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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, June 28, 1884, Image 3

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CLASS DAY EXERCISES,
A LARGR AUDRDIENCE AT THE OPERA
HOUSE THIS MORNING.
Oration’s Essays and lecitations by the
Class ot ’B4—XYoung Ladies and Gentle
men Clesing Honorably their School
Term—The Partielpants Acqait
Themseives With Credit.
While the clouds were dark and lower
ing this morning avd the rain fell in dis
mal sheets the atmosphiere of the Opera
i{ouse was bright and sunuy, made so by
the hundreds of pleasant faces and bright
smiles of those who had gathered to en
joy the elass day exercises. The inclem
cnt weather doubtless prevented very
many from being present, but notwith
standing this the first and second floors
were well filled. There were not 80 many
hight costumes worn as there have been
on other occasions of a similar character,
owing to the unfavorable day, but this
fact did not in the least detract from the
appearance of the assemblage. The au
dience was largely composed of ladies.
The stage arrangement wias similar to
that of last year and the class was seated
in the same way. Chairs were placed in
two semi-circular rows, with an aisle in
the center. At the right of the'stage was
a piano and’en the leit geats for the fac
ulty. Above the heads of the graduates,
suspended on almost invisible wire, near
the front ot the stage, was the class
motto-—*The End Crowns Our Work.”
It was worked in immortelles fringed
with evergreens and looked very pretty.
Superintendent Foose, Prof. Wert and
Rev. \¥. 11. IL, Snyder oceupiced seats on
the lefi, the superintendent direeting the
CXCTCIses,
At 9 o’clock Miss Annie G. Beck took
her place at the piano, and while she
played a march the graduates came on
the stage, entering by twos from the rear
center of the stage. Marching to the front
through the aisle between the chairs they
faced to the right and left, taking the
places assigned them. After all had en
tered Miss Beck played a short prelude
and then striking the beautiful chords of
the magnificent anthem, “Praise the
Lord,” the class joined in ' singing it
through with much expression, the sweet
voices of the young ladies blending nicely
with the deeper tones of the young gen:
tlemen.
Following the singing of the anthem
Rev. Mr. Snyder oftered a fervent prayer
in which the blessings of God were in
voked upon the common schcols, their
Supcrimcudenr, the directorg, teachers
and scholars; upon the termination of the
school course and upon those who were
about to receive the honors of gradua
tion. Ie besought the Divine blessing
upon the exercises of the morning and
asked that the occasion might be one of
happiness to the participants, to their
parents, to their teachers and to all.
Edwin A. Nicss chose as the subject of
his oration, “True Nobility.”” It embod
ied many excellent thoughts and the ref
erences 1o historieal characters evidenced
a well-stored mind. The eminent char
acters in past ages, as well as those of the
present, were called up, and the qualities
that made them great were in turn dwels
upon. The young gentleman had an
casy delivery, and his manner was free
from that stage stiffness that too often
characterizes young speakers. At the
conclusion of his oration he was warmly
applauded.
A recitetion by Miss Alberta Zimmer
man, subject, ““The Sisters,” was most
excellent. The young lady has elocu
tionary powers ofnomeanorderand very
creditably acquitted herself thismorning.
“The Influence of Home’ was the
well-seleeted theme of an admirably
written cssay h{' Miss Sadie M. Heplord.
She spoke of the happy influences and
advantages of a home, and the thoughts
embraced in hier cssay were aptly ex
pressed.
Miss Katic M. Robinson’s essay was
basged on *‘Songs,”’ and he succeeded in
developing some umque and pretty ideas
with respect to music. Music whispered
kind words in our time of trouble;it kept
down angry passions. You might
ging to the wicked man, sing to the dis
consolate, sing to the sufierer, sing to the
old and young-—music would inspire them
all. The human voice was the most per
fect musical instrument ever made. The
essayist clothed her subjeet in choice lan
guage and read very distinctly.
Miss Nellie M. Vaughn followed with &
piano solo from “‘LaTraviata’ by Ascher.
The young lady rendered the solo with
much expression and her touch evidenced
the thoroughness of her musical educa
tion.
“Don’t Give up the Ship”’ was the
subject of 8. Alter Kennedy'’s oration.
Ile started out by citing incidents in naval
warfare where great heroism was dis
played and thenin well rounded periods
spoke of the requisites to success in life.
Two of these were common sense and
perseverance. Ifis line of thought
was well brought out. ,
Miss Macy C. Sites had an essay on
“Baskets.””” She traced the origin and
uses of baskets and wicker work and said
many good things.
