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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, January 19, 1884, Image 3

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THE MAYOR'S MESSAGE
v '
Gentlemen of the City Councils @ By the
requirement of the act of May 23d, 1874,
I respectfully submit a resume of the
condition of the caity during thc year
just closed, and such viewsas in my
opinion the interests of the ¢ty may re
quire. I congratnlate the council and
the people upon the improved sanitary
condition of the ¢ity; 1o epidemics hav
ing prevailed during the year. Small
pox, searlet fever und diphtberia made
their appearance, but by stern sanitary
regulations the [ormer was completely
stamped out alinvst upoen its appearance
and the ravages of the latter greatly re
stricted in comparison with that of
former years. I would suggest that in
view ofthe contagious character of scarlet
fever and diphthicria, now gencrally re
cognized by the medical authorities, that
the same resirictions be placcd upon
families in which the disesse prevails as
1s now placed upen families afllicted with
small-pox—tha . compiete isolation of the
people arnd the destruction of all infected
property be requirved, By these means
and proper sanitary regulations connect
ed therewith, I have ro douht bhut that
scourge of the nursery may be almost
cradicated therefrom. I renew to the
councils my sugeestion made to your
Joint Commniittee on Banitary Aflairs some |
time since, that arrangements be madei
for the frequent flushing with water of |
the public séwers and by so doing de- |
stroy the germs of discase lurking
thereir.
The extension of public and private
sewers on Front strect to low water mark |
has been & source of great public benefit l
ina sanitary point of view. It is to be |
hoped, however, that some measures ’
may be adopted in the early future |
whercby the sewage now emptied along
city front may be condected beyond the
lower limits of the city and thus prevent
the pollution of the waters and air along
the river boundary. During the past
year the condition of Paxton creek has
engaged much of my :a'\!(,*:'.:inn«hxmls‘
along its borders, which have been hith- |
erto successiully drained by the opening '
of the channel, arc flooded at stages ot |
water previously unknown. Aninvesti- |
gation revealed the faei that numcruusl
dams exist near the outlet. Bars and
grass-plats formed along the line, 2 heavy
fall of water from Ihe acqueduct of the
Pennsylvania canal, and the inadeauate
channel corsiiucted by the Reading
railroad company to condict ihe waters
away from the lipe of their Steelton
branch railroad have combined to raise
the level of the stream to such an extent
as to cause the flooding named. Efforts
were at once made to remedy the evil—
the keading company making immediate
preparations for the widening of the
channel consiructed by them but were
stopped by legal notice served by the
owners of property through which the
channe! runs. The Lochiel iron com
pany, fecling secure in what they be
lieve a vested right to obstruct the creek
by a series of dams, have declined to
accede to my request to remove their ob
structions. 1 have therefore to respect
fully request the necessary legislation by
councils to open and straighten the chan
nel of the crcek from a point at or near
the canal acqueduet to the mouth of the
stream, and ine removal of all obstruc
tions therein as provided by existing law.
This is the only method, in my opinion,
whereby the water level of the creek
may be lowered and relieve the lower
part of the city from {he malarial influ
ences of the undrained Jands along its
course.
The ordinance relating to dogs, which
has been lying dormant for several years
past, was put into force during the year
just closed. Cur city has been overrun
with dogs, the majority of which are
worthless. Notwithsianding the heavy
tax laid upon these animals, no less than
1,068 were registered, yielding a gross
revenue to the city ol $1,605 50, 'l'hcl
number of dogs within the city limits
has been computed at at least four thoun ‘
sand. At least fifty persons have heen |
reported at pelice headquarters during |
the vear as having been bitten by dogs, '
many of them geriously, and in one in
stance 1 Luman life destroyed. The ob- |
stacles in the way of successtul enforee
ment of this ordinance have been the
difficulty in securing permanent dog
catchers—those performing the duty re
maining in gervice but a few weeks at
the farthest, owing to the uupopularity
of the business and the opposition of the
people. 1f our citiwens believe that the
ordinance is oppressive or so unpopuiar
that they cannot submit to its enforce
ment, it is clearly their duty to secure its
expungement from the Ordinance Book.
The Chief-of-Police has earnestly endea
vered to enforce the ordinance and the
authorities should not be subjected toun
friendly eriticism in the eaforcement of
laws which they are sworn to do and
which the people themszelves have per
mitted to go upon their statutc books.
In any event a revision of this ordinance
is desirable and I hereby recommend it.
The enforcement of the ordinance will be
continued as soon as the weather permits.
I would earnestly urge upon your at
tention the question ot the removal of
garbage, ni%ht soil, ete. The methods
adopted and now in use are too crude for
a community the gize of this, By the
adoption of garbage cart lines under
contract, and the licensing of night soil
men or firms, all to be subject to police
surveillance and designated points of de
posit outside the city limits will not only
avoid great trouble and annoyance, but
the health of our citizens be greatly ben
fited. and this too at no greater expense
than is now entailed.
During the month of November Jast I
received information that the Harris
burg city passenger raidway company
were about to construct tracks on certain
streets, not heretofore occupied for the
purpose, without first having obtained
the consent of the city authorities so to
to do, and further, that the materials to
be used in the construction of said tracks
was not such as is used In the construc
tion of street railways. Delieving the
act of the company to be an invasion of
the rights of the people, I notified them
that they would not be permitted to
gonstruct said tracks unless by permis
sion of the city authorities formally ob
tained, and further that they would not
be permitted to lay the tracks proposed
by them, it being an undoubied obstruc
tion of the highways. The company
have not as vet made any effort to con
struct the tracks regardless of the notice
furnished them. What the result of this
eontest will be T amunable now to say,
it is a question which must be decided by
the highest judicial tribunal of our State,
a decision which will settie the question
of the rights of the people as against
those charters of certain corporations
granted prior to 1373, which charters, to
say the least, are infamous, disregarding,
as [ believe they do, the right of the peo
ple to regulate their own affairs. It will
be my pleasure to aid in extending the
benefits of the city passenger railway
system all over our city, but I de claim
and demand that, until otherwise decided,
these corporations must conform to such
regulation as the municipal government
shall deem necessary for the welfare of
the people.
The efficiency of the fire department
maintains its high standard. With the
complete repairs of steamers Nos. 1 and
~ now accomplished, the thorough over
i‘fi;}“‘é of steamer N 0.6 and the pur
dontdulr.:}"new tuck, which must be
{he (‘;(‘Dd:';ll; the present year, will place
any (lon“‘we‘m'm cqu@mon to cope with
M gration. which may visit us.
