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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, August 02, 1884, Image 4

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Notes to Contributors,
ANY communication intended for publicatio
must be written on one gide of the paper and the
full name of the writerattached.
No communication will be published without
charge, 1f consisting of more Pban three pages of
paper.
Xlel communications intended for sgubllc&tlon
muskt be sent in on or before Thursday of each
week.
Correspondents will make their letters short,
poltnted and newsy, as long letters crowd others
out.
Correspondence solicited and agents wanted
throughout the country. Snm%le copies sent
free. Supscription terms invariably in advance.
Liberal inducements offered to a.%ents. Address
JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,
Harrisburg, Pa.
A&~ The office of THE JOURNAL PUBLISHING
CoMPANY has been removed to the corner of
South strebt and Tanners’ avenue, where all
business wiil be transacted. Send in your Job
Printing aud subseriptions.
REPUBLICAN COUNTY CONVENTION.
The Republicans of Dauphin county,
and all favorable to the maintenance of
Republican principles, are respectfully
requested to assemble at their usual places
for holding delegate elections on
SATURDAY, AUGUsT 9, 1884,
in the townships, between the hours of 5
and 7 o’clock, and in the boroughs and
city of Harrisburg, between the hours of
7:30 and 9 o’clock p. 3., for the purpose
of electing two delegates in each town
ship, borough, precinct and district, in
the waris and precincts of the
city of Harrisburg, in the same ianner as
in the townships, boroughs and districts
of the county—to represent them in the
County Convention to be held in the
Court House, inthe city of Harrisburg, on
ToESDAY, AuGusT 12, 1884,
at 10 o’clock A. M., for the purpose oi put
ting in nomination a ticket to be pre
sented to the voters of the county at the
ensuing clection.
The following officers are to be nomi
nated :
One person for Congress, subjectto the
district conference.
One person for State Senator.
One person for the Assembly from the
First Legislative district, composed of the
city of Harrisburg, who will be nomi
nated in accordance with the rules gov
erning the’ nominations for city oflices
and under the auspices of the Republican
City Exccutive Committee.
Two persons for the Assembly from
the Second Legislative district composed
of the rest of said county.
One person for Sheriff.
One person for County Treasurer.
Two persons for County Commissioners.
One person for Recorder of Deeds and
Clerk of Orphans’ Court.
Ofi¢ person for Pirector of the Poor.
Two persons for County Auditors.
Jonx H. WEiss, Chairman.
W. H. H. SiEq,
E. W. 8. PARTHEMORE,
Jonx A. HERNMAN,
James Licur,
warteEr H. KeExbiac,
Dr. CnarLes H. CLARK,
Secretaries
Republican City Convention,
The Republicans of the city of Hurris
burg and all favorable to the maintain
ance of Republican principles, are re
spectfully requested to assemble at their
several wards and precincts for holding
delegate elections on Saturday, August
2d, 1884, at 7:50 r. »., for the purpose of
naming persons to be voted for on Satur
day, August 9th, 1884, as delegates to the
city convention.
You are also requested to meet at the
geveral ward and precinet houses on Sat
urday evening, August 9th, 1884, be
tween the hours of 6:30 and 9 p. ~ for
the purpose of electing delegates from
those named in each precinct and ward
(in accordance with the rules of the Re
publican City Commitice), to represent
them in the city convention to be held in
the court house in this city, on Monday
evening, August 11th, 1884, at 7:30
o’clock, for the purpose of placing in
nomination one person for the Assembly
from the first legislative district composed
of the city of Harrisburg.
. By order of the Republican City Com
mittee, W. H. BMITH,
President.
Attest: E. W. S. PARTHEMORE, Sec.
GATHERED ABOUT TOWN.
Interesting Ite—;n_é Gleancd by
Journal Reporters.
Political talk 18 at fever heat.
The recent rain hLas been quite
beneficial.
Mr. R. . Bowser, of P’hiladelphia,
p2id the burg a flying visit.
Mr. Harry Clark, of Middletown,
was in the city during the week.
Wesley Missian church will held
their quarterly meeting next Sunday.
We are pleased to see Miss Susie
Maxwell, of New York in our midst
again. *
Preparations are being made for
Childrens Day at Wesley Sabbath
school.
Dr. Phillip Barber, of Norfoik,Va.,
spent a few hours in the city on
Tuesday.
