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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, November 22, 1884, Image 2

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The State Journal.
Published every sSaturday by
THE JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
J. H. Howard, Manager.
SATURDAY, NOV. 22, 1884.
RATES OF SUBSCRIPTION,
One Year, inadvance, - - - - $lO6O
PR R, e e . . % 75¢
MR MEORENS, |/« R eL O
Delivered to any psrt of the cl% by carriers at
FIFTEEN CENTS PER MONTH.
ADVERTISING
No advertisments taken for lcss than fifty
cents. Special rates for qnnrt.erlg, one-half
yearly or yearly advertisements. yotices for
public meetlnx;, church entertainments and the
like will be charged for halfthe regular rates.
When job Pflnting is given to this office no
charge will be made forlocal announcementg,
Bills for advertising will be collected monthly.
THE STATE JOURNAL
Has the largest circulation of any paperin the
State managed and published by colored men. It
has a circulation in every part of the State, and is
the only general newspaper devoted to the in
terest of the colored peopla of Pennsylvania.
Advertisers will find the THE STATE JOURNAL
;ullgod meaium for reaching any partof the
e.
Specimen copies sent free.
Address all communications to
JOURNAL PUBLISHING CO.,
Harrisburg, Pa.
Too much confidence was placed in
the Irish vote and too little regard
paid to the colored population.
Support the Journal.
For the past two years we have
struggled hard to present to the col
ored people of I'enneylvania a paper
devoted exclasively to their interest.
We have defended their rights and
voiced their sentiments when every
other newspaper was silent. We
gave them at a great expense such
news concerning the members of oar
own race as was obtainable nowhere
else. We opened up a pleasant
avenue of intercourse between the
different sceions cf the State and the
conntry, and msny o'd friends were
found, and a knowledge of the
weekly occurrences at the former
homes of many were given, aud all
we asked then, and all we ask now,
is for their support. If the colored
peopls wou'd give us as liberal a
patronage as they give to other
papers, which have no material inter
est in their welfare, we could give
them a far better paper. We ac
knowledge with pride the great inter
est our many sapporters throughout
the State have manifested in our suc
cess; and while some of our agents
have robbed us, others have been
traly honest. And while many of
our sabscribers have received the
paper and never paid for it, others
realiging that a paper cannot succeed
without its subscribers pay, have
shown their interest for our success
by paying up promptly. Newspapers
devoted to the interest of colored
people have a ragged road to travel,
as a rule, and have to deperd largely
upon the encoursgement received
from those to whom it devotes its
columns. We, therefore, appeal to
the colored people of Penusylvania,
and this city, for renewed support.
Tar Washington Advscate being
one of those lucky papers with a
Government office at its back, flies
into a passion and attempts to chas
tise the Jourvar for giviog the
reasons why one of the Ilonorary
Commissioners of Massachusetts re-
fused to serve, and advising the col
ored people not to be put aside in the
exhibition, unless every facility was
allowed them as was allowed others.
The hide of the editor of the Advo
cate is very close, and nothing pricks
him so severely as when be thinks
some one might get a hold of the
public teat upon which he has feasted
go long. He is as true and earnest
in his protection of the public funds
as Democracy is to her time-honored
pricciples. No matter what may
bappen; days may come and days
may go; the rivers in the valleys may
run dry: the sun may cease to move;
the wreck of matter and the press of
time will be survived, but he will
ever hold on to the public teat and
defend any interest on which he has
a pull. We are and have been in
favor of the New Orleans exposition,
and we want our people to have
every chance for as creditable a dis
play as possible. Thus is is our only
solicitude, and for the success of that
display we propose to contend for as
liberal a contribution as can be had.
It must be gratifying to the colored
men to read Mr. Blaine’s cogent re
marks at Augusta, Maine. It comes,
however, at rather a bad time. Had
Mr. Blaine put half of those senti
ments in his letter of acceptance, and
in some of the many speeches made
during the campaign, they might
have carried with them more force.
While there is much truth in all he
says the colored people realized all
this at the time their friends were
trying to pass the force bill; and,
perhaps, had Mr. Blaine realized
more fully tben the importance of
protecting the colored vote, he would
not now, while suffering the bitter
pangs of defeat, have cause to mourn.
WE presume that if the newspapers
give Mr. Cleveland a 8 chance he will
make up his own cabinet.
What Shall We Do?
