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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, September 20, 1884, Image 2

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The State Journal.
Published every saturday by
THE JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 20, 1884.
RATES OF SUBSCRIPTION.
One Year,inadvafice, . - - - $lO6O
Six Months, . . . . - . 75¢
g T e S Y,
Delivered to an rt of the city by carriers at
FIFTEEN CEN*‘SP‘PEB MON '%H.
ADVERTISING.
No advertisments taken for less than flttly
cents. Special rates for qnuuflp one-half
yearly or yearly advertisements. Notices for
Publlo meounfif. chureh entertainments and the
ike will be charged fcr half the rfif.ular rates.
When job Pflnung is given to t! office no
charge will be made forlocal announcements.
Bills for advertising will be coilected monthly.
THE STATE JOURNAL
Has the largest circulation of any paperin the
State mansgodm and published b{ eolopm} men. 1t
has a circulation in every part of the State, and is
the omly gheneral newspaper devoted to the in
terest of the colored people of Pennsylvania.
Advyertisers will ind the THEE S7..re JOURNAL
g good meaium for reaching any partof the
Specimen copies sent free.
Address all communications to
JOURNAL PUBLISHING CO.,
Harrisburg, Pa.
CAMPAIGN.
THEE JouRNAL will be sent to any address
from this date until after the Presidential elec
tion for fifty eentsin advance; to clubs of five,
#2.50, and upwards at the same rate, cash in ad
vance. One copy free to the getter up of club.
Nend in your subseriptions for the campaign and
get. the opinions of the colored press which will
e published weekly.
REPUBLICAN TICKKET.
For FPresident:
JAMES G. BLAINE,
Of Maine.
For Vice-Fresident:
JOHN A. LOGAN,
Of Illinois.
Flectors at Large:
Jonx LEISENRING,
James Dossoy,
Carnvin WELLs.
STATE.
Congress at- Large :
GEN. EDWIN S. OSBORNE,
Luzerne Cenaty.
Congress—Joshua M. Wiestling.
Senator—Alexander F. Thompson.
Representative Ist Dis—C. A. Miller
2d Dis—J. W. Rife
—J. B. Seal
Sheriff—lsaac Mumma.
County Treasurer—E. J. Jones-
County Commissioner—A. Slentz.
Recorder—Charles Crone.
Dirctor of Poor—Adam H. Shope.
Auditors—lsaac N. Bonawitz.
—George W. Fox.
TO CORRESPONDENTS.
Correspondents will please not
write on both sides of the paper. All
communications must be signed by
the writer’s full name, or else the
commuoication will no be publiched.
Tuaomas HEeNDRICKS never pas:es
a colored man now without extending
his hand, but at the same time ele
vating his nose to an angle of forty
degrees, as an evidence of the rancor
in his bosom against him.
A utTrE more independence and a
little less reliance upon the fortunes
of other people outside of themselves
would be conducive to the succees of
many colored peoble.
Don’'t be Partisan
Ir the people of this conntry, irres
pective of perty, could be brought to
a realization of the fact that the time
has come when colored men should
no longer be looked apon as blind
partisan tools, only doing the bidding
of one party in its every interest, a
far better feeling would exist toward
the colored voter, and he would be
held in greater respect by all classes.
In looking over the field of politics
to day we find that less attention is
given ito the Negro vote than any
other class of voters in the country.
