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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, November 08, 1884, Image 4

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Notds to Contributore,
ANy communication intended for publicatio
must be written on one side of the paper and ine
iu!l name of the writerattached.
No communication will be published without
;fi;srge, 1f consisting of more than three pages of
per.
All communications intended for gnbucstlon
;:x; be sent in on or before Thursday of each
Correspondents will make thelr letters short,
'pol:nod and newsy, as long letters crowd others
out.
Correspondence soliclted and agents wanted
throughout the country. Sample copies sent
free. Supscription terms invariably in advance.
Liberal inducements offered to agents, Address
JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,
Harrisburg, Pa.
A&~ The office of THE JOURNAL PUBLISHING
CoMPANY has been removed to the corner of
South street and Tanners' avenue, where all
business wiil be transacted. Send in your Job
Printing aud subscriptions.
Special Notice to Subscribers
All persons whose subscription to
the Jourxar. has expired, and have
received notice of the same, will
please remit to postal order, regis.
tered letter or postal note, at once, or
the paper will be stopped from this
issue.
JouexaL PusristinGg Co.
GATHERED ABOUT TOWN.
Interesting Items Gleaned by
Journal Reporters.
Pay the collector.
Subscribe for the Jour~aL
Mr. James Auter and Guy Burton
returned home from Philadelphia
‘Wednesdey after helping to elect
Blaice and Logan.
Oan Saturday they will be an Apple
Dumpling Festival, at Jackson and
Able’s restaurant, DMitchel House,
State state.
A grand Japarese party will be
given at Shakespeare hall Thanks
giving night by the Short street A.
M. E. church. Somethking novel is
promised.
Mr. Geerge Book and Miss Anna
Carpenter, both of Harrisburg, la,
were joined together in matrimony
on the 30th day of Octcber, 1834, by
Elder H. R. Phoenix.
There is some tals of the Youog
Men’s Republican club organizing as
a permanent organization. J. G.
Popel, president of the organizatioo,
will spare no effort in putting into
effect this intention.
We have cut off a number of oar
agents bccause of their irregular re
turns. All persons desiring the pa
per will inclore the amount of eub
scription and forward direct to the
office. Tue paper will bs mailed
promptly to your aedress. It don’t
pay to mail papers for nothing.
Mr. Eli Baptist, a well known
colored citizen of Springfield, Mass,,
received from Gov. Robinson a com-
mission as justice of the peace. This
commission was asked for by some
of the well known business men of
Springfield, and is a well deserved
and worthily applicd compliment.
‘WitHixN the past ten years the clam,
hitherto unknown in that locality, has
propagated itself on the California coast.
ALL along the Canadian border there
are houses and stores built exactly across
the line for the purpose ot smuggling,
and the Canadians are making an effort
to have the practice made illegal by both
countries. It would appear to be no in
fringement on the rights of a citizen to
compel him to build his house entirely
on one side of the line or the other.
PrerARrATIONS Of the drug known as
cocoa have been used somewhat largely
by physicians as exhilarants. It is stated,
however, that the crude article has be
come so poor in quality that the real
strength of the manufactured one is un
certain; so its place has been supplied by
a preparation of tea, and the ‘fluid ex
tract of tea’’ may now be found on the
list of & manufacturing chemist. It
would seem strange to us at first to send
the family teapot to the junk shop, and
watch our wives as they held a tiny vial
overa cup of hot water and asked us
“how many drops we would have.”
IN Formosa there is not much sick
ness, but when a man is sick they string
him up by the neck snd let him down
again quickly. This geunerally kills or
cures him, and if the former his death is
celebrated by a general spree. Attwenty
one a man is provided with a wife, but
until the age of forty he must not visit
her openly. He may do so stealthily,
however, and if he doesn’t like her he
can get a divorce in ten minutes. A man
often marries four or five dimes a year.
No children born before the mother has
reached thirty-seven are in any case per
mitted to live.
STATEMENTS are made in England that
India is on the brink of an organized re
bellion, fomented and backed by Russia.
Copper-red is a favorite color for the
crepe de chene and silk Jersey waists
that are worn with skirts of white wool or
of blacfiace over satin.