‘utemplated purchase of additional
' lines of hose and the minorimprovements
i already under way will serve to increase
' the efliciency cf thic volunteer department,
| already incomparable. The completion
| of the building for the No. 8 company
| should be a source of satisfaction to our
| people and insures more efficient pfotec
| tion of the “'liil district.’”
| Attention is called to the detailed re
| port ot the Chicef of Police of matters
{ pertaining to the department of which he
lls the head. There has been a gratifying
{ decrease of c¢rime and consequent in
| creased sccurity for the citizen. The
| numerical weakness of the police force
| has been a very serious drawback to the
| complete eflicicney of the force as a
. whole. This defect will, it is believed,
| be remedied in a very great measure by
| the increase in numbers just allowed by
. councils. The “‘iramp’’ problem pre
| sented itself upon the advent of cold
' weather. I have endeavored to reach a
solution of tais problem by the purchase
- of the necessary implements and put
l ticg these idle wanderers to work.
' Nearly all of the brick work of the old
reservoir on North street has been re
' moved by them to points where it is
i avaiable for use by the authorities. The
' streets have been cleaned of mud and
the crossings and city property kept
clear of snow by the labor of these peo
' ple, and this, too, at a time when the
l city was without money or authority to {
employ men for the work. Wiih proper
arrangements made for the feeding, &c., |
of the “‘nomads,”” I believe the grounds
‘at the new reservoir may be converted
into beautiful pleasure grounds, a pride
to the city instead of the unsightly wil
derness itnow is. It i 3 thus that these
men can repay, by their labor, the ex
pense the eitizens, not only of this city
tut of the county, are at to maintain
them in idlenessand will, I believe event
ually drive them out of this region of
country.
That the condition of our highways
throughout the city is bad at the present
time is beyond dispute ; but it is hoped
that upon the opening of spring the im
provements contemplated, and especially
with the increased facilities at hand, will
be commenced and pushed forward to
completion in such 2 manner as will con
vince the taxpayers that the amount of
ol money allotted to the highway depart
ment has been judiciously appropriated.
Your attention is called to the condition
of Front screet, from Vine street to a
point at or near the Paxton rolling mills,
the property owners along the line, de
sirous of paving in front of their resi
dences have secured their line and paved,
thus leaving the roadway so narrow as
in many places to preclude the passing
of wvehicles. 1 would recommend the
filling out of the rondway, as in its pres
ent condition it is under many circum
stances, dangerous to travel.
The reports of the financial department
of the city merit and should rececive the
careful attention of the councils and the
people. The credit of the city remains
at a premium at all financial centers in
which its securities have been negotiated.
Your attention is especially called to that
portion of the repcrt of the City Con
troller wherein that officer recommends
the destruction of certain bonds, in
amount $30,000 now in the sinking fund.
These bonds were executed but never ne
cotiated—they were placed in the sink
ing fund representing a liability which
never existed. The peculiar function of
these bonds seemed to be to compel pay
ment into the sinking fund of $l.BOO
dollars per annum which is credited to
the interest account upon the face value
of said bonds when no such debt as they
are claimed to represent exists. By the
cancellation of these bonds the debt ac
count of the city is reduced $30,000 dollars
and the interest thereon can either be
placed openly in the sinking fund for the
redemption of our bonded debt, or ap
plied to municipal improvement.
The assessed valuation of preperty in
the city is inamount $6,178,490. It must
conclusive to all who take anyinterest be
in the important subject, that it is far be
low a fair one-third valuation. Complaints
of discrimination are¢ heard en all sides.
Nearly all the valuable properties are as
sesged far below one-third of their value,
while the homes of the working people
are, in a majority of cases,assessed above
the one-third valuation, and in many in
stance reaching one-hall and more. The
blame for this state of affairs must not
be placed upon the assessor—probably he
does the best he can within the law and
restrictions under which he acts—but the
remedy ‘‘does’’ lie in the municipal gov
crnment. All other remedies failing, re
course should be had to existing laws
which if accepted by the municipality
would remove the evii complained of—an
cvil which is direetly contrary to the
mandate of the Constitution of the
Commonwealth, which we have sworn to
support and obey, wherein it is distinetly
declared that “all taxes shall be upiform,
upon the same class of subjects within
the territorial iimits of the authority levy
ing the tax, and shall be levied under
general laws. The councils thus have
the remedy in their own hands.
During the past year the necessary
legislation was had, and, under direction
of councils, sale was commenced of the
grounds at the corner of North and El
der streets used for reservoir purposes un
der the old water system; this property
it is estimated will yield at least $125,000
to the treasury. By a wise provision of
the ordinancc authorizing the sale, the
proceeds realized therefrom is to be kept
separate from all other funds in the
treasury and cannot be appropriated ex
cept by special ordinance. Recognizing
as I do that these grounds, or the pro
ceeds from the sale thereof, have been
held, if notinlaw, at least in honor, as a
part of the collateral upon which the
great bulk of our bonded indebtedness
has been pledged, I fecl it incumbent
upon me to declare at this time that my
consent for the expenditure of a single
dollar of this revenue shall be withheld
except that it be re-investedinrevenue
yielding improvements. It must not be
forgotten that in a few years hence the
bulk of our bonded indebte¢ness must be
met and prompt measures must be taken
to meet that indebtedness as it becomes
due—thus maintaining theproud financial
reputation Harrisburg holds among the
cities of the Commonwealth,
Your attention is called to the urgent
necessity of securing the laws and ordi
nances of the city in some compact form
to which ready reference may be had.
Under our present system it is almost im
possible to secure prompt and ready infor
mation upcn the laws and crdinances of
the city for the reason that a large number
have been bound in book form, while for
a number of years they were simply re
corded and filed among the archives of
Councils and those from 1874 to date
have been printed on loose slips—a more
inconvenient and miserable system could
not readily be conceived.
Councils have had prepared, at very
considerable expense, a collection of the
laws and ordinances relating to the city.
The work has been presented in compact
form for your consideration. I would
~earnestly urge upon your honorable
- bodies an early consideration of the sub
Ject of revising and preparing this work,
as you may see proper, with the sole de
sire to see these laws and ordinances
placed in some convenient shape for the
guidance of the public.
The report of the City Solicitor, trans
mitted herewith, shows at length the du
ties performed Dby that officer during the
year and the litigation under his charge
in which the city is interested. It merits
your careful attention. The report of the
City Engineer, aisotranstuitted herewith,
is a concisc statement of the duties per
formed by his important department,
The city Government will be called
’ upon to determine many important ques
‘tions during the present year, notably
those of lighting the city, and the exten
sion of its water system. Of the former
the (%uestion to be detirmined is whether
it will be a more renumerative enterprise
for the city to own the plant for lighting
il streets or to retain the contract system
now in vogue. As to the latter it will
also be called upon to legislate upon the
expediency of such an extension of our
water system as will permitthe city works
to suppfv the thickly populated districts
lying just onour borders. These enter
prises, if it be decided the city shall enter
upon them, involve a large expenditure
of money, but as they also involve an
increased revenue to tge treasury which
may be applied to the liquidation of our
liabilities I need only suggest the disposi
tion of the funds arising fiom the sale of
the old leservoir grounds'in this direction
to accomplish the object named.