And why is this? Simply because
we are counted upon as sure Repub
licans. This is not objectionable in
itself, for at this time upon the great
issues of the day we find it to our in
terest, and to the interest of the coun
try, to support the party which repre
sents good government, protection to
American labor (notwithstanding we
epjoy but little of 1t), a free ballot
and a fair connt. We stand with the
Republican party of the Nation upon
this broad platform, realizing that all
the rights and privileges we possess
we owe to that party. We are honest
in support of its candidates, because
the men are the accepted and sc
knowledged embodiment of the party's
principles. We bave no disposition
to give any support to the Democratic
party, which has beenj diametrically
opposed to all we enjoy to-day, or can
we consistently support its candidates
who represent its plans, purposes and
policy. What we do adhere to and
advocate, is the fullest eajoyment of
a free ballot, and to 8o exercise that
right in the Nation, State, county, or
locally, with an intelligent discrim
ination of what is best for our interest
as a race, and upon the questions of
the day, no matter how broad or how
narrow, use that judgment as will
eliminate the charge against us of
blind partisans in supporting a man
because of his Republicanism. Be
sure that he embodies the true prin
ciples of the party. No man is
worthy of the support of the colored
voter who is not willing to accord
him every advantage, right and priy
ilege given to any other American
citizen.
The Mulligan Letters.
The Democratic_ press, with its
usual vindictiveness and uneéxoelied
ability for mud slinging, have‘_fi
arraigned James ©. Blaine, before
the publie, as the man who used his
official position while Speaker of the
House of Representatives, for mer
cenary purposes. They pursue him
with all the relentlessness of bitter
hatred, and like the uncompromising
and unreasonable enemies they are,
concealing the record of a whole
party traced in treason, dishonesty
and bloodshed over a period of fifty
years, using every endeavor to attract
the attention of the public to what
they claim to be the misdeeds of one:
man, and blinding the confiding eyes
of the people to their own unenviable
record. Admitting that James 'G.
‘Blaine was the author of the 89-called
Mulligan Letters, and admitting”that'
‘while Speaker he held shares in “the
‘geveral railroads mentioned by the
‘Democratic press, can any reasonable
‘man, after reading all of the corres
pondence between Blaine; Mulligan
and Fisher, find a word that can be
construed as even implying an inten
tion to use the power which Mr.
‘Blaine, as Speaker of the House con
trolled. Why, the whefé matter is as
flimsy as a tissue ballot. Cabnot any
man, who is not a hide bound partisan
biased thinker, understand that the
publication of these private letters,
given to the Democratic press by
Fisher and Mulligan, is but one of the
‘mean contemp'ible schemes adopted
by the Democratic party as campaign
bancombe. How many votes will b 2
‘made by the publication of these let
ters? Who will vouch for their au
thenticity? And who knows how much
money Barnum has paid to resurrect
these men who have been reposing
for years in private, almost forgotten,
and to thousands of voters unknown?
But from one degree of degradation
to another sinks the Democratic
party. In perfect keeping with their
past record is this mode of warfare.
Just as the rebels resorted to chain
balls and tortured Union prisoners,
just so their sympathizers conduct 2
political campaign. And never until
the Demoaratic party, with new prin- i
ciples, plans, purposes, and a new |
name, will the people of this country
entrust to them the administration of
their affairs.
Tue brown jug and the pap:r box
in the hands of children, onght to be
boycotted. Just why everybody’s
child should be made a mendicant
soliciting pennies from door to door,
and from every perscn upon the
street, we don’t know, but we do
koow that while the object may be a
worthy one, the principle is decidedly
bad. The average boy or girl is for
ward enough, and parents -have suffi
cient trouble in making them realize
that they are not of age until they
attain their twenty-first year, but if
the teachings of parents are to be
counteracted by the innocence of the
charch and Sabbath school, then the
labor of the parent is thrown away.
While churches, and especially these
of our race, have to be sustained
largely through public contributions,
theze is a way to secure such contri
butions without corrupting the morals
of the community. Another evil as
sociated with this method of making
beggars of children and teaching them
boldness ard immodesty, is that of
dishonesty. How many of these boxes
and envelopes when returned look as
though they had been tampered with
and the money extracted. How often
when children are given tickets to
sell for church entertainments, that
no return is either made of tickets or
money. These things occur often,
but the managers evidently work upon
the presumption plan, that where ten
are dishonest ninety are honest, and
they figure the gain upon their own
side without regard to the bad effect
upon the morals of the community.
