OCR Interpretation


The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, March 22, 1884, Image 3

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83027086/1884-03-22/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

e
! T T \
BEAUTIEUL FLORIDA.
THE MECCA OF THE VALETUDINA
RIAN,
Graphic Description, from the Pen of a
Harrisburger, of the City of St. Augus
tine, the Winter Resort of Seekers
for izealthand Pleasure—A Para
dise of Peaceful Rest—&e.
Sl. AUvGUSTINE, Fla., March 17.—The
one thing of Florid: is the climate, and
during the past three weeks, while you
have been alternately freezing and shiv
ering, the weather here has been reason
ably satisfactory—the average thermome
ter about 65°, We have had days when,
in the shade, the thermometer indicated
86°, and several times when it went as |
low as 50, but the average is about as T
state it. But fow cloudy days—most of
the time clear, and while cool enough to
be bracing, sufliciently warm to entice the
invalid out of deors and encourage open
air exercise. Twice, during our stay
here, there have been changes of 20° in
as many minutes—the thermometer fall
ing each time from 80° 1o 60° ; but the
rapid changes do not injuriously affect
one as at the North. This is the heighth
of the season here—hotels and boarding
houses are overtlowing. In the carly
winter the flow of travel is up the St,
Johns to Enterpiise, Sandfoid and points
beyond, along the Halifax and Indian
rivers, through the interior further south,
and up the Ocklawaha, with its romantic
boat ride. DBut now the tide has turned
northward, and most people stop to see
the oldest city of the Union before they
return North The gnaint narrow streets
are filled with tourists, earriages, coupes
and wagons of all kinds. Saddle horses
stand for hire along the sea wall, yachts,
big and little, with countless row’ boats,
dot the bay, nurses and children roam
in the plaza, scores of men and women
line the ramparts of the old fort, and
leisurely loiier on its inside, while hun
dreds enjoy themselves fishing (which is
excellent) or roaming on the north or
south beach of the not distant ocean. The
old town is throbbing with new life. It
is the progress of the ninetecenth century
dispelling the darkness of the sixteenth—
the present holding high carnival with
the past, under the very shadow of the
ancient cathedral, whose bells, in vain,
try to ring away the civilization of the
times. Ring on, untique bells, ring out
your hallelujahs in memory of ancient
customs and glories faded never to re
turn ! The living atmosphere of to-day,
the laughing waters from the fountain in
the plaza hard by, the cool, gentle breezes
from the sea rwurmur a perpetual and
convincing answer to the idolatry of the
past. Orange trees are in full bloom, and
the yards and gardens are fragrant with
numberless roses ; children are selling
bunches of yellow jessamine, and violets, |
white and blue, while the woods are car- |
peted with pretty mosses and beautiful |
wild flowers. No malaria here. Itisa |
place of rest—peaceful rest. Real estate |
1s advancing, and people predict a great |
future for the “ancient ecity.”” Over one |
thousand Northerners are here now— |
mostly from New York, Boston and the |
cold Northwest. |
The spring term of the circuit court of |
this county, Judge Baker, of Jackson
ville, presiding, was in session here last |
week. The judge is a fine looking man, |
and said to be a good lawyer. e deliv- |
ered, the papers say, a very able and |
lucid charge to the grand jury, who, after
deliberating several hours, came into
court and reported that they had no busi
ness and were discharged, His Honor
complimenting them in generous terms
for their arduous labor well performed.
This would be a good place to send
brother M’ Carrell. e
TR
THE PRESIDENT ON PORTER.
Indications That the ‘Retief Mill Will be
Vetoed,
By Associated Yress,
New Yorx, March 20.—Washinggon
specials to the Zeening Post say that at
the Executive mansion a few days since
reference was made to the Fitz John Por
ter biil. Various features of the biil
were discussed, when the President
talked freely of the debates in Congress. |
Among other things he said that the jeal
ousy Dbetween Porter and « Pope
had been very great, and was not
to be approved ; that on pardoning
Porter he had restored hin to his civil
rights, and that he had not seen anything
in the evidence that had been presented,
whether new or old, to justify placing |
him back in the army. The suggestion |
was made to the Prezident that a veto |
would = mot| | improve | his Presi.
dential prospects in Minnesota and |
in some other quarters, where|
Porter was sai€ to have friends. |
The President took no notice of this sug- |
gestion, but said that he entertained |
these views, and did not object to hav- |
ine them known., .
By Associated Press
THE BUBBLING BUCKNEK.
A Denlial that is Choked by an Approval of
the Thing Denied.
Rpecial to the TELEGRAPH,
WasHrNaToN, March 20.—Representa
tive Buckner, of Missouri, who verified a
recent interview with him on the tariff
question by attempting to deny it, is
hearing from his constituents in I\{issonri
supporting his course and deprecating the
conduct of the Democrats in. Congress in
undertaking to carry out a free-trade pro
gramme. Missouri is the first but
will 'mot be the @ last| Southern
Btate to make itself heard
on the side of protection., If the
Bourbon leaders do not look out there
will be no solid South. Itisnow in order
for Representative Buckner 4 deny his
denial and admit that he dié warn Car
lisle against countenancing an agitation
of the tariff, which Carlisle promised,
which won his vote, and which he has
now ignored. K.
e 1 )ee et
GEN. GORDON DISAPPOINTED.
The Egyptian Mln‘ister of War to Go to
His Rescue.
By Associated Press.