Mr. C. M. Brown has taken posses
sion of the United States Hotel bar—
ber shop.
The Hod Carriers Association of
Harrisburg, picnicked at Mont Alto,
on Tuesday. -
“Dead men never lie.” No, but
the men who preach their funerals
make a terrible strain on the truth.
Wm. H. Miller, of Philadelphia,
and Charles Odonnell, of Pittsburg,
passed through the city on Monday.
The excursion of the Second Bap
tist church which took place last
Sunday was largely attended not
withstanding the rain.
There are colored men in Harris
burg who sre active workers in the
republican party that should have a
position of some kind.
Rev. Lawrence Miller, of Elder
Street Presbyterian Chureh, preached
an eloquent and instructive sermon
on last Sabbath evening.
Pen Mar, the beautifal excursion
point on the South Mountain Yo:d,
cinnot be secured by colored excur
gionists. This is in the state of
Pennsylvania.
W. H. Conrad our energetic Wil
liamsport correspondent spent a few
hours in the city Wednesday, enrcute
for Gettysburg where he will remain
during the encampment and write up
,\the camp notes for the JouRNAL.
NEW DOMINION,
Magtixssure, W. Va,, Jaly 29.=
The rain cante in {ime to revive the
corn.
The messenger of death has been
calliog our citizens away very rapidly
in the past few weeks. The follow
ing have died since my last. Mrs.
Dicey Smith, aged 84 years, died at
hes residence July 24. Levina Wil
lis died at her residence after a lin
gering iliness.
“The Children's Day” at the Mt.
Zion M. E. church Sunday evening,
was in every way a grand affair. In
decorating, the ladies and gentlemen
displaged an artistic taste rarely
equaled, which reflected great credit
upon them.
The county counvention met last
Saturday and elected delegates to the
state and congressional conventions,
Messrs. G. W. Greene, . Allemon
and Rev. 11. E. Keyes were the regu
lar selected colored delegates from
here. A motion that all who want
might go was made, one of the white
delegates said that J. R. Clifford
would like to go, and at the ssme
time moved that his name be annexed
to the list. Upon this (in his absence)
another white delegate moved that J.
W. Corsey’s name be annexed. Thig
is the reason why Martinsburg has
five colored delegates.
We are off for the convention at
Parkersburg.
WirLLiamsrorr, July 29.
Mr. William West, of Elmira, N.
Y., was in the city on Tuesday.
Mies Cora Davis, who has been
visiting friends in the western part
of the state, returned home on
Wednesday.
Mr. J. B. Johnson, formerly of
Washington, D. C., arrived in the
city on Tuesday from Harrisburg to
gpend a few days.
Mr. Robert Brown, the ever popu
lar hackman, bas one of the finest
hacks in the city. Any person wish
ing a first class drive weuld do well
to cousult him.
Mr. John Slaughter left last Satur
day for Washington, D. C., to re
main away for a fewdays and mingle
with the capital people.
Y our correspondent will be absent
from his post for a period of 10 or
14 days,” but this column will be
looked after by one who has been
there before.
A party of young people gathered
at the residence of Mr. Charles Kelly
last Thursday evening to give Mr.
Charley Brown a grand send off,
previous to his leaving for his home
in Altoona.
Mr. S. S. Lacy has taken the
agency of the Blamne and Logsn
books, including the history of the
two candidates. Any persons wish
ing the books or any campaign goods
can call on the above named gentle
man at Anderson’s barber shop, Pen
alley.
The Bethel Sunday school held
their annual picnic on last Thursday.
Everything passed off fine, over 350
people being present, enjoying the
festivities of the day. The only
thing that occurred during the day
was 3 young lady and gentleman went
out to fish for bass, but when the
young man cast his line into the
flowing river something secemed to
grasp the hook. Both young lady
and gentleman took firm hold of the
rod- With a few wild shricks they
managed to land to the surface a
huge minnow about four inches long.
Carusce, Pa., July 30.
We were blessed with four days
rain.
Moonlight is increasing.
The A. M. E. Bethel Sunday-school
scholars are jubilent over their new
library.