A voUNXG negro in a southern town
found an old bomb shell, and tried to
break it open with a stone. He will
never tell the result.
Miss CLARA BARTON, president of the
American Red Cross Association, has
taken out a permit for the erection of the
association’s first building in Washington.
TrE old United States flagship Brook
lyn has just returned from a three years’
cruise with the South Atlantic squadron,
and is reported in good condition and
ready for more service.
AT the late meeting of the three Em
perors, the Czar presented his own por
trait to Bismarck. This is said to be the
only thing he could give, as the Chan
cellor already has received all the decora
tions of Russia.
A Verdict of Manslaughter.
BArTiMORE, Oct. 29.—The jury in the
case of Gilbert W. Hazeltine, ou trial for
shooting and Kkilling & young woman
named %ismie Thorpe in an attempt to
kill another womin named May White
because she refused to surrender to bim
a valuable diamond to pawn to raise
funds to continue a debauch, last night
returned a verdict of manslaughter. The
result was a great surprise to everybody,
not exceptmg the counsel for the de
fense, as the State had made out a clear
case of murder in the first de , and
the only question was whether fi?:eltine
was insane at the time he shot the woman.
The general impression was that he would
be acquitted on the ground of insanity.
The court stated that sentence would be
deferred. The penalty for manslaughter
in this State is imprisonment from one
day in jail toten year inthe@penitentiary.
STORIES ABOUT STQREY,
The Rcmarkable Career et the Deceased
Chicago Journalist.
From the Philadelphia News, i
The veteran editor of the Chicago
Times, whose death was announced a
few days ago, was a type of the aggres
sive and bitterly personal journalist.
Tall, angular, with a saturnine expres
sion of countenance, Megphistophelean
features, piercing dark eyes and silvered
hair, all heads turned to get a good look
at ‘‘old Storey of the Zimes,”’ as his
brougham horses drew up panting before
the T'imes’ office.
Storey had his faults, but not among
them was the fear of danger. His vin
dictiveness and viluperative powers
earned him the hostility of many desper
ate men. George Trussell, the gambler,
who was afterward shot by the ‘‘soiled
dove,” who bore his name, received a
severe scoring in the Z'mes for his abuse
of her. He sneaked ué) behind Storey
in front of the old Sherman House
and struck him on the head with a brick.
Storey was armed in anticipation of an
assault. He drew an old-fashioned four
barreled Sharp’s pistol from his pocket
and emptied it at Trussell without effect.
One of the bullets struck the chimney on
top of the Sherman House. He apolo
gized to his readers in the morning for
such wretched shooting, but promised to
do better next time.
But the hottest hot water he ever got
into was during the early part of the
war. His determined opposition to the
war policy of the government caused him
to be classed with the dangerous Copper
heads. An order was issued from Wash
ington to suppress the Zimes. It ncarly
caused a riot. Artillery was gotten
ready to disperse the mob. Luckily the
order was rescinded.
Chicago at a later period of the war
was a vast camp. The boys in blue hated
old Storey and made up their minds to
punish him for his “fire in the rear.”
Two of them called on him at the Z%mes
office and opened on him with a volley of
abuse. lle seized one by the collar of his
blouse and the waistband of his trousers
and flung him through the window of the
private office on the ground floor into the
alley. The man carried the sash out with
him. The other soldier walked out of the
office, and Storey was not molested again.
This was a quarter of a century ago.
Storey was comparatively young then
and possessed enormous physical sirength.
Where the Union warrior and the reck
less gambler failed, a frail—indeed a very
frail—little woman succeeded. Every
one remembers the cowhiding adminis
tered to the old man by the English bur
lesque actress, Lydia Thompson, for his
caustic comments of her performance.
During the affray Lydia’s husband, Hen
derson, stood over the struggling group
with a pistol. Storey did not strike
Lydia, but wrenched the whip from her
grasp, applying to her as he did so an
expression that even the Zimes would
bave thought twice of before publishing.