Parts, March 20.—The Figaro news
paper has a dispatch from Cairo this
morning, which says General Gordon
has told the French consil 2t Khartoum
that Lie is disappointed in what he has been
able to accomplish. He said it would be
impossible for him to defend the place
against the advapcing tribes. It is stated
in Cairo that Abdel Kader Huassan, Min
ister of War, will bz sept to the rescue
of General Gordon.
e ) e ) ee,
GOV. HOADLY PUBLISHES A DENIAL
Corvmsus, 0., March 20.—Governor
Hoadly yesterday furnished for publica
tion a card addressed ‘“To the people of
Ohio and the charitable elsewhere who
have furnished money or sapplies for the
relief of the sufferers b{ the floods in the
Ohio river,” in which he authoritatively
denies the charges of misconduct agninst
the members of the Ohio State relief com
mission appointed by him to distribute
the charity of the State.
SINGULAR ACCIDENT TO A BOY,
Du Boss, Pa., March 20.—While walk
ing along the sireet in Pennfield on
Thuesday, with an open knife in his hand,
4 boy named Young fell and plunged the
Wweapon through his heart, causing in
stant death,
A
CHILDEEN POISONED BY MISTAKE,
Lovisvirre, March 20.—Four children
of G. D. Alsop, living mear this city,
Were given opium yesterday by théir
mother in mistake for powdered rhubarb.
Two have died and the others are not ex-
Pected to recover,
% AN (ILD_B_'!.‘OBY.
| How Two Men Sentenced to Death, Were
Saved From the Gallows.
Riehard Carr, an octogenarian, who
died recently at Erie, Pa., lived in his
youth at Victoria, a Canadian village just
across the lake. About fifty-five years
ago Carr and auotlrer poor man named
Smith stole an ox, and were tried and
convicted, a jury of twelve sentencing
them to death. The Rev. John Ryerson,
the spiritual advisor of the con(femned
men, and Dr. Rolf, who were opposed to
thelt being punishable with death, sym
pathized with them, and determinetf on
making an effort to save their lives. Dr.
‘Rolf made a horseback journey to To
ronto, and interceded with the Govern
~ment for a pardon or reprieve. He cal
culated to return before the hour fixed
for the cxecution, but was greatly de
layed. The Rev. Mr. Ryeson had, how
ever, determined to delay the execution
until Dr. Rolf returned, andactually con
tinued his final prayer from the gallows
for more than an hoir and a half, and
hever gave up till Dr. Rolf arrived with
the reprieve. When he reached the foot
of the gallows he was too exhausted to
speak or move, but 2 man in the crowd
snatched the document from his hand
and, mounfng on the back of the horse,
shouted ‘Reprieve!” The Rev. Mr
Ryeson was as much exhausted by his
praying against time as the bearer of the
reprieve, but the two afterwards greatly
rejoiced at ihe suceess of their plan to
give the ox thieves an opportunity for
repentance. Carr abandoned Canada af
ter his marrow escape, and ended his
days, after a long lfe, in the State of
Pennsylvania. His remains were taken
to Canada for interment.
“¥FRITZ, LET FLY!”
The great fifty-ton hammer in Krupp’s
works at Essen gained its name, ‘‘Unser
Fritz,” and the inscription it bears,
“Fritz, let fly ! in the following man
ner : When, 1n 1877, the Emperor Wil
liam visited Essen, this steam hammer
attracted his attention. Krupp presented
him to the machinist, Fritz, who, he said,
handled the hammer with such nicety
and precision as not to injure or touch an
object placed in the center of the block.
The Emperor at once put his diamond
studded watch on the spot indicated, and
beckoned 1o the machinist to set the ham
mer in motion. Fritz hesitated, out of
consideration for the precious object, but
Krupp urged him on by saying: ™ “Fritz,
Jet iy I Down camec the hammer, and
the watch remained untouched. The
Ewperor gave it to the machinist as a
souvenir, and Krupp added 1,000 marks
to the present. .
SOCIETY IN MANITOBA,
From a Winnipeg Letter.
It must bea pretty difficult person who
can’t be pleased with the entertainment
offered at a Manitoba sociable. A meet
ing of Sunday school teachers was held
a few evenings ago at an up-town book
store, and a very cnjoyable evening was
spent. The meeting opened with prayer
and singing, after which the guests par
took of coffee and cake. Dancing fol
lowed, and then the party settled down
to a quiet gamc‘lof euchre and whist. After
the night was far spent and the dawn was
at hand Mr. Richardson proposed that
they should all unite in singing a hymn
—“Sun of My Soul, Thou Saviour Dear.”’
This was done, and the guests departed
well pleased with the night's entertain
ment. Everybody’s taste was considered,
which is the only sure way of having a
good time of it.
A BROTHER KILLS HIS SISTER.
Jack Hirsch, a farmer living near Ba
ker’s Station, nine miles south of Nasi
ville, Tennessee, killed his sister Rose on
the night of the 4th inst., after a hand
to hand encounter lasting longer than an
hour. The brother and sister have re
cently had many quarrels, and they
finally agreed to settle it with knives.
They locked themselves in a room and
fought like demons until Rose bled to
death. It is reported her brother then
buried her body, no one knows where,
and has fled to Texas, having previously
bought a ticket. Twelve_years ago the
futher of the two became a convert from
Judaism to the Baptist faith. Rose bit
terly lamented her father’s apostacy, and
her mind became affected. She was a
tall, dark, handsome Jewess, about thirty
years of age.
AN JILL-FATED FAMILY.
Last summer the wife of Benjamin
Smitd, of Hancock, Delaware county, N.