Tue weather is now getting too
cold for camp-meetings. Ministers
of the gospel will return to their
flocks and open their churches for
the suffering and lost sinners. The
good sisters and brothers who have
been singing and shouting in the
woods for the amnsement of a sordid
crowd, will transfer their base of
operations to the church, and will
pray louder; speak longer than any
one else upon the sinfulness of the
world, There may be some good
done at camp-meetings, but it is more
than off-set by the evil. '
Tue colored citizens are at a loss to
understand why Dr. Hutton, Presi
dent of Common Council, in appoint
ing the Centeonial Committee over
looked the only representative of the
colored people in council by his failure
to appoint Mr. Howard upon that
committee. They ought to know
that Dr. Hatton has never appointed
Mr. Howard upon a special commit
tee since he has been a member of
Council. Nothing strange should be
thought of this, as the President of
Common Council paves his way with
good intentions.
Tue schools are open again, and it
is hoped that Miss Givler, of the
Girls’ High School, will not tolerate
any of the mean and pelly anncy
ances which many of her colored
scholars were made to suffer by the
cod-fish aristocracy of that school last
year,
It is a heavy load under which Mr.
Cleveland struggles. Starting out
without a record. he has been success
ful in gaining one in a few brief
months that will follow him into ob
livion, into” which he will pass, at
tended by the entire Democratic
party after November 4th. .
Toe newspapers keep the New
York "@lobe and Brother Fortune
constantly in hot water. So mnc¢h
for being popular. - If Timotby ean
only stand prosperity be will pull
through: : :
PRESS COMMENTS.
Thomas Heundricks is telling the
colored people how he loves them. In
view of this circamstance it should
be explained why Mr. Hendricks
gome twenty years ago voted in favor
of a bill making it a crime for any
c:lored man to move into the State
of Indiana: It was because Mr.
Hendricks loved the colored man so
much that he didn’t want him to
catch the Indiana malaria.—-2’hila
delphia Press.
We hope and advise tbe millicn
colored voters to be consistent, and
not throw away their votes by voting
the Prohibition ticket, but to rally to
the support of the Republican party
as the party that will look after the
best interests of the American people,
and vote solidly for Blaine and Logan,
on November 4.— Baltimore Vindi
cator.
~ Human liberty is above every other
congideration, and as the Democratic
party has failed to acknowledge that
as a cardinal principle, remains but an
unqualified support of the party that
does, the party whose exponeuts are
Blaine and Logan.— L’hilcdelphia
Independent.
Hexpricks oON COLORED SOLDIERS.
—On May 17, 1864, a bill to equalize
the pay of soldiers in the United
States Army, with especial reference
to the colored troops, was introdaced
in the Senate. Mr. Hendricks opposed
the bill, and in the course of the de:
bate said: “I believe that every dol
lar that is paid away of the people’s
money to support Negro troops in
the field is so much money lost.”
This was after the Negro troops had
proved their fighting qualities and
shed their blood on twenty fields.—
Cleveland Gazette.
Direcriox or Benny's Eye.—Dßen.
Butler is testing his strength now,
and hopes to be able to become the
man of destiny for 1888. Ie has a
perfect right to do what he will at
this or any other time in that respect.
We shall not be a party to the scheme-
The Republican party needs all its
gurplus votes to win the day, in No
vember next, and if it has any to
spare, as it doubtless will, of course
Ben can have them. There ain’t
nothing mean about the G. O. P,
save its shameful neglect of the col
ored brother, which let us hope wiil
not be repeated.— Washington G'rit.
The people of these United States
will not convert the White House
into a feeble-minded institute, even to
accommodate such distingunished pa
tients as Grover Cleve'and, of Buffalo,
and Thomas A. Hendricks, of Hoosier
dom.— Lowisville Bulletin.