“Public Spirit”” was the dunal fountla
tion of George A. Tippctt’s oration. He
gpoke of the motives which prompted the
public spirit and his oration embraced
very many excellent ideas. Ilis gestures
were good ag was also his delivery.
Miss M. Josephine Reese read an cssay
on “Fiction as an Educator.”” 'The es
sayist mentioned the classes of current
literature, the effects of certain kinds of
reading on the mind, and drew from her
subject numerous interesting points. Miss
Reese read in a distinct, pleasant voice.
A vocal golo by Miss Katie M. Robin
son from Gumbest’s ““Ye Merry Birdg,”
was well rendered and prodaced a good
eflect.
*(radle of Our Mation”’ was the timely
subject of Wm. B. Crownshield’s oration.
He said in afew days we would be cele
brating our 108th anniversary of American
independence. During these ycars how
rich and .powerful had our country
grown. That' ecountry . which de
manded for tself a place among
the nations of the earth then numbered
thirteen colonies. Now forty-cight States
with their filty millions of people are en
closed within its vast boundaries. lis
wealth has more than deubled every ten
years and its g:;uductsarc earried (o every
nation of the globe. Although the
youngest of the nations it takes its stand
as the forcmost. e concluded with an
cloquent peroration.
Miss Leila Grace Bowers chose “Love
Lightens Labor’ as the title of her essay,
and succeeded in saying many pretty
things. Her essay was admirably writ
ten and the thoughts expressed gave evi
dence of a well-matured mind.
“The Froward Duster” was a humeor
ous reading by Miss Mary B. Rutherford.
The lady read the selection in a ciear
voice and as she evidently understood its
humor the audience enjoyed the reading.
A piano duet from Bellini's ‘“Romeo ct
Juliette” Dy Misses Nebie M. Vaughn and
Annie G. Deck was charmingly rendered
and was much appreciated by the audi
ence.
W. S. Johngon won laurels for himself
this morning by his ormtion, subjec:,
“Tact and Talent.”” He defined tactand
talent in turn and then clearly arrayed
the two in the race of lifes
Tact could be successful without
talent, but talent never without tact.
In all the practical purposes of life tact
superseded talent. Mr. Johnson spoke
in an easy, unembarrassed manner, and
had evideméy given his subject abundant
thought. His delivery was very good.
“The Land of Penn” was the title of
Miss Viola Fritchey’s essay, and the es
sayist acquitted herselt most admirably,
paying a high tribute to the Quaker
founder of our State. !
Miss Emma M. Sites recited “A Little
Pilgrim.”” She did herself much credit,
anf her selection was well made.
Miss Katie E. Booscr read an essay on
“Love and Death.”’ It was full of ex
cellent thoughts, well put together and
the essay was read in- a clear, distinet
voice.
A vocal solo by Miss Roberta Vaughn,
““Creole Lover’s Song,” was appreciated
by the audience. The young lady sang
it with much expression.
Charles C. Whiteman’s oration was
based on the ‘“Value of Time.” He
spoke of the opportunities of life, which
once lost would never return. Time
was so precious that there was never
but one moment in the world
and that was taken away Dbefore
another was given. The present might
be long or it might be short, but the fu
ture depended entirely upon how we
spend it. 'We couldn’t possess time; we
could only use it. ‘The orator had a good
delivery and spoke with clearness.
Miss H. Alice Speese recited ‘‘Brier
Ilose” in an admirable manner, and she
brought out clearly the spirit of the se
lection.
Miss NoraJ. Early prepared the ‘“Class
Prophecies,”” and J{liss ‘Anna M. Ken
nedy read them. They were prepared in
good taste and contained nothing that
could offend the most sensitive. Pleasant
references were made to individual grad
uates, and the prophetess saw many
things in the future lives of the class
members that were amusing as well as
flattering. Miss Kennedy read in a dis
tinet voice, and the audience smiled aud
ibly as one pleasantry after another was
read.
“Not Now” was the subject of
Miss Aunnie Cooper’s essay and the
quict easy manner in which she read,
sttracted much attention. She
breught out some excellent points as
to the proper time for the beginning
of the struggle of life.
A Voezl Solo, sung by Miss Katie
[Robinson, was rendered in admirable
style and was highly enjoyed. Miss
licbinson posesses an excellent voice
and has perfect control over it. She
displzyed to great advantage her
musical training.
The exercises were concluded just as
the hands of the Capitol cloek pointed to
124 y the singing of Oflenbach’s ‘‘Rustic
Festival” by the whole class.
