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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, September 13, 1884, Image 2

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The State Journal.
Published cvery sSaturday by
THE JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY
SATURDAY, SEPT. 13, 1884.
RATES OF SUBSCRIPTION.
Onpe Year, inadvance, - - +« = -$l6O
six Months, - - - . 18 -12 T6O
Three Months, = . - . U Jds J4iridle
Delivered to any part of the clt¥ by carriers at
FIFTEEN CENTS PER MONTH.
ADVERTISING.
No advertisments takem for less than filty
cents. Special rates for qwufl‘. one-half
yearly or yearly advertisements. otices for
üblic meetings, church entertainments and the
Plke will be charged for half the regular rates.
When job Prlnung is gl{en to this office no
charge will be made forlocal announcements,
Bills for advertising will be collected monthly.
THE STATE JOURNAL
Has the largest circulation of any paperin the
State managed and published by colored men. It
has a circulation in every part of the State, and is
the only general newspaper devoted to the in
terest of the colored peopla of i'»nnsylvania.
Advertisers will find the THe STAT £ JOURNAL
a good meaium for reaching any partof the
State.
Specimen copies sent free.
Address all eommunieations to
JOURNAL PUBLISHING CO.,
Harrisburg, Pa.
CAMPAIGN.
Tar JournNaL will be sent to any address
from this date until after the Presidential elec
tion for fifty cents in advance; to clubs of five,
%2.50, and upwards at the same rate, cagh in ad
vance. One eopy freeto the getter up of club.
~end in your subscriptions for the campaign and
get the opinions of the colored press which will
be published weekly. |
REPUBLICAN TICKED
For I resident:
JAMES G. BLAINE,
Of Maine.
For Vice-Fresident:
JOIIN A. LOGAN,
Of Ilinois.
FEleetors at Large:
Joux LEseNriNG,
James Donson,
CaLvin WELLS.
STATE.
Congress at Large :
GEN. EDWIN S. OSBORNE,
Luzerne Ceunty.
Congress—Joshua M. Wicstling.
Senator—Alexander I, Thompsor.
Representative Ist Dis—C. A, Miller
®d Dis—J. W. Rile
Ao J. 1B Sesl
Sheriff—lssac Mumma.
County Treasurer—E. J. Jones-
County Commissioner—A. Slentz.
Re:order—Chsrles Croue,
Dirctor of Poor—Adam 11. Shope.
Auditors—lsaac N. Bonaw .tz
—George W. Fox.
TO CORRESPONDENTS
Correspondents will please not
write on both sides of the paper. All
commuuications must be sigred by
the wri er’s full name, or else the
commutication will no be published.
W cught to have a County Com
missioner from the city who has some
8, mpathy with the people in the city.
foxes have holcs, but in Maine the
Demog acy have no place to lay their
bones.
‘'z Republican parly appretiating
the efforts of the Democracy in the
State of Muine, extended their grect
ing 80 t ras to crowd them cntirely
over the State line.
Now is the Time
We lope that the readers of the
Journai will not misunderstand our
positior, or the relation. we hold to
the pecp'e whom we represent. We
do not want to be considered a Lide
bcund, close ¢lipped, blind partisan
party paper, for such we are not. On
the coutrary, we intend to assume
whatever position the interes's of the
people demands, and we will not sup
port a candidate upon the local ticket,
or shali the name of a single candi
date be placed at the head of our
columns who we think is unwilling
to accord to every voter without dis
crimination, the recognition his feality
to the party deserves. The Republi
cans of Daupbin county will be woe
fully disappointed one of these days.
There is much dissatisfaction among
the colored voters, and there is no
better time to get even with the men
who have refused them recognition,
than the present. The talk about
this being a Presidential year and
not a good time to cut a ticket, is all
blarney; it is the same old food
warm over, upon which colored men
have been fed year after year. Now
is the time to cat, cut from head to
bottom, cut National, State, County
or City, if by so doing you can pre
gerve your God given rights, declare
your independence and secure the
recoguition which belongs to every
American citizen. We bave repeat
edly claimed that the importance of
cur vote is not properly recognized
in Dauphin county. We are growing
tired of supporting men for cflice who
have no regard for our frequent ap
peals fer recognition, and we propose
as the opportunities presents itself to
support the men at least whom we
have confidence in their words as
well as their Republicanism. = The
voters of this county and city will
have a square blow at the men who
have persistently barred them from
any thare in county matters fur
ther than delegates to vote for their
stated candidates, bave no compunc
tion about the time. Now is the time
to assert our manhood.
The Force of the Negro Vote.