Upon the whole our citizens have cause
for congratulation—the future of the city
is assured, and I may venture upon the
prediction that with the increased rail
road facilities thrust upon wus, within
the next decade Harrisburg will rank as
the third city of the Common
wealth. A great duty however devolves
upon the municipal government—while
others are helping us we must
help ourselves, and by our own efforts
contribute to our importance. With this
gbject in view, I must emphatically urge
upon the Councils the necessity of offer
ing such inducements to what are known
as small manufacturers as will make itan
object for them to locate among us. In ‘
the accomplishment of this object you
will have my most cordial support.
S. C. WirLsox,
Mayor. |
A NNUAL REPORT
OF THE
, q
Dauphm County ~ Prison
} A
- !l ,
HARRISBURG. PA,,
FOR THE YEAR 1883.
OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR I.SL
INsrECcTORS—J. Brisbin Boyd, George W,
Porter, William K. Cowden, Samuel M‘IL
henny, W. W. Jennings and Thos. (i, Fox.
PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD—J. Brisbin Bu)‘-d.
SECRETARY OF THE Boarp—George W,
Porter.
Puysicr .N—William H. Egle, M. 1).
KEEPER—Simon Duey,
U~NpeER-KEEPER—Willinm Van Horn,
MATRON—Mrs. Susan Duey.
Warcumanx—Michael J, Shaeffer,
INPECTORS REPORT.
To the Honorable the Judges of the Court
of the Quarter Sessions of Dauphin
County: .
In contormity with the requirements of
the act of the Isth of AJ);'H, A. D, 1841, the
Inspectors submit in detail, their annual
report of the condition of the Dauphin
County Prison, and would respectfully call
your attention to the following:
As will be seen by a comparison of the de
tailed statement of commitments made to
the prison during the year 1883 with the pre
ceeding yvear, 1882, those were 1,495 persons
committed to our charge in 1383, against
1053 in 1882, showing an increase of 412 for
the year past.
The number sentenced by the court to the
Eastern Penitentiary was 8, being one less
than in 1882,
The number sentenced by the courtto the
i;g}:se of Refuge was 8, being 5 more than in
The number of prisoners remaining in
prison, December 3lst, 1883, was 88, at the
same time in 1882 there were 57 remaining.
There have been 60 more cases of disease
treated in the prison during the last year
than in 1832, viz: 378 as against 318 for 1882,
As will be seen by a reference to the state
ment in detail of the expenditures for all ex
penses of thcsi)risou of 1882, that the total
cost was $12,634 60 while for the year 1883 the
total amount required to pay the entire ex
{;ensus, including all necessary repairs has
S(i{‘n $11,428 85, (See statement in detail,
1883.)
Table showing the number of commit
ments during the year, and the offenses of
which charged. .
SRR el S B 1
URTTR (R ol ons i LS e aan 2
RRTIIINER L 2
ASKENIG GG DRELETY ... ... i idiwss 42
Assault and battery with intent to kiil 1
RN L N U S L o
Bail Yiwo 3
B Y Momße. L e 2
IR s 2
IR = o R e o e o B 6
Bur};lury B IRCAIY . . LUI ey Gk 4
IS e<o o b i eo i i P i S o o 1
Carrying concealed deadly weapons.. 12
Carrying concealed deadly weapons
and assault and baitery........... 1
('un‘yinfi concealed deadly wvug)(ms
and felonfous assault and battery 1
(.':u‘rying concealed deadly weapons
and felonious a55au1t.............. 1
RN L L LS 1
I e e s dsewn 3
Criminal reckleßSnNOss. ... .c.c.ccovvtissess 1
EORTERNRN B B ORI, L i ere 1
Relrpuding lanMlora. ... cco.eobecsonsss 7
PPN AR LN Sl ¢
IR L. B L 8
Disturbing religious meeting........... 1
BIERONIOT Y OOBIIRCT. .. ..-y o s vi's ocnosise 24
SRMOREIEEN ANONNRIR L S 3
DlRuk ana GiNoraerly.... ..o .i.. 0000 812
BV L b i IR b 83
RL L 4
R B A S SRR L K 1
RER DGR MYe OF DOPFOW .0\ i b aias 1
e T T R R e Oe S 9
Rreloniens QasaxY .. Lol 3
Felonious assault and battery........... 9
Felonious agsault and battery and car
rying concealed deadly weapons..... 1
Felonious assault with intent to kill.. 1
Felonious assault and battery and lar-
SIDERY .o 4 srisnamononanosnte sonhsuansinnsnns Rl
HRIORIONE ONETY . ia it e e 1
Felonious entry and attempt to commit
IR ee el LLI 1
IO SR Ls e 2
Fornication and bastardy.........ceeue.e 8
BRI L L L s
B vor s b i e 5
BWY TODROTF . coxsesessonosotesssnnnse 2
SRR BRI .. - - or 4 s e Tansnsnsons 22
lndcc(-nc[x;.................. 2
Y L S es U 4
}n5au;ty.................. 15
IO LLS s b e R
ABTOORY AU DUPEIMYY .o occosssorascanenss 2
LATOenY DY DRIIGD . sueiicvsc pinnnssiissaiss 4
Larceny and cruelty to animals.... .... 2
Larceny Buspieion 0F)...... .o . deae-tsss 10
S I L o TR s s nenn g 3
o PUECEER TY G R 10
IR L i e e s e e 1
RERT (DODRSROEE BO). oo no 00 camansonsss 7
DR L iok eet e 1
Passing counterfeit m0ney........000uee ?
Peddiing withonut Moßnse .- ... covecarann 1
Pickpockets (attempt t 0)................ 2
RADE (AUUAMDE V 0) oo cccss covericnsasssons 2
N EUINE . . oa4 e 4 e 1
Recol\'m‘f R 3
Returned from House of Refuge........ 1
TIREIRc o o R e 10
BRI s sidsi b aihabuos seniiasni vhasns 4
DRI o 7i i s e el 1
Safe kec'ping 10
Selling liquor without license .......... 5
Selling liquor to min0r5.................. 1
B G i e e ameaiey 1
Sodomy, attempt to c0mmit............. 1
Surety Of the PORCe......ccooeuesvssaasass 14
Suspicious conduct..... ... ccoioeeeirvan. 8
Suspicton of larceny and forcible entry 1
TSR W BEIRE. . ois s b e vidie 2
R S R R S 1
TTOSDABS. v ovsrsvnssrsasansrsssosasasssagye 1
VOBTADLS v eovvrvasosossarasnsesnsnrsnsenes O 3
Total number c0mmitted............ 1,495
NATURE OF SENTENCES BY THE COURT,
Sentenced only topay c05t5............. G
Sentenced only to pay fineand costs. .. 5
Sentenced to impriscament 5 days and
pay finaand Costs..cociiiiiiiiininnn. 2
Sentenced to imprisonment 10daysand
pay tine and COSIS. ....coeivuriiierenns. 7
Sentenced to imprisonmentlidaysand
pay fine and COStS........ovvaesvinanns 1
Sentenced to imprisonment2odaysand
pay fine and COStS......ccovanecasnonssy 1
Sentenced to izxgrisoumeut 30daysand
pay fineand CastS .....covecireriiinans 1
Sentenced to lm{,rlsonment 1 month
and pay fineand c05t8.........cc0nnnn. =
Sentenced to imprisonment 2 months
and pay fine and c05t5................. 13
Sentenced to imprisonment 3 months
and pay fine and c05t5....%\............ 11
Sentenced to imgrisonment 4 months
and pay fine and costs ...........ccoooe 16
Sentenced to imprisonment 5 months
and pay fineand c05t5................. 1
Sentenced to imprisonment 6 months
and pay fineand c05t5................. 10
Sentenced to imprisonment 7 months
and pay fineandcosts ................. 1
Sentenced to imprisonment 8 mgnths i
andmyflne‘%n% RGBEB. eoo tneercnons 3
Sentenged to imprisonihent ¥ months
and pay fine and c05t5................. 4
Sentenced to imprisonment 10 months
and pay fineand c05t5................. 4
Sentenced to imprisonment 11 months
and pay fine and COStS .ucavviiiiiinnen. 3
Sentenced to imprisonment 12 months
and pay fine and c05t5.............00e 1
BRI
Senienced to Eastorn Penitentiary..... 8
Sentenced to House of Refuge........... 8
Whole number of sentences by the
RO N I ks KR
Number of persons remaining in prison
December 31, 1883, and the crime with
charged.