The audience then dispersed with
many complimentary comments upon the
various features of the program ana the
creditable manner in which the gradu
ates had acquitted themselves.
YESTERDAY'S CABINET SESSION.
Wasninceroy, June 26.—The Cabinet
meeting yesterday wasattended by all the
members. The scssien lasted over three
hours and was mainly devoted to the con
sideration of the Fiz John Porter bill.
No conclusion was reached and the mat
ter will be taken up again at the next Cab
inet mecting. The Swaim ccurt martial
was also under consideration, but was
not finally acted upon. It is expected
that the detail for the court will be an
nounced in a few days.
IKE BUZZARD IN LANCASTER.
LANcAsTER, June 26 —Sheriff High ar
rived from Chicago last evening, bring
ing with him Ike Buzzard, the Welsh
Mountain desperado, who was recaptured
last week. Almost a thousand persons
were at the station when the train arrived
with the prisoner and all were anxious to
catch a glimpse of him. He was taken
at once to prison and placed in an iron
clad cell.
Practical Democratie Civil Service Reform.
Philadelphia Item,
Gov. Pattison is filling all the vacan
cics he can control with people of his
own political stripe, carrying his parti
sanship into public institutions that have
hitherto been free from politics. Some
of his recent appointments present no
rccommendation beyond political sym
pathy, and are as unsuitable as they
could well be. This is Democratic Re
form.
A PHYSICIAN’S FATAL FALL,
HoxespaLk, June 26.—Dr. Daniel Ut
ter of Starrucca, was found yesterday
morning at the foot of the stairs at his
residence unconscious, his skull being
fractured. Ile died a few moments after
being discovered. The Coroner returned
a verdict that death was caused by acci
dentally falling down stairs,
POLITICAL NOTES,
Democratic parsimony threatens to
cripple the operations of the Government
Printing Office.
Members of the Senate Appropriations
Committee believe that Congress will be
able to adjourn sine dic on July 5.
The Southern Democrats will practi
cally leave the choice of a Presidential
candidate to the delegations from New
York, New Jersey and Indiana.
The members of the Republican Na
tional Commiitee which willmeetin New
York to-day, have all arrived in New
York city. It wassaid B. F. Jones, of
Pittsburg, wiil preside at the mecting of
the committee to-day and that S. B. El
kins, of New Mexico, will be secretary.
Ex-Senator Barnum, of Connecticut;
Serator M'Pherson, of New Jersey, Gen
eral Roger A. Pryor, of New York, and
Sepator Gorman, of Maryland, were clos
eied at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New
York, last evening, in Senator Gorham’s
rooms. General i’ryor went from them
o General Dutler, on the floor below,
everal times during the evening. It was
said that efforts werc being made to in
duce Butler to withdraw from the Presi
dential race. Others denied that there
was any political significance in the meet
ing.
THI OLD NORTH STATE.
The Denmcrn!fi]h‘ided on the Presidency.
Rarneiem, N. C., June 26.—The Demo
cratic State convention vesterday nomi
nated General Alfred M. Scales for Gov
ernor and Charles M. Stedman for Lieu
tenant Governor. The delegation to
Chicago is divided between Bayard and
Cleveland. A dispatch was reccived from
(General Scales anvouncing his aceceptance
of the nomination. ;
WM. SCOTT,
PRACTICAL HATTER,
313 BRIGGS STREET.
Manufactures and Alters Hilk Hats
to Confirm to the Latest Style.
Avlso Cleens, Colors and Repairs
Felt Hats of every Description
Ladies Silk Riding lats a Specialty.
313 BRIGGS ST.
- ORDER A PAIR
Famous $5.00 Pantaloons
MADE TO ORDER. - FIRST CLASS.
COOVER'S DRY GOODS STORE,
TAILORING DEPARTMENT, SEGOND FLOOR,
NO. 4 SOUTH MARKET SQUARE.
GRAND OPENING!
GOLDSMITH’S
MAMMOTE
j
329 MARKET STREET. 329
Is now open for public inspection. Ever;body is invited to ecall and ex
amine the extensive stock of Clothiog, as well as to admire one
of the FINEST CLOTHING ESTABLISH
MENTS IN THE CITY. A
The splendid interior of the large room will be brilliantly lighted in the
evening, and attendants will be glad to show callers through the various
departments.
THIS NEW PLACE
is a credit to the capital city, and those who visit it will agree in this state
ment.
The store is to be strictly a One-Price cs
tablishment -- something long
needed in this City.