Corporal Jesse G. Thompson, Post,
No. 440, G. A. R., Dept. of Pa., was
organized on July 2d, 1884, by order
of the Department Commander, with
the following officers: Wm. Chap
man, commander; Wm. H. Wood
burn, 8. V. commander; Milton Lane
J. V. commander ; Jos. N. Jordan,
Adjutant of Post; John A. Simonds,
quarter master; Henry Williams,
chaplain; Chas. H. Howard, officer
of the day; Abraham Parker, officer
of the guard; Wm. J. Jackson, sur
geon ; Henry Smallwood, sergant
major ; Alfred Humes, quarter master
sargent.
Don't forget the Daughters of Tem
perance picnic on 21st of Angust.
All are invited.
Miss Jennie Gatewood, of Tenn
essee, will be home on the 18th. A
short vacation.
Mrs. Ida Profater leaves for Long
Branch Wednesday ; Also, Mrs Pe
ter Hodge and Miss Ida Thompson,
start for Winchester, Va., soon on a
three weeks visit.
Wm. Chapman, commander and
Jos N. Jordan, of Corporal J. G. T.
Post, attended the meeting of the
committee of the Grand Army Posts
of Cumberland, Franklin and Daa
phin counties, held at General Boyd's
office at Chambersburg, for the pur
pose of making arrangements for
holdingacamp fire, Willlame' Grove
was eelected a 8 the place to hold it
and September 2d 1884 the date.
Farther notice will be given.
It is with feelings of regret that we
are called upon in this issue to chroni
cle the death of Wm. Alexander, of
consumption, only son of Anthony
and Barbara Alexaoder, which took
place at his father's residence on North
street this morning. He was a bright
and promising young man. His pa
rents haye the sympathy of the com
munity in their sad bereavement.
Zotes from up the Vally by Occa
sionally.
CuaMßerssUßG, July 30th, 1884,
Rain! Rain! Rain! Rather hard
on campmeetings and pic-ni¢, but
splendid for vegetation.
There was an excursion from Balti
more, on July 23d, under the aus
pices os the faithful few. The excur
sion numbered about 150 and was
accompanied by the Empire Cornet
Band.
Mr. James Rhoads and wife are
visiting friends in our city, and are
the guests of Mr. Joseph Winters.
The entertainment given in Re
pository Hall, on Thursday evening
24th, by the Zion church, was a per
fect success. Oar people did credit
to themselves by turning out in large
numbers.
Prof. Wm. Howard Day addressed
the assemblage in his usual able and
instructive maoner, his subject being
“Justice, Liberty and Equality.” His
remarks were highly appreciated and
listened to with the closest attention.
Solos were rendered by Mrs. J. L.
Davenport and Miss A. B. Williams,
in a bhighly creditable manner. The
eminent German Pianois:, Prof. Gar
ner, preided at the piano. You
should hear him, he is grand.
The camp at the Island, owing to
the rain, was not the grand success
it otherwise would have been. The
Hall was secared by Supt. Boyd and
the train numbering 15 cars ran into
town. Services were held in the
hall at 3 o’clock ». m. The opening
hymn was sung by the united choirs
of Harrisbarg and Martinburg. Serip
ture reading and prayer by local
preacher Geo. Cartis, ot A. M. E_
church, this city. Mrs. Harriett
Baker of Columbia, was then intro
duced to the audience, and preached
a very able sermon from “lst Cor.,
15 chapter and 55 verse.” “Oh!
Deatn where is thy sting. Oh!
grave where is thy vietory.”” The
exercises were conducted in a quiet
and orderly manner, as became the
Sabbath day. We were glad to meet
several of our most agreeable and
highly respected friends from Mar
tinsburg, should like to have met
your Martinsburg correspondent here
last Sabbath. What is to prevent
you my co-worker from meeting me
at Falling waters on Aug. 13th, and
accompanying Yours truly to Poto
mac Isle. Oar hostess shall be noti
fied in consideration of the double
invasion, to make double preparation.
Mr. Isaac Watson, of McConnels
burg, Fulton county, paid a short
visit to town on 28th.
Miss Mary Mason has returned
from Carlisle, where she has been
spending a few days with [riends.
The Hod Carriers Aasociation ar
rived on the 1:20 ¢ . frain. The
weather being disagreeable, they did
not go to the park, but came direct
to the town. They passed the after
noon in the hall and in visiting points
of local interest. In the evening
they gave a ball and tripped the light
fantastic toe until early morning.
The excursion numbered 200 and
were accompanied by a portion of the
State Capital band.