Storey’s enemies howled with delight,
but the cow-niding scrape did not tame
his fiery spirtt. His ‘short ends’’ be
came moreintense, more acrid and ven
omous. Public men teared Storey as
they did the devil. His pen was like the
poxious air beneath the upas tree. It
touched but to destroy. Strong passions
wilt a man in time. The sword
wears out the scabbard. The nervous
system, drained, gave way, and the tale
was breathed about that ‘‘old man
Storey’” was dying a-top. He had but
little to do with the paper during the last
few years of his wretched life, but his
fine judgment in the selection of heads
for departments aused the newspaper to
survive the decay of its chief.
Sweet Femininity.
Mrs. Polk, the widow of ex-President
Polk, and her daughter are in Washing
ton.
Mrs. William 11. Vanderbilt knits real
yarn stockings for her millionaire hus
band.
Many of the aristocratic ladies of Vi
enna have gone into mourning for Hans
Makart.
Sarah Bernhardt’s condition has be
come so scrious that the journalists of
Paris have ceased to joke about it.
The Baroness Burdett-Coutts is loaning
the distressed fishermen of Southern
and Western Ireland money for the pur
chase of boats and appliances.
It is said in Boston that Miss Maud
Banks has abandoned the idea of going
upon the stage because she cannot en
dure having her portrait displayed in gin
mill windows.
The daughters of the great scientist,
Huxley, are said to be among the pret
tiest girls in London, though their father
is phenomenalf{ homely. One of them
is to be married in the spring.
Clara Louise Kellogg’s father, the vet
eran phonographer, taught the prima
donna in her childhood phonetics and ar
ticulation, which he thinks accounts for
the distinctness with which she speaks
and her facility in the acquirement of
foreign languages.
Honolulu’s Trying Climate,
The Californian, when he first encoun
ters the Honolulu climate, is said to scoff
at the white garments of the older colon
ists. ““Youcall this heat,”” hesays, *‘why
we can discount this in Sacramento on
any August day.”” Therefore he clings
stoutly to his San Francisco clothes, walks
at his usual gait, scorns the expresses, as
the little rockaways with which the streets
are jammed are called, and though he
may sacrifice two or three collars a day,
still insists that the weather is bracing.
A month goes by, and he has compromis
ed by shedding his coat fora linen blouse.
He is not quite so brisk on his feet, nor
does he talk about a five-mile stroll with
the same amount of self confidence which
marked the early days of his sojourn.
Two months go by, and we find him all
in white, calling an express to ride two
blocks in, and quite as limp, moist, and
indeolent as the others. The staying pow
ers of the climate have conquered. It
sticks to between 87° and 80° in the shade,
and never lets go of it. This is what
saps the foundation of the visitor’s nerve,
and casts him into line with the rest of
the baked-out population.
Fact, Fanoy and Fun,
Sankey has bought a lotin New Castle,
this State, where he will build a public li
brary. I e i
When you arrive at the hotel office al
ways smile pleasantly and say, “Can I get
a room here ?”’ If you didn’tsay thisthe
clerks might think you were a peddler.
General Beauregard’s paper on “The
Battle of Bull Run” in the November
Century has caused such an extraordinary
demand that a new edition bas been
found necessary.
Dr. Phillips Brooks will be the select
preacher in the University of Cambridge
next June. This is the second time that
this honor has been conferred on an
American cler an.
General M’gglan is very decidedly a
society man, fond of pretty girls, anc{ in
no way averse to the festivities of fash
ionable life. He looks nearly as young
as when he led the Army of the Poto
mac.
"Astonishin%, isn’t it, how things are
taxed?”” said Straddles. ‘“Why, 1 hear
lots of peo%e talking about taxing their
brains.”’—Washington Hatchet. i
Newspaper reporters will always be
found fault with until they can write up
an account of g 8 street fight that will
please the man who gets licked. —‘“‘New
Orleaus Picayune.” ®
There is none so unfortunate but there
is some place which he is calculated to
ornament. The bow-legged men, when
on horseback, can laugh at straight.
imbed humanity. —Boston Transcript.
A MISTARE,
1 was passiug by the dvor
Justateve,
And I never saw before,
1 believe,
Sweet refinement shown so purely,
As she sat there quite demurely,
Witn a daim% pose that surely
Might deceive.
