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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, May 24, 1884, Image 2

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The State Journal.
Published every sSaturday by
THE JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
Bingle Copy - .- ¢ - b cents
Three Months - - wor oA NS
Bix months T T S $l.OO
One Year, in advance, - 1.50
e if not in advance, - - 2.06
SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1884.
10 OUR READERS.
We take pleasure jin calling the atttention
of our readers to our advertisers betore pur
chasing. The parties whoadvertise in this
paper uare reliable, and should have our en
tire patronage. The fact that they patronize
u: is an evidence that they are friendly
toward us, and desire our patronage.
Please mention the JourNaL when you call,
State Journal, the only general
newspaper devoted to the interest
of the colored people in the State
of Pennsylvania., Published week
ly, at Harrisburg, Pa. -
Note.
Hereafter all subseriptions to Tue
Stare JourNar will be in advance.
We are now printing the only news
paper devoted to the interest of the
colored people of the State of Penn
gylvaria. That we may be able to
successfully do this, we are compelled
to exact psyment in advance. All
bills for back subscription should be
paid without delay.
GREAT REDUGTION.
Tue State JourNaL will be deliv
ered to subscribers in any part of the
city hereafter for
15 CENTS PER MONTH.
A Work to be Performed by the
Conferences of the Colored
Methodist Churches.
The discussion which took place in
the general conference of the Zion A.
M. E. church at New York last week
brought about by a remark made by
Timothy Fortune on the uniting of
the Methodist churches does not go
far enough, we would like to see
this question thoroughly discussed
by both conferences and a final
union brought about. There never
was a time when men holding im
portant positions as leaders of the
people, who stand at the head of two
of the greatest organizations exist—
ing among cur people had a better
opportunity to show their unselfish
ness in the interest of a struggling
race,and display there truly christian
spirit than the present. Bishop
Jones who years ago placed him
self equarely uponth is issue, took
ocecasion to again cffer himself asasac
rifice to the carrying out of this poject
andhe was followed by Bishops Hood
Moore and the other lights of Zion.
These men are perfectly willing to
give up their high ecclesiastial posi
tions or take their chances in a bag
as Bishop Joues expressedit. There
is not a bishop in either connection
that cannot fully realize the great
power these two bodies merged into
one would wield or can they fail to
see what an important example this
union would set to the people, stand
ing apart as they have been for years
both struggling out an existence, in
some places there ministry eking out
a bare existence, two churches where
one is barely supported has been the
result of a mere technical difference
of opinion on the part of the heads
of the church, a division fanned and
kept alive more on account of an
unwillingness to forego abigh lucra
tive and commanding position than
for any other reason. The pulpit and
the press are the two great influences
which have civilized and moralized
nations and now with a press com
manding in its influence, potent in
its good, united in its action, there is
every prospect of the pulpit dropping
into second . place unles it begins the
advocacy of those things caleunlaled
to strengthen and unite the colored
people. 700,000 members are cou
trolled by these two bodies, property
valued at nearly $30,000,000 are
possessed by them and with all this
power and influeace they stand
divided. Not as Presbyterians and
Baptists, or Universalists and Metho
dists, but as a house divided
against itself, there ig a divine pre
diction which would be well for these
two bodies to remember before they
adjourn, “that ahouse divided against
itself cannot stand.” The lack of
unity has ever been a characteristic
of ourrace and why should it be other
wise, when the seeds of it are sown in
the Sabbath school and reaped in the
church. These conferences have a
great work to accomplish and para
mont and above aay other work they
may perform is that of uniting over
half a million people under one banner
with a single interest a upited pur
pose to stand united rather than fall
divided with them they will have the
united support of the colored press
and the laudations of millions of their
race. i
Ir Africa is not evangelized it will
not be for the lack of high dignitaries
of the church. All the Methodist
conferences now in session are send
ing missionaries into that benighted
country, and the hope that much good
will yet come out of Ethiopa isa
good one. ;
The Douty Dealer.
The Detroit Plaindealer doubt
less feeling happy over the success of
the colored people of Michigan receiv
ing representation in the Nationul
Convention, cannot understand why
the Jour~au feels dissapointed in the
30,000 colored voters of Pennsylvania
not receiving any representation.