OCCASIONALLY.
The A. M. E. Zion Church.
Mioprerown,gPA.,, Aug I.—Rev.
T. H. Slater, pastor, is still strug—
ling along.
We had a grand rally on the third
Sabbath of this month. The collec
tion did not come up to our expecta
tion, yot we were thankful for £23.65.
The services were attended with great
blessing at night, we had a crowded
house. Brother Wright,of the Bethel
church preached for us. The Lord's
Supper was administered, and all
went home feeling it was good to
wait upon God. We also like the
readers of the JourNaL to know that
the Zion church at Marietta with its
few members are still alive. We had
a days meeting on Sunday, had a very
good time and collected $21.21 for
the benefit of the church. A woods
meeting will be held by the church,
commencing Saturday evening, Au
gust 2d. closing on Monday. The
meeting will be held at Garber’s
woods hear Maytown, two miles from
Marietta.
y ity 5 A 4
Col. M. S. Quay and Mr. David
Lane were in the city Sunday last,
also handsome Christ McGee,of Pitts
burg. The two former gentlemen
visited Senator Cameron at his Done
gal farm.
The Rock Spring jodge of Hagers
town, Md., has honored Ilarrisburg
by selecting Prof. Howard Day and
Mrs. Josie L. Bibb, as orators of the
day and Jacob T. Cumpton, as mas
ter of ceremonies at the anniversary
of their lodge.
Services in Elder Street Presby
terian Church to-morrow as follows:
Sermon on, aod administration of In
fant baptism at 10:30 A. M. Adalt
baptism and communion at 7:30 P.
M. Rev. Lawrence Miller, pastor.
Sabbath school at 1:30 in the after—
noon. T. J. Miller, Superintendent.
The public cordially invited.
A very excellent concert was given
at Steelton, by a party of ladies and
gentleman from this city, on Tuesday
evening- The participants were Mrs.
C. M. Robinson and daughters Ag
gie and Katie, Miss C. Popel, G. W.
Thomas and Jos. G. Popel.
OLYMPICS VS, NATIONALS,
Playing Nine Men and the Umpire
is why the Nationals Defeated
the Olympics.
About two hundred people assem
bled on the Third street ball grounds,
Monday, not withstanding the threat
ning weather and the slight rain
which came down at intervals. The
enthusiasm at times run high and the
audience expressed admiration at a
good play by a yell which could be
heard for some distance. The game
wasa good one,the work being done by
the batteries, few hits being made off
either. Walters or Thompson ler
bert, first baseman of the Olympics
took care of every thing that came his
way, while Matthews at third distin
guished himself by a fine ranning catch
ofafoul ball. The Nationals were out
plaved at ever point, asd had it not
been for the umpire who boldly gave
decissions against the Olympics they
would have won the game. Hiner
never failed to call one of the Olymp
ics out on strikes, when a man had
two striks on him. Tbe umpiring
was outrageous. Thompson's pitch
ing was one of the features of the
game, only four singles and one
double being made on him. Walter’s
also piteched a good game, but was
badly supported. He struck ount by
the sid of the umpire, ten men. The
following is the score:
Olympics, 000310 2 0 x—6
Nationals, 00011300 2—-7
Base hits, Olympics 7, Nationals 4;
two base hits, Naticnals 1; double
plays by Slentz and Kunkle ; left on
bases, Olympics 5, Nationals 7; errors,
Olympies 9, Nationals 14 ; Uumpire,
Dan. Hiner. Earned runs, Olympie,2.
AN HISTORICAL INCIDENT.
iiow Captain Ingraham, of the U. S.
Steamer St. Louis, Protected anAmerican
Citizen,
The following historical incident will
serve to illustrate what can be done and
has been done by an American when rep
resenting ‘K pluribus unum’ instead of
a faction of our country.
In the summer of 1853 the American
Consul at Smyrna appeared on board the
United States corvette St. Louis, then
in the harbor, and informed Captaia In
graham, commanding the vessel, that the
Austrian Consul had in the most shame
ful manner seized Martin Kosta—a Hun»
carian refugee—who had some time pre
viously filed his declaration of intentions
to become a citizen of the United States.