THE CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT
It nicely carpeted and comfortable for Jadies. It isone of the handsomest
rooms in Central Pennsylvania.
FOR SAL: EVERYWHERE.
WHOLESALE HOUSEK
FLA LI IR ETI RIS, 1P A.
DRANDS—TIenry Clay, 10 cent segar ; Royal Panch, 10 cent segar ; Lily of Key
West, 5 cent segar ; Plantation, 5 cent segar ; Red Rooster, 5 cent segar.
LADIES’ |
BUTTON BOOTS, - 8135
LADIES’
KID BUTTON BOOTS, 8175
LADIES’
WALKING SHOES, 98 CTS.
MISSES’
SCHOOL SHOES, - §$L25
CHILDREN’S
Dress Shoes Very Cheap and
Durable.
T\
MEILY'S
N4&216 MARKET ST
EfiUSSEPS, _VELV’E'I‘
INGRAIN CARPETS |
SEEGER'S,
Dll Market Street.
APP[I.I_I,q now-]['!limgd to n!:lg INgnargcms of the AI ln H ,
LATEST ST YLHEH,
At prices that never before were eqnalled by
A FIRST-CLASS CUSTOM TAILOR.
SUITS, 's'lB’ 's/?0, 's‘22, 's‘(?4
And upwards, our 335 and $4O eni:s are well worth $8 to £l2 more.
Remember that all our work is done by first class workmen and trimmed
in the best manner possible.
APPERL, ithe London Tailor,
; No. 5 South Market Square,
Two doors below the Jones’ House.
- BOWMAN & CO'S
POPULAR DRY 60005 HOUSE,
326 Market Street,
Is the place for
JERSEY COATS FOR $1.25, $1.50, $1.75 AND $2.00.
LAWNS, 5,6, 8 AND 10 CENTS.
CALICOES, 4, 5 AND 6 CENTS.
Parasols in all the newest styles.
We are offering the cheapest dress goods in Harrishurg.
Ladies’ Wrappers, Aprons and Children's Dresses very cheap.
FOR MEN,
WOMEN AND CHILDREN,
| You ask yourself how far will this
| week's wages go toward shoeing
f my family; be convinced
! what you can save on
BOOTS AND SHOES
|
] By going to the largest
| BOOT AND SIOE HOUSE.
G.W. MEILY,
NA&2I6 MARKET ST
Now i the time 3 substtibe for
THE STATE JOURNAL,
delivered to all parts of the city by
carriers for
15 CENTS PER MONTH.
The only paper published in the
state devoted to the interest of the
people.
Employment Bureau.
Parties aceking employment, aud persons
desiring servants, can avail themselves
ot the advantage of advertising in this
paper their wants. Ordinary advertise
ments will be inserted for 25 cts.
MeDonell Hotel
Cor. State and Spruce Sts.,
Boarding by the Day Wesk or Month.
S. L. McDONELL., Propr.
0. . GROSS & SII,
Druggists
Fatey Goods, ?aihts, s & Glase
Avritists’ Materials at
Best Prices.
Prescriptions a Specialty.
§SE ectrie Night Bell.
It always pays to go to
Dr. RAYSOR’S
DRUGC STORE.
LINGOLY CEMETERY.
Special notice, at this seasen of the
year, is called to Lincoln Cemeteuy.
As a resting place for the dead i 3 a
necessity, the sooner one is procured
the better, and now is the best time
to procure your ‘ots, at reasonable
prices. The ground is being well
improved, censequently raising the
value of the lots. Morcover the lots
can be improved at this season at but
small cost.
All persons, irrespective of de
nomination. can purchase lots in the
Cemetery. Lots can be purchased
for 88, %10, 815 and $2O.
INTERMENTS IIN LOTS.
BRI 3 L o o raca bsk zibsaseisieir sR D
CHUHOTON . .citivsvrasvivisssondisosssdinises ik 0D
INTERMENTS IN SINGLE SECTION.
TG, v« puies v itysny i 46 4 4 Lenad sl & susive G D
SRR - i s i ciitone bR
Any information can be had of the
secretary, J. P. SCOTT, 605 South
street.
NEP AL BEVENT SSOELTO,
PENN;?:)%?I;{L’ANIA
ASSURANCE OF DENEMS,
Home Office, Pittshurg, Pa.
Brancu Orrice:
18 NORTH THIRD STREET
Harrisburg, Pa.
Szcknesf,Acmdents,Uldfi_ge and Burial Fund
BENEFITS.
Special Charter Under the Act of 1874,
for Beneficial Purposes.
Branch Offices in Most of the Prin
cipal Cities.