The following is from the cditorial
correspondence pf the Debroit Plain .
dealer, and we .comménd it to the
serious consideration of the Republi
can party of this and other States:
“The political caldrons are becom- 1
ing more and more heated. There
are but two months more for effective
work and the Irish, Germans, Swedes,
Dines, Poles-and even the Italians
are fostered and cooed like turtle
doves, while ali over the country the
veteran politician bugs the working
man closer th=n a brother. Figures
and estimates are carefully made of
the votes cf all tbgée pationalties, and
the prospects. of capturing them for
ore or the other of the parties is an
important theme jn the campaigp.
But in all this gnxiety over the poli
tics of the foreigner by the Repubii
cang there is a singular lack of care
for the Negro vote. We speak golely
to the Rlepublican party, not only be
cause we want apd expeet no care
from the Democrats, but because the
Republicans have everytbing to lose
‘ aud nothing to gain. The caunse for
this lack of inter«st is obvicug, though
‘ the reason is not so plain. No party
ever had a more unanimaus support
from any class than the Republican
paity has reecived from the colored
man. The Negro we have with us
always is an wecepted phrase, The
Germans may come and the Irish may
go bat the Negro goes on forevar,
coutinuing Liz allegiance Lo the party
of freedom.
We have alweys advo-a'cd this al
legiance as the best thing for us to
do, and consider such support eom
mendable. But .we would submit
some p'ain, nradulteratea feets tothe
parly mauagers that they will do we'l
to consider. The total voting popu-—
lation of the United States i 3 12.571,-
487, of which 1,457,251, or abont one
ninth, is conceded to the Negro., Tie
Germaus of the country comprise bat
8.9 per cent. while the Negroes com
prise nearly 13 per cent., yet the Ger
mans, ungrateful ss they are, receive
every attention f om the hands of the
Republicans. The Negro has the
balance of power in California, Con
vecticat, Illincis, Indiana, Massacha
setts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey.
New York, Obio and Pennsylvania—
ten Norihern S-ates, aud yet in not
one of them has such a pswer been
given a thought. In Mi higan, for
instance, there me about 14,000 Ger
man voters, 9,000 Irish and 6,309
colored voters. Why should not they
be represented 1 party eouncils-and
made to feel that they and their sup--
portion with th o oihore: ~General
Butler was a good {riead to the Negro
in times of adversity. Ile has spoken
and will probibly speak again here
duricg the campaign. Ilas anything
been dooe to keep them from follow
Jing their old fricod at his eall? Has
anything be:n done to show them
that General Batler of to day, thouh
personally our ficud, represents
poison now where he represented
balm twenty yearaago? Very little,
and yet the Michigan colored men
are tieated better than many other
States that we have mentioned. The
vote of the Negro may be regarded
generally as certain snd can be more
so if Butlerism could be shown to
him in its true light. We say this as
a Republicin organ fighting for the
Republican czuse and desiring noth
ing but the party’s good.
Toere is little anxiety cxpress:d
over the colored voter, so sure is the
party that it can be relied upon, as it
were. We find no objection to this
great confidence of a great party, but
what we do find objection to is the
lack of appreciation for our faithful
ness. It 1s an excellent tting to have
those we can rely upon in the hour of
trial and tribulation, but how un
grateful when in the hour of our pros
perity we forget thosé who helped to
win the battle.
It is said that the only evidence of
a cold wave this week was felt in
Grover Cleveland's spinal column on
Tuesday when the news from Maine
struck him like a Western cyclone.
Republican, - Republican, all is Ile
publican.
Grover CLEVELAND never entered
into so discouraging a battle since he
was mayor of Buffalo, which position
his Democratic friends are basing his
qualifications for I’resident of the
United States.
R W ey
SOLITUDL,
Langh and the world laughs with you;
Weep,and you weepalone;
For the sad old earth must borrow its mirth,
But has trouble enough of its own.
Sing, and the hills will answer;
Sigh—it is lost on theair:
The echoes bound to a joyful sound,
But are lost to voice your care.
Rejoice, and men will seek gou:
Grieve, and they turn and go;
They want full measure of all your pleasure,
But they do not need your woe. .
Be glad, and your friends are many;
Be sad, and you lose them 21I:
There are none to decline your nectared
wine
But alone you must drink life’s gall.
Feast and your halis will be crowded:
Fast, snd the world goes by;
Succeed and give, and it helps you live,
But no man can hel&you aie.
There is room in the halls fo pleasure
For a large and lordly train;
But one by one we must all file on
Through the narrew aisles of pain.
~Ella Wheeler.
