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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, February 09, 1884, Image 2

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The State Journal.
:;’T__._“‘T/__“_.".._T_.:" —
Publisheda every saturday by
THE JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
e s e
Whree Monthe Hi e e
3ix months - i i i i £l.OO
One Year, in advance, - - 1.5)
fi.‘,i_ if n_ot. in advance, - - 2.00
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1884
T e e G
We take pleasure jin calling the atttention
of our 11:;1-%:-1%: to our advertisers before pur
chasing. The parties who advertise in this
paper are reliable, and should haye ouren
tire patronage. The fact that they patronize
us is an evidence that they are friendly
toward us, and desire our patronage.
Please mention the JOURNAL when you call
State Journal, the only general
newspaper devoted to the interest
of the colored people in the State
of Pennsylvania. Published week
ly, at Harrisburg, Pa.
Note.
Hereafler all subseriptions to Tue.
Srare Joursar will be in advance.
We are now printing the only news
paper devoted to the interest of the
colored people of the State of Penn
sylvamia. That we may be able to
successfully do this, we are compelled
to exact payment in advance. All
bills for back subseription should be
paid without delay.
Wendell Phillips.
With the death of Wendell DPhil
lips passes away one of those glorious
lights slong the line of life that tend
to penetrate and rend the clouds that
o'erhang our existence. Naturally
sympathetic and possessed with high
moral courage, he championed, in
telling eloquence, the cause of the
down trodden and oppressed, and
this with no selfish end in view. IHis
charzcter and attainments were of the
highest. lis time, means and voice
were ever enlisted in the interest of
equity and right, erecting for himeelf
a monument imperishable. When
the announcement of the demise of
guch men reaches us, we lock around
us with anxious inquiry to find one
upon whom we can safely bestow the
honored but now empty manptle:
Along with Gerrit Smith, Charles
Sumner and Lloyd Garrison, Wendell
Phillips sleeps the sleep that kuows
no waking, but he, as they, still lives
in the memory of his noble works
left behind. He bas fully merited
the esteem and the plandits of the
most exacting, and let us hope that
in his transition from his sphere of
usefulness, he has risen to that ever
lasting peerzge and happioess that
awaits the upright and just.
Better Turn the Tide.
The Philadelphia F7¢ss is making
the road very bard for Mayor King
by showing up the weakoess of his
police appointments. Mayer King
like every cther long headed oflice
holder has taken up a priseiple in ap
pointing colored men upon the police
force which makes it a hard obliga;
tion for the colorcd voters of Phila
delphia to discharge. They don’t
want to appear ungrateful and unless
they vote for King they will be. We,
of course, believe in the event cf the
election of Wm. B. Smith that col
ored men will be continued on the
force. Mr. Smith could not afford to
do otherwise unless he wanted to
dig the grave of the Republican
party. Dut this constant recognition
of colored men by Demccrats in
office and the vindication of their
rights by men who are not counted
as there friends, is a threatening
menace to the continuence of Repub
lican rule by the assistance of col
ored votes, and we invite the atten
tion of the Republican party through
out the state to the necessity of turn
ing this tide in their own favor.
Too much undeserved credit has
has spoiled the disposition of many
people, and when they are justly eriti
cised upon overrated accomplishments,
they cannot stand the rub. leople
who appear before the public in what
ever capacity it may be, are open to
criticism. Whatever may be said by
this paper regarding the public actions
of our people, is not said out of malice
or partiality, but is done in all fair
ness, and if at any time we fail to
criticise fairly we are willing to suffer
such condemnation as those deserve
who misrepresent facts,
T
Axoruer crank comes to the front
in Congress, Bennett, of N. C.
Almost 28 fitting a place for him to
come from as the place where he will
probably go to, wants Ccnpgress
to pass a bill to prohibit the inter
marriage of white and colored in the
District of Columbia. Charge this
up to the account of Fred Douglass.
i
Tre necessity of a well organized
political body among colored men in
this State as a means to secure repre
sentation and show to machine poli
ticiaus, and the Republican party as a
whole, that when they reckon without
us they reckon without usis even
admitted by eur best friends.
Cor. Quax's interview lLas been
widely circnlated, and many excepticns
have been taken to his expressions.
POLITICS ABOUT TOWN.
Information Gathered for Our
Readers.
The nameing meetings have pass
ed off quietly and te-night the regu
lar nominees of the Republican party
will be put in nomination for politi
cil preferment, everybody will admit
that the best available material should
be selected to fill the city offices
‘before the people in the comirg
el ction, in some of the wards,oftic-rs
go begaing, it being almost impossi.
ble to get desirable men to ran on
the ticket. The few county offices
have numerous candidates and the
c:nvention will doubtless be spirited.