Assanit and battery...iliiinsi. ..o 3| P
R - L s T % |
Cuarrying concealed deadly weapons. ... 2| K
CURIRN. ..i oo guibavmins eiy vabisnennns <o 0 AF
TR ) ey, .. 8 H
False pretense... ..o coievveriieissananss .
l"elonllt))us assault aud battery.......... 1, St
FotOn i OMEER i il sl i daeins vias i i
Felonious entry and attempt to com- 'M
mit1arcen5'............. Ry )
Fornication and ba5tardy............... 1! L
o T T e G S S 1 4
SSR L e e 1| M
Lareeny and Darg1ary...........00.....0 o
R e ASR B 5 | St
BRI Rl e 514
MOrier (AOCOSSOPY VO) -aac sssnsingcssssis 7 Sa
Receiving stolen g00d5.................. 5 1
Ti R s R SR Sl 1. O
o 1 SSI SRR 4} 1
TR eL L L e e SSI ]
HARRISBURG, Dec,. 31, 1882,
To the Inspectors Dauphin Counly Prison.
GENTLEMEN : Herewith is my annual report
and record cf diseases treated in the Dau
{)hin county prison for the year just closing.
t will be seen that the sum total of cases
amounts to three hundred and seventy.
eight. The number of visits made was two
hundred and forty-seven, of which seven
were night visits. With the exception prob
ably of some of the bronchial atfections a'l
the other diseases originated outside of the
prison walls.
There are various suggestions arising,
which, could thef be carried out, woald
%rrcat]y tend to an improvement in the sani.
ary condition of the prison, but at this time,
when there is being a heavy outlay by the
County Commissioners in the reconstruction
of the almshouse, the present condition cf
affairs must continue.
Two deathsoccurred during the year—both
from disease of the heart—one having been
brought to the prisonin a moribund condi
tion—the other 1n almost a similar situation,
if we may judge from a previous history of
the case.
It may be here stated that the health
of the prisontrs who are convicts has been
unu<ually good, most of the sickness being
confined to those committed for trial, or to
vagrants. Of the latter class, nine-tenths
are ailing, while one-half of other admis
sions reqmire treatment. As usual there
are & number of ephegtlcs. These poor un
fortunates, it is to be hoped, will hereatter
be taken to the almshouse instead of being
committed to prison. The latter institu
tion is not the proper place for this class of
patients.
The prison has been kept clean and neat—
the food has been abundant and withall
well-cooked. The complaints, it any, are
from thos¢ who are not accustomed when
out of prison toas good fare.
In conclusion 1 beg to return my thanks
to the Imspectors, and espeeially to the
Secretary of the Board, Dr. George W.
Porter, who have seconded every effort
nade to ameliorate the condition ot the nu
fortunate siek. Tothe Warden, Matron and
l'nderkwp-r. I cannot but acknowledge
their kindly aid in numerous instances,
Respectiully submitted,
WILLIAM H. KGLE, M. D.
Physician to Dauphin County P’rison,
RECORD OF CASES TREATED IN DAU
PHIN COUNTY PRISON FOR THE YEAR
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1883,
WHITE. BLACK.
e gy ey
£% K =
Diseases, s & 8 B
¢B o B
o - O
STV ..o oo hokios o b it M R
WRURN N L LR G
R o i o e
USRI g I S R
SOOI RENGE. .. .. .o..cuseiibB . 6 1T X
ot b Got R aa R S e R R
Bt el R e
Te e B s
FOUMERRMIN. ONEe LD e L B
TR ERRNAE. OB PO, . ..o ivihs B e esiea
BN L R S R e e R s
BN R R
Epi10})5y......................... w 3 ..
IR e R e
RN ot R Sl
rFover tatermtttent............ 49 1 '3 1
PO SOMMIIDRL, .ch coniosrinee W T B o,
ORI L e Ll e L
O GRS | o onievriies M s By
IR ot s Rl e
IV i e B
et yniroinrdin of .. v e Bass oo
BN S e R
B e N e b
SR L e LR
BN s eye 0 T
BIMERN e R s
PR s
0{m1mhuhit.....................‘ e
SRR L
Rheumatism, acute...ece...oooo 11 ~ 3 ..
Rheumatism, chr0nic.......... 8 .. 2 ..
= e e e
SRR, e R S
DU e L e 8 G
SYDhRis Resadßle. . oL, B 8 Lo 8
WODRG IR T e SR
DR IRIEEG ORI . o ooienaiee R e B
T O el R s s
Total number ot cases treated. 234 22 60 2
DEATHS. p
Two—Disease of the heart—not included
in statistieal record.
AUDITORS REPORT.
RECEIPTS IN 1883,
Balance due the Inspec
tors Jnnmu?' 1, 1883, by
John 8. Longenecker,
WTONRTEII. . ucnsicos vhiven . RS B 0
Requisition on County
C0mmi55i0ner5............ 12,000 00
l((-g fees for Simon Duey,
PR e 216 49
——————sl2,sBB 83
Jnmmry 1, to balance due
by John S. Longenecker,
hs«l., County Treasurer,
to Prison Inspectors...... $l,llO 00
PAYMENTS IN 1835,
By amount of orders from
N0.1t099, inc1u5ive......5!1,428 85
By balance due the Inspec
o NSRS ORI TG R
——512,533 85
We the undersigned, Auditors of Dauphin
cnnm&'. Pa., after being duly sworn and at
tirm+d according to law, to certify that we
did andit and adjust the foregoing accounts,
nnid that said a :counts, as above stated, are
correct, and that we find a balance of one
thousand one hundred and ten dollars (31,-
110 00) aue by said John 8. Longenccker,
Esq., Treasurer, to the Prison Inspectors.