- T%le Wonderful
RESTORER.
When the Hair begius to f3ll
Use Juice's Restorer.
When the IHair begins to fide
Use Joice's Restorer.
When the Hair grows gray
Use Joice's Restorer.
It wili Restore the llair to its
patural color.
It will Tmpart to the IHair life,
strength and beauuy.
It will arrest falling lair and give
bealth to the scalp.
And as a dressing nothing cin be
more beautifa! and agreeable. It is
elegantly perfamed and renders the
Hair soft, plaint and lifelike. It also
serves to give the Hair that peculiar
richness and coler which is always so
essential to a complete toilet. Re
member this preparation is not a dye.
Remember it contains no impurities.
This also remember, all who have
used it are loud in its praise. Kvery
bottle guaranteed to rgstore the Hair
to the full ratural shade. “ To the joy
and satisfaetion of all who use it. See
testimonials.
For sale at Dale & Hart's, Mrs. M.
E Joice's Hair Store, 118 South Duke
street, also John T. Joice’s Shaving
Saloon, Market street, York, I'a.
“IWSURE BERORE TOO LATE.”
I will offer Special Rates until April
Ist to all persons desiring
Fire Insurange.
None but First Class Stock Com
panies represented.
“No AsSESSMENTS DEMANDED,”
W. K. VERBEKE, JR.,
General Insurance Agent.
Orrice—Trust Bailding (Ist floor,
rear entrance),
Harriseure, PExy' A,
STATE JOURNAL AGENTS.
Parties desiring the Jourxar, can
obtain it from any of our agents, as
follows:
WEST CHESTER,
G. L. Frye
(State Journal For Sale.)
BELLEFONTE, PA.,
Roßerr WiiniauMs.
(State Jourpal For S.ije.)
MIDDLETOWN,
W. B, Huanes,
(State Journal For Sale)
STEELTON,
R. D. PoxpEXTER.
(State Journal For Sale)
LUKE WIHITE, SR,
C(IGAX AND NEWSPAPER EMPORIUM,
419 South 7Tth Street,
: PuiLaverenia, Pa.
(State Journal for Sale.)
J. . MORRIS,
TONSORIAL ARTIST.
Cigars For Sale.,
126 Wylie Avenue,
Pirrssora, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
N. L. BUTLER,
SHAVING and BAIR CUTIING SALOON
South Street, larrisburg, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
J. G M. BROWN,
Main Street,
Yorxk, Pa.
(State Jonrnal For Sale.)
1. J. MANN,
Ow. Ciry, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale.)
UNION NEWS STAND,
I'ENN’'A R. R. DEPOT,
Harziserre.
(State Journal For Sale.)
T. L. WIITE,
TONSORIAL ARTIST,
CuaMßeßrsßura, Pa.
(State Journal For Sale )
NEWS STAND 4
LOCIIIEL HOTEL,
HArrissußG.
(State Journal for Sale.)
EIGKS AND BURNLEY’S

BOOK STORI,
Wirriamsrort® I’a.
(St:te Journal for Sale.)
A. A. GERY,
R ading, Pa
(State Journsl for Sale.)
RICHARD JOHNSON,
Caruisre, PPA.
(State Journal For Sale.)
CHARLES LANDNE,
111 East Harrison street,
Cuicaco. 2
J. 1. REED,
41 Sheeten street,
Bavrivore
J. SMITIHL WILLIAMS,
10 Wright street,
\Vn.KEs-BAmiH.
GEORGE CHRISTIAN,
Cigar Store,
Atlantic zvenue,
Arraxtic Ciry, N. J.
D. W. DENNY,
FrankuLin.
IHOLMES ANCHARD,
Logan House,
Arroona DPPENN'A.
Harrisburg Colored Church
and Society Directory.
Wesley Unton Church, corner South street and
Tanners avenue—Pastor, Rev. Z. T. Pearsall.
Services at 10:30 and 7:30 every Sunday. Sun
day school at 1:30. Jos. B. Popel, Superintend
ent.
Bethel M. E. Church, Shortstreet—Pastor, Rev.
Amos Wilson. Services at 10:20 and 7:30 every
Sunday. Sagbath s:hool 1:30. Richard Snaively,
Superintendent.
Elder Strect Presbyterian Church—Services at
10:30 and 7:20. Sabbath school at 1:30. Thomas
Miljer, Superintendent.
Second huptist Chureb, Eleventh street near
Market—Pastor, Rev. Beverly Jones. Ser
vices every Sunday at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath
school 1:30. Robert Carrington, Superintend
ent.