Now the Flaindealer is a sly fox and
takes this means of attracting atten
tion to the one Northcrn state- which
has been magnanimous enough to give
what all other northern states have
refused. There isn't anything selfish
about the Journar, we have not
taken only our immediate surrcund
ings luto consideration, but point to
the figures which stand.out boldly
and plain as a verification of our state.
ment as to our political position,
Every colored man in the country,
unless he be an office holder or a
Mich -igander,will agree with us,that
we arc dropping between the two
parties. We complain and with rea
son, of the Republican party’s recent
treatment of us, and the Democratic
party is a thing of abomination to us.
Perhaps our cootemporary sees a
middle position or contemplates form
ing one. Whatever may be our
conclusions as to our peeitions politic
ally, we entertain as high a hope for
the future of the race as our contem
porary, and we still stick to our
plea, that more attention to business
and industrial enterprise and less
attention to politics would be better
for the race. Oar contemporary is
an able critic, which it shows in its
attempt to criticise our position on
that Smith's Convention held at
Pittsburg, which emitted so' much
sound for sense, We never expected
that convention io accomplish any
thing further than to give a few men
a chance to air their oratory and if it
succeeded in doing anything else,
pardon us for our obtuseness. If
inconsistent we are grateful for being
shown the error of our way and if
our countenance wears a woebegone
and dissapointed aspect, we discover
from the following clipped from the
colums of our brilliant contemporary,
that if in misery we have company.
Speaking of itself thus despondently:
We cannot picture the future of this enterPri}ge
ago for whelh wo 100 K DOUL nd 00 With what &
North donial of opportunity is our 1t and in th
overy stop. Wher we sondider these things in
their entfi-ety there is little to hope for, lgimo
Edomitablo Wil broaks the speh of despair and
we hope on study on and push on against fate.
Wavyxe MacVeacu wrote a letter
of instruction to ex-Secretary Bris
tow as to how to shape his speech to
the business men of New York and
for a republican of the wishey
washey type Mr. MacVeagh gave a
striking illustration by his sarcasiic
references 4o I’resident Arthur. If]
in the course of events, Mr. Mac-
Veagh should see President Arthar
the nominee of the republican party
som:body would have am unsavory
mess of crow to eat. The fact of
President Arthur becoming President
through the bullet of a pitiless crank
cannot conceal the manly action of
Mr. Arthur in his present adminis.
tration. The prizes drawn in this
lottery of assassination, as Mr. Mac-
Veagh terms it, has not permeated
any true republican with one half of
the bitterness or selfishness that per
meates this sample independent re
publican.
Many people supposed that when
Wayne MacVeagh weunt into Gar
field’s cabinet, holding different views
from many of the other members,
and in fact to some extent from the
President himself, that he somewhat
resembled that animal with the long
ears, and since his recent letter to
ex Secretary Bristow the supposition
proves true that he not only shows
his long ears but shows and lets fly
his heels regardless of who may be
standing at his head.
Tuere is no mistaking the fact that
Sammy Tilden wants to be President,
weak, emaciated and aged as he is,
the vigor of an earnest desire lingers
around him still.
Some Logic.
It has been considered pretty rough
on Robeson that a colored man should
best him as an alternate to Chicago.
It is a doubtful compliment for a col
ored man to be called upon to run
against George M., but when the
Sta warts have any dirty work a col
ored man is apt to get the job, and
that is about all he does get.—At
lantic City Times.
Striking for His Color.
Special to the JOURNAL.
Purcaverenia, May 22.—Charles
W. Pepper, a colored seaman, yester
day afternoon walked into the barber
shop of Emil Wachter, 323 South
Tenth street, and requested to be
shaved. Wachter replied that he
did not shave colored men, where
upon Pepper proceeded to beat the
barber. ~The assailant was arrested
and taken before Magistrate McClin
tock, who held him in $5OO bail for
trial.
A. M. B. General Conference.
Bavritore, May 20.—At the ses
sion yesterday of the African Metho
dist Episcopal General Conference it
was decided that Senior Bishop D.
A. Payne should have a small Epis
copal district given <him in order to
allow him time to finish his work on
the history of the church. Fred
Douglas and T. Thomas Fortune
made addresses. Robert Seymour,
of California, presented a resolution
directing the committee about to visit
Washiogton to request the President
to urge the republican party to put a
plank in their platform supplement
ing the bill annulled in regard to
civil rights, or a new bill entirely, in
order that the same may be submit
ted to the vote of the people in the
coming national campaign. Its con
gideration was _deferred amid con
fusion. The Rev. C. S. Smith spoke
in favor of ministers taking an active
part in politics.
Bavriore, May 21.—Bishop W.
F. Dickerson presided yesterday at
the African Methodist Episcopal Gen
eral Conference. There was a great
struggle over the report of the Ccm
mittee on the Book Concern, which
recommended the removal of the pub
lication headquarters from Philadel
phia. The report was finally adopted
by a vote of 67 to 46. Places to
which the concern should be removed
were unamed, and Philadelphia was
chosen by a vote of 88. The con
cern therefore remains in Philadel
phia as heretofore. In order to give
the standing committees time to dis
cuss the many papers referred to them
the convention adjourned earlier than
usual.
CHUKLCHMEN AT WORK
A Missionary for Africa Elected.
Purnaperruis, May 22.—The pro
ceedings of the Methodist Conference
{esterday were presided over by Bishop
“oster, who at the opening of the session
announced the following Committee on
Tenure of Church Property; Judge G.G.
Reynolds, C. B. Eddy, H. L. Sibley and
G. W, Parkerand G. W. Wells, Esgs.,
and Revs. M. J. Talbot acd W. 8. Pren
tice. The reports of the Committee on
Sunday schools and Tracts were presented
and adopted. The report suggested
changes in the discipline of the Sunday
School Board, and recommended the edi
tor of the German Sunday school pub
lications of Cincinnati to be made
German assistant sccretary of the
Sunday School Union. It also spoke
in a gratified manner of the re
port of the Tract Society, which has
issued 52,215,070 pages of tracts. The
Conference invitccll by a vote the four
bishops-clect to take seats upon the plat
form. Rev. C. W.Smith was announced
to have been elected eaitor of the Pitts
burg Adwvocate by the ballot taken the day
before. The report of the Committee of
Missions recommending the election of a
missionary bishop for South Africa pro
voked an animated discussion. It was
finally adopted, and it was agreed to post
pone the election until the afternoon ses
sion. A number of nominations were
made. Among them were Rev. Joshua E.
Wilson (colored), Rev. Dr. Vernon, Rev.
C. O. Fisher (colored), and missionary
William Taylor, of South India. There
was a full attendance at 2 o’clock when
the Conference reassembled after the
noon recess. Bishop Wiley presided.
A number of the candidates for the
South African bishopric withdrew their
names, and the election was between the
three-—Missionary Taylor, Rev. Charles
0. Fisher and lev. Pierre Landry.
Missionary Taylor was chosen by a large
majority. Mr. Taylor is familiary known
as Father Taylor. He was born in Vir
ginia in 1821, and joined the Baltimore
conference in 1843. He became an elder
of the church in 1847. Ile was after
ward sent as a missionary to California.
Since that time he has been engaged in
missionary work in Canada, and in many
European countries and in South Amer
ica. During the last twelve years he has
been in Burmah, India and other Eastern
countries. The conference eclected Dr.
B. F. Craryeditor of the California Chris
tian Advocate, and after taking a ballot
for editor of the Southwestern Christian
Advocate, adjourned.
Presbyterians at Saratoga
SaraToGca, N. Y., May 22.—At the
morning session of the Presbyterian Gen
eral Assembly yesterday, a fraternal tele
gram was read from the General Confer
ence of the Methodist Episcopal Church
in session at Philadelphia. The commit.
tee of forty-two on reduced representation
was granted additional time in which to
report. Overtures relative to the Pres
byteries of Washington city and Dayton
were accepted and adopted.
At the afternoon session of the Presby
terian General Assembly the forty-sixth
annual report of the Board of Publication
was submitted. The total issues during
the year were 1,789,500, and the aggre
gate publications 15,195,566. The re
ceipts were $308,393 98; expenditures,
$287,216 09; balance in treasury, $21,-
176 96; aggregate sales, $199,950 58.
Methodist Protestant Geuneral Conference,
BarTiMorg, Md., May 22.—1 n the
General Conference of the Methodist
Protestant church yesterday, the conven
tion refused to strike from the discipline
the clause permitting the choice by the
candidate of the mode of baptism. It
also refused to make any change in the
prescribed marriage ceremony. A num
ber of verbal alterations were made in
the discipline and Constitution. The
Committee on Revision reported against
a proposition to expunge from the disci
pline all that relating to infant baptism
which makes its observance obligatory.