Carrer Harrieon, of Illinoig, tbe}
Democratic mayor of Chicago, has |
the support of several influential gol- 1
‘ored men of that city in his eandidacy |
for Governor. i
PRESS COMMENTS.
The Republican party commends
itself to every intelligent voter on
account of the explicitness of its plat
form, the pflefemiher{fi ‘qualifications
and qualities of its nominees, acd its
gplendid record. Tt has saved the
Uuion—emancipated the slavee—re
stored peace at home and secured it
abroad.— Baltimore Vindicator.
Misery likes company — Henry
Ward Beecher to Grover Cleveland.
— Detroit Plaindealer.
Carl Schurz will leave the country
it Blaine is elected, it is said. Thus
we have yet another National bless.
ing dependent npon Republican sue
cess —N. C.'Sentinely
The Butler boomlet drags along
briskiy epresding devastation and
woe in the ranks of both the old par
ties, so think the Butlerites—{rom a
biack Republican standpoint we de
mur.— Washington Grit.
The opinion of Thomas endricks,
concerning the colored people, is the
same as it was during the dark hours
of the rebellion.— Washington Bee.
Bavry Arruicrep — Dispatches
from KEufauyla, Ala, state that 32
colored persons on the Doughtie
plantation, near that city, are suffer
ing from bydrophobiain 8 mild form.
The disease, it is said, was commu
nieated by the colored people eating
the meat of a hog which had been
bitten by a rabbid dog. Itis also
said several mules on the plautation
which were bitten by the same dog
exhibit symptoms of hydrophobia.
TeLRg W W e o
A POLICEMAN'S COURAGE.
stopping a Mad Dog’s Career Despite the
Animal’s Bite.
To-Day's New York Times
The sidewalks of DBroadway, in the
Eastern district of Brooklyn, were
crowded Thursday afternoon with shop
pers and pedestrians, most of them ladies
and children. It was very hot and not a
breath of air was stirring about 3 o’clock,
when there was a sudden startled cry:
“Mad dog! Mad dog! Get off the side
walks. Mad dog!”’
There wasa panic-stricken stampede
into the strect and stores. Mothers seized
their children and ran screaming into the
nearest doors or rushed up the most con
venientsteps. Men sprang into moving
wagons or ran for the street cars, and the
sidewalk was left clear for a white Spitz
dog, which, with its hair muddy and tan
glc‘d,cycs glaring, and mouth foaming,lan
toward the ferry, snapping rightsand left
at everything it passed, but ncver ceasing
itsran. DPolice Officer James Short stood
at the corner of Eighth street and heard
the cries of warning from the men andthe
screams of the women. Ile turned about
just as the dog was upon him, and so
close was the brute that he had no time to
Ai o feun big hedi Juiko sl it
teeth upon his knuckles and made two
ugly cuts, and, snarling and snapping,
attempted to continue its run.
But Short had no intention of letting
the dog get into the throng of women
and children again, and he picked it up
and dashed it to the sidewalk, while a
little erowd collected at a respectfal dis
tance, though no oneoffered to assist him.
The dog at onee sprang up, but the ofilcer
got out his club and struck and kicked
it until it Dbolted into a grocery
store. The proprietor saw the animal
coming and jumped upon the coun
ter, while two clerks climbed up the
shelves in the rear with the agility of
monkeys. The dog dove in between a
molasses barrel and a jile of soap boxes
and lay close against the wall, panting
and snarling. The police ofticer closed
the doors of the store, and, leaving the
gentlemanly proprietor despairingly bal
ancing himself upon the top of the cheese
box on the counter and the two clerks
clinging in horror stricken silence to the
heavily loaded shelves, e ran into a neigh
boring hardware store and borrowed a
revolver. Then he came back and shot
the dog. The brute ran yelping from its
corner and, springing through a window,
ran up to Ninth streed causing great con
sternation among the crowds who were
waiting in the streets to see the police
man kiil it. The officer followed close
behind it, and at South Fifth street its
strength gave out and it fell. Then Short
shot it again and satisfied himseif that_it
was dead.
Officer Short had paid no attention to
his bitten hand during the fight, and he
found that it was bleeding badly. He
went to the drug store on the corner of
Eighth street and Broadway and applied
ammonia tothe wounds;apd then had them
cauterized,and a number of men who had
witnessed his courageous action compli
mented him on his bravery. Hedoes not
fear hydrophobia,and yesterday he played
ball with his wounded hand. The cour
ageous officer in only 25 years of age.
He is a son of American parents, and
was born in Brooklyn. Ile has been con
nccted with the police department of that
city for four years.
MODERN MEN,
Ben Butler is fond of poker.
Andrew Carnegie if said to be negotia
ting for the purchase of one of the leading
New York papers.