Free Will Baptist Chureh, corner William and
Colderstreets—Pastor, liev. Frazer. Services
every Snnda.{' at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath
school 1:30. William Burrows, Superintend
ent.
Union A. M. E. Church, Tanners avenue—Pas
tor, Rev. Z. Johnson. Services every Sunday
at 10:30 and 7:30. Sunday sehool 2P. M.
Wesley Mission, Marion street near Colder—
Pastor, Rev. Bushrod. Services every Sab
bath at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath school 1:39
Daniel Williamz,Superiatendent.
SOCIETIES.
Brotherly Love Lodge 836, G. U, 0., of O. F.;
nall in South street; regular meeting every
Mwnday nizht.
Chosén Friends Lodge, Masonic hall, Odd Fel
lows building, South street regular meeting
every alternate Thursday night.
Golden Chain Counecil Hall, South Street,
Franklin Hall; regular mecting every Tuesday
"dood
Samaritan Council, hall East State street;
refiular meeting every Tne&ix(u{lmght.
. Household of Ruth Hall, Odd Fellows Hall
Slon;h street; regular meeting every Tuaesday
night.
Paxton Lodge, No. 18, A. Y. M., mects every
Monday evening, at Franklin Hall, South st.,
Harrisburg.
GO TO ;
. TRORLEYS DRUG STOR
: 3
WEST STEELTON.
FOR
FANCY ARTICLES,
PURE DRUGS,
MEDICINES AND SPICES,
, At Harrisburg Prices.
|
* PERFUMERY.
[ STEELTON, PA.
« T. EAUPMAN,
DT GODS AND (ROGERIES,
A full and well selected stock
All'of which he is selling at
the lowest prices.
- Froxt Streer, SterLTON, Pa.
PRACTICAL DRESSMAKER.
Faney and Plain Sewing
DONE TO ORDER.
Mrs. Ella Howanrd,
1&9 Fourth Street.
])—EL\';\" SYLVANIA RAILROAD
On and after November ISth, 1883, the Pas.
senger Trains of the Pemuyinnlu Railroad
Company will depart from Harrisburg and ar.
rive at Fhtladelphia, New York, Pittsburg and
Erie as follows:
EASTWARD.
Philadeiphia Express daily (ex t Mondays)
at 1:20 a. m.. arrives at Phihjalm at 425 a.
n., and New York at 7:00 a. m,
Fast Line daily at 4.7 3. ~ arrives at Phila
delphia at 7:50 a” m., and New York 11:20 a. m.
Harrisburg Express daily except (Sunday) at
7:00 a. m., arrives at Philadelphia at 10:20 a.m.
and New York at 1:20 1;. m,
Columbia Accommodation daily (except Sun
day) at 7:15 2. m., arrives at Philadelpwia at
11:45 a. . and New York at 3:40 {l. m-
Lancaster Accommodation dai y (oxce&t Sun
day) at 7:40 & m., arrives at Lancaster 8:55a. m.
New York Limited Express of Puliman Palace
Cars datly at 2:25 P. 11, arrives at Philadelphia
at 5:15 p. m, and New York at 7:30 p. m.
Lock Hlaven Express daily (except Sunday) at
11:50 a. m., arrives at Philadelphia at 2:15 Pp.m.,
and New York 6:20 p. m,
Johnstown Express daily (except Sunday) at
12:301\}). m., arrives at Philadelphia at 5:05 P. m.,
and New York at 8:50 p. 1.
Day Express daily at 4:20 P« m., arrives at
Philadelphia at 7:77 p. m., and New York at
10:20 p. m.
Harrisburg Accammmlmiun. via Colnmbia,
daily (except Sunday) at 4:50 P. m., and arrives
at Philadelplia at o'ls p. m.
Mail Train on Sunday only, 1:00 P. m., arrives
at Philadelphia 5:45 p. n., New York 9:30 p. m.
Middletown Accommodation on Saturday only
5:10 p. m. Daily (except Saturday and Sunday)
6:00 p. m.; every week day at 1:00 p, m,
Mail Express daily at 11:40 P. m., arrives at
Philadelphia 3:05 2, t., ang New York at ¢:lu
a. m.
All Through Trains conneot at Jersey City
with boats ot “*Brooklyn Annex” for Brooklyu,
N. Y., avoiding doubfe ferriage and journey
htrough New York Qity., .
WESTWARD.
Western Express daily at 12:30 a. m., arrives at
Altoona at 4:2) a. ~ and Pittsburg atB:osa. mi.