Mg. Braixe has been de’eated; 6o
matter what the cause; but that the
solid South and broken faith in the
North among the leaders, has been
largely responsible, is guite evident.
For twenty long years bave the col
ored men stood faithfully by the Re
publican party. They bave been
murdered, lashed and hunted like
animale, and yet they have never
swerved in their fidelity to the cause
of the Republican party, and when
ever one turned his back upon the
party, his own race was the first to
censure him. Always feeling thatdeep
sense of gratitude to the party which
done 80 much toward m:kiog him a
citizen, he paturally felt to leave the
ranks of that party was the deepest
ingratitude = Within the last few
years it has appearcd that the Repub
lican party were endeavoring to rid
itself ot the Negro. Appeals were
made to every race and class of peo
ple for their support, while the sup
port of the certain and reliable vote
of the colored man in the South was
left unprotected. The Irish were
appealed to; the German was cajoled;
the Italian was smiled upon; while
the most earnest devotees of the party
were left to their fate, and this fate
has brought deteat to the Republican
party. Now, what i 3 the position of
the colored man? Does this defeat
of the party by its leaders free the
colored man from further obligation?
Wiil it be to bis interest to oppose
the party now about going into power
as vigorously as he has doue hitherto,
or will it be to the best interest of the
race to divide in opinion and in their
support between the two great pol.ti
cal parties? Within the next finr
years new issues will arisee The
rapid advarnce in intelligenco of the
colored man will teach him to dis
criminate between the difference of
the paramount interest of his race and
the psramount interest of his party.
Many of our young men graduating
from school will cast their first votes,
and it is essential that these votes be
directed in the right direction. We
present these questions to our readers,
as they will certainly have to be zn
swered in the near future.
Ix view of the fact that Pennsylva
nia gives such a large majority, and
the Legislature is largely Republican,
the party might surprise itse't by
giving some colored man outside of
P’hiladelphia a decent position, some
thing above the third house commit
tee rooms, pasters and folders, and
sach like. The reason we say outside
of Philadelphia, is because hitherto
that city is always represented, while
the rest of the State is left out. All
the colored men who vote in this
State don’t live in Pkiladelphia by
several thousand.
Trk time-honored principles of the
Democracy wiil now have four years
in which to cavort around, and in the
meantime prove to the world whether
they truly believe in a free ballot and
a fair count; whether the colored
man in the South is to be longer dis
franchised, bull-dozed and murdered,
and take advantage of the opportu
nity they have to do something for
which a colored man might support
them without a conecientious scruple.
Maxy young colored men will for
the first time in their life live under a
Democratic admioistration. The
present geueration is the hopa of the
race. They can command greater
respect for themselves aud their race
as intelligent Awerican citizens by
accepting philosophically the result
of the recent political cortest than by
displaying a vindiciivoness, which
would only invite unnecessary discord.
Mg. W Sorrers, of the Eighth
ward, took occasion to vigorously
defend the Eighth ward club and
arraign the Heckstown band for the
display of colorphobia;they made dur
ing a Republican parade. Mr. Sol
lers gave this band of sticks to under
stand that such conduct as they in
dulged in would not be tolerated by
the people of this city.
We have no admiration for the
leading RRepublican papers that kept
the minds of the people 1n such a
state of anticipation and hope, when
they had every facility for ascertaio
ing the truth. There are many peo
ple who believe they knew the result
as well the second day after the elec
tion as they know it now.
Noropy can estimate how much
Dr. Burchard received for those three
words. The curses put upon him
are enough to damn him eternslly,
while the prayers sent forth for him
are enough to raise him into a seventh
heaven of hope and contentment.
Some Democrat, filled with bug
juice, imsgined that he saw a colored
man throw a stone into the parade
on Monday night. It was simply a
delusion of the brain, interspersed by
an overdose of free rum.
PRESS OOMMENTS
The Government Btill Lives.
Zouthern Tribune.
Let not the Negro think that life
is only worth living under a Repub
lican administration, but recognizing
that this is bis country as much as
any other citizen’s, recognizing that
this Gevernment owes the perpetuity
of its institution to his :ervices ia the
field, et him go to work and better
fit himself for those duties of citizen
ship of which his bitterest enemies
dare not deprive him. God rules and
the Government still lives.
Mis-spent Money.
Philadelphia Independent.
Milhous spent to convert the Irish
to Republicanism and not one cent’s
worth of good accomplished. Joha
Kelly paraded as working for Blaine
and working for John Kelly all the
time.