Representative Randall writes to a
friend 1n Wheeling that he expects to
speak there on October 1.
~Henry G. Bohn left some remarkably
full memoirs,covering fifty years and deal
ing with authors. They will be published
soon.
Senator James B. Beck,of Kentucky,al
though nearly G 0 years old, has all the
animal spirits and much of the mischiefof
a boy.
Bishop F¥. F. Pierce, senior of the
southern branch ofthe Methodist Church,
died yesterday at his home near
Sparta, Ga., from an acute disease of
the throat which Irad troubled him some
time.
It is now alleged on good authority that
J. P. McDonnel,editor of the Paterson
Labor Standard and an inspector of
Jersey factories, will be appointed
National Labor Commissioner by the
President.
A quotation is given in the Pall Mall
Gazette from St. Augustine, in which
the word “Nihilist” is employed in ex
actly the same way as by Tourgeneff,
who has the credit of having invented the
word.
Lord Coleridge recently has given an
extra-judicial decision that sermons should
not extent beyond twenty minutes, and
probably now he will be bored for an
opinion on the proper curtailment of cur
tain lectures.
ABOUT KISSES IN LITERATURE,
Stories of Milkmaids and Duchess with
Their Dukes and Swains,
Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire,
gave Sleet, the butcher, a Kiss for his vote
nearly a century since; and another
f}flally beautiful woman, Jane, Duchess
Gordon, recruited her regiment in a
similar manner, Duncan Mackenzie, a
veteran of Waterloo, who died at Elgin,
Scotland, in 1866, delighted in relating
how he kissed the duchess in taking the
shilling from between her teeth to be
come one of her regiment, the Gordon
Highlanders, better known as the Ninety
second. The old Scottish veteran of ’B7
has not left one behind him to tell the
same tale about kissing the blue eyed
duchess in the market-place of Dutkill.
An American naval officer who had
spent some considerable time in China
narrates an amusing experience of the
ignorance of the Chinese maiden of the
custom of kissing. Wishing to complete
a conquest he had made of a young mel
jin (b‘buutiful lady) he invited her—
using English words—to give him a kiss.
Pinding her comprehension of his request
somewhat obscure, he suited the action
to the word and took a delicious kiss. |
‘The girl ran away into another room,
thoroughly alarmed, exclaiming: “Ter
rible man-eater. I shall be devoured.”
léut in a moment, finding herself unin
jured, she returned to him saying: “I
would learn more of your strange rite.
Kees me.’* He knew it wasn’t right,
but he kept on instructing her in the rite
of kee-es me until she knew how to do it
like a native Yankee girl. And after
that she suggested a second course, re
markiong: “‘Kee-es me some more, seen
jine, Mee:-lee-kee!” (Anglice-American),
and the lesson went on until her mamma’s
voice rudely awakened them from their
delicions dream.
Kiss her gently, but be sly:
Kiss her when there’s no one by:
Steal your kiss, for then "tis meetest,
sStolen kisses are thesweetest.,
Tom Hood once asked whether Han
nah More had ever been kissed—that is
to say, by a man. It is almost impossible
to imagine such a thing, and yet it has
been usserted by the author of ‘“‘Rejected
Addresses.”” But to think of her being
kissed on the sly and in church-time!
Horace Smith distinetly aflirms that on a
certain occasion
Sidney Morgan was playing the organ,
W hile behind the vestry door
Horace Twain was snatching a kiss
From the lips of Hannah More,
PETRIFIED FORESTS TO UE UTIL
-IZED,
The petrified foresis near lolbrook,
Arizona, have been purchased by a com
pany. They have commenced the ship
ment and manufacture of the petrifac
tions into tablets, tiles and various orna
mental articles in building and finish
ing. In this connection the Prescott
Miner has the following; ‘“‘Governor
Tritle informs us that while in San
Francisco he inspected 2n establishment
recently started for the cutting aud pol
ishing of petrified wood taken from the
wonderful forest of petrifications existing
along the line of the Atlantic and Pa
cific in this Territory. The parties en
gaged in this work state that the petri
fied wood is rapidly driving California
onyx from market as a material
for fine mantels, &c., as it is suscep
tible of a much finer polish and is also
more permanent and lasting than that of
the onyx. Several companies have al
ready been formed for the purpose of get
ting possession of portions of the forest
by pre-emption, ete.— Virginia Uity
(Nev.) Linterprise.