The proposition to change was voted
down and infant baptism remains in the
discipline. The committee on creden
tials reported favorably on the certifi
cates of Rev. J. M. Barge and Layman
J. M. Smith, of the Georgia (colored)
district.
Moravian Synod.
LANCASTER, May 22.—The triennial
provincial synod of the American Prov
ince of the Moravian Church began its
sessions at Lititz yesterday. Bishop De
Schweinitz, of Bethlehem, was elected
resident and Rev. M. Loubert, of New
%ork, secretary. Yesterday’s session was
occupied in the transaction of routine
business. There are ninety-seven dele
gates, representing twelve States, present.
Miss Ella V. Somerville, of Wash
ington, D. C,, a colored graduate
from the State Normal school of
Massachusetts, ss to address the
National F lucational Association, at
Madison, Wis., in July.
THE GREAT RACE PROBLEM.
A SOLUTION OF THE DIFFICULTY IN
PROGRESS.
Register Bruce’s Views of the Situation in
Mississippi, Arkansas and Other South
ern States—A Hopeful Outlook for
the Colored Man—Great Hopes
for the Fusion Movement,
THE RACE PROBLEM IN THE SOUTH
The Question Rapidly Approaching a Solu
tion—Views of Register Bruce.
WasniNaTon, May 19.—Hon. Branch
K. Bruce, of Mississippi, Register of the
Treasury and formerly a Senator of the
United States, and perhaps one of the
most courtly, intelligent and experienced
leaders of the colored race in the South,
has returned from a six weeks’ absence in
Arkansas and Mississippi. Mr. Bruce, in
narrating the incidents and lessons of his
recent experiences among old friends of
hingW'xx race and the people generally,
said:
“I went to the Hot Springs for medical
treatment, and to avoid the appearance of
having other objects in view, I delayed
my arrival until after certain political mat
ters in Arkansas had been disposed of.
You can imagine my surprise, when I
reached Hot Springs, to find a large as
semblage at the station, fully one thou
sand persons, more than one half of them
white citizens, who had gathered there to
give me a cordial welcome. I must sayl
was overwhelmed with emotion when I
looked in retrospect over the past quarter
of a century and saw in that gathering
the tangible evidences of progress in the
elevation of my race.
“1 tell you weare fastsolving the prob
lem of the white and the black race in the
South.”’
‘“How do you account for this 7"’
“The causes which have brought about
these results are many. First, Ig found in
Mississippi and Arkansas and I believe it
exists elsewhere in the South, a great
improvement in public sentiment. The
causes which led to race troubles
are gradually diminishing or disappear
ing. There exists greater toleration
not only between the races but
among the better class of whites.
I have great hopes of the fusion move
ment in Mississippi. Last year this plan
was tried in at least fifteen or twenty
counties in the State, and wasa great suc
cess. It was brougnt about by colored
and white men of influence standing side
by side. The young men are doing this.
It is perhaps too much to expect an old
time Democrat, and especially a politician
trained in the old-time methods, to have
much to do with such a movement,
but the young men are ripe for
a revolution in political methods.
They are discovering the suicidal
policy of keeping up these race prejudices
for the benefit of a set of men who make
opposition of progress and the clinging to
the absolute ideas of the past the main
spring of public duty. The young men
appreciate the situation and are profiting
by it. Let me mention the county of
Hines. There wehad afusion ticket. So
many Republicans, so many Democrats,
and distributed also by races, were placed
upon the ticket. the scheme worked ex
cellently. The same thing has now been
tried in most of the connties with eminent
success. The best men of both races and
parties are getting tired of ballot-box
stufliing.”’ L ; o
““Are the colored people accumulating
any property, ‘“said the writer. ‘O yes,
the most thrifty of them are rapidly be
coming possessed of the ooil. The planters
have no means, so by a co-operative ar
rangement the white planter and the
colored laborer share the losses and the
proceeds of the crops. In that way both
become interested in the soil and its
crops. But many colored men own their
own farms and the numberis increasing
every year.”’
“What is the political outlook.”
“The results of my inquiries lead me to
think that the hestility to the National tick
et will not be so great as heretofore. It is
generally conceded that a Northern man
must be elected, and the young men say
give us a give us a good man and we will
support him. [ think there are names of
candidates mentioned among the Repub
licans who would poll a very strong vote
in the South, and might, where the Re
publican majority on a fair ballot is un
doubted, produce satisfactory results. I
was chosen a delegate by the recent con
vention. The delegation consists
of nine- white men and nine
colored. That is what we are
doing now. The two races divide the
honors. In the convention the question
of preferences was not discussed, and we
therefore did not think it wise to instruct.