Delegates, bowever, will not find any
inducement to go contrary to in
structions. Mr. Lynch, the present
incumbent of the Recorder’s office,
asks for a continuance, and as it is an
office where little or no patronage is
distribated, there will not be much
change unless his opponents make a
vigorous fight. Mr. Crone, proprie
tor of the White Hall Hotel, aspires
to the office and counts his friends by
the dozen throughout the county.
We believe that if the Moyers were
up for County Commissioners again
they would get-a black eye from the
colored voters, whieh they would
richly deserve, for during their cntire
term or terms of office they bave
completely ignored the colored vote.
They have kept a man in office as
lock up keeper so long that he got
tired of the office and let the lock-up
go to the demnation bow wows.
County Commissioners are to be
elected, however, and we hope such
men will be seclected as will have
brains broad enough to comprehend
that a factor of the party representing
1,200 votes in the county are entitled
to some of the spoils they continunally
help to capture.
There is not much of a spirit of
contest in the several wards except
ing the Kighth. As usual, politics
over in the Eighth is at fever heat,
but it scems to be among the politi
cians and not the people. The col
ored voters have a large vote in this
ward, and when on gocd terms with
the white Republicans can carry
things to suit themselves. Two ecol
ored men are in the ficld [for the
aldermanship, also the present incum
brnt, A. I'rice; either of these dear
charmers could be "happy were the
other dear charmer away. Both of
the colored aspirants are well known,
Msj. J. W. Simpson for his chronic
desire to hold office, and like Bilkin’s
boy always up; George Gailbreath
for his faithfulness to the machine
and the reputation for dealing in
mysterious politics. The pecple feel
that they have not mach choice, and
will act on the principle that cof two
devils—choose the smallest one. W hat
object Alderman Price has for running
is open to but one conclusion, and
that is to @ssist the Democaatic can
didate, Mr. Wolfinger, as Mr. Price
has frequently stated that he did not
want the office. A strong feeling ex
ists against Prof. Wm. Iloward Day
for School Director, and it is probable
he will be left off the tickat. The
Professor does not scem to have any
desire to continue in the office, and if
he wants to save himself from the
humiliation of defeat, it would be safe
for him to remain off. Mr. Samuel
Wiestling and Amos Young are both
named for School Directors, either of
which wounld make excellent oflicials.
C. W. Harley is up for the constable
ship in this ward, and has an oppo
nent in Noah Pinkney. Thereis a dis
position to lay Harley upon the
board, but Pinkney basn't got sufli
cient knowledge of the machine to
defeat so old a politician as Harly. It
cannot be said, however, that Harley
is the choice of the people.
Tue colored men of Pennsylvania
can form an iuca of what importance
the machine covsiders them. DBat
would it be different if there was
not a machine?
——— e e() e e
Morrison’s tariff bill is a sticker
to the Democratic party as it fails to
meet the views of many of the lead
ing Democrats.
AR s P i
Alterations are being made in the open
hearth furnace, and will be finished this
week, when this additional industry will
be put to work.
There has never been a time in the
history of the borough when cverything
appeared in so flourishing a condition.
The mackinery for the new flouring
mill will arrive next week. It is being
manufactured in Wilmington, Delaware.
Mr. John T. Curwan, assistant to Prof.
M’Ginnes, of the high school, is confined
to his room by sickness. Miss Katie Sieg
is filling his position in the school.
The Philadelphia and Reading railroad
company have awarded the contract for
the building of a depot at this point to
Mr. John Coder, the builder of our new
flouring miil.
The borough has been visited during
the week by Indian chiefiians, politicians
and other distinguished guests. The In
dians were sight-seeking, but the politi
cians were feeling the pulse of some of
the old time wire-pullers in this section.
It is “‘just a little bit too early yei” to
commence the fall campaign. Good
men will come to the front without start
ing up a factional fight six months before
there is any necessity for nominating a
ticket. It is the old way, but disaster
has been met by it, and surer and safer
methods shonhg be adopted. "
FACTS OF HISTORY.
Important Events—Births and Deaths.