Pacific Express dalfly at 3:10 a, ~ arrives ai
Altoona at 7:50 a. m., and Pittsbur at 1:00 p. m.
Chicago Limitad xpress of Pu%lman Palace
Cars daily at 2:10 P. m, arrives at Altoona at
5:25 p m. and Pittshurg 9:00 pP. m,
Mail Train daily at 11:10 a. m., arrives at At
toona at 3:50 p. w., and Pittshurg 8:45 p. m.
Fast Line daily at 3:15 P. m., arrives at Al
toona at 7:20 p- wl, ane Pittsburg at 11:30 p, m.
Mifflin Aecoramodation daily (except Sunday)
at 10:19 a. n:., 5:90 and 10:05 P. wi., on Sunday at
10:10 a. m,
STEELTON TRAINS leave Harrisburg daily
(except Sunday) at 6:45, 7:00, 7:15, 7:40 a. m.,
12:50, 4:50, 11:¢0'p. m. Daily (except Naturday
and Sunday) 5:45 and 6:00 P. m. On Saturdays
only, 5:00 and 5:10 p. m. On hunda&y only, 1:00 p.
m. Returning, leave Steelron aily (except
Sunday) 6:32, 6:57, 8:51, 10:42, 10:59 a. m.; 3:52,
7:12 and 9:41 p. m. Dally (except Saturday and
Sunday) 6:10p, m. On Saturday only, 5:13 p.wm.
On Sunday ouly, 5:31 a. m, and 10:59 a, m.
PHILADELPHIA & ERIE R. R.DIVISION.
MAIL TRAIN daily (except Sunday) at 4:2¢
a. m., arrives at Williamsport at 8:10 a. m., and
Erie at 7:55 p. .
NIAGARA EXPRESS daily (except Sun.
day) at 11:15 a. m., arrives at Williauns]gort at
2:50 p. M., Liock Naven at 3:55 p. m., and Renovo
5:10 p. m,
LOCK HAVEN ACCOMMODATION daily
[except Sunday) at 3.2 p. ~ arrives at Wil
famsport at 7:0) p, m., and Lock Haven at 8:05
D, 1.,
- Time eards and fall information ean be ob
tained at the Ticket office at the Station.
J. R, WOUD, General Passenger Agent.
__g;lfx_s. E. PUGH, (}ongl_-j.ll_nglnag’g[.ri_ L
CUM BERLAND VALLEY
RAILROAD,
TIME TABLE.
IN EFFECT MAY 206, 1884
* DOWN TRAINS,
|Dillsburg
Passenger
New York
_Express .
{Accom'n ..
T
f,.!%-se_rfis
lFast Mail.
Harrisburg
~Accom™n.
Harrisburg
__Express.
! i ! i ]
Leave— ADMANMAMA. M. P.M P, M.IP.M
Martinsburg ... ceeeleae.f 818).....i3 98], ... Bl
Hagerstown ... ceeliee 91511 454 15) 0 05....
Greencastle ........\....| 9 3722 104 431 S 5 ..
Ghambersburg. 450 7 0010 00112 37/5 15| 9 50l .
Shippensburg.. 4 537 2510 20,1 0354310 10....
Newvi11e......:5 157 5010 46, 1 276 0510 30,.,..
Car1i51e........|5 438 15/11 Upl 1 68,8 3010 50j....
Mechaniesburg 6 10'8 4511 21' 2 20,7 00,11 ;I;3‘ 10
Ar. Harrisburg. 8 259 20(11 40 2 557 SOll 3014 40
ACADTAL MLP. MLIPMIP. M.IP.M
P TRAINS,
. Dilisburg
| Passenger
'Harrisb'g |
| Express |
Harrisburg|
! __Accom’n./
| Day g
! L'_.gprcs;t_-
| Southern f
| Mail... .
;.,Accom'n 5
| N 7 Orleans
i Express
i | | ' |
Leave— AN AM.AM. P.M P.M.'P. M. P\
Harrisburg .. 4 30/ 7 3511 404 05/ 0 25' 6 55(1 45
Mechanicsh'g . 4 05 8 0212 (4 30{ 6 50. 9 222 10
Car1i51e1.......;5 20{ 8 3012 2214 55| 7 20! 9 45/ Ar.
Newville .....15 45 9 00112 425 20l 7 5010 10 ....
Shippensburg ¢ 10 9 25 1 005 41] 8 1510 38!, ...
Chambersh’y.. 5 40 9 57} 1 24'6 10‘ 8 40111 00.....