A wvayiniar figure at Saratogo is a
cripple, Marion Foster. She is a poverty
stricken Cincinnati painter, whom Fanny
Davenport, the actress, discovered and
brought away for treatment. She is still
physically helpless, and gets about by
means of a wheeled couch, but her for
tunes seem to have greatly mended, for
she hoasds ip o fashionable house and is
come is derived from the artistic work of
her own hands. One nighta robber bold
broke into her room, and she heroically
drove him forth by shooting at him with
a revolver,
Tre ostrich farming enthusiasts having
tried Caiiforsin and Florida, have now
concluded to begin all over again in
Mexico. The Government has granted
the promoters of the scheme 70,000 acres
of land and 200 apiece for the first 200
birds imported. On these conditions it
looks as though the promoters would
make money even if the ostriches died as
soon as imported.
BUSINESS CARDS.
. LT &,
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. A
select agsortment of Canned Goods, Fruits,
Nuts, &¢, 807 North Third Street.
THAT

LORILLARD'S CLIMAX
PLUG TOBACCO
with Red Tin Tag ; Rose Leaf Fine Cut Chew
ing : Navy Clippings, and Black, Brown and
Yellow SNUFFS are the best and cheapest,
quality considered ?
FOR A FIRST CLASS MEAL
CALL AT

WARNERS RESTATRAINT,
FOR A
COOD LUNCH,
GIVE UIM A CALL.
If you want geod
ICHE CREAM
FOR
Festivals, Parties or Picnics,
He will give you satisfaction.
Game, Fish and Opysters in Seagov.
AMERICAN HOUSE,
WARNERS, State and Spruce Sts.
D. C. LAWRENCE & CO,,
Sell all fresh and salted meats at
prices below any in tbe city, and at
the same time the best in the market
will be kept in stock. Ouar Chicago
Dressed Beef we know to be “Sweet
as a 'Possum.”
D C. LAWRENCE & CO.,
8 Court avenue.
Henry Marhsall,
Oyatars, Fish, Vopetatln & Pl
Dressed Poultry a Specialty.
FOURTH and SOUTH STS.
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Has a large and
increasing circu
lation, and is the
only paper man
aged by colored
men and devoted
to the interest of
the colored peo
ple of the State
of Pennsylvania.
[HE
STATE
JOURNAL
Invites special
attention to their
Job Office, where
first - class Book
and Job Printing
of every d;escrip
tion is neatly
done.
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Is the only me
dium through
which the senti
ments of the col
ored people can
be obtained.
THE DUFFING AR UNGOUPLING
}AUTUMATIC BRAKE GCO.
SHARES FOR SALE!
For particulars address : ‘
J, E, HOWARD, Sec’y,
Oftice Jonrnal Publishing Company.
GFEORGE H. SOURBIER,
UNIDERT AN H F
And Dealer in -
FINE FURNITURE.
334, 336 and 338 Broad Street, Harrisburg. Pa.
& Black Cloth Caskets for $65, trimmed as desired.
No extra charge for Black or White Hearse.
1210 NORTH THIRD STREET.
R HEHI D) BYEL G INTEY.
L. B, "WOHOXK,
WALL PAPER & WINDOW SHADES.
REAED PP ROIN I
FILLEMING.
BOOKS AND SITATIONERY
PRESEN T S
= C. BURNITE'S
GALLERY OF ART
NO. 16 NORTH THIRD STREET, HARRISBURG, PA.
Executes Photographs in the most artistic style and finish. Crayons,
Boudoirs, Panels, Cabinets and Cards. Life-Size Crayon Portraits
a Specialty.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRAND OPENING!
GOLDSMITH’S
MAMMOTE
)
329 MARKET STREET. 329
Is now open for public inspection. Ever;body is invited to call and ex
amine the extensive stock of Clothing, as well as to admire one
of the FINEST CLOTHING ESTABLISI
MENTS IN THE CITY.
The splendid interior of the large room will be brilliantiy lighted in the
evening, and attendants will be glad to show callers through the various
departments.
THIS NEW PLACE
is a credit to the capital city, and those who visit it will agree in this state
ment.
The store is to be strictly a« One-Price es
tablishment -- something long
needed in this City.
THE CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT
Is nicely earpeted aud comfortable for ladies. It is one of the handsomest
rooms in Central Pennsylvania.
APPEI.I-I,S now prepared to make up garments of the '
L ATEHRST STV L.H,
At prices that never before were equalled by
A FIRST-CLASS CUSTOM TAILOR.
SUITS, $lB, $2O, $22, $24
And upwards, our $35 and $4O suits are well worth $8 to $l2 more.
Remember thst all our work is (Virb;ea—by first class workmen and trimmed
n the best manner possible.
APPELL, the Londen Tailer,
No. 6 South Market Square,
Two doors below the Jones’ House,

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