1
gheooting down tho:e who, knowing |
heir rights, dired 1o mainiain them |
by whippiug and cutraging their
families and thus creating a reign of
terror prior to an election. It is an
undisputed facs that if the biack men
of the South were allowed to ecast
their ballots according to their desire
that two-thirds of the Southera States
would be Republican to-day from ten
to thirty-five thousaud majority. Who
are we to blame for this cond‘tion of
things? The Republican party who
stcod quietly by while the bravest
and best of our people were being
shot down for their devotion to Re
publican principles.
State after Stite South was wrested
from the party by violence, and out
rages unheard of in the history of
civilization. Yet the Republicaus
did nothing but protest. loes avy
one snppose that if the black men of
this country had have been as loyal to
! the Democratic parly as they have
been to the Republican, does &Ly oze
suppose that the Democratic party
would have allowed the Repunblicans
to hang, shoot down, oulrage and
otherwise abuse the blagks on ascount
of their devotion to their principles?
The Demoeratic party would have
protccted them, if'in so doing they
would have the country in another
war, and the question naturally oc
curs are not our votes worth as much
to the Republicsn party as they
would be to the Democratic party ?
i’l‘nke the cighteen thousand co'ored
‘ voters in Pennsylvania from the Re
publican and transter them to the
Democratic party, and is therc any
doubt as to how Yernsylvania would
go? And ss if to add insult to in
jury the Supreme Court of the United
] States, which is Republican by a
| great majority, comes forward and de
| elares the Civil Rights Bill, instituted
by Congress for the protection of the
‘ colored man, “unconstitntional,”
| thereby removiog the only balwark
| ‘ of protection that the colored man in
| the South has. And now Mr. Frye,
of Maine, proposes to still further
cripple us by reducing our Repre
| sentation in the next Natiornal Con
| yeution. But thanks to ope dele
| gate, Magee, from this State, the mo
tion was defeated for the present.
Now, colored men of Pennsylvania,
l is it nnt time that-we eall a halt to
1 these movements? I 3 it not time
- | that we demand of our party that the
| rights of every black man in this com.
munity, South as well as North,
. l ghall be protected. I have heretofore
| opposed the cailling of cenveuntions
among our people as not amounting
| to anythiug, but I think the time has
| arrived when patience bas ceazed to
5 , be a virtae, when he who would be
| free must first strike the blow. Let
| ’ us then make an effort to bave a con
vention of the cclored wen of the
State of Pennsylvania to show our
| brethren of the South that we are
gorry with their sorrow. That we
| grieve with their grief, and that we
are determined to have equal and
| exact justice tor every man.
“ Yours, EvLpox.
| In Aid of of the Hampton
Institute.
| _ New York, Dec. 17.
At a meeting held in the Presbyte
rian Memorial Church, at Fiffty-third
street and Madison-avenue, last even
ing, 1 the intrest of the Hampton In
stitate for colored students, in Hamp
| tor, Va.,a large audience listened to
addresses by the Rev. C. 8. Robinson,
| who presided ; Gen. 8. C. Armstrong,
| Superintendent of the institute; the
| Rev. H. P. Fissell, chaplain of the
| institute; Mr. Booker Washington, a
| eolored gentleman, who has charge of
the Normal School at Tuskegee, Ala.,
and Mr. Bushotter, a Sioux Indian.
A quartet of Hampton graduates sang
African hymups, Chaplain Frissell
| spoke of the condition of the negro in
| the South, and compared the indus
| trious colored man of the rural dis
tricts favorbly with the idle city
negro. He spoke of the good work
which the ipstituie had done in in.
structing the colored people of the
South. Mr. Washington talked in
terestingly of the condition of the
| negro in the South. e thought that
| all that was necuessary to place the
colored man on equality with the
| white was to give him brains and
| property. As soon he had something
| which the white man wanted, the
‘| white man was glad to have harmony.
Five thousand dollars had been raised
for a school building at Tuskagee,
and it would be built as soon as 5,000,
more was procared. Mr. Bushotter
| made a speech with a long quotation
from Mr. Sitting Ball, in Isdia. A
collection was taken up for the aid of
| the Hampton Institute,which amount
ed to $450.
v iE O TO = :
ROSHON'S NEW GALLERY
To have your Photographs taken,
328 MARKET STREET.
Come in the forenoon, if possible. Respectfully,
GEORGE H. SOURBIER,
ITTNDERTAKER.
And Dealer in
FINE FURNITURE.
334, 336 and 338 Broad Street, Harrisburg. Pa.
~ ¥¥Black Cloth Caskets for £65, trimmed as desired
. No extra charge for Black or White Hearse.
|
T BOU CI
WILL GIVE SI'ECIAL BARGAINS IN
iGLOTHING, OVERCOATS & UNDERWEAR,
| — AT ——
| 319 BROAD STREET, HARRISBURS, PA,
Ist o sBA el e i
1 1210 NORTH THIRD STREET.