In witness whercot we have hereunto set
our hands and seals at oar office, in the city
of Harrisburg, this 9th day of January, A. .
184,
L. W. CLEMSON, [L..B |,
SAMUEL R. MILLER (c. B.],
NELSON ENDERS, [L.B.],
Auditors of Dauphin County,
Attest—NELSON ENDERS, Clerk.
STATEMENT IN DETAIL.
Pursuant to law of payments, disburse
ments, &c., in the foregoing accounts, viz
(account of 1883, settlement book): Dry
Goods, Groceries, Drugs, Medicines, Light
Fuel, Maintenance of Prisoners, Salaries,
&e., &c.
J. R. Eby & Sons, groceries, &c¢ $l6 00
Manrioe C. By, @0.... 00 cid.. 45 60
Joseph Strouse Bros, clothing 84 03
Wm, 11. Egle & Co., drugs and
P G R 207 83
John W. Leedy, shoes ......... 39 75
. BN SROSS. L 12 60
Henry Gilbert & Son, Hard-
MR Lol ok eb i i 179
Houser & Breitinger, merchan-
NI e S 112 26
William Knoche, chapel organ 0
$7Ol 38
MAINTAINING PRIBONERS.
For Quarter ending March 31,
BRI S
For quarter ending June 350,
BORE, eet R vk - ORI
For quarter ending September
80, 1988. ... ..¢. 0000 snecicens.. 1,661 T
For quarter ending December
LR L
—g7 34 65
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES.
Simon Duey, money expended for prison:
For quarter ending Maveh 31,
T e
For quaiter ending June 30,
For quarter ending September
e R
For quarter ending December
ST T e D
—— 3106 90
Citizen fire company, sprink-
HNgstreel. .. qllesrsresssancase #l2OO
wmfiuu Stephen, filling straw
DS, Jhhkertaswis ok ah §asdan st the 71 m‘
$l9O 50
LIGHT AND FUEL,
Harrisburg gas company:
Gas for quarter ending March
31, 1883.0esvesrnvosancnceieess 2] 30
United gus improvement Co.:
Gas for quarter ending June
& THER. . nesivncriv s s sane i dstons 20 BN
Gas for quarter ending Sep
tomber P 10N5.....cc00000000. 3T MO
Gas for quarter ending Decem
ber3l, 1883.......0cccccinenaaey P 40
#8320
W. Howard Eby, eea1................. 30 00
H. M. Kelly, c0a1........cc000niennn... L 0 GO
John K. May, coal and w00d........ 180 45
William Sheesley, w00@.............. 10 00
$328 65
SALARIES OF OFFICERS.
Simon Duey keeper...... ... ivee 400 00
William Van Horn, uyndes keeper... 802 00
Mrs. Susan %uey, matr0n............ 200 00
Dr. Wm. H. Egle, phy5ic1an.......... 300 00
Michael J. Shaeffer, watchman, (6
TOOREREY .. v e svirsbershvserivsesss I
$2,000 00
PRINTING ANNUAL STATEMENT, STATION
ARY, ETC.
Harrisburg TELEGRAPH,printing an-
BDURE SEREOIIORE.. o voasssennsissnsian - 5 08D
Harvisburg TELEGRAPH, printing
annual pamphlet.....ooveviiiiains 50 00
Patriot Publishing Company print
ing annual 5tatement.............. 50 00
Harrisburg Independent printing
annual 5tatement................... 50 00
Hummelstown Sun, printingannual
SURCINIR K. i oov chh sit a son 25 00
Stattz Zeitung, printing annual an
e R TR 25 00
Millersburg Herald, printing an
nual statement..... .. .i.o.vaneens 2500
Lykens Register, printing annual
SOOI - cisit itk it at A 25 00
Middletown Journal printing an-
BRABE SERUOEREIL D.. .o onv v s vivian s o 25 00
Steelton Reporter, printing annual
RPN, - i chav e chee b i iEs 25 00
Samuel W: Flemming, stationary
O OB . 121 78
Clerk hire in Secretary’s office,
making quarterly returns to
Board of tharities. preparing an
nual statement, etc................ 250 00
$ 32178
REPAIRS TO PRISON.
M. B. Elder; p1umbing.........0..... $34 57
Fager & Maeyer, tinware, gratesand
COEBINAR. . 1
Zollinger & Kline, tinware and re-
PORREDE + i s bvonoksvaiscnvaveiveion 43 70
A. B. Tack, paper andr‘;)apering.. MR 1270
Willinm Gates, repairing cells and
BRI e 12 81
I. D. Marshbanks & Son, two water
DRSS 11 60
P. Bernheisel & Co, 1ime............. 5 00
$144 89
J. BRISBEN BOYD, |
President.
GEO. W. PORTER,
Secretary.
WM. K. COWDEN,
SAMUEL MILHENNY,
W. W, JENNINGS,
; THOS. <. FOX,
Inspectors of Juuphin county prison for
the vear 183¢, juni4-1,3,5-3t
Harrisburg Colored Church
and Society Directory.
Wesley Union Church, corner South street and
Tanners avenue—Pastor, Rev. Z. T. Pearsall.
Services at 10:30 and 7:30 every Sunday. Sun
day school at 1:30. Jos. B. Popel, Superintend
ent.
Bethel M. E. Church, Short street—Pastor, Rev.
Amos Wilson. Services at 10:30 and 7:30 every
Sunday. Saqbath school 1:20. Richard Snaively,
Superintendent.
Elder Street Presbyterian Church—Services at
10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath sehcol at 1:30. Thomas
Miljer, Superintendent.
Second Baptist Church, Eleventh street near
Market—Pastor, Rev. Beverly Jones. Ser
vices every Sunday at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath
scl:ool 1:30. Robert Carrington, Superintend
ent.
Free Will Baptist Church, corner William and
Colderstreets—Pastor, Rev. Frazer. Services
every Sundu{ et 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath
scl;uul 1:30. William Burrows, Superintend
ent.
Union A. M. E. Church, Tanners avenue—Pas
tor, Rev. Z. Johnson. Services every Sunday
at 10:30 and 7:30. Sunday school 2P. M.
Wesley Mission, Marion street near Colder—
Pastor, Rev. Bushrod. Services every Sab
bath at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath school 1:30
Daniel Williams,Superiutendent.
SOCIETIES.
Brotherly Love Lodge 836, G. U. 0., of O. F.;
hall in South stireei; regular meeting every
Monday night.
Chosen Friends Lodge, Masonic hall, Odd Fel
lows building, South street regular meeting
every alternate Thursday night.
Good Samaritans Hall, South street, Franklin
Hall: regular mecting every Tuesday night.
Golden Chain Council, hal! East State street;
rei:ular moeting every Tuesday ni¥lt.
{ousehold of Ruth Hall, Odd Fellows Hall
Soutfh street; regular meeting every Tuesday
night.
“IiGURE BEFORE TOO LATE”
i
I will offer Special Rates until April
Ist to all persons desiring
Fire Insurancge.