Greencastle .. 7 (5110 22, 1 448 338'Arr. |Ar. |-
Hagerstown... 7 30,10 55| 2 30!7 06!.....1.... 4 . "
Ar.Martinsh'g: Ar. 11 45| 4 057 56"‘
(AMIALMLIP. M. P.M{P.ALIP. M.P. &
New Orleans L‘xfress and Southern Maii
west, and Fast Mail and New Yoek Express
east, run daily. All other trains daily except
Sunday.
TRAINS LEAVE HARRISBURG -
For Williams' Grove and Dillsburg at 7.835 a.
m., 1.45 p. m.. 405 p. m. and 6.25 p. m. Return
ing arrive at 6.35 2. m., 11.49 a. m., 4.40 p. m, and
7.39 p. m, i
For Mercersburg, Loudon, Richmogd and
points on Southern Pennatvzlvanla railroad at
7.35 a. m. and 11.40 a. m. Returning arrive at
11.4% a. m. and 7.50 p. m.
For Mt. Holly, Pinegrove Furnace and Gettys
bunf, and points on Gettysburg and Harrisbury
Railroad and South Mountain Railroad at 7.3
a.m., 11'40 a. m. and 4,05 p. m. Returning ar.
rive at 11.49 a. m., '.'.{vsvp. m, and 7.3) p, m.
For Mount Alte, Wayneshoro nmf peoints on
Mount Alto Railroad at 7.5 a. m. and 4.05 p. m.
Returning arrive at 11.40 a. m. and 7.30 p. m.
Trains on Shenandoali Vulley ratlroad con
nect with trains leaving at 11.40 a. m. and 4.3) a.
m+ Returning, with trains arriving at 11.40 a.
m.-and 11.3) p. .
A.H. M'CULLOUGH, J. F. BOYD,
General Ticket Agent, Superintendent.
JAMES CLARK, General Agent.
HARRISBU!HY axp POTOMAC
RAILROAD—TIME TABLE No. 40.
Takes effect Monday, October Ist, 1883,
{ SBTATIONS, WES 1D
Mail A¢ i Mall Ae.
AM. ar AM. PN
8 202 25 Ly, Shippensburg, Ar. 12 00 6 40
8 302 35 Ly. Lcesgurg. ¥., Lv. 11 505 3
8 352 40 Lv. Jacksonville, ¥., Lv. |ll 455 26
8 402 45 Ly, Hays Grove, F., Lv. 11 405 21
8 4712 50/Lv. Doners, ¥., Ly. 11 255 18
8 50'2 3 Lv. Longsdorf, F., Lv. 11 32513
8 552 57/ Lv. Huntsdale, Lv.; 11 255 09
9013 62 Lv. Moore's Mill, ~ Lv. 11 235 u 4
9 123 13 Lv. Barnitz, ~ Ly. 11124 43
9 17.3 18 Lv. Mt. Holly Springs, Lv. 11 09'4 4%
9193 21{Lyv. S. Mnt'n Cross'g, ~ Lv. 11 y 414 45
9 493 42/Liv. Boiling Springs, Lv. v 50.4 30
9453 47 Ly. Lel(!l&'hs. ¥ iv. 10 44 410
9 503 52 Ly, Grandtville,'F., Lv. (10 304 10
9 553 56/ Ar. M. &D. Junction, Lv. 110 254 0a
10 90 p.xt|Ly. M. & D. Junction, Ar. |.... p.x
10 15|, . |Ar. Bowmansdale, Lv. {lO3O ....
AN, . e T R L
Mail Train leaving Shippensburg 420 a. m.
connects with C. V. train arriving at Harrisburg
at 11:00 a. m. Accommodation Train leaviuy
Shippensburg at 2:25 p. m. econneets with . V.
train arriving at Harrisburg 5:50 p. m.
Train leaving HMarrisbarg at 7:25 a. m. wili
connect with . &P, train leaving M. &D.
Junction at 10:090 4. m. Train leav%ng Harrls
burg at 3:10 1) m. connects with H, & L. tralo
leaving M. & D. Junction at 4:05 p. m.
Train leaving Shippensburg at 8:20 a. in. wil'
onnect with train leaving NS. M. Crossing for
Carlisle at 9:3) a. m. 'Train leaving \li b
Junection at 10:35 a. m. will conneet with trais
leaving S. M. Crossing tor Carlisle 11:21 a. m
F Flag statiops.
| ROB'T, H, MIDDLETON,
Superintendent
BOILING SPRINGS, Pa., Sept. 25,1883,

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