-nd I could not sleep atall
'l‘hroufh the night,
So I left an early call,
That I might
At the soonest hour endeavor
All restraining ties to sever,
And converse with oue so clever
And sobright.
I recall it now and swear
Witha D
How I questioned who the fair
Maid might be ;
When, believe it, if you can, sir,
"T'was & scrub girl turned to answer.
Andas I’'ma living man, sir,
1t was she.
+ —=James C. Harveyinthe Judge.
LATEST STYLE OF FUN.
Cut Blas and Trimmed up by the Press
Humorists.
“Puck:” The darkest hour is when you
can’t find the matches.
N. X. “Life:’ . Mr, 8t John will
probably draw largely from the floating
pogulation.
hila. “‘Call:”’ ‘‘Sweets to the sweet,”’
snickered the dude, as he passed the
pretty youn% lady boarder the su(fa.r.
“Like cures like,”” she replied, handing
him the cold veal.
Texas ‘‘Siftings:”’ A young man who
had led a rather fast Jife finally got mar
ried to a wealthy but rather warm tem
pered young lady. After the ceremony
was over the father-in-law said : “I
hope you will not get yourself inany
more foolish scrapes.”” ““No, I guess I'll
not get into any more scrapes. I reckon
I’ll never get out of this one.”
‘“Peck’s Sun:” All great men have
some eccentric habit, and now that Sit
ting Bull is becoming civilized he is not
an exception. Whenever the great chief
appears at dinner he carefully unfolds his
napkin, spreads it on his chair, and sits
upon it.
N. Y. “Graphic:”” The young lady
who lives in the vicinity of Madison
Square and sings “Nobody Loves Me”
every evening after dinner in the board
ing-house parlor, has nc one to blame
but herselt.
Boston “‘Jingo;"’ Mr. Bergh has warned
the riflemen that they will not be per
mitted to hit the bull’s eye.
N. Y. “Journal:”’ A barber says that
it is the rich who become hald the
soonest. No wonder. A poor man
can’t afford to indulge in the luxury of
the hair tonic which cheers, yet de.
teriorates.
“Cinc. ‘“Merchant Travelier:” A min
ster is after the society editor of the
dailies because an item which should
have read ““The spirit moved him to go
out of town for a season,”” appeared in
“The Sheriff moved him to go out of
town for a reason.”’
N. Y. “Tribune:” Some one asks how
the great men of this country began life.
We are under the impression that they
generally began life asinfants.
“Carl Pretze’s Weekly:"" *“ This is the
latest agony in bonnets,”” she remarked
to her husband as she tried its effect in
the mirror. *‘ls it paid for?’’ he asked.
“No; I had it charged.”” “Well, it isn't
the latest agony in bonnets tken,” he
said with a groan.
Yonkers ‘‘Statesman:’ “I'll darken
your personal pronoun,”’ i 3 the way
Boston pugilists threaten their enemies.
" Yonkers ‘‘Gazette:"’ ‘‘Have you got
the pitch 7"’ asked the leader of the choir.
“You bet I have.”” answered the base
bawler; *‘it’s a double end curve, and it
will strike out any batter in the country.”’”
Whereupon he was requested to strike
out for home. gt
Phila. ‘“Call:” Rev. Jo. Cook is
charged with saying: ‘‘Here, you,
Sambo,’’ to a Pullman car porter. Mr.
Cook should remember that wealth has
some rights which even learning is bound
to respect.
“Puck:"” A Boston lady took her six
year-old daughter to see Henry Irving
play “Hamlet.”* After the performance
the mother said: *‘He’s the worst *‘Bun
thorne’’ I ever saw,’”’ was the reply.
iN. Y. “Graphic:”’ *““What did the
doctor preach about this morning?’ he
he asked. ‘I believe it was politics,”
“Politics?’’ ““Yes. I think it was about
prohibition.”” “What was the text?”