Norne but #rst Class Stock Com
panies represented.
“No Assr;ss;;fl?)l<;nx\Nl»lfib.”
W. K. VERBEKE, JR.,
General Insurance Agent.
Orrrce—Trust Building (Ist floor,
rear entrancej,
Harrissvra, Pexx'a.
D. BACOCOIN,
Manufacturing Confectioner,
434—438 MARKET STREET.
HARRISBURG, PA.
Factory, COR. FIFTH AND MARKET.
MRS. ELLEN PARKER,
DRESS MAKING & PLAIN SEWING
Prompt attention given to all
orders.
116 TANNER'S AVENUE.
CHICAGO MEAT MARKET
OPEN DAILY.
CHOICE MEATS ALWAYS N RAID,
414 WALNUT STREET.
It always pays to go to
Dr. RAYSOR’S
DRUC STORE.
WILLIAM E. HUGHES’
LIQUOR STORE.
FULL STOCK OF
Whiskies, Brandies, Gins, Wines, &,
ALWAYS ON HAND.
No. 510 MARKET ST., near U. S, Hotel,
HARRISBURG, PA.
The Wonderful
-
RESTORER,
When the Hair begins to fall
' Use Joice's Restorer.
When the Hair begins to fade
Use Joice's Restorer.
When the Hair grows gray
Use Joice’s Restorer.
It will Restore the Hair to its
natural color. |
It will Impart to the Hair life,
strength and beau.y.
It will arrest falling Hair and give
health to the scalp.
And ag a dressing nothing can be
more beautiful and agreeable. It is
elegantly perfumed and renders the
Hair soft, plaint and lifelike. It also
serves to give the Hair that peculiar
richness and color which is always so
essential to a complete toilet. Re
member this preparation is not a dye.
Remember it contains no impurities.
This also remember, all who have
used it are loud in its praise. Every
bottle guaranteed to restore the Hair
to the full natural shade. To the joy
and satisfaetion of all who use it. See
testimonials.
For sale at Dale & Hart's, Mrs. M.
E Joice's Hair Store, 118 South Duke
street, also John T. Joice’s Shaving
Saloon, Market street, York, I’a.
JOHN CUNKLE. GEO. W CUNKLE.
JOHN CUNKLE & SON,
DEALERS IN
Coal and Wood.
Lykens Valley, Wilkes-Barre and other Coal
always on hand.
Office and Yard: 924 ELDER ST., near Boas.
THE
"G BENEETT ASSOGIATION
Rag VBl :
Braxcn Orrice:
321 MARKET STREET,
Harrisburg, Pa.
Secures you a weekly indemoity in
case of sickness or accident, a burial
fund in case of death, and provides
for old age.
The Power of $l.OO.
$l.OO per month pays for a twenty
year endowment of $lOO.OO, includ-
Ing a sick benefit of $5.00 per week.
If you die previously, the $lOO 00 is
psaid to your heirs, immediately, upon
proof ot desth. If you live twenty
years the $lOO.OO is paid to you cash
in hand. ;
For fargher particulars address or
call at office.
Ounly persons between the ages of
five and sixty five years are entitled
to membgrsh_ip.
STATE CAPITAL LIGRT ROUSE,
H. FRALEY,
= DEALER IN =
1 I
Ols, lamps and lamp it
QUEENSWARE, GLASSWARE, AND
Faxcy Houipay Goobs,
307 Broad Street, Harr_isburg.
STATE JOURNAL AGENTS,
LUKE WHITE, SR,
CIGAR AND NEWSPARER EMRORIUM,
419 South Tth Street,
Puoicaperrnia, Pa.
(State Journal for Sale.)
e . -
TONSORIAL ARTIST.
Cigars For Sale.,
126 Wylie Avenue,
Prrrseure, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
T. W. GALE,
TONSORIAL ARTIST,
Cigars For Sale,
1112 Eleventh Avenue,
AvrtooNa, Va.
(State Journal For Sale.)
MRS. E. MARSIIALL,
TOBACCONIST,
4th and South Sts
(State Journal For Sale.)
] N. BUTLER,
SHAVING and HAIR CUTIING SALOON.
South Street, Ilarrisburg, Pa.
_ (State Journal For Sale.)
JAMES MINOR,
Groceries and Sundries,
Hycexia, Steerrox.
(State Journal For Sale.)
RUSSEL THOMAS,
TONSORIAL ARTIST,
CaruisLe, PA.
(State Journal For Sale.)
WILLIAM BOLYAR,
ERIE RESTAURANT,
826 State Street.
: _m(Siagt-e”JouAr_nalr Kor Sale.)
J. G. M. BROWN,
Main Street,
York, Pa.
eSO S TR
I. J. MANN,
O Crry, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
UNION NEWS STAND,
PENN'A R. R. DEPOT,
Harriseora,
____(State Journal Kor Sale.)
T. L. WIIITE,
TONSORIAL ARTIBT,
CuaMBERSBURG, Pa.
___(State Journal For Sale)
WILLIAM HOWARD,
68 Prospect Place,
WiLkes BARre.
___w__(St.ate Jc urnal_l_“_or Sale. )
E. C. LUM,
Mipprerows, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
NEWS STAND,
LOCHIEL HOTEL,
HARRISBURG.
WM. H. CONRAD,
PARK HOTEL,
WiLrLiamsport, Pa.
PHILADELPHIA ANDREADING R. R.
ARRANGEMENT OF PASSENGER TRAINS.
OCTOBER 29th, 1883.
Traing leave lerlnbnrg as follows :
For New York via Allentown, at 7.50 a. m.,
and 1.45 p. m.
For New York via Philadelphia and * Bound
Brook Route,” 6.25, 7.0 a. m. and 1.45 p. m.
¥or Philadelphia at 6.25, 7.50, 9.50 a. m., 1.45
and 4.00 p. m.
For Reading at 5.20, 8.25, 7.50, 950 a. m., 1.45,
4.00 and 8.00 p. m.
For Pottsville at 5.29, 7.50, 9.50 a. m., 1.45 and
4.00 p. m., and via Schuylkill and Susquehanna
branch at 3.00 p. m. For Auburn at B.IV a. m.
For Allentown 5.20, 7.5, 9.50 a. m., 1.45 and
4.00 p. m.
The 7.50 a. m.and 1.45 p.m. trains have through
cars for New York, via Allentown.
SUNDAYS.
For Allentown and way stations at 520 a. m.
and 1.50 p. m.
. £or Reading and way stations 5.2) a.m. and
.50 p. m.
For Philadelphia, 5.20 a. m.
Trains for Harrisburg leave as follows: |
Leave New York via Allentown, at 9.00 a. m.,
1.00 and 5.30 p. m.
Leave New York via * Bound Brook Route,”’
and Phlladolfhh, at 7.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 and
- 5.30 p. m. 12.00 midnight, arriving at Har
risburg at 1.50, 8.20, 9.25 p. m., and 12.10 and 9.40
- @&.m.