Y., was so badly injured by a runaway
horse that she died ina few hours. After
her death Smith and his son James, aged
16, continued to live in Hancock. Two
weeks ago the father was driving on a
steep hill near the village with a load of
bark. He fell from the load in some way,
and one runner of his sled passed over his
head, crushing him to death. The son
then went to live with a married sister at
Lordville, a neighboring village. Last
Saturday he stole a ride on the caboose of
a freight train, on the Erie railway, to
Hancock, «The train did not stop at the
station. Young Smith jumped from the
train, and, falling beneath the wheels of
the cahoose, was instantly killed.
——————
PENNSYLVANIA LUMBER PRODUCTS.
RocuesTEr, N. Y., March 20.—Last
evening a party of the heaviest lumber
capitalists in Central and Western New
York returned from a trip over the
Rochester and Pittsburg road to the
great lumber districts in Southern and
Western Pennsylvania. They claim to
bave gained control of the products of
that section, which will hereafter reach
the seabord by way of New York city
instead of Philadelphia, as heretofore.
—_——— — @
A TOBACCO FACTORY BURNED.
By Assoeiated Press.
LANCASTER, Pa., March 20.—S. M.
Long’s tobacco establishment, at Man
heim, was destroyed by fire this morning,
together with over two hundred cases of
tobacco and a large quantity of manu
factured <igars. li_oss, $35,000. Insur
auce, $22,000. -
e e )e@) e ey e
GASTRONOMICG O SSIP,
From the IHotel Mai!l,
The coming month will be last for oys
ters.
The early salad maker now catches the
lettuce.
Early asparagus has, of necessity, to go
on toast.
Mince pies of the vintage of 1883 are still
in season.
Yet a ltttle while and soft-shell crabs
will be with us again.
Where ignorance is bliss, the American
sardine takes the lemon.
New England apple dumplings are a
yard wide and all dough.
“Batter cake, batter cake, you've bad
your day—Db. c., b. c., go away.”
Florida oranges are very abundant—
in fact. no family should be without them.
Southern vegetables are becoming more
and more abundant, and of better quality,
too.
Terrapin are no longer regarded as a
gastronomic novelty by our blase epi
cures.
Noah's family is believed to have in
vented tapioca pudding, and it has been
served at hotels ever since.
The newest salad is made of sliced ap
ples with sherry wine. Few people de
sire to be helped a secoad time.
Somethin (%flnew in puddings is one made
entirely of different varieties of nuts and
with a deep layer of icing on top.
The less sweets at dinner, says a gastro
nomic autkority, the better for digestion.
- But suppose old digestion isn’t invited?
l POSTAL TELEGRAPHY.
Proposition Made byn:n'. George D. Rob
e .
WasHINGTON, March 20.—George D
Roberts, representing the Postal Tele
graph company, appeared before a sub
committee of the Senate Committee on
Posteffices and Post Roads gesterday and
submitted a proposition directing the
Postmaster General to enter into a con
! tract with the Postal Telegraph company.
The conditions embraced in the proposi
tion include an agreement to transmit all
messages delivered to the Postal Tele
graph company by the Postoffice Depart
ment over snuch routes as are stipulated in
the contract, the lines to be established
within a specified period. The rate to be
charged is twenty-five cents for all mes.
sages of twenty words or less transmitted
between towns in the Atlantic division,
and ten cents for each additional ten
words; the rates of transmission between
towns in the Atlantic division and towns
in the Pacific division shall be double the
former amount.
CURRENT POLITICS.
The result of the primaries in Philade!-
phia is so uncertain that authorities differ
as to which faction won the victorg.
Congressman Beiford says ex-Senator
Conkling woeuld support Mr. Blaine if the
latter was nominated for President.
In North Carolina the Liberals and Re
publicans propose to amalgamate against
the Bourbons. Arthur is fixe favorite.
The Democrats of Butler county, Pa.,
yesterday elected delegates to the State
Convention and instructed them to vote
for Randall.
The Senate of Virginia passed a reso
lution that its formal request to Senator
Mahone to resign be read in the United
States Senate.
The Democrats of Rhode Island yes
terday nominated a full State ticket,
headed by Thos. W. Segar for Governor
and Amasa Sprague for Lieutenant Gov
ernor. Delegates to the National Con
veation were also chosen.
A convention of the National party of
the State of New Jersey has been called
to meet at Trenton on April 23, for the
purpose of electing four delegates and
four alternates from the State at large to
the National Convention, to be held at
Indianapolis May 28.
The Republicans of York county, Pa.,
yesterday elected delegates to the State
Convention, who were instructed for Gen.
Beaver for Congressman-at-Large and for
Captain W. H. Lanius as delegate forthe
county to Chicago. Thke delegates are
also to choose a Presidential elector. The
platform earnestly pronounces for Blaine.
WRETCHEDNESS AT MAHANOY CITY.
Manaxoy City, March 20.—The bor
ough council here held a meeting on
Tuesday night, at'which a committee was
appointed to investigate the complaints of
the citizens against the manner in which
Polanders and Hungarians are huddled
together in buildings not fit for habita
tion. The committee visited nearly all
the places yesterday and found the peo
ple and their wietched hovels in a filthy
and unhealthy condition. In one room
was found thirteen men, one¢ woman and
a child. In nearly every place visited
almost as bad a state of a&:airs was found.
The council propose to pass an ordinance
to prevent more than three or four from
occupying the same dwelling.
MAORI KING WILL VISIT ENGLAND,
By Associated Press.
Loxpox, March 20.—The Maori King
will sail from Auckland for England by
way of San Francisco on April Ist.
e@) e ) e
A MORTGAGE FOR A MILLION.