TaURsDAY, February 7.—Georgia set
tled, 1733. In November, 1732, General
Oglethorpe, commiserating the wretched
condition of prisoners for debt that
crowded the English prisons, proposed to
Parliament the founding of a colony in
America for the benefit of that unfor
tunate class. A royal charter was ob
tained for a corporation *‘in trust for the
poor.”’ Oglethorpe left England with 120
to found, under the provision of the char
ter, a colony in the disputed territory
south of the Savannab, to be called
Georgia, in honor of the King. He laud
the foundation of the fature State, Feb
ruary 7, 1733, upon Yamacan Bluff, and
called the place Savannal,
Charles Dickens born 1812. Mrs. Rad
cliffe, the romancist of -‘The Mysteries
of Udolpho,”” “The Romance of the For
est,”” and other novels of the old blood
curdling school, died 1823. There are
few who would forego the memories of
their first revels in these romances. Sir
Walter Scott, notwithstanding all the
extravagances of Mrs. Radcliffe’s stories,
says: ‘‘The praise may be claimed for
her having been the first to introduce into
her productions a beautiful and fanciful
tone of natural description and impres
sive narrative which had hitherto been
exclusively applied to peetry.”’
Born—Rev. Sit Henry Moncrieft, D.D.,
1750.
Died—James, Earl of Moray (the Bon
ny), murdered 1592. IHenry Neele, poet,
1828. Mr. Bourrienne, secretary to Na
poleon Bonaparte, died in a madhouse at
Cacen, Normandy, 1834.
KEYSTONE BRIEFS.
Charles Owens, a miner at the Central
colliery at Scranton, was crushed to death
by falling roof rock yesterday.
Four men were killed and several in
jured by the falling walls of & burning
building at Allentown yesterday.
The bouse of Frederick Gardner, in
Upper Yoder township, Cambria county,
was recently robbed of $lOO in gold.
A coffin six feet long, two feet and
eleven inches wide and twenty-one inches
deep has been made for the body of John
Knecht, who died recently at Durham,
near Easton. The weight of the de
ceased is 450 pounds,
The trustees of the Evangelical Asso
ciation Schuylkill Seminary met in Read
ing yesterday. The proposition of Colo
nel Lack, of Fredericsburg, Pa., to re
move the seminary to that place, he be
ing willing to donate $lO,OOO towards the
cause, will be considered, and it is
thought will be accepted. However, the
removal will not be made until next year.
PRIMARY ELECTIONS.
A Coirespondent Gives the Law Controll
ing Them,
Epitor TELEGRAPH :—As the time is
approaching for the holding of the prim
ary election of the Republican party for
the nomination of supervisors and the
several ward officers, I ask that you give
this communication a place in your col
umns, as it may tend to more cnlighten
all as to who are entitled to vote at said
eleetion.
Section 4 of the act of June 8, 1881,
provides that “if any person not qualified
to vote at a general clection shall vote at
a nominating election held by any politi
cal party o 5% ¥ i® 0% Lhe or they
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on
conviction shall be fined not exceeding
the sum of two hundred dollars and im
prisoned for a term of time not exceeding
three months.”
It will be seen from reading the above
section that a person must possess all the
qualifications required of him to vote at
a general election before he can cast a
lawful ballot at a primary clection. The
act of June 20, 1881, provides further
that a person must also be qualified in ac
cordance with the rules adopted for the
government of primary elections by the
political party holding the same. The
rules adopted for the governing of the
primary elections of the Republican
party of this city require among other
things, that a person must have voted the
Republican ticket at the preceeding
general clection before he can vote at a
primary election. *“The judge maty ad
minister the oath to any elector offering
to vote as to his qualifications to vote at
such election.’’
The officers conducting a primary clec
tion shall, before entering upon the dis
charge of their duties severally take and
subscribe to an oath or aflirmation that
they will impartially and faithfully per
form their duties in accordance with the
laws and Constitution of the State and the
rules and regulation adopted for the gov
erning of said primary elections, meet
ings, &c. Any such oflicer presuming to
act in such capacity before the taking and
subseribing to the oath or affirmation as
aforesaid, or shall willfully dis
regard the same by knowingly
rejecting the vote of a person entitled to
vote as aforesaid, or shall be gulty of
of any wilfull fraud by destroying or de
facing ballots, adding ballots otber than
those lawfully voted, stufling the ballot
box, or by making false returns, shall be
guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon con
viction shall be fined not exceeding two
hundred dollars for the first two offenses
and not exceeding five hundred dollars
and imprisonment net exceeding one year,
or both, at the discretion of the court, for
the last-named offense.
It will be seen from the above that the
law in relation te the holding of primary
elections is as stringent as the law in re
gard to the helding of general elections,
and there can be no good reason why it
cannot be conducted just as honestly. I
hope that all good citizens will see that
the law is strietly enforced, and that no
one will be allowed to vote unless he
possesses the necessary qualifications.