He had been two years in America, and
was temporarily absent at Smyrna, when
he was seized by three Greek hirelings
and carried on board the Austrian brig of
war Hussar. i
Qur Captain Ingraham immediately
boarded the brig and demanded to see
Kosta. He was told that he was not on
board, but when the Austrians found that
ke was determined to find him they
brought the prisoner. Captain Ingraham
ask(i Kosta: “Are you an American?”’
*Lam."
“Do you demand protection of the
American flag ?”’
1 do.”
“Then you shall have it.”’
This was on the 2d of July. Our Cap
tain informed the Austrian commander
that he would give him four hours in
which to deliver Kosta. This time was
afterward extended at the request of the
American Consul, when the man was de
livered, by compromise, to the French
consul. After a lapse of time Kosta was
set at liberty and settled in the United
States. . Lo
The account of this transaction further
shows that Captain Ingraham bad cleared
his decks to combat the Austrian brig,
schooner and two steamers, a fleet carry
ing thirty-eight guns and 240 men, while
the St. Louis carried 20 guns and 200 men.
The inhabitants gathered on the shore
to witness the combat, and when the man
was given up, thousands cheered for
“America and Kosta.” Parties were
given on shore to the gallant sailors and
the hospitalitics of the town extended,
and “there were no personslike the Amer
icans.”
A STORY is on the rounds to the effect
that the Mayor of Boston sent two pack
ages exactly alike in weight and con
tents by mail a few days ago. One of
them was bound to Paris, France, 3,000
miles or so away, and the postage on it
was 20 cents. The other was destined
for Worchester, 40 miles distant, and the
postage was 28 cents.
THAT
LORILLARD’S CLIMAX
PLUG TOBACCOD
with Red Tin Tag; Rose Leaf Fine Cuat Chew
ing ; Navy Clippings, and Black, Brown and
Yellow SNUFFS are the best and cheapest,
quality considered ?
McDonell Hotel,
Cor. State and Spruce Sts.,
Boarding by the Day Week or Month.
S. L. McDONELL, Propr.
DAESS GOODS,
OMIE A 0 STMMER
Frank J. Hess invites the atten
tion of the Jadies to some special
showings in new dress goods, and
believes there is -nowhere to be found
a collection of good goods in choice
and desirable coloring to equal them.
We name a few :
FRENCH TRICOTINES,
42 INCHES WIDE,
NEW SHADES.
FRENCH CAUPES,
44 INCHES WIDE,
NEW MODE AND
TON SHADES.
ALL WOOL CSHMERES in
bandsome sand-gray, mode, ton and
steel gray, 42 inches wide, 58 cents.
Regular price, 75.
36 INCHJERSEY CLOTHS, em
bracing the new spring colorings, 60
cents a yard.
24 INCH TWILLED VETOVA
Suitings, 25 cents a yard. Ilandsome
shades of brown, giay, mode, green
garnet, tobacco Brown and drysand
shades. These goods are warranted
to give the highest satisfaction both
as to color and wear.
One lot ALL WOOL FRENCH
D:BEGES; 42 inches wide, 50 cents.
Medium and dark gray medium and
light brown mixtures.
TWILLED CASHMERES, wool
faced, 34 inches, new and beautiful
colorings, 25 cents.
SPRING CLOTHS, 54 inches.
Amsazon and French tricot cloths,
$l.OO a yard. Embracing new choice
mixtures and solid colorings.
We are showing light weight
spring cloths in mixed colors at 15
cents made to sell at 25.
Special showing in twelve colors
of English DBrockatelle 121 cents,
regular price 25 cents.
BLACK GOODS.
I'rank J. Hess now offers at the
Black Goods Counter the best col
lection of Black Dress Fabrics for
Spring and Summer to be found in
the city. It 1s not too much to say
we have never been as busy 1n this
special line of goods. We show a
a collection of stuffs not surpassed in
large cities of staple black goods,
and at prices much less for the same
qualities.
WASH DRESS GOODS.
Some new things in wash goods
reminds us to call your attention to a
new line of Bates Seersucker Ging
hams in fine hair line stripes,medium
and wide stripes, neat checks,medium
and broad hair line blocke. The ex
cellent washing qualities of these
goods makes them desirable above
many others.
DRESS TRIMMINGS.
Remember our announcement last
week of special new and handsome
patterns of Satin Passementries,
Chenelle Fringes and Tailor Made
Buttons, covered, ivory, flat and ball
shapes. Also a complete line of
COLORED VELVETS,
for trimming¢ Garnet Navy, Browns,
Gray, Mode, Sand, Myrtle and many
odd shades, not known in any other
establishment. ;
FRANK J. HESS,
Third and Cumberland Sts.