UxioxTowN, March 20.—The largest
mortgage ever recorded in Fayette county
was entered in the Recorder’s office here
yesterday. It was for one million dol
lars and was given by the Chicago and
Connellsville Coke and Iron company,
of which Judge Leisenring, of Mauch
Chunk, is president, and whose works
are located at East af West Leisenring,
this county. The company owns eight
thousand acres of coal land here, which
they are developing with eight hundred
coke ovens. The mortgage is given in
favaor of the Fidelity Trust and Safe De
posit and Insurance company, of Philadel
phia, to secure bonds to the amount of
81,000,000 issued by the coke company.
The bonds bear six per cent. and are re
deemable in five or fifteen years. The
document was executed in Philadelphia
March 14.
THE JAS. CARNEY CASE.
By Associated Press.
Asurnanp, Pa., March 20.—The coro
ner’s jury. in the case of Jas. Carney,who
died yesterday after being struck by Jas.
M’Fadden, found that deceased died of a
complication of diseases, though death
may have béen hastened by M’Fadden’s
blow.
A STORY OF MURDER DENIED.
By Associated Press.
NasaviLLE, Tenn., March 20.—There
is no foundation for the statement made
in the special dispatches sent from here
on the 18th inst. that two men had been
shot and killed near Hatsburg by another
man with whom they were playing cards.
FIRE IN TEXAS.
By Associated Press.
GarLvestoN, March 20. — Howard’s
grocery, Pendleton’s general store room
and a saloon were burned yesterday at
Whitewright, Gayson connty. Loss $30,-
000.
A LOVER COMMITS SUICIDE.
Ixpraxarornis, Ind., March R2O.—W,
M. Dane, twenty years old, of Bentoa
ville, Fayette county. became enamored
of a thirteen-year-old girl named Ada
Swift. Her parents objected to his suit,
and on Saturday night Dane purchased
two ounces of laudanum, giving Ada one
half and swallowing the other half him
self. The poison failed to have a fatal
effect in either case, being an overdose.
The father of the girl had Dane arrested.
On Tuesday night Dane procured a pistol
and killed himsels.
WAS IT AN ACCIDENT.
By Associated Press.
Bircawoop, Tenn., March 20.—James
Bowens shot and kilied Miss Roak last
night while handling a pistol. He had
taken her home from church.
PRESS OPINIONS. |
Tue Philadelphia News says that the
building “boom’’ has opened lively in
that city.
Tws information is from the Philadel:
phia Call: Jay Gould has looked Cuba
over, and concluded not to buy it.
Taa West Chester Republican rises to
remark that “the Democratic party is for
frce trade, but not in favor of a free bal-
L.’
Tue Wilkes-Barre Record is of the
opinion ‘‘that public sentiment is crystal
izing against the indiscriminate use of in
toxicants.”’
TrE Scranton Republican says of Car
lisle’s speech that it ‘‘was weak and il
logical, but there was not a particle of
protection in it.”’
_Tue Pittsburg Telegavk gives this
warning : Those of both sexes who have
developed a special fondness for the brand
ot candy called “‘rock and rye,”’ will be
startied to learn that every two pounds it
contains enough of that deadly drug,
fusel oil. to produce the death of anadult.
Tue Richmond State foams at the
mouth like a dog with the rabies be
cause, as it says, Secretary Lincoln has
declared that he will not agree that Fitz
John Porter shall be restored so lonf as
he is in the Cabinet. The name of Lin
coln quite naturally excites the rage of
the ex-rebel,
ELDER&TASH
’ —)o(— i
jTo the Colored People of this Section : I
We urge special attention of the!
ocolored citizens of this vicinity to our ,
Clothing, Underwear and Hat Em [f
porium. Our business is done uponl
the ‘“Oqe Price” system, and justice
is dealt out to every patron. The
clothing we sell is manufactured ex
pressly for us. The underwear and
lat stock is the largest in the city
Call and see.
ELDER & TASH,
One Price Clothiers, Hatters and Furnish
ers, 34, 36 and 38 North Third Street,
HARRISBURG, PA.
J HHOWARDG& CO.
Uytans, Fish, Vagelables & Pru
Dressed Poultry a Specialty.
NO. 8 MARKET SQUARE.
J. C. MEHRING,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
1217 N. Third Street,
Furnishes a Finer and more substan
tial piece of goods for the money
than anyone else in the city.
B&s"Give him a call.
T. KEAUFMAN,
DAT GOODS AND GROGERIE,
A full and well selected stock.
All of which he is selling at
the lowest prices.
I'ronT STREET, STEELTON, PA.
MRS. E. MARSHAI.L,
TOBACCONIST,
4th and South Sts.,
llzwing just opened the above establish
ment with a full supply of the best
brands of smoking and chewing
tobaccos, we desire your pa
tronage. Giveusa trial.
(Jour~aL for Sale.)
LARGEST AND MOST COM
PLETE ASSORTMENT OF
GENT" FURNISHING
GOODS IN THE
Iy,
Y| Y—
Neckwear, Gloves, Shirts, Underwear of all
styles, cheap Canes: also Gold Headed
Canes. Umbrellas—Silk, Alpaca and
Gingham. Completeline of Gents’
Jewelry of all novelties. Shirts
made to order a Specialty. Under the
Jones House, No. 207 Market Street
bau
L. A, Segelbaum,
C. H. OSSMAN,
Choice and Stanle Groceries
Aiways on hand. Fine assortment of New
Raisins, Prunes, Citrons, Nuts, &c. Just
received an endless variety of Can
ned Goods. Give us a call for
Holiday Goods.