“I don’t remember exactly, but it was
taken from St. John.”’ i
Boston ‘“‘Transcript:"” “No’’ said the
politician, “I never lend my influence to
anunworthy cause.”” He forgot to men
tion that the reason why he did not lend
was beause he sold it. ; i
Oil City “Blizzard:"" Mrs. Beecher
baving written to Grover Cleveland,
Henry Ward should now strike up a cor
resoondence with Maria Halpin. i
Pittsburg “Telegraph:”’ “Remember,
my son,’’ said Mr, Jarphly, ‘‘There is
always room at the top.” “I don’t see
how any one could forget it who has to
come in contact with your ideas,”
snapped Mrs, Jarphly.
Serene between the wheels I sit, -
_ltuck mv drapery in a bit,
I pump the treaders udf; and down,
And circle my way through Washington,
There never has been a President
Who 'round the town ona trlci'cle went,
Anad u;ey'll never be one, the Fates have
saiq,
Who pulls his clcthes on over his head.
—Burlington Hawkeys.
. B, MITCELL & GO,
Lykaas Vallay and
G[ml,{flard Whita Ash,
CORD and
KINDLING
WOOD
NEW STORE,
336 MARKET STREET 336
The Largest and Best assortment of
BOOTS, SHOES and RUBBERS
in the city.
Ladies’ and Children's Shoes a
specialty.
Will not be undersold.
Remember the place.
J. H. DeHAVEN,
336 Market Street 336
THAT
LORILLARD’S CLIMAX
PLUG TOBACCO
gey iRyLt Ao
Yollow SNUFFS are the best apd cheapest,
quality considered ?
OYSTERS!
23,80, 90 GT3.A QUART'
Daaisa Come or St Waker Opstens by bhe Barne] o}
Warner’s,
Coruer State and Spruce Streets
A Wanderer’s Return,
A good many years ago, during the
early gold excitement, a young married
man in Georgia quarreled with his wife,
and leaving her and her infant, went to
California. Subsequently the wife heard
of his death and remarried. A few days
since Mr. R. W. Wilsen commissioner
from California to the New Orleans Ex
position, stopped at the Atlanta hotel.
He was the long-missing husband, and is
now & millionaire, It would have been
another Enoch Arden case except for the
simple fact that the wanderer’s ex-wife
was dead ; but he did find his child, now
a man with a family. They will all go
west to enjoy the wealth of the father
and grandfather, and thus there will be a
happy ending for the parties to the ro
mance.
The report comes of a3t Louis girl’s
foot being caught in a railroad %‘rog.
They must make railroad frogs down in
that country infinitely iarger than they
do in the northwest,—St. Paul lerald.
P.K.SPRENKFEL,
MILLINERY GOODS,
Entire New Stock, all the novelties
of the season at low prices.
FRONT and MARKET STS.
PALL AND WINTER GOODA,
J. NEIDIC,
Announces to his customers and the
public that he has opened a fall
line of FALL and %INTER
GOODS for
LADIES GENTS and CHILDREN.
Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery
and a fall line of
CORSETS, RIBBONS, GERMAN
TOWN WOOL, ZEPHYRS,
SAXONY AND STOCK
ING YARN
and everything belonging to a first
class Notion Store.
You are cordially invited to call.
J. NEIDIG,
COR. 3d AND HERR STREETS,
Harrisburg, Pa.
D. L. JAUSS & CO.,
— DEALERS IN —
COAL & WOOD.
Telephone Connections with all parts of the
City. Orders promptly delivered,
Race and Nagle Streets.
C.A.BOASR,
DIAMONDS,
WATGHES,
JEWELRY
SILVERWARE,
No. 7 Market Square,
Harrisburg, Pa.
UNITED STATES HOTEL
RESTAURANRT.
Meals served a* all honrs
Regaiar DINNER served daily.
CEXBSBTHE RS
in every style.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.
Directly opposite P. & R. and P.
R. R. Depots,
WM. ADORE,
Proprietor.
JOHN G.HERMAN
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
TOBACCO
AND
CIGARS.
22 N. Third Street,
(Cor. Strawberry avenue,)
HARRISBURG, PA,
KETSTON: MA;RBLE WORKS,
BEATTY & SON,
FOURTH ST., NEAR MARKET,
Next to Lutheran Church,
HARRISBURG, PA.
Granite Monuments, Tomb
stones, Marble and Slate
Mantels,
AND
ALL KINDS OF STONE WORK.