Leave Philadelphis at 4.30, 9.50 a. m., 4.00, 5.50
and7.Bs g m.
Leave Pottsville at 6.00, 9.00 a.m,, and 4.40 p.m.
Leave Reading at 5.00, 7.30, 11.59 a. m., 1.27,
8.15, 7.50 and 10.25 p. m.
LeavePottsville via Schuylkill and Susque
hanna branch at 8.20 a. m. and 4.40 p. m.
Leave Allentown at 0,00, 8,40 a. m., 12.15, 4.30
and 9,06 p. m,
SUNDAYS.
Leave New York via Allentown at 5.30 p. m.
Philadelg{nn 6.30 a, m., and 7.45 p. m.
Leave omilng at 7.30 a. m. .mfm.zs p. m.
Leave Allentown at 9.05 p. m.
STEELTON BPBANOH.
Leave Harrisburg for Paxton, Lochiel and
Steeiton dailx. except Sunday, at 5.35, 6.40, 9.35
a.m., 1.85 and 9.40 p. m. ; daily, except Saturday
and Sunday, 5,35 p. m., and on Saturday only,
4.45,6.10 p.m.
Returning, leave Steelton dail{. exoe¥t Sun
day, 6.10, 7.05, 10.00, 11.45 . m., 2.15 and 10.15 p.
m.; daily, except Saturday and Sunday, 8.10 P.
m., and on Saturday only, 5.10, 6.30 g‘ m.
J. E. WOOTEN, C.G.HANCOCK,
General Manager. Gen. Pass. & Ticket Agt
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD
On and after November ISth, 1883, the Pas
senger Trains of the Pennsylvania Railread
Company will depart from Harrisburg and ar
rive at Philadelphia, New York, Pittsbur; and
Erie as follows:
EASTWARD.
Philadeiphia Express dallyusexce?t Mondays)
at 1:20 a. m.. arrives at Philadelphia at 4:25 a.
m., and New York at 7:00 a. m.
Fast Line daily at 4:30 3. w., arrives at Phila
de}lfhla. at 7:50 a. m., and New York 11:20 a. m.
arrisburg Express daily except (Sunday) at
7:00 a. m., arrives at Philadelphia at 10:20 a. m.
and New Yorlk at 1:20 xiv m.
Columbia_Accommedation daily (except Sun
day) at 7:15 a. m., arrives at Philadelphia at
11:45 a. m. and New York at 3:40 {) m-
Lancaster Accommodation daily (oxoext Sun
dafi) at 7:40 & m., arrives at Lancaster 8:55 a. m.
ew York Limited Express of Pullman Palace
Cars dally at 2:25 PP' m., arrives at Philadelphia
at 5:15 p. m. and New York at 7:30 p. m.
Lock Haven Express daily (except Sunday) at
11:50 a. m, arrives at Philadelphia at 3:15 p. m.,
and New York 6:20 p. m,
Johnstown Express daily (except Sunday) at
12:50&). m., arrives at Philadelphia at 5:05 p. m.,
and New York at 8:50 p. m.
Day Express daily at 4:20 p. m., arrives at
Philadelphia at 7:25p. m., and New York at
10:20 p. m.
Harrisburg Accommeodation, via Colnmbia,
daily (except Sunday) at 4:50 p. m., and arrives
at Philadelphia at 9:45 p. m,
Mail Train on Sunday only, 1:00 p. m., arrives
at Philadelphia 5:45 p. m., New York 9:30 p. m.
Middletown Accommodation on Saturday only
5:10 p. m. Daily (except Saturday and Sunday)
6.00 p. m.; every week day at 1:00 p. m.
Mail Express daily at 11:40 p. m., arrives at
Philadelphia 3:05 a. m., and New York at 6:10
a. .
All Through Trains conneet at Jersey City
with boats of “*Brooklyn Annex" for Brookiyn,
N. Y., avoiding double ferriage and journey
htrough New York City.
WESTWARD.
Western Express dai'r at 12:30 a. m., arrives at
Altoona at 4:20 a. 1., and Pittsburg at 8:05 a. m.
- Pacific Express dally at 3:10 a. m., arrives at
Altoona at 7:50 a. m., and Pittsburg at 1:00 p. m.
Chieago Limited Express of Puqlman Palaco
Cars daily at 2:10 E m , arrives at Altoona at
5:35 p m., and Pittsburg 9:00 p. m.
Mail Train daily at 11:10 a. m., arrives at Al
toona at 3:50 p. ~ and Pittsburg 8:45 p. m.
Fast Line daily at 3:15 g m., arrives at Al
toona at 7:20 p- m., ane Pittsburg at 11:30 p. m.
Mifflin Accommodation daily (except Sunday)
at 10:10 a. m., 5:00 and 10:05 p. m., on Sunday at
10:10 a. .
STEELTON TRAINS leave Harrisburg daily
(except Sunday) at 6:45, 7.00, 7:15, 7:40 a. m.,
12:50, 4:50, 11:00 p. m. Daily (excel‘)t Saturday
and Sunday) 5:45 and 6:00 p. m. On Saturdays
only, 5:00 and 5:10 p. m. On Sunda‘.{ only, 1:00 p.
m. Returning, leave Steelton daily (axoobpt.
Sunday: 6:32, 6:57, 8:51, 10:42, 10:59 a. m.; 3:62,
7:12 and 9:41 p. m, Dnlly (except Satm‘d? and
Sunday) 6:10p, m. On batnrdn{ only, 5:15 p. m.
On Sunday only, 8:51 a. m. and 10:59 a. m.
PHILADELPHIA & ERIE R. R.DIVISION.
MAIL TRAIN daily (except Sunday) at 4:20
a. m., arrives at Williamsport at 8:10 a. m., and
Erie at 7:35 p. m.
NIAGARA EXPRESS daile’v (except Sun
day) at 11:15 a. m., arrives at illlamllgort at
2:35 p. m., Lock Haven at 3:55 p. m., and Renovo
5:10 p. m.
LOCK HAVEN ACOCOMMODATION daily
(except Sunday) at 3:25 p. m., arrives at Wil-
Hamsport at 7:0) p. m., and Lock Haven at 8:05
p. m.
Time cards and full information can be ob
tained at the Ticket office at the Station.
J. R. WOOD, General Passenger Agent.
CHAS. E. PUGH, General Manager.
CUM BERLAND VALLEY
RAILROAD.
TIME TABLE.
IN EFFECT NOVEMBER 18, 1883,
DOWN TRAINS,
N TN
| L & |
22 5% 8 2Epe et
38 . § |8 859 |§E
B 2: |& ("B 2"
oy SLY R DYRIE
||| | | ]
Leave— AN A.M.P.M. P.M AMP, M. P.M
Martinsburg... .../ 7 00......3 00 ........ |....
Hagerstown ... ....| 8 00{ 1 35/4 00....| 9 05/....
Greencastle ... ....i 8 25 1584 28....925.,..