CORNER STATE AND FILBERT STREETS.
PRACTICAL DRESSMAKER.
Fancy and Plain Sewing
DONE TO ORDER.
Mrs. Ella Howard,
169 Fourth Street.
Unlted States Hotel Restaurant,
Meals Served at all Hours,
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.
WILLIAM ADORE, Prop.
W. A. KEISTER,
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES, QUEENSWARE
AND NOTIONS, Cheap.
Oppdsite Market House,
SteerroN, Pa.
THE |
REPUBLIC BENERIT ASSOGIATION,
OF }
PENNSYLVANIA
FOR THE
ASSURANGE O BEMERITS.
Home Office, Pittsburg, Pa.
Braxcn Orrice:
321 MARKET STREET,
Harrisburg, Pa.
Sickness, Acidents, old Ageaad Burial Fand
BENEFITS.
Branch Offices in Most of the Prin
| oipal Cities.
FORSA LE.
AN Ovrp EstaßLisnieD
FOUR CHAIR
First Class in every respect. The
best location in the city. Do
ing a good business. !
Goop Reasoxs For SeLLING.
Call on or address,
T. W. GALE,
1112 Eleventh av., Altoona, Pa.
M'NEIL'S
N EXTERKINATOR
eal Family Use,
For Cholera, Dysentery, Cholera Morbus,
Diarrheea, Colds, Quincy, Rheumatism,
Bruises, Teothache, Burps,” Pains in Joints,
&e., &e.,
’ ‘ 1 ‘.
There is Hothing Bebler in the Market
BLEWARE OX COUNTERFEITS.
The genuine has the abeve TRADE MARK
Druggists and Dealers generally sell it.
M’ NEIL’S LIVER AND BLOOD PILLS
Have no superior, Try them.
J. X. QUIGLEY, Proprietor.
261 and 283 Boas street, Harrisburg, Pa.
Y
Employment ~ Bureau.
Parties aceking employment, and persons
desiring servants, can avail themselves
ot the advantage of advertising in this
paper their wants. Ordinary advertise.
ments will be inserted for 25 cts.
MeDonell Hotel,
Cor. Staie and Spruce Sts.,
Boarding by the Day Week or Month.
S. L. McDONELL," Propr.
W, GROSS & SON,
119 Market Street. Harrisburg, Pa.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Druggists
And dealers in
Panty Goods, Dainbe, (ils & Clase
Artists’ Materials at
Best Prices.
Prescr’;ptiox—ls—; Specialty.
¥ Electric Night Bell.
“INSTRE DEFORE TOO LATE.”
'
I will offer Special Rates until April
Ist to all persons desiring
Y .;’ 5 " 26) .
Fire Insurance,
None but First Class Stock Com
panies represented.
“No AsSSESSMENTS DEMANDED.”
W. K. VERBEKE, JR.,
General Insurance Agent.
Orrrce—"Trust Building (Ist floor,
rear entrance),
Hagrissura, PENNA.
D. BAOOIN,
Manufacturing Confectioner,
434—438 MARKET STREET.
HARRISBURG, PA.
Factory, COR. FIFTH AND MARKET.
MRS. ELLEN 'ARKER,
DRESS MAKING & PLAIN SEWING
Prompt attention given to all
orders.
116 TANNER'S AVENUE.
CHICAGO MEAT MARKET
OPEN DAILY.
CHOICE MEATS ALWAYS ON HARHD.
414 WALNUT STREET.
The Wonderful
¥ r
RESTORER.
When the Hair begins to fall
Use Joice’s Restorer.
When the Hair begins to fide
Use Joice’s Restorer.
When the Hair grows gray
Use Joice’s Restorer.
It will Restore the Hair to its
patural color.
It will Impart to the Hair life,
streogth and beany.
It will arrest falling Hosir and give
health to the scalp.
And as a dressing nothing cin be
more beautiful and agreeable. It is
elegantly perfumed and renders the
Hair soft, plaint and lifelike. It also
serves to give the Hair that pecaliar
richness and color which is always so
essential to a complete toilet. Re
member this preparation is not a dye.
Remember it contains no impurities.
This slso remember, all who hive
used it are loud in its praise. Every
bottle gnaranteed to restore the Hair
to the full natural shade. To the j y
and satisfaction of all who use it. See
testimonials.
For sale at Dale & Hart's, Mrs. M.
E Joice's Hair Store, 118 Soath Duke
street, also John T. Joice’s Shaving
‘Saloon, Market street, York, ’a.
STATE JOURNAL ABENTS,
LUKE WHITE, SR.,
CIGAR AND NEWSPAPER EMPORIDM,
419 South 7th Street,
Puiraperepia, Pa.
(State Journal for Sale.)
J. H. MORRIS,
TONSORIAL ARTIST.
Cigars For Sale.,
126 Wylie Avenue,
Prrrseura, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
T. W. GALE,
TONSORIAL ARTIST,
Cigzars For Sudle,
1112 Kleventh Avenue,
ALTOONA, I'a.
(State Journal For Sale.)
N. BUTLER,
SHAVING aad HAIR CUTIING SALOON
South Street, Ilarrisburg, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
JAMES MINOR,
Groceries and Sundries,
HyceNiy, STEELTON.
(State Journal For Sile.)
RUSSEL THOMAS,
TONSORIAL ARTIST,
CarnisLe, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
WILLIAM BOLYAR,
ERIE RESTAURANT,
826 State Street.
(State Journal For Sale.)
J. G. M. BROWN,
Main Street,
York, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
I. J. MANN,
O Crry, Pa.
(State Jourmal For Sale.)
UNION NEWS STAND,
PENN'A R. R. DEPOT,
Harriseure.
(State Journal For Sale.)
T. L. WHITE,
TONSORIAL ARTISY,
CiIAMBERSBURG, PA.
(State Journal IFor Sale )
WILLIAM HOWARD,
68 Prospect Place,
WiLkEs -BARRE.
(State Journal For Sale.)
E. C. LUM,
Mipprerows, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
NEWS STAIND,
LOCHIEL HOTEL,
Harrrssura.
(State Journal for Sale.)
WM. EH. CONRAD,
" PARK HOTEL,
WiLLiausrorr, Pa.
(State Journal for Sale.)
A. A. GERY,
Reading, Pa.
- (State Journal for Sale.)
JOHN CUNEKLE & SON,
Coal and Wood.
Q@EP_}_"G Yard: 924 ELDER Sy_i‘ifl"fl
GO TO
0, THORLETS DAUG STORC,
WEST STEELTON.
FOR
FANCY ARTICLES,
PURE DRUGS,
MEDICINES AND SPICES,
At Harrisburg Prices.
PERFUMERY.
STEELTON, PA.
It always pays to go to
Dr. RAYSOR’S
DRUC STORE.
Harrisburg Colored Church
and Society Directory.
Wesley Union Church, corner South street and
Tanners avenue—Pastor, Rev. Z. T. Pearsall.
Services at 10:30 and 7:30 every Sunday. Sun
day school at 1:30. Jos. B. Popel, Superintend
ent.
Bethel M. E. Church, Short street—Pastor, Rev.
Amos Wilson. Services at 10:30 and 7:30 every
Sunday. Saqbath school 1:30. Richard Snaively,
Superintendert.
Elder Street Presbyterian Church—Services at
10:30 and 7:30. Sabbsath school at 1:30. Thomas
Miljer, Superintendent.
Second haptlat Chureh, Eleventh street near
Market—Pastor, Rev. Beverky Jones. Ser
vices every Sund’ay at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath
school 1:30. Robert Oarrington, Superintend
ent.
Free Will Buatift Church, corner William and
Colderstreete—Pastor, Rev. Frazer. Services
every Sumh.{lv at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath
school 1:30. illiam Burrows, Superintend
ent.
Union A. M. E. Church, Tanners avenue—Pas
tor, Rev. Z. Johnson. Services every Sunday
at 10:30 and 7:30. Sunday school 2P. M.
Wesley Mission, Marion street near Oolder—
Pastor, Rev. Bushrod. Services every Sab
bath at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath school 1:30
Daniel Williams,Superiutendent.
BOCIETIES.
Brotherly Love Lodge 896, G. U. O, of O. F.;
hall in South streei; regular meeting every
Monday ng‘h.t
Chosen nds Lodge, Masonic hall, Odd Fel
lows building, South street regular meeting
every alternate 'x‘hux'sd“:‘yl xl:}ght..
' Golden Chain Cou all, South Street,
Franklin Hall; regular meeting every Tuesday
night.
rmln&wd Samaritan CoundTl,Q!:ll East hstm street;
r movm:{x every Tuesday n G
Household of Ruth Hall, ({ldls.llofl Hall
ao:g:x street; regular meeting every Tuesday
{ )
i WILLIAM E. HUGHES
LIQUOR STORE.
|
FULL STOCK OF
Whiskies, Brandies, Gins, Wines, s,
l ALWAYS ON HAND.
| No. 510 MARKET ST., near U. S. Hotel,
? HARRISBURG, PA.
| JPENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD
On and after November 13th, 1883, the Pas.
senger Trains of the Pennsyinm. Railroad
Compmly will dogart from Harrisburg and ar
rive at Philadelphia, New York, Pittsburg and
Erie as follows:
EASTWARD.
Philadeiphia Express daily (except Mondays)
at 1:20 a. m.. arrives at Phllmielphfs at 425 a.
m., and New York at 7:00 8. m.
Fast Line daily at 4:30 3. m., arrives at Phila
delphia at 7:50 a m., and New York 11:20 a. m.
Harrisburg Express dua except (Sunday) at
7:00 a. m., arrives at Phil elphia at 10:20 a. m.
and New York at 1:205». m.
Columbia Accommodation dall{u(exoopt Sun
day) at 7:15 a. m., arrives at Philadelphia at
- 11:45a. m. and New York ns:mf. m
- Lancaster Accommodation dai y (exoo&t Sun
dafi) at 7:40 a la., arrives at Lancaster 8:35 a. m.
| ew York Limited Express of Pullman Palace
Cars daily at 2:25 p. m., arrives at Philadelphia
at 5:15 p. m. and New York at 7:30 p.-m.
Lock Haven Express daily (except Sunday) at
11:20 &. 1., arrives at P’hiladelphia at 3:15 p. m.,
and New York 6:20 p. m, 0
Johnstown Express daily (except Sunday) at
12:50PP. m., arrives at Philadelphia at 5:05 p. m.,
and New York at 8:50 p. m.
Day Express daily at 4:20 P. m., arrives at
fi)hé(l)ndolpbia at 7:25p. m., and New York at
:20 p. m.
Harrisburg Accommodation, via Colnmbia,
dally (except Sunday) at 4:50 p. m., and arrives
at Philadelphia at 9°45 p. m.
Mail Train on Sunday on‘ls'. 1:00 p. m., arrives
at Philadelphia 5:45 p. m., New York 9:30 p. m.
Middletown Aceommodation on Saturday only
5:10 p. m. Daily (excest Saturday and Sunday)
6:00 p. m.; every week day at 1:00 p.m.
Mail Express daily at 11:40 P. m., arrives at
Philadelphia 3:05 a. m., and New York at 6:10
a. m.
All Through Trains conneot at Jersey City
with boats of “*Brooklyn Annex’ for Broeklyn,
N. Y., avolding double ferriage and journey
htrough New York City.
WESTWARD.
Western Express daily at 12:30 a. m., arrives at
Altoona at 4:2) a. m., and Pittsburg at 8:05a. m.
Pacific Express daily at 3:10 a. 0., arrives at
Altoona at 7:50 a. m., and Plttsbg:s at 1:00 p. m.
Chicago Limited Express of Iman Palace
Cars daily at 2:10 B m , arrives at Altoona at
5:35 p m., and Pittsburg 9:00 p. m.
Mail Train daily at 11:10 a. m., arrives at Al
toona at 3:50 p. m., and Pittsburg B:4rbflp. m.
Fast Line daily at 3:15 g m., arrives at Al
toona at 7:20 p- m., ane Pittsburg at 11:30 p. m.
Mifilin Accomrnodation daily ?exoept Sunday)
:]ts 110:10 &. m., 5:00 and 10:05 p. m., on Sunday at
10 a. m,
STEELTON TRALNS leave Harrisburg daily
(except Sunday) at 6:45, 7:00, 7:15, 7:40 a. m.,
12:50, 4:50, 11:00 p. m. Daily (exce?t Saturday
and Sunday) 5:45 and 6:00 p. m. On Saturdays
only, 5:00 and 5:10 p. m. On Sund? only, 1:00 p.
m. Returning, leave Steelton aily (except
Sunday) 6:32, 6:57, 8:51, 10:42, 10:59 a. m.; 8:52
7:12 and 9:41 p. m. Dally (except Saturd? and
Sunday) 6:10p, m. On baturda{ only, 5:15 p. m.
On Sunday oaly, 8:51 a. m. and 10:59 a. m.
PHILADELPHIA & ERIE R. R.DIVISION.
MAIL TRAIN daily (except Sunday) at ¢:2O
a. m., arrives at Williamsport at 8:10 a. m., and
Erie at 7:35 p. m.
NIAGARA EXPRESS dallgv (except Sun
day) at 11:15 a. m., arrives at IlllsmsEort at
2:35 p. m., Lock Haven at 3:55 p. m., and Renovo
5:10 p. m.
LOCK HAVEN ACCOMMODATION daily
(except Sunday) at 3:25 p. m., arrives at Wil
liamsport at 7:0) p. m., and Lock Haven at 8:05
. m,
¥ Time cards and full information can be ob
tained at the Ticket office at the Station.
J. R. WOOD, General Passenger Agent.
CHAS. E. PUGH, General Manager.
CUM BERLAND VALLEY
RAILROAD.
TIME TABLE.
IN EFFECT NOVEMBER 18, 1883,
DOWN TRAINS,
B BRI Uk O a
|I ® 9
® B
gal e {E‘« |8 Bafa |22
3& . 15 |8 885 (3K
881: |l§ |9 |B°|gFEe
o NGB L R
Rl
Leave— JADNA. M, P. M./ P.M AM P, M. P.M
Martinsburg.../....[ 7 001.....18 00(....[.... ...
Hagerstown ‘ 8 00 1 354 00]....| 9 05/....
Greencastle ...|....| 8 25/ 1 58/4 28/....| 9 25]....
Chambersburg. 4 30 8 56, 2 20/5 00|....| 9 60/, ...
Shippeneburg.. 453 9 191 2 406 28)....]10 10]....
Newvi11e.......|5 19! 9 41/ 3 005 55|. .. .110 30| .~
Car1i51e.........5 4210 05/ 3 208 25/7 80'10 50(1 50
Mechanicsburg 8 0910 33 3 426 55,8 00“11 102 17
Ar. Hamsburg.'s 3-’),11 001 4007 25‘8 30'11 30(‘1 bd
AMA.N.'P. M. P.MAMP, M. P.M
———————— BB R DT MR
UP TRAINS,
| AR | @ Q|
=l2 =g Hgbfi me [»
ol S |BE IMEIQR (WA o
35 8 2F KB5 98|35
.§g[ 8 |7y iagtgo gu.' go
SRi: L (Relg [N g
Leave— lA.;JA.I.!A.N.[P.I!P.H.’P.U.'P.I
Ilarrlsburi ..420 735 :m!c 15112 30| 8 55(6 90
Mechanicsb'g . 4 40| 8 0411 50(4 42, 7 00| 9 22|17 00
Carlisle} ......i5 00| 8 30'12 ;g& 08 25 9 45| 26
Newville .....[5 19| 8 556112 295 35/ Arr. [lO 10/ Ar.
Shippensburg 15 38 9 1912 4816 00}.....]10 884....
Qhambersb’g..iB 00! 955 1 10{8 30/...../11 00f....
Greencastle .. .8 1910 15} 1 29/6 55/.....|Ar. |....
Hagerstown... 8 4010 45| 2 057 o™
Ar.Martinsb'g|Ar. 11 85| 3 20{8 15|..... '
|A.H|A.!.;[‘. M. P.MP.M.IP. M. P.M
Dillsburg Passenger.leaves Harrisburg at 8:50
a. m. and 3:10 p. m., arriving at Mechanicsburg
at 9:20 a. m. and 3:39 Sm. Returning, leaves
Mochanlcsbunf at 11:18a. m, and 5:20;. m., &r
-rlvimf at Harrlsburg at 11:48 a. m. and 5:50 p. m.
Dillsburg Branch trains leave Harrisburg at
8:50 a. m. and 3.10 p. m., arrivingat Dillsburg at
9:50 a&. 1, and 4:10 p. m. Returning, leave lfills
burg at 6:30 a. ~ 10:50 a. m. and 4:50 p. m., ar
riving at Harrisburg at 8:30 a. m., 11:48 a. m. and
5:50 p. m.
New Urleans Express and Accommodation
west and Da{ Express and New York Express
gndrun daily. All other trains daily except
unday.
On g&turdny Carlisle Accommodation train
leaves Harrisburg st 5:30 p. m., Mechanicsburg
at 6:00 }1) m., arriving at Carlisle ot 6:30 p. m.
South Pennsylvania branch trains leave
Chambersburg at 9:30 2. m., 4:15 p. m., Mercers
burg at 11:20 a. m. and 5:15 p. m., Loudon 12:00 a.
m, and 5:37 p. m,, arriviog at Richmond at 12:16
p-m. and 5:45 &; m. Returning, leave Richmond
¢:10 a. m, and 1:15 p. m., Loudon 7:20 a, m. and
1:30 p. m,, Mercersburg 7:45 a. m. and 2:10 p. m.,
arriving at Chambersburg 8:45 a. m. and 3:55
. m,
’ South Mountain trains, going south, connect
with trains lcnvin% Harrisburg at 7:35 a. m and
11:30 a. m. and 4:15 p. m* Retuml&g, arrive at
Harrisburg 11:00 a. m., 2:ssand 7: ?m. On
Saturday a train connects with the train leaving
Harrisburg at 8:55 p. m., and returns Monday to
connect with th the train arriving at Harrisburg
at6:3sa. m. i
Mont Alto trains, %olnz South, connect with
trains leaving Harrisburg at 7:35 a. m. and 4:156
p.m. Retutning, conncct with trains arriving
at Harrgsburg at 11:00 a. m. and 7:25 r.m.
Trains on Shenandoah Valley raliroad leave
Nagerstown at 7:00 a. m. and 2:00 p. m., ¢on
nectlng witn trains leaving Harrisburg at 4:2) a.
m. and 11:20 a. m Returning, connect with
trians arriving at Harrisburg at 4:035 p. m and
11:30 n m.
A .H. MCULLOUGH, J. F. BOYD,
General Ticket A'f;n(, Superintendent.
JAMES CLARK, General Agent.
HARRISBUR(: axp POTOMAC
RAILROAD--TIME TABLE No. 40.
Takes effect Monday, October Ist, 1883,
e L
B S'rw'l BTATIONS. WEST'D
nm‘?Ae.\ Mail Ac.
A.M-P.M |A. M. P.M
8 2012 25 L. Shipgensburg, Ar. 12 005 40
8 30/2 35| Liv. Leesburg, F., Lv. {ll 505 30
8 352 40iLv. Jacksonville, F., Lv. 11 455 28
8 402 45|Lv. Hays Grove, F., Lv. 11 405 21
8 4712 50|Lv. Doners, F., Lv. 111 355 18
8 50i2 83| Liv. Lonfi«dlorr, F., Lv. {ll 325 13
8 55/2 57|Lv. Huntsdale, Lv., |ll 28/5 C 9
9 0113 02iLv. Moore's Mill, F., Lv. 111 235 04
9 123 13| Lv. Barnitz, F., Lv. 1124 43
9 173 18 Lv. Mt. Holly Springsg, Lv. 111 02'4 48
9 103 21\Lv. 8. Mnt'n Cross'g, F., Lv.|ll 04 4 45
9 40,3 42/ Lv. Bomn%b‘prinf‘, Lv. (10 504 30
9 4613 47|Lv. Leldighs, F., Lv. 110 44415
9 50i3 52|Lv. Grandtville, F., Lv. 110 3914 10
9 5513 56/Ar. M. &D. Junction, Lv. 110 354 05
10 ‘Oglr.x Lv. M. &D. Junction, Ar. |..... p.M
10 15!....]Ar. Bowmansdale, Lv. 30 ...
AL SR,
Mail Train leaving Shippensburg 8:20a. m
connects with C. V. train arriving at Harrisburg
at 11:00 a. m. Accommodation Train leaving
Shippensburg at 2:25 p. m. conneets with C. V.
train arrivieg at Harrisburg 5:50 p- m.
Train leaving Harrisburg at 7:35 a. m. will
connect with H, & P. train leafln¥ M. &D.
Junction at 10:00 a. m. Train leaving Harris
burg at 3:10 B m. conneets with H. & P. train
leaving M. & D. Junction at 4:05 p. m.
Train leaving Sbippensbnrg at 8:20 a. w, wil!
onpect with train leaving S. M. Croulni tor
Carlisle at 9:3> a. m. Train leaving M. & D
Junction at 10:35 a. m. wili connect with train
luvt;f 8. M. Crossing for Carlisle 11:21 a. m
F Flag stations,
RORB'T. H. MIDDLETON,
Superintendent,
BoiLixg Seßives, Pa., Sept, 25, 1883,
’r.l.{r.x
8 556 90
9 22(1 00
. 9 45| 20
IlOluAr.
10 8§4....
11
P
Bl

xml | txt