The Bone of Contention.
Arkansas Herald Mansion.
There is no Democrat living who
fought to destroy the flag which Le
is anxious to take possession of, can
quietly calm himself without having
aveoged himself of what he conceived
to bave been his misfortune by con~
tending for the lost cause. If we
could tell which of the two would be
the bone of contention, the negro or
the treasury department, we would
picture in glaring letters as near as
possible our future hope and poesition.
More Than Satisfled.
Indianapolis World.
We hope the Republican party of
Indiava is satisfied with the Irish
vote it received. We are afraid that
our rumored Irish gains existed in
the fervid imagination of some paid
Irish patriot. The party bad a large
number of patriots on their roll.
They Helped to do It
Detroit Plaindealer.
Ex president Ilayes, wrapped up
in his conciliatery policy, paved the
way for the present condition of
things by the withdrawal of troops
from the South and leaving the col
ored people to the mercy of their
worst enemies. What Garfield would
have done is a matter of conj-cture.
The conservative Arthur thinks more
of the fashionable fete than of the
rights of men at the ballot box.
Peace Reigns,
Louisville Bulletin.
The transfer of power from one
party to another, in this country, 18
equivalent to the change of dynasty
in any of the effete monarchies in
Europe. That such a thing can occur
without popular outbreaks, or the
shedding of blood, proves the strength
of our free instituticns, and the law
abiding character of onr people.
Glorying in Their Shame
Charleston News and Courler, Dem.
Senator Brown, of Georgia, in a
speech at Atlapta, ssid that the
6,000,000 colored people in the
Southern Stat:s give those States
about thirty seven Representatives in
the House, and thirty seven members
of the Electoral College. Governor
Cleveland’s majority over Blaine in
the Electoral College is 37, the num
ber of votes which the Southern
States gain by the enfranchizement
of the colored people. Without those
votes, the total electoral vote wonld
be 364, and a majority would be 182,
which is the Blaine vote exactly.
Too Late For Comment.
Philadelphia Press.
There are 130 000 colored voters
in Mississippi to 108,000 white, yet
Cleveland’s majority is over 35,000,
while Blaine, according to the returcs,
received less thun one third of the
colored vote. 1)ors any one beliave
that this is the leg’ mate result of a
fair election? ‘L. .reis no one with
any claim to intelligence who does
not know or with eny honesty who
will not admit that the so-called elec
tions of Mississippi are a dreary faroce,
and that, were a fair expression of the
wishes of the people allowed, Cleve
land would have had as much chance
of getting the electoral vote of Min
nesota as of Mississippi. Yet the
people of the North are expected to
submit patiently while #he frandalent
elections of Mississippi, Louisiana and
South Carolina, each of which has a
majority of colored voters, decide
who shall be President of the United
States.
So Be It.
Washington Bee.
The blood of the forty Negroes
killed in Louisiana will ery to Heaven
against Mr. Martinet of the Louisiana
Standard who aided and abetted the
Democrats in their atrocious maur
ders.
BAVARIAN AND BOHEMIAN
BEER,
Robert Smith's India Pale Ale,
Yuengling & Sons Potts
ville Porter.
Telephone connections. Orders
promptly filled.
GEO. N. BACOX,
26 Grace avenue, Harrisburg, Pa.
f, B, MITCHELL & (0,
[;[' Al- | Lykans Valloy and
| Bard Whits Ash,
CORD and
RINDLING
. WOOD
WM. E. HUGHES,
ounuplkil Malt Whisk,
Brandies, Winss, Ginls and Whiskies,
510 MARKET STREET,
FALL STYLES
MILLINERY
LARGEST ASSORTMERT,
~ LOWEST PRIGES.
Goods received daily at
JENNING'S BAZAR,
Cor. Second and Walnut Sts.
HERMAN J. WOLL,
CIGARS, PIPES axd TOBAZCD.
Choice Segars at Low Prices.
Give us a call.
1884 WALL PAPER 1885
H. L. HERSHEY.
A full line of New and Cheap
WALL PAPER AND WINDOW SHADES,
received daily at
Ne. 3 N. MARKET SQUARE.
Also Agent for Dauphin County, for
Immitation Stained Glass,
— FOR —
Private Dwelings and Churches,
H. L. HERSHEY, _
NEW STORE,
336 MARKET STREET 336
The Largest and Best assortment of
BOOTS, SHOKS and RUBBERS
in the city.