Chambersburg. 4 30 8 55, 2 205 00....] 9 50'....
Shippensburg.. 4 53 9 19 2 405 28'..../10 10'....
Newvi11e....... 519 9 41 3 00{5 65!....10 30!....
Car1i51e........ 5 4210 06 3 206 257 3010 501 50
Mechanicsburg 6 (910 33 3 426 558 0011 102 17
Ar. Harrisburg. 6 35 11 Op, 4 067 258 3011 302 55
AMA.R.P. M. P.M A.M'P, M. P.M
e ————————————————— e et e
UP TRAINS,
Aoy g
Zc £ mE [FERS 82t
AC = pas | 1=
358 27 /RR 8% 58|38
280 "4 228% g g
wn . o o | 2oy | .
TR S T .
Leave— AM A.M. A.M. P.M P.M. P.M. P.)
Hnrrisbnr% .. 420 7356113041512 30) 8 656 9
Mechaniesb'g. 4 40/ 8 0411 50'4 42 7 00/ 9 227 00
Carlisle] ...... 5 00/ 8 30,12 10/6 08, 25 9 45| 25
Newville ..... 5 19/ 8 5512 29'5 856'Arr. 'lO 10, Ar.
Shippensburg 5 33 9 1912 486 00'...../10 35/....
Chawmbersb'g.. 8 00/ 9 50 1106 30 ...../111 00'....
Greencastle .. 6 1910 15 1 206 55.... [Ar. |....
Hagvelrstown... 0 4010 46{ 2 057 28i.....}.........
Ar.Martinsb’g Ar. 11 85 3 208 15 eavoslavenaloass
L (AMA.M.P.M. P.MP.M.P. M. P.NM
Dillsburg Passcenger leaves Harrisburg at 8:50
a. m. and 3:10 p. m., arriving at Mechanicsburg
at 920 a, m. and 3:39 p. m. Returning, leaves
Mechanicsburg at 11:153 a. m. and 5:20 p m., ar
rmmf at Harrisburg at 11:48 a. m. and 5:50 p. m.
Dillsburg Dranch trains leave Harrisburg at
8:60 a. m. and 3.10 p. m., arriving at Dlllabugg at
9:50 a. m. and 4:10 p. m. Returning, leave Dills
burg at 6:30 a. m., 10:50 a. m, and 4:50 p. m., ar
riving at Harrisburg at 8:30 a. m., 11:48 8. m. and
5:50 p. m.
New Orlears FExpress and Accommodation
west and Day Express and New York Express
east run daily. All other trains daily except
Sunday.
On Saturday Carlisle Accommodation train
leaves Harrisburg at 5:30 p. m., Mechanicsburg
at 6:00 p. m., arriving at Carlisle ot 6:30 p. m.
South Pennsylvania branch trains leave
Chambersburg at 9:30 a. m., 4:15 p. m., Mercers
hurg at 11:20 a. m. and 5:15 p. “ii' Loudon 12:00 a.
m, and 5:37 p. m., arriving at Richmond at 12:15
P m. and 5:45 p. 1. Returning, leave Richmond
:10 a. m. and 1:15 p. m., Loudon 7:20) a. m. and
1:30 p. m., Mercersburg 7:45 a. m. and 2:10 p. 1.,
arriving at Chambersburg 8:45 a. m. and 3:55
.M.
" South Mountain trains, going south, connect
with trains leaving Harrisburg at 7:35 a. m and
11:30 a. m. and 4:15 p. m* Returning, arrive at
Harrisburg 11:00 a. m., 2:ssand 7:25 p-m. On
Saturday a train connocts with the train leaving
}iarrlsbur’g at 8:55 p. m., and returns Monday to
connect with th the train arriving at Harrisburg
at 6:35 a. m,
Mont Alto trains, going South, conneet with
trains leaving Harrisburg at 7:35 a. m. and 4:15
p. m. Returning, connect with trains arriving
at Harrgsburg at 11:00 a. m. and 7:25 ? m,
Trains on Shenandeali Valley railroad leave
Nagerstown at 7:00 a. m. and 2:00 p. m,, con
nectlng witn trains leaving Harrisburg at 4:20a. ;
m. and 11:20 a. m Returning, conpect with °
trians arriving at Harrisburg at 4:05 p. m and
11:30 r{ m.
A.H. MCULLOUGH, J. F. BOYD,
General Ticket Agent, Superintendert.
JAMES ULARK, General Agent.
HARRIbBUI{G axp POTOMAC
RAILROAD-TIME TARBLE No. 40.
Takes effect Monday, October Ist, 1883.
IASTW'I ATATIONS, WEST'D
Mai‘;Ac.! Mail Ac.
A M- P M| A.M. P.M
8 202 25 Lv. Shipgennhurg. Ar. 12 005 40
8 30,2 35iLv. RMeesburg, F., Lv. 11 505 30
8 352 49 Lv. Jacksonville, F.. Lv. 11 455 28
8 4012 45 Lv. Hays Grove, F., Lv. |ll 405 21
8 472 50 Lv. Doners, F., Lv. 11 355 18
8 502 53 Lv. Longsdorf, ~ Lv. 'll 325 13
8 552 57|Lv. Huntsdale, Lv., 11285 6o
9 013 92 Lv. Moore's Mill, F., Ly. 11 235 04
9 1213 13/Lv. Barnitz, F., Lv. {ll 12.4 43
9173 la}m. Mt. Hully Springs, Lv. (11 (84 48
9193 21{Lv. S. Mnt’n Cross'g, ~ Lv.ll 04 4 45
9 403 42 Lv. lmilinisl»rinf. Lv. !w 5014 30
9 453 47|Lv. Leidighs, F., Lv. (10 44 415
9 503 52|Lv. Brandtville, F., Lv. |lO 39'4 10
9 66!3 58{Ar. M. &D. Junction, Lv. ‘lO 35105
10 00ip.M|Lv. M. & D. Junction, Ar. |.... p.u
10 15\ Ar. Bowmansdale, Ly, o 2%....
AN I
Mail Train leaving Shippensburg 8:20 a. m.
connects with C. V. train arriving at Harrisburg
at 11:00 a. m. Accommodation Train leaving
Shippensburg at 2:25 p. m. conneets with C. V.
train arriving at Harrisburg 5:50 p. m.
Train luvinfi Hnrruburf at 7:3> a. m. will
connect with H., &P. train leaving M. &D.
Junction at 10:09 a. m. Train leaving Harris
burfi at 3:10 B m. connects with H. & P. train
leaving M. & D. Junetion at 4:05 p. m.
Train leaving Shlx,)pcnsbunr at 8:20 a. ™. will
onnect with train leaving S. M.Crossinitor
Carlisle at 9:3> a. m. Train leaving M. & D.
Junection at 10:35 a. m. will connect with train
leaving S. M. Crossing for Carlisie 11:21 a, m.
" qulg stations.
ROB'T. H. MIDDLETON,
Superintendent,
BoiLixG SrRINGS, Pa., Sept, 25, 1383,

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