0. P. GROVE.
SWEERING REDUCTION!
BARGAINS !
We offer our Summer Silks,
We offer our Black Silks,
We offer our Colored Silks,
We offer our Spring Dress Goods,
We offer our Remnant Dress Goods,
We offer our Remnant Embroideries,
We offer our Fine Lisle Hose,
We offer our Fine Misses Hose,
"~ We offer our Parasols,
We offer our Seersucker Ginghams,
We offer onr Dress Trimings,
We offer our White Quilts,
AT A
Swoeping Roduction!
LOOKQUTFOR BARGAINS,
0. P. GROVE,
ORDER A PAIR
Famous $5.00 Pantaloons
| MADE TO ORDER. = FIRST CLASS.
COOVER'S DRY GOODS STORE,
TAILORING DEPARTMENT, SEGOND FLOOR,
NO. 4 SOUTH MARKET SQUARE.
J B. FIRST,
ND. § SOUTH THIRD TREET, HARRIBURG.
REAL ESTATE AND BUSINESS AGENT.
COLLECTIONS MADE AND PAID PROMPTLY.
[ have properties for sale in any part of the ciiy; also, same in Steelton.
LADIES’
BUTTON BOOTS, - 8135
LADIES’
KID BUTTON BOOTS, SL7S
LADIES’
WALKING SHOES, 98 CTS.
MISSES’
SCHOOL SHOES, - 8125
CHILDREN’S
Dress Shoes Very Cheap and
Durable.
S
MEILLY'S
N4&216 MARKET ST
Is now prepared to make up garments of the )
e B RBY S'TY L.,
At prices that never before were equalled by
A FIRST-CLASS CUSTOM TAILOR.
SUITS, $lB, $2O, $22, $24
And upwards, our $35 and $4O suits are well worth £8 to $l2 more.
Remember that all our work is done by first- class workmen and trimmed
in the best manner possible.
APPELL, ithe London Tailor,
No. 6 South Market Square,
Two doors below the Jones’ House
BOWMAN & CO'S
POPULAR DRY GOODS AOUSE,
326: Market Streéet,
Is the place for “
JERSEY COATS FOR $1.25, $1.50, $1.75 AND $2.00.
LAWNS, 5,6, 8 AND 10 CENTS.
CALICOES, 422, 5 AND 6 CENTS.
Parasols in all the newest styles.
We are offering the cheapest dress goods in Harrishurg.
Ladies’ Wrappers, Aprons and Children’s Dresses very cheap.
X lER EF I - O CARF N
HOUSEFURNISRING STORE,
Water Coolers,
Ice Cream Freezers,
: oil Stoves,
Express Wagons,
Step Ladders,
Baskets,
Fishing Tackle,
- Window Secreens.
FIRE BRICKS, STOVE GRATED AMD GASTINGS,
Wire Cloths, Cutlery, Pocket Knives, ete. Rodgers Bro.’s Plated Ware.
Picture Frames made to order. Come and examine my goods, whether you
purchasge or not.
STEPHEN HUBERTIS,
1216 North Third Street, Harrisburg, Pa.
WM. SCOTT,
PRACTICAL HATTER,
313 BRIGGS STREET.
Manufactures and Alters Silk Hats
to Confirm to the Latest Style.
Also Cleans, Colors and Repairs
Felt Hats of every Description
Ladies Silk Riding Hats a Specialty.
313 BRIGCGGS ST
FOR MEN,
WONEN AND CHILDREN,
You ask yourself how far will this
week's wages go toward shoeing
my family; be convinced
what you can save on
By going to the largest-
BOOT AND SHOE HOUSE.
G.W. MEILY,
24 & 216 MARKET ST
NEPRL T SSOAT
| PENN;?)]I?:LIIEANIA
gmo T
Home Office, Pittshurg, Pa.
Braxcn Orrice:
18 NORTH THIRD STREET
Harrisburg, Pa.
Sickness, Acoidents, 0l Ageand Burial Fund
BENEFITS.
Special Charter Under the Act of 1874,
for Beneficial Purposes.
Branch Offices in Most of the Prin
. cipal Cities. *

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