Also a great variety of
ENCAUSTIC TILES.
Glazed and Enameled, for Vestibule
Floors and Mantle Decorations.
0. P. GROVE.
THIRD and BROAD STS.,
HARRISBURG, PA.
Winker Goods Now pen,
PRICES LOWER THAN LAST SEASON,
DRESS GOODS,
BLANKETS,
FLANNELS,
VELVETS.
VELVETEENS,
SIIL.EKS,
Ladies’ Merino Underwear,
Misses’ Merino Underwear,
SHA WLS

Ladies’ Cloaks, Misses’ Cloaks, Kid
Gloves, Hosiery, Trimmmings,
Black Cashmeres, Table
Linens, Cloth Dress
Goods, Napkins, etc.
0. P. GROVE,
3d and Broad Sts.
LE RUE LEMER,
PHOTOGRAPHER,
206 MARKET ST.,
Harrisburg, Pa.
First class pictures at reasonable
rates.
H.O.HOUCK
bty Purnisfiing 00,
1904 N.3D ST
COME AND EXAMINE HIS
LARGE STOCK OF
FALL and
WINTER
AT
Lowest Prices )
AL STOCK OF CARPETS AND OL CLOTES
Our n:w stock i 8 now ready for you to see. The patterns are very
very choice and prices surprisingly low.
Velvets, Body Brussels, Tapestry Brussels, Ingrain and Rag
Carpets, Rugs, Door Mats, Druggets, Stair Rods, Carpet
Lining, &c., all at the Lowest possible CASH prices and all
good guaranteed to he as represented.
Ll 1 . J
MARKET STREET, AT THE RIVER BRIDGE,
HARRISBURCGC, PA.
Look for our RED BANNER across the street.
Get the exact measure of rooms and we will cat carpets, eto., to fit.
BALANCE OF STRAW MATTING AT COST.
J B. FIRST,
NO. 3 SOUTH THIRD STREET HARRISBURE.
REAL ESTATE AND BUSINESS AGENT.
COLLECTIONS MADE AND PAID PROMPTLY.
[ have properties for sale in any part of the city; also, kame in Steelton.
LADIES’
BUTTON BOOTS, - $135
LADIES’
KID BUTTON BOOTS, SL7S
- LADIES’
WALKING SHOES, , 98 CTS.
MISSES’
SCHOOL SHOES, - $1.25
CHILDREN'’S
Dress Shoes Very Cheap and
Durable.
S
MEILY'S
214 & 216 MARKET ST
Neely & Numbers,
UNDERTAKERS, CABINET MAKERS
AND FURNITURE DEALERS,
213 N. SECOND ST. Branch Store, 1103 Ridge Road.
HARRISBURG, PA. J. Feight, Manager.
FALL and WINTER
CLOTHING.
Everything Rew of the [Latest de
signs in CLOTHING.
GOLDSMITH'’S
ONE - PRIGE GLOTHING HOUSE,
399 MARKET STREET. 329
A perfect palace. 'The Largest
and Handsomest Store Room in
the city.
MEN'S, YOUTHS’ BOYS’ and
CHILDREN'S CLOYHING.
Politg Ettg&?gn[fi?)rifidcia?lg: it[:yfiag 2;‘;;;;.211132?1';;13: ;e;zlle‘::e: :lt:rtkl:”k'
329 MARKET STREET 329
LOW PRICES,
onirts and Coder Woear
H.R.ZEILS
410 (;;Z');:tuhg,treet.
FOR MEN,
WOMEN AND CAILDREN.
| You ask yourself how far will this
. week’s wages go toward shoeing
| my family; be convinced
| what you can save on
BOOTS AND SHOES
|
| By going to the largest
' BOOT AND SIHOE HOUSE.
$1.25
G.W. MEILY,
24 & 216 MARKET ST
FASHION BAZAR,
1204 North Third Street,
(Opposite Frank J, Hess’ Stors.)
MRS. ANNA 6. LOWE,
daughter of the late
MR. AND MRS, THEO. FENN,
has removed to this city and opened
a first class
MILLINERY, FANCY GOODS
and NOTIONS STORE
To which she cordially invites the
public.

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