I, for one, and I hope all the Southern
delegates will go to Chicago to select the
man who can carry the pivotal States of
the North and can bring out the Repub
lican vote of the Fouth. AsT have said,
there is a large floating vote which could
be brought over, il we get the right man.
I shall do all I can to aid in the nomina
tion of the best candidate for the whole
country. Noise in the interest of a can
didate is not always the indication of
strength.”’ K.
WASHINGTON’S NEW MONUMENT
The Ceremony of Unveiling—The Statue,
WasmixeToN, May 22.—At 2 o'clock
yesterday afternoon the ceremonies of un
veiling the statue to Martin Luther, the
great Reformer, began in this city. The
exercises began with musicby the Marine
band, (“The Heavens are Telling'—
Haydn), followed by prayer and the
reading of the history of the statue,
The openinyg oration was made by Hon.
Omar D. Conger,and he was followed by
Rev. Dr. J. G. Morris, D. D. LL. D., of
Baltimore.
The speaking over, Judge Miller arose
and, with a few appropriate words, gave
the signal for the removal of the bunting
with which the figure was veiled. The
ropes were pulled, but the veil had been
unskillfully adjusted, and a delay of sev
eral minutes ensued. The matter was
finally arranged, and to the music of
Luther’s hymn, “Eln Feste Borg,” by
the band, and the clapping of hands by
the multitude, the features of the re
former’s counterfeit were disclosed. The
statue reaches an elevation of more than
twenty feet, the pedestal being eleven
feet in height. The latter consists of four
blocks of dressed granite, the undermost
covering an area of one hundred and
twenty square teet. The only inscription,
““Martin Luther,”” is in raised letters upon
the principal block of the pedestal. The
entire body and limbs of the figure are
enveloped in the folds of a priestly robe.
The left hand holds a closed book, the
clinched fingers of the right resting upon
it. The raised face, deeply kpotted brow
and firmly closed lips, together with the
sturdily placed limbs, portray determina
tion and defiance. It isa duplicate of the
principal figure of the Luther group at
Worms. The money was contributed
from all parts of the country, und the
work is that of the Lutheran Church of
the whole nation. The ceremonies ended
with a benediction. sl
The exercises were <concluded last
night by a reception to the members of
the Luther Statue Society and their
friends and the visiting clergy, who were
present in large numbers. M_r. Scherin,
of New York, presided, and brief speeches
were made by Dr. Morris, of Baltimore;
Mr. Geirrich, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; Mr.
Daniel Eppley, of Harrishurg; Dr. V. L.
Conrad, of Philadelphia, and Mr. Ram
mey, of Altoona, Pa.
This space is
reserved for W.
J. ADAMS &
BRO., FURNI
TURE and CAR
PET DEALERS,
who are so busy
they had no time
to write an ad
vertisement.
. Nos. 105, 108
and 110 S. Sec
ond St, Harris
burg, Pa.
THOS. J. DINAN, JR,
NG DABLOR, DINING ROOM AND
KITCREN FURNITURE.
Chamber Suits a Specialty.
235 and 237 W. S_t;t:e St., Harrisburg
Repairing and Repainting Neatly Done.
36 MILLINERY 36
SPERINCG SBTY IL,LES,
TRIMMED HATS,
TRIMMED BONNETS,
(all of the latest styles.)
CRAPES and
CRAPE BONNETS
MATHER’'S MILLINERY,
36 N. Second, Cor. of Walnut.
Henry Marshall,
Uyatans, Fish, Tomotablen & Fru
Dressed Poultry a Specialty.
FOURTH and SOUTH STS.
J. C. MEHRING,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
1217 N. Third Street,
Furnishes a Finer and more substan
tial piece of gocds for the money
than anyoue else in the city.
. B&¥™Give him a call.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Legislature.
ALBERT B. TACK, OF HARRISBURG,
announces himself a candidate for the Leg
islature from this district, subject to the decision
of the Republican Convention, and respectfully
solicits the support of his friends.
Legislature.
D C. BURNITE, OF HARRISBURG, AN
-47, nounces himself a candidate for the f.e%ls
lature from this district, subject to the decision
of the Republican Convention, and respectfully
solicits the support of his friends,
Legislature.
CHARLES A. MILLER, OF HARRIS.
BURG, announces mmaeff a candidate for
the Leizlature from this district, subject to the
decigion oi the Regublloan Convention, and re
spectfully solicits the support of hi# friends.
Recorder.
CHABLES G.CRONE,OF HARRISBURG,
announces himself a candidate for Recorder
of Dau{)hln county, subject to the decision of the
Republican convention, and respectfully solicits
the support of his friends.
Recorder.
CIIRIST. W.LYNCH, OF HARRISBURG,
announces himself a candidate for Recorder
of Da.uPhin county, subject to the decision of the
Republican convention, and respectfully solicita
the support of }is friends.
County Commissioner.
J‘ J. HARGEST, OF HARRISBURG, AN
. 'NOUNCES himself a_candidate for Coun
t{ Commissioner of Dauphin county, subject to
the decision of the Republican convention, and
respectfully solicits the suppert of his friends.
County Commissioner.
J A. SLENTZ, OF HARRISBURG, AN
+ NOUNCES himselfa candidate for County
Commissioner of Daufhln county, subject to the
decision of the Republiean Convention, and re
spectfully solicits the support of his friends.
BUSINESS CARDS.
The Very Latest in Hats and Caps.
‘ LARGE STOCK OF ELEGANT AND
Stylish Spring Headwear for men, boys and
children, in endless variety of shapes and colors,
which for qum{, lightness and prices, are un
surpassed, are displayed by
WARREN A. ZOLLINGER,
13 S. Market Square, Harrisburg, Pa.
3-29-3 m.
H. LUTZ,
sTAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. A
seleet assortment of Canned Goods, Fruits,
Nuts, &c¢., 807 North Third Street.
3-29-3 m.
' LUTHER R. KELKER,
BUILDERS', SADLERS' AND COACH HARUWARE,
ITROIN, ST HBE L,
Puoars” and Michamiss’ Tols, Painda, (fls, Class, &
Mallory, Wheeler & Co.'s Locks, Chesapeako Nails,
Lester & Rogers’ Scroll Saws, Sargents Shelf Hardware,
Sarven and Plain Hub Wheels, Porter’s Door Corner Irons
G. D. Wetherill & Co.’s Pure Lead.
N. Y. Enamel Paint Co.’s Ready Mixed Paint. The best and cheap
estin t! market. Fully warranted. f
Luther R. Kelker, 62 Market Square, Harrisburg, Pa.
P. O. Box 114.
WE HAVE GREATLY ENLARGED OUR ROOMS,
Our Spring Stock of
Are now open for your inspection
|
Velvets, Body Brussels, Tapostry Brusael, lnona
AND RAG CARPETS.
OULL LOCATION :
ON MARKET ST., NEAR RIVER BRIDGE.
Carpets are in very choice styles this season and the prices unusually low, a fact few&mople are
aware of,_a.nd allowing themselves to be misled bf glaring price lists of Phlladelpma‘ ew York
houses, when same (fiuamxes could be bought for ess in this city from any dealer. Come to our
store and find out what we can do for you before buying.
Six Doors from Front Street and the Bridge, on Market Street.
00l Cloths, Bugs, Door Mats, Auwora Swespers Ete.
B, Y FEN
. W. YINGST,
111 MARKET ST, HARRISBURG, I’A.
GEORGE H. SOURBIER,
UNDERTAKER
And Dealer in .
FINE FURNITURE.
334, 330 and 338 Broad Street, Harrisbure. Pa.
ge=Dßlack Cloth Caskets for $65, trimmed as desired.
No extra charge for Black or White Hearse.
1210 NORTH THIRD STREET.
H. . WA OCHX,
‘WALL PAPER & WINDOW SHADES.
1) PR OINT.
FLEMING.
BOOKS AND STATIONERY
PRESENT S,
39 N. THIRD STREET.,
FORNEY *» STEWART,
Boots, Shoes & Rubbers,
321 MARKET ST,
HARRISBURG, PA.
GALLERY OF ART
Executes Photographs in the most artistic style and finish. Crayons,
Boudoirs, Panels, Cabinets and Cards. Life-Size Crayon Portraits
x a Specialty.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
J B. FIRST,
NO. 9 SOUTH THIRD STREET, HARRISBURE.
REAL ESTATE AND BUSINESS AGENT.
COLLECTIONS MADE AND PAID PROMPTLY.
[ have properties for sale in any part of the city; also, same in Steelton.

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