Ladies’ and Children's Shoes a
gpeciaity.
Will net be undersold.
Remember the place.
J. H. DeHAVEN,
336 Market Strest 336
THAT
LORILLARD'S CLIMAX
PLUG TOBACCO
with Red Tin Tag ; Rose Leaf Fine Cut Chew
ing ; Navy Clippings, and Black, Brown and
Yellow SNUFFS are the bes:t and cheapest,
quality eonsidered ?
PALL A 0 WINTER GOODS,
J. NEIDIC,
Announces to his customers and the
public that he has opened a fall
line of FALL and WINTER
GOODS for
LADIES'GENTS and CHILDREN.
Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery
and a full line of
CORSETS, RIBBONS, GERMAN.-
TOWN WOOL, ZEPHYRS,
SAXONY AND STOCK
ING YARN
and everything belonging to a first
class Notion Store.
You are cordially invited to call.
J. NEIDIG,
COR. 3d AND HERR STREETS,
Harrisburg, Pa.
P. K.SPRENKEL,
MILLINERY GOODS,
Entire New Stock, all the novelties
of the season at low prices.
FRONT and MARKET STS.
_Subscribe for The State
Journal. Show it to your
neighbor.
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Has a large and
increasing circu
lation, and is the
only paper man
aged by colored
men and devoted
to "ohe interest of
the colored peo
ple of the State
of Pennsylvania.
[HE
STATE
JOURNAL
Invites special
attention to their
Job Office, where
first - class Book
and Job Printing
of every descrip
tion is neatly
done.
THE
STATE
JOURNAL
Is the only me
dium through
which the senti
ments of the col
ored people can
be obtained.
The Union Car Uncoupling
AUTOMATIC BRAKE CO.
SHARES FOR SALE!
For particulars address
J. H . HOWARD, Sec'y,
Oftics Journa! Publishiug Company.
GEORGE H. SOURBIER,
UNDERTAKER
And Dealer in
FINE FPURNITURHE.
334, 336 and 338 Broad Strect, Harrisburg. Pa.
sayr-Black Cloth Caskets for $65, trimmed as desired.
No extra charge for Dlack or White Hearse.
FILIXMING-.
BOOKS A_ND STATIONERY
PRES ENTS.
32 N. THIRD STREET.
D. C. BURNITE'S
G'léllsl H&TF Tfi;Ys'szglgmsfieß:.r :
Executes Photographs in the most artistic style and finisb. Crayons,
Boudoirs, Panels, Cabinets and Cards. Life-Size Crayon Portraits
a Specialty.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
BOWMAN & CO.,
326 MARKET STREET.
POPULAR DRY 600DS and NOTION HOUSE,
A FULL LINE OF ——
FALL AND WINTER GOODS.
Dress Goods, Blankets, Flannels, Velvets, Velveteens, Silks,
Ladies’ Merino Underwear, Misses’ Underwear, Shawls,
Ladies’ Cloaks, Misses’ Cloaks, Kid Gloves, Hosiery,
Trimmings, Black Cashmeres, Cloth Dress Goods
IN NEW SHADES.
EIVW MAN & CO.
XX ER EF - ORIV
HOUSEFURNISHING STORE,
Water Coolers,
Ice Cream Freezers,
oil Stoves,
Express Wagons,
Step Ladders,
Baskets,
Fishing Tackle,
Window Screens.
PIRG BAICE, STOVES GRATES AND CASTINGS,
Wire Cloths, Catlery, Pocket Knives, etc. Rodgers Bro.’s Plated Ware.
Picture Frames made to order. Come and examine my goods, whether you
purchase or not.
STEPHEN HUBERTIS,
C i i {Q_"‘t!f_‘fllzi‘?treet, Harrisburg, Pa.
fobo Geonge’s Drug Ston
PURE DR@;R@EHIGMS
Pure Spices Grownd on Bis Own Mills,
GERMAN DRUGS and HOUSEHOLD
REMEDIES A SPECIALTY.
George’s Swedish Elexire of Long Life
is a sure cure for Malaria, Liver Com
plaint, Dpspepsia and Headache.
1306 NORTH THIRD STREET,
HARRISBURG, PA.
D. W, GAOSS & 3
Druggists
Poaey out, Dunte, (s & Do
Artists’ Materials at
Best Prices.
Prescriptions a Specialty.
s Electric Night Bell,

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