1 O, B. W6COCKL,
~ WALL PAPER & WINDOW SHADES.
‘ 1883, 41883.
FALL STOCK OF
~
CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, &C.
l ~—NOW OPEN AT—
T TN GST’S,
| ON MARKET STREET, NEAR THE RIVER BRIDGE,
E HARRISBURG, PEININ'A.
| We always sell good goods at the very LOWEST CASH
| PRICES. OIL CLOTHS, our stock never was
; so full of Handsome Patterns,
. F. W. YINGST, 111 MARKET. ST., NEAR FRONT.
i T'! 'VV‘A” o :,_j_:”“""" ”‘l"—'—"’f—“:i;f:i:_______.____——"&\“"“'""'"""“k - ;_;f--ff
CHRISTMAS GOODS
i IN ENDLESS VARIETY AT
. HAMMERSLEY’S CHINA HALL.
}Dncomted China, Dinner and Tea Sets; Decorated Chamber Scts; lavi
| land’s 'China., Fish, Fruit and Berry Sets. Fine Table Lamps; Fine
l Hanging Lamps; Foreign and Domestic Glassware, Colored, Crys
' tal and Engraved. We respectfully ask an examination of
? our stock and prices.
i HAMMERSLEY & CO., ‘
114 Merket Street, Harrisburg, Pa.
1 Near the Bridge. Don't Forget the Number.
i B e ee e ee e
(2 ' ’
36 MATHERS 36
i FASHIONABLE
f'\i'“ & vE W W i ;
MILLINERY HOUSE
i"\ L§.&y Y s \ ® ;;
; 36 N. SECOND STREET, CORNER WALNUT,
iT e e eeßets Gt o g A bl ot et
1
l HARDWARE. The Latest Style. j
{ PAINTS, The Best Assortment. f
| OILS. The Lowest Prices.
i GLASS. The Largest Stock.
l CALL AND WE WILL PROVE IT.
| HENRY CILBERT & SON,
i 219 Market Street, Harrisburg,
; ' D. C. BURNITE'S
GALLERY OF ART,
~ NO, 16 NORTH THIRD STREET, HARRISBURG, PA,
gExecutes Photograph;; the most :rgx;g;:tyle and finish. Urayons,l
I - Boudoirs, Panels, Cabirets and Cards. Life-Size Crayon Portraits i
i a Specialty. : |
| SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
M.W.FRENCH,
NANUFACTURER OF
CIG ARS.
TOBAGEOS, DIPES, SHCTY, ke,
410 Marked Strent, Bamishurg, Po
FREDERICK WAGNER,
ol EAST STATE STREET,
BREAD, CAKES AND PIES,
ALWAYS 3 FRESH,
BAKEFD ToA Ty oY
LARGEST AND MOST COM
PLETE ASSORTMENT OF
GENT FURNISHING
; GOODS IN THE
CITY.
Neckwear, Gloves,_Slfi:s—. Underwear of all
styles, cheap Canes: also Gold Headed
Canes. Umbrellas—Silk, Alpaca and
Gingham. Completeline of Gents*
Jewelry of all novelties. Shirts
made to ord- r a Specialty. Under the
Jones IlYouse, No. 207 Market Street
L.A.Segelbaum,
i g
GROCERY.
The undersigned has opened a
grocery store at
No. 807 North Third Street,
with a full supply of staple and fancy
groceries,
Pure Spices, Coffee and Tea,
SUCARS,
CANNED GOODS, CRACKERS,
Etc., Ete. §F"Goods delivered to al
parts of the city,
. LUTZ. 807 N. THIRD ST,
THE
JOURNAL
PUBLISHING O.
Are now prepared to execute
ALL KINDS
OF
FIRST CLASS
JOB WORK!
AT
Y 1 OO h 2
REANONABLE - RATEN,
Programmes,
Bill Heads,
Circulars,
Dodgers,
Posters,
Tickets, ete.,
~ Gve ws @ Trial
| it
i
[ ESTIMATES GIVEN
! ON
APPLICATION
[ ADDRESS,
Address the Joumal Publishing Co,,
Harrisburg,
Penn’a.
~ C. H. OSSMAN,
Choice and Staple Groceries
Aiways on hand. Fine assortment of New
Raisins, Prunes, Citrons, Nuts, &o. Just
received an endless variety of Can
ned Goods, Give us a call for
Holiday Goods,
CorNER STATE AND FiLert STREETS,
FOR SALE.
Ax Orp Esraßrisuep
FOUR CHATR
BARBER SHOP
First Class in every respect. = The
best location in the city. Do
ing a good business.
Goop Reasoxs For SeLrixa.
Call on or address,
| T. W. GALE,
1112 Eleventh av., Altoona, Pa,
&4
S
i
i \J‘;;
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