A Vicrit or Woe.—Henry Ward
Beecher mast have realized that fame
was but a bubble’s reputation, and
that the best efforts of a man are
often misjudged when he saw the last
number Qf Fuck, which contained a
cartoon in which he was represented
as a monkey flinging mud at Cleve
land. As a member of the tailed
tribe, a boon companion of Keily,
Butler, Dana and Grady, and such
Democrats as the Independents have
characterized as the most venal, his
heart must have failled him, and like
Wolsey soliloguized over fallen great
ness.— Detroit Plaindealer.
Dox't Evex Ger A Craromo.—The
colored vote is not even considered a
“white elephant,’”’ but an ordinary,
old, plain, every-day kind of an ele.
phant that is not satisfied with what
he gets, but wants the earth. If he
wants the earth he doesn’t get it. He
doesn’t even get a chromo of the
earth.— Indianapolis World.
Republicans, as a general rule, con
cede to the colored man great ability.
to vote for white Republicans, but
regard it as altogether wrong to sup
port a colored man for office. 'Tis a
poor rale that won't work both ways.
— Chicago Conservator.
If the colored people want less pre
judice by the white race, they should
bave less among themselves.—Piits
burg News.
The trustees of Berea College at
their annual meeting, June 26th,
called to a tutorship, J. 8. Hathaway,
colored.
THE “‘riff-raf”’ of Boston, to the num
hgr of 25,000, received Blaine last night.
80 the Democrats were disappointed
in Maine. They expected a very small
fiority for Blaine and now that the
ority is the largest given at a Gover
nor's election in tweny years they com.
fort themselves by charging that Repub
licans bought up Democrats like sheep
are bought in the shambles. DBut how
could they do this with that empty purse
of which we heard so much before the
election. .
THE Hon. Dan. Dougherty, Democrat,
pays that it is ““utterly impossible for an
intelligent man totorture a dishonest con
struction by any fair inference out of the
Blaine letters.”” True, but the Patriot
does not pretend to be intelligent.
Tue Republicans of Philadelphia made
good nominations yesterday. Itis un
necessary to say that they will be elected
by overwhelming majorities.
Tee Cincinnati Jnguirer supports
Cleveland in a way much calculated to
do him harm. The reason given for the
course is that after Cleveland’s nomina
tion and before the publication of his let
ter of acceptance, Civil Service Pendleton
was the only Ohio Democrat called to
Albany or consulted about it. Editor
M’Lean isagainst Civil Service. Pendle
toa favors it. M’Lean has power. Pen
dleton is a defeated candidate for re-elec
tion. The situation being well under
stood, what the result will be so far as
M’Lean can control it, can be readily
foretold.
CrLEvELAND did not go to Chicago
because his party friends found
it inconvenient to organize agricultural
fairs along the line to furnish crowds for
his meetingg.
THERE is another fool getting ready to
go over Niagara Falls, this time, her
metically sealed in'a rubber ball. The
papers scem willing to give him all the
advertising he wants, and one of
them, publishes his picture. We
aré bound to say that if the picture looks
any thing like the man he is evidently
fool enough to undertake that or any
other folly. On. the whole, the world
would be better off if there were no
cranks like him to perpetuate their kind,
and we are inclined to the opinion that
the sooner he goes over the Falls thLe
better.
‘WE have only one fear in connection
with the Ohio election: the Philadelphia
Times is predicting Republican success.
CLEVELAND denies that he wrote to
Congressmen asking them to vote for the
Morrison bill, but he does not deny that
he wasin favor of its passage, and in ac
cord with Carlisle on that subject. Per
haps his private secretary wrote the let
ters for him. Nelson is not likely to
have lied on such asubject,and as Cleve
land hides his opinions now, upon that
question, he may be dodging about the
letters. .
BUSINESS CARDS.,
H. LUOUTZ,
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. A
seleot assortment of Canned Goods, Fruits,
Nuts, &c¢., 807 North Third Street.
1. B, MITCHELL & (0,
|] A[ {Lykens Vallay and
[: Hard Whits Aab,
CORD and
HKINDLING
WOooD
THAT
LORILLARD’S CLIMAX
PLUG TOBACCO
with Red Tin Tag ; Rose Leaf Fine Cut Chew
ing ; Navy Clippings, and Black, Brown and
Yellow SNUFFS are the best and cheapest,
quality considered ?
FOR A FIRST CLASS MEAL
CALL AT
)
WARNERT RESTAURANT,
FOR A
COOD LUNCH,
GIVE HIM A CALL.
. If you want good
ICE CREAM
FOR
Festivals, Parties or Picnics,
He will give you satisfaction.
Game, Fish and Oysters in Season.
AMERICAN HOUSE,
WARNERS, State and Spruce Sts.
D. C. LAWRENCE & CO,,
Sell all fresh and salted meats at
prices below any in the city, and at
the same time the best in the market
will be kept in stock. Our Chicago
Dressed Beef we know to be “Sweet
as a ’Possum.”
D C, LAWRENCE & CO,,
8 Court avenue.
Henry Marhsall,
Dyatars, Fish, Vaehabls & Frut
Dressed Poultry a Specialty.
FOURTH and SOUTH STS.
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Has a large and
increasing circu
lation, and is the
only paper man
aged by colored
men and devoted
to the interest of
the colored peo
ple of the Stale
of Pennsylvania.
ht
STATE
JOURNAL
Invites special
attention to their
Job Office, where
first - class Book
and Job Printing
of every descrip
tion is mneatly
done. f
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Is the only me
dium through
which the senti
ments of the col
ored people can
be obtained.
THE DUFFINSCAR UNGOUPLING
AUTOMATIC BRAKE CO.
SHARES FOR SALE!
For particulars address
J. E, HOWARD, Sec'y,
Office Journal Publishing Company.
GEORGE H. SOURBIER,
UNDERTAKER
And Dealer in
FINE FURNITURE.
334, 336 and 338 Broad Street, Harrishurg. Pa.
B 2 Black Cloth Caskets for $65, trimmed as desired.
No extra charge for Black or White Ilearse.
1210 NORTH THIRD STREET.
REID P IROIN'D.
. B, "WHCXLX,
WALL PAPER & WINDOW SHADES.
RED FPFRONT.
FLEMING.
BOOKS AND STATIONERY
PRESEN T &.
32 N, THIRD STREET.
GALLERY OF ART
Executes Photographs in the wost artistic style and finish. Crayons,
Boudoirs, Panels, Cabinets and Cards. Life-Size Crayon Portraits
a Specialty.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRAND OPENING!
COEOBRETE S
0N - PHGE CLOTHNG OLSE
329 MARKET STREET. 329
Is now open for public inspection. Everjbody is invited to call and ex
amine the extensive stock of Clothing, as well as to admire one
of the FINEST CLOTHING ESTABLISH.
MENTS IN THE CITY.
The splendid interior of the large room will be brilliantly lighted in the
evening, and attendants will be glad to show callers through the various
departments. .
- THIS NEW PLACE
is a credit to the capital city, and those who visit it will agree in this state
ment.
The store is to be strictly a One-Price es
tablishment -- something long
needed in this City.
) !
THE GHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT
Is nicely carpeted and comfortable for ladies. It isone of the handsomest
rooms in Central Pennsylvania.
APP[I-1.1,S now[‘!jagd to !:QH guargcye of th].Al I-UH’
LATEST STYLHE,
At prices that never before were equalled by
A FIRST-CLASS CUSTOM TAILOR.
SUITS, $lB, $2O, $22, $24
And upwards, our $35 and $lO snits are well worth $8 to $l2 more.
Remember that all our work is done by first class workmen and trimmed
in the best manner possible.
APPELEL, the London Tailer,
No. § South Market Square,
Twe doors below the Jones’ Housg,

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