D, W, B,
— e @) et
The sale of reserved seats will com
mence to-morrow (Friday) morning at
9 o’clock. at Dunkle’s store. Those of
your citizens who desire tickets would do
well to have their seats reserved early.
The hall is small and will be filled to
overflowing. The Choral numbers over
sixty voices and have been well trained.
The Democrats of the borough have
become disheartened. Whether it is the
‘‘tariff’ or some other heartache is not
known. For two years they had main
tained a club room, met regularly, and
appeared well organized, but alas, yester
day their furniture and traps were taken
from Litch’s hall and stored in ex-burgess
Confer's warehouse. The clubis‘‘busted.”’
The Republicans will hold their nam
ing and nominating meetings on Saturday
evening. 'There is considerable agitation
on several of the positions, but the best
ef feeling exists, and the ticket nominated
will be elected.
Fires will be lighted in the new furnace,
known as No. 3, of the Pennsylvania
Steel company to-night. The furnace is
supplied with all the latest improved ap
pliances, and is one of the largest in the
State. The engines, pumps and other
paraphernalia have been tested and found
to work satisfactorily.
The Merchant mill is crowded with
orders and it is determined to put on a
double turn of workmen. The night
turn will start in to-night.
There is unusual activity in all the de
partments, excepting the frog shop,
which is very short ot work.
The starting of No. 3 furnace and the
extra force in the merchant mill will in.
crease the number of workmen,
G.U.0.00f O. F.
Annual Report of Brotherly Love
Lodge for the Year 1883.
Receipt5—t0ta1..............c0nee..n... 81,260 36
Expended for 5ick.............. $283 50
Expended for aged persons..... 48 00
Expended for funerals of broth
ers, wives and children....... 230 00
Expended for charity.......... 1000
Il::lxpongg gorreal SEERES. . ..o }E}g}
I or current expenses i SR
'1‘:t.p:1expended....‘.....................1,14190
Balance in treasury..........cceeooomoeo 78 41
ASSETTS.
Real e5tate................... 1,300 CO
Lodgefixturcs.......... 500 00
Bonds and other securities. . 229 (0
Balance cash in treasury..... 78 41
Unpaltdnens. ...l e 212 35
RN s b o oo s SRR
LIABILITIES.
Due P.G. M. Council N 0.7 G.
LA o e 200 00
Due Household of Ruth No. 1
S Naa ¥ . ... 110 00
Due on Repairing ha 11....... 59 51
i e 369 51
LOSSES.
Non payment of due 5......... $7O 11
TR DL In e inaensiie . B
RN s s S 18
B N hivcici i iraknibacisinatnininn ok
SDEReRS Dlaed . L i G e 19
DEaTsdonsased .. . .. b oS
Bloshirs With deoensad. . b ciiiiieiesvnnss <
Brothers children aeceased.......ccconeeeeees 2
Respectfully submitted,
BT b
HOWARD & MARSHALL,
Dealers in
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS,
VEGETAB'LES AND OYSTERS,
No. 8. Market Sq. HARRISBURG, Pa.
HATS, CAPS, TRUNKS, GLOVES AND
UMBRELLAS,
s() e
L H KRKINNARD,
At 305 Broad Street, sells these goods
at the lowest prices. The stock
is large, varied and fresh;
and satisfretion is guar
anteed to all who buy,
HOLIDAY GOODS.
UHLER BROS.,
116 MARKET STREET.
China, Glass and Queensware.
Call and exa;;l—e our Stock.
MRS. E. MARSHAILL,
TOBACCONIST,
4th and South Sts.,
Having just opened the above establish
ment with a full supply of the best
brands of smoking and chewing
tobaccos, we desire your pa
tronage. Giveusa trial,
(JourxnaL for Sale.)
g L TEIMET LA,
-——DEALER IN—
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS PRODUCE,
Queensware, Glassware, &c.
Cor. Fourth and Walnut Streets
HARRISBURG, PA.
NEW
GROCHRY.
The undersigned has opened a
grocery store at
No. 807 North Third Street,
with a full supply of staple and fancy
groceries,
Pure Spices, Coffee and Tea,
SUCARS,
CANNED GOODS, CRACKERS,
Ete., Ete. & Goods delivered to al
parts of the city.
H. LUTZ, 807 N. THIRD ST.
LARGEST AND MOST COM
PLETE ASSORTMENT OF
GENT" FURNISHING
GOODS IN THE
CITY.
e )
Neckwear, Gloves, Shirts, Underwear of all
styles, cheap Canes: also Gold Headed
Canes. Umbrellas—Silk, Alpaca and
Gingham, Completeline of Gents’
Jewelry of all novelties. Shirts
made to order a Specialty.: Under the
Jones House, No. 207 Market Street.
