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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, December 13, 1884, Image 4

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Notes to Contributors
ANy communication intended for publicatio
must be written on one side of the paper and irLe
tull name of the writerattached.
No eommunication will be published without
charge, if consisting of more than three pages of
aper.
" All communications intended for publication
.nusfi be sent in on or before Thursday of each
week.
Correspondents will make their letters short,
poitnted and newsy, as long letters crowd others
out.
Correspondence solicited and sgents wanted
throughout the country. Sample copies sent
free. Supscription terms invariably in advance.
Liberal inducements offered to agents. Address
JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,
Harrisburg, Pa.
8% The office of THE JOURNKAL PUBLISHING
CoMPANY has been removed to the corner of
South street and Tanners® avenue, where all
business will be transacted. Send in your Job
Printing aud subseriptions.
Special Notice to Subscribers
All persons whose subseription to
the Journar has expired, and have
received mnotice of the same, will
please remit to postal order, regis
tered letter or postal note, at once, or
the paper will be stopped from this
issue.
Jovenarn Popuskine Co.
GATHERED ABOUT TOWN.,
Interesting Items Gleaned by
Journal Reporters.
Christmas is not very far off.
You fall befere you thiok at the
rink.
Please pay your iudebtedness to
the JourNnaL
S. W. Fleming is a candidate for
City Treasurer.
J. G. B. Marshll leaves to morrow
for Philadelphia.
There has becn po social clubs
formed this winter.
What shsll we bay for Christmas?
That's the question.
Sheriff Sheesley, it is said, his an
eye on the Mayora'ty.
Mr. William Middleton will spend
Christmas in Chamberzburg.
Many distinguished perscos have
bzen in our city the past week.
The Central Demacratic Clab in
tend giving a ball on January 28.
Some of our young ladies are be
comivg quite graceful on the rollers.
Mr. Luke White, of Philadelphia,
is 8 musician of no mean distine
tion.
Aldus Groff, a brakeman, was
killed near Middletown Wednesday
morning.
Mr. Joseph L. Thomas has almost
completed his new residence in
Muench stzeet.
The programame presented by the
Bethel Literary on Tuesday evening
was quite interesting.
A BRAVE GIRL
BY FLORENCE B, HALLOWELL
“Now, mind you don’t leave the
house, Jenny, even fora minute.’'—*No,
ma’am.”’—“And keep the blinds all
closed, and have supper ready for us.
There’s some chipped beef inthe pantry,
and you can cut off the rest of that cold
turkey. Skim that pan of milk I putin
the cellar this morning, and make some
dry teast from that stale loaf in the bread
box. Anddon’t let the fire go cut. We’ll
be back by six.”
“Yes, ma’am,’ said Jennie, and handed
her mistress her parasol, and watched her
with longing eyes as she climbed up into
the spring wagon and seated herself by
her husband’s side on the front seat. On
the back seat sat old Mr. May, Mrs. Den
ning’s uncle, and little Agnes, the cnly
child of the house.—*‘lt seems tome you
lefta good many directions, niece,”’ said
the old gentleman, as the horse, obedient
to a touch of the whip, started off on a
brisk trot. ‘‘That child must be smarter
than she looks.”’ i
“I’vetrained her pretty well, ’answered
Mrs. Denning, ‘and she knows well
enough what thereis to do.”’—‘‘Do yeu
think it safe to leave her alone all day?”
said Mr. May.—*‘Oh, yes; we often do
so. She has Towser, and he is so fierce
that a strenger can’t get within fifty
yards of the house. There’s no danger
as long as he is around.”
“You got the child fromthe poor house
I think you said ?"’—*‘Yes; she was enly
two years old, and dreadfully stupid.
Of course she wasn’t of much use for a
year or so, but I’ve taught her to work
and I reckon she earns her bread and but
ter, if nothing else.”’
“Do you send her to schoolatall "’
“I let her go three months of every
winter. Ican’t spare her for a longer
time. I don’t think it necessary for her
to have much of an education, anyhow,
for she will never be anything better
than a servant.”’—‘‘But she can read and
write better than I can, mamma,’’ said
Agnes. ““Oh, if uncle would only let
her go to school with me.”—“What an
idea, Agnes,” said Mrs. Denniag. ‘“Your
uncle has something better to do with his
money than to use it in educating a
charity child. Don’t talk nonsense.”
Then she changed the subject, and the
conversation soon drifted very far away
from peor little Jenny.
Mr. May, who was visiting his niece
for the first time, