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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, September 27, 1884, Image 2

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The State Journal.
Published every Saturday by
THE JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 27, 1884
RATES OF SUBSCRIPTION.
One Year, inadvance, - - - - 8150
Six Months, - - - . 4 . 750
Three Months, . - - - - -40 c
Delivered to an& San of the cit.'i’_ by carriers at
FIFTEEN CENTS PER MONTH.
ADVERTISING.
® No advertisments taken for less than fift‘y
cents. Special rates for qnuurlp one-half
yearly or yearly advertisements. Notices for
üblic meetlnfi.‘church entertainments and the
fike will be rged for half the regular rates.
When job Prinung is given to this office no
charge will be made forlocal announcements.
Bills for advertising will be collected monthly.
THE STATE JOURNAL
Has the largest circulation of any pg({)er in the
State managed and published by colored men. It
has a circulation in every part of the State, and is
the only general newspaper devoted to the in
terest of the colored people of Pennsylvania.
Advertisers will find the THE STA | & JOURNAL
§ tgood meaium for reaching any partof the
ate.
Specimen copies sent free.
Address all communieations to
JOURNAL PUBLISHING CO.,
Harrisburg, Pa.
CAMPAIGN.
THE JoURNAL will be sent to any address
from this date until after the Presidential elec
tion for fifty cents in advance; to clubs of five,
$2.50, and upwards at the same rate, cash in ad
vance. One copy free to the getter up of club.
Send in your subseriptions for the campaign and
get the “opinions of the colored press which will
e published weekly.
REPUBLICAN TICKET.
For President:
JAMES G. BLAINE,
Of Maine.
Por Vice-President:
JOON A. LOGAN,
Of Illinois.
Fleotors at Large:
Joux LEISENRING,
James DogssoN,
Canviy WELLS.
STATE.
Congress at- Large :
GEN. EDWIN S. OSBORNE,
Luzerne Ceunty.
Congress—Joshua M. Wiestling.
Senator—Alexander F. Thompson.
Representative Ist Dis—C. A. Miller
2d Dis—J. W. Rife
—J. B. Seal
Sheriff—lsaac Mumma.
County Treasurer—E. J. Jones-
County Commissioner—A. Slentz.
Recorder—Charles Crone,
Dirctor of Poor—Adam 1. Shope.
Auditors—lsaac N. Bonawitz.
—George W. Fox.
TO CORRESPONDENTS.
Correspondents will please not
write on both sides of the paper. All
communications must be signed by
the writer's full name, or else the
communication will no be published.
Mg. CuariLes Croxe, independent
candidate for recorder, has bright
-Deoßpaate-Lor Bactpan.. Lepotls come
popularity. His eletion will pe grau
fying to the majority of republicans
who are unwilling to give the county
the earth.
Left, as Usual
The Republican State Centrai Com
mittee met in Philadelphia Tuesday
and elected General Lilly to fill the
vacancy on the electoral ticket. The
meeting was remarkable for more
than one reason, 1t was remarkable
for the large representation present,
and it was remarkable for the absence
of a eclored representative. We can
not help but refer to this apparent
contempt for the colored vote. So
sure are the party of success in this
state that we have been absolutely
ignored in every position of honor
which has hitherto been accorded the
colored vote. We are at lost to un
derstand in what manner we are re
garded by the republican party. Do
they expecct that the voices of 40,000
true and tried republicans, who are
beyond dispute an integral party of
the party, who have served twenty
years with faithfulness and fidelity to
the " principles of republicanism, are
going to guietly submit to such ig
nominious treatment? If we are not
worthy of recogmition; if we are no!
to have a voice in the guidance
of the canvass; if we are merely
to follow like sheep to victory or
defeat, then we better surrender
at once our manhood and our elective
franchise and allow the republican
party to cast our whole vote as one
man owned body and soul by his
master. From every part of this
state the colored voters express sur—
prise and disappointment at nct hav- |
ing any recoguition, and from the
first selection of the state committee
by the state convention,this dissatis
faction was made manifest. The
leaders were made aware of it, but
choose to disregard our claims. We
have no desire to create discord in
the party at this time, but if Mr.
Blaine's election depended upon our
silence, as the organ of the colored
voters of this state, we could not be
silent. We have suffered too many
indignities and have been silent too
often when our voices ought to have
been raised in our own behalf. Fore
bearance is ceasing to be a virtue.
The last straw is being piled upon
the camel’s back and he is tottering
under the heavy load. A Job could
not bear with patience such a con
stant puil upon his manhood. If the
party cannot see the advisability of
applying the brakeswe as men should
apply them ourselves.
Oxce more the colored men of
Philadelphia have let slip the oppor
tunity of nominating a colored man
for the legislature, and it will ever
stand to their lasting discredit.
There is either a great deal of jeal
ousy existing among the leaders or a
large quantity of stupidity of the
mule like order. Weed it out.
Weed it out.
Dox Camerox is for Blaine and the
whole ticket, for he himself has said
it. When Don moves therz is a
noticeable agitation about the watera.
His besetting sin is his stalwart ob
liviousness of his 40.000 black fol
lowers. ;
For every vote gained to the dem
ocratic party by the Mulligan letters
a high premium has been offered by
the supporters of Mr. Blaine. They
wont have to spend much money for
premiums.
It strikes us that such absclate dis
regard of the ever faithful colored
vote of this State as sbown by the
leaders of tbe Republican party,
cclipses all ides of ingratnitous
ingratitude. . '
As a factor in National politics, so
far as recognition goes, the black vote
is surrounded by so much inky gloom
that the Republican party are unable
to ree it.
A virree independence in Dauphio
county on the part of the Republicans
of this city will disclose to the county
politicians that they must leave some
of the earth for the city to occupy.
St e il
It takes a wonderfal stretch of the
imagination, as well as a profound
ignorance of politics, to place Penn
sylvaria among the doubtful States.
Havixe vaulted over his own am
bition Mr. George Wm. Curtis has
closed his mouth for the balance of
the campaign.
Repusrican Philadelphia, as is her
custom, showed the country how to
give a republican candidate a rousing
reception.
PRESS COMMENTS
HHow Trve —The colored Repub
lican gets less out of politics as a
business than any other class of men.
Since it has become fashionsble for
men to realize substantial benefits for
gervices rendered, where is the im
propriety in the negro making /Zis
demand right now? Now is the
time to strike; fair promises and
ble to the Republican party he de
serves proper recognition.— Wash_
ington Grit.
Republicans can bank their pile on
the fact that the colored vote is not
solidly waiting on them for a wink
and a nod. In fac’, the colored vote
will give the Republicans the hood
wink this fall.—Cincinnati Afro-
American.
Bring out everything sgainst Blaine.
The more the dirty Democrats try to
place him in a false position, the
better he appears before the Ameri
can people.—Louisville Bulletin.
The New York Zerald in order to
stay the stampede of the Irish vote to
the Republicans, is trying to stir up
a race war between them and the
Negro. DBut their attempt is as weak
as it is mean and unmanly, and has
not inflaenced the Irish one whit.
They are better able to think for
tnemselves than the Herald is to
think for them.— Detroit Plaindealer
Thomas A. Hendricks denounced
the emancipation s 8 “a wicked thing
to have isened” and he has never re
tracted that utterance. Still we do
net expect this year to see his senti
ments endorsed by his election to the
second highest office in the Republic,
—Philadelphia Press.
The Colored Vote of Ohio
A special from Columbus to Tues
day’s Herald states that ¢ Governor
Hoadly is to have charge of the col
ored contingent, &and to assume ex
clusive coatrol of that branch of the
political harvest that is to have as its
resuit the securing of Negro votes
for Secretary Newman.” Another
l good reason why more attention
'should be paid the colored vote of the
State. Hoadly, through his influence,
had four colored men appointed to
place—one to a clerkship in the
House, a second was given a position
in his office, and another as janitor
about the State House. A third bad
been given a position under Secre
tary Newman, and Peter H. Clark
was appointed a member of the board
of trustees of the Ohio State Univer
sity in place of T. Ewing Miller, one
of the founders of the instilution.
This will hawe some weight with the
colored vote, just as it would have
with any other, and it may not be
cheerful news to Republicans who
have been uninformed as to the true
political status of affairs, but itisa
fact that this fall more attention must
be paid to the colored vote in certain
localities, if the autonomy.of the
party is to be preserved. It is true
the greater part of the colored people
in Ohio, as elsewhere, is firmly
grounded in the faith of Republican
ism, but here and there the peculiar
power of argument suggested above
will be used with some effect, and in
October every Republican vote be
tween Lake Erie and the Ohio River
mast be polled in order to secure a
Republican victory next month. It
will not do for the State Executive
Committee to sit idly by, and, while
doing its duty in other directions,
take it for granted that ¢ the colored
vote is all right,’ for if they do,
something may drop.— Cleveland
Gazette.
Notwithstanding the opposition of
the sore-head Republicans, the Re
publicans will carry the election like
an earthquake that takes in an entire
country.— Washington Bee.
THE WORLD’'S FAIR.
An Important Consultation of
Prominent Colored Men at the
Hoffman House to take into
Consideration the Col
ored Feature of the
Great Fair to
- Open at New
Orleans
Dec. 1.
New York Globe, Sept. 20.
Register B. . Bruce sent out a
large number of invitatiors to gentle
men in this and other cities to eet
him at the Hoffman House at 12 M.
last Tuesday, September 16, to taku
action in regard to the exhibits to be
made by the colored people of the
several States at the World's Expo
sition to open at New Orleans, La,,
Dec. 1. Among those who responded
to the invitations were the following:
New York State—Peter W. Ray,
M. D., and D Philip A. White, the
Commissicners appointed on the part
of New York; Rev. Wm. B. Derrick,
J. A. Emerson, Hon. John F. Quarles,
Reverends Robert I'. Wheeler, R. H.
G. Dyson, W. 11. Thomas, W. Tt
Dixor, D. W, Wisker, P. W. Mor
gan, Jacob Thomas, T. W. Johnson,
Geo. E. Smith; J. H. Wilson, of the
Literarg Enterprise, and T. Thomas
Fortuse cf Tue Grose.
Massachusetts— Archibald Grimke,
editor of the Baston 7ud, Commis
sioner for the State of Massachusetts.
Rhode Island—Rev. Mahlon Van
Hern, of Newport, Commissioner.
New Jersey—Rev. W. 8. Braith
walte.
Pennsylvania—Rev. B. T. Tanner,
D. D., Commissioner.
Lounisiana — Govercor P. B. 8.
Pinchback and Hon. H. C. C. At
" Ur&*wmmpw-
New York, was made chairman, and
Rev. Robert F. Wheeler, Secretary
of the conference.
* Senator B. K. Bruce, Chief Direc
tor of the Department of Colored Ex
hibits, explained the objects of the
Conference, and drew a graphic de
scription of the woik already done,
and the work yet necessary to be
‘done. Ile said the most generous
‘allowance of space had been made for
the colored exhibits at New Orleans,
and stated that it appeared to be an
anxious desire of those having the
exhibition under management to have
the completest possible exhibition of
colored talent, ingenuity and industry,
and impressed upon the gentlemen
present the importance of making the
colored feature a thorough success.
Governor Pinchback wanted to
konow if the colored people of the
country were in a position to make a
creditable show. If not, he was op
posed to the attempt to make it. He
was not sure that the time remaining
was suflicient in which to do the ne
cessary work. Governor Phchback’s
remarks drew out general discussions
on points raised by him.
Rev. Wm. B. Derrick was sure
that New York State was rich in ma
terial and would make a creditable
showing.
Mr. Grimke spoke enthusiastically
of the part Massachusetts would play
at the exhibition, and was sure that
State was rich in material.
Rev. Van Horn s2id Rhode Island
would do herself eredit in her exhibit
of agricultural products and manufac
tured fabrica.
Dr. Tanmer said Peansylvania
would be largely represented in the
arts, mechanics, and in agricultural
products.
Rev. Braithwaite spoke for New
Jersey, Mr. Emerson for Arkansas,
and Mr, Fortune for Florida.
After a thorough interchange of
opinions, which was regarded as
highly favorable {o the enterprise,
the Conference adjourned. ‘
NEW BOOKS.
Newspaper Annual.
N. W. Ayer & Sons, of Philadel
phia, present to the public their
American Newspaper Annual for
1884. 1t is a full and complete state
ment of all the newspapers in the
United States and Canada. Also
complete lists of all the Religious or
Agricultural Periodiea's, of Medicsl,
Commercial, Scientific, Eduacational,
or any other of the class publicatlons,
can be obtaiaed from it.
In it is given the population of
every State, Territory, County and
County-seat; of all the large cities
and towns, and of almost every place
in which a newspaper is published;
also the Colored population, by eoun
ties, in the Southern and South-west
ern States, and the Chinese population
on the Pacific Slope.
It also gives the Political majority
of every State, Territory, and County,
and the number of votes polled by
the Greenback party at the Presi
dential election of 1880.
It tells how many counties there
are in each State; in how many of
these newspapers are published; in
what towns of a State papers exist,
and which of them are county-seats.
It has a list of the cities, towns and
villages of the United States having
a population of five thousand and up
ward, arranged in alphabetical order.
It is the most complete and exact
work of the kind ever published. The
information is of the most valuable
kind, and can always be referred to
as a book of reference for information
concerning counties and States.
History of A. M. BE. Zion Church.