. Segelbaun
L.A,Segelbaum,
C. H. OSSMAN,
Choice and Stanle Groceries
Aiways on hand, Fine assortment of New
Raisins, Prunes, Oitrons, Nuts, &e. Just
received an endless variety of Can
ned Goods. Give us a call for
Holiday Goeods.
Corxer State axp FiLpert STREETS
FOR SALL.
Ax Orp Esraprisuep
FOUR-CEH ALK
BARBER SHOP
First Class in every respect. The
best location in the city. Do
ing a good business.
Goop Reasoxs For SerLniNG,
Call on or address,
T. W. GALE,
1112 Eleventh av., Altoona, Pa.
W. A. KEISTER,
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES, QUEENSWARE
AND NOTIONS, Cheap.
Opposite Market House,
SteeLToN, Pa.
LUTHER R. KELKER,
WIHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
DUILDEAS', SADSLERS' AND COACK BARWARL
y Nebdd 9
ITRON, STEREL,
and Mshaes” o, Pain, Ol Class, &
Pumers” and Mchawiss’ Tools, Painds, (il Class, é.
Muailory, Wheeler & Co.'s Locks, Chesapeake Nails,
Lester & Rogers’ Seroll Saws, Sargents Shelf Ilardware,
Sarven and Plain ITub Wheels, Porter’s Door Corner Irons
G. D. Wetherill & Co.’s 'ure Lsad.
N. Y. Enamel Paint Co.’s Ready Mixed Paint. The best and cheap
est in the market. Fully warranted.
Luther R. Kelker, 6% Market Square, Harrisburg, Pa.
P. O. Box 114
Q 0 TO
ROSHON'S NEW GALLERY
To have your Photographs taken,
328 MARKET STREET.
Come in the forenoon, if possible. Respectfully,
i v
¢.Y Titsoor.
GEORGE H. SOURBIIR,
UNIBEEREIL VA -KK Hibs .
And Dealer in
FINE FURNITURE.
334,2336 and 338 Broad Street, Harrisburg. Pa.
g5~ Black Cloth Cagkets for $65, trim.med as desired.
No extra charge for Black or White Hearse.
1210 NORTH_?’_ILIRD STREET.
RED FPROINT.
A B. WOCES,
WALL PAPER & WINDOW SHADES.
R HRHTD P'R OIN TI.
41883. 1883.
FALL STOCK OF
MY
CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, &C.
— NOW OPEN AT——
3
N A L
ON MARKET STREET, NEAR THE RIVER BRIDGE,
HARRISBURG, PEININ'A.
We always sell good goods at the very LOWEST CASH
PRICES. OIL CLOTHS, our stock never was
so full of Handsome Patterns.
F. W. YINGST, 111 MARKET., ST., NEAR FRONT.
CHRISTMAS GOOODS
2O RO oS, J ) P,
IN ENDLESS VARIETY AT
HAMMERSLEY’'S CHINA HALL.
Decorated China, Dinner and Tea Sets; Decorated Chamber Sets; lavi
land’s China, Fish, Fruit and Berry Sets. Fine Table Lamps; Fine
Hanging Lamps; Foreign and Domestic Glassware, Colored, Crys
tal and Engraved. We‘respeclfuily ask an examication of
our stock and prices.
HAMMEBERSLEY & CO.,
114 Market Street, Harrisburg, Pa.
Near the Bridge. Don't Forget the Number.
36 MATHEHERS 306
FASHIONABLE
36 N. SECOND STREET, CORNER WALNUT,
HARDWARE. The Latest Style.
PAINTS. The Best Assortment,
OILS. The Lowest Prices.
GLASS, The Largest Stoc!~
CALL AND WE WILIL PROVE IT.
HENRY CILBERT & SON,
. 219 Market Street, Harrishurg.

D. C. BURNITE'S
FALLERY OF ART,
NO. 16 NORTH THIRD STREET, HARRISBURG, PA,
Executes Photographs in the most artistic style and finish. Crayons,
Boudoirs, Panels, Cabinets and Cards. Life-Size Crayon Portraits
a Specialty.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED,
The Latest Style.
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Has a large and
increasing circu
lation, and is the
only paper man
aged by colored
men and devoted
to the interest of
the colored peo
ple of the State
of Pennsylvania.
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Invites special
attention to their
Job Office, where
first - class Book
and Job Printing
of every descrip
tion is neatly
done e
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Is the only me
dium through
which the senti
ments of the col
ored people can
be obtained.
dium
which
ments

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