Right Rev. Bishop J. J. Moore
has completed a full and dctailed his
tory of the A. M. E. Zion Church,
beginning with the cause that led to
its formation, and continning to fol
low each detail of its existence from
its establishment in 1796, when a
number of the most influential mem
bers called a meeting at a member’s
house in New York City, to the pro
ceedings of the Annual Conference
of 1883. It is probably the only
complete history of the Chureh, in
cluding a brief history of the General
Conferences, and the educational in
gtitutions controlled by the connec
tion. Bishop Moore furnishes this
interesting history of the Church ata
period in life when it erects a living
monument to his memory, and which
will serve as a precedent for some
young man to base an excellent work
upon, containing as it does the only
authentic data of occurrences, it is the
only reliable history of the Church.
Black and White.
T. T. Fortune, of the New York
Globe, presents to the public an in
teresting book, entitled “Black and
White,” which to be appreciated
must be read. While the book will
not, perhaps, just accerd with the
views of the average white man, it
cannot help but meet tbie approba
tion of all colored men. Mr. Fortune
cerning the race with the force and
vigor which characterizes his edito
rials, and what he thinks of the
class of men wko misrepresent
us in their opinions and comparisons,
he says without biting his tongue.
We agree with him upon many
points, especially as regards industrial
education for colored children, and
while the views expressed are mostly
Fortune’s, they arc in the main cor
rect. His advocacy of independence
and a division of cur votes as a fur
therance of our interest politically,
will be better appreciated in the near
futare than at present. Much of
the work we would like to quote in
our columns, but space forbids. We
hope, however, to give our readers
the benefit of many of Mr. Fortune's
views. |
H. B, MITCHELL & 0,
[;[l M {Lykens Talley aad
Had Whits Ash,
CORD and
KINDLING
WOOD
FOR A FIRST CLASS MEAL
CALL AT
5
WARNERT RESTAURANY,
FOR A
COOD LUNCH,
GIVE HIM A CALL.
If you want good \
IICHE CREAM
FOR
Festivals, Parties or Pienics,
He will give you satisfaction.
Game, Fish and Opysters in Seasop.
_ AMERICAN HOUSE,
WARNERS, State and Sprace Sts. |
Henry Marhsall,
Uyaters, Jish, Togotables & Pl
Dressed Poultry a Specialty.
FOURTH and SOUTH STS,
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Has a large and
increasing circu
lation, and is the
only paper man
aged by colored
men and devoted
to the interest of
the colored peo
ple of the State
of Pennsylvania.
[HIE
STATE
INNRNAL
Invites special
attention to their
Job Office, where
first - class Book
and Job Printing
of every descrip
tion is mneatly
done.-
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Is the only me
!dium through
which the senti
ments of the col
ored people can
be obtained. ‘
THE DUFFING GAR UNGOUPLING
AUTOMATIC BRAKE CO.
SHARES FOR SALE!
For particulars address !
J, B, HOWARD, Sec’y,
Oflice Journal Publishitig Company.
GEORGE H. SOURBIER,
UNDERT AKER
And Dealer in
FINE FURNITURE.
334, 336 and 338 Broad Street, Harrisburg. Pa.
& Black Cloth Caskets for $65, trimmed as desired.
No extra charge for Black or White Ilearse. .
1210 NORTH THIRD STREET.
NED BTR OINT.
B, 88. HWEHCOCEL,
WALL PAPER & WINDOW SHADES.
o DR O N I
HFILEMING.
BOOKS AND STATIONERY
DRE%ENT%
32 N. THIRD STREET,
GALLERY (F ART
Execates Photographs in the most artistic style and finish. Crayons,
Boudoirs, Panels, Cabinets and Cards. Life- Siza Crayon Portraits
.8 Specialty.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRAND OPENING!
‘ GOLDSMITH’S
‘ MAMMOTEL |
J
329 MARKET STREET, 329
Is now open for public inspection. Eversbody is invited to eall and ex
amine the extensive stock of Clothing, as well as to admire one
of the FINEST CLOTHING ESTABLISII.
MENTS IN TIHE CITY.
The splendid interior of the large room will be brilliantly lighted in the
evening, and attendants will be glad to show callers through the various
departments.
THIS NEW PLACE
is a credit to the capital city, and tgoes:twho visit it will agree in this state-
The store is to be strictly a One-Price es
tablishment -- something long
needed in this City.
THE CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT
Is nicely carpeted and comfortable for ladies. It is one of the bandsomest
rooms in Central Pennsylvania, f
APPEI.'-1,-, now prepared to make up garments of the ’
LATEST STY L,
At prices that never before were equalled by
A FIRST-CLASS CUSTOM TAILOR.
SUITS, $lB, $2O, $22, $24
And upwards, our $35 and $4O suits are well worth $8 to $l2 more.
Remember that all our work is done by first class workmen and trimmed
in the best manner possible. “
APPELYL, the London Tailor,
No. 5 South Market Square,
. ’ Two doors below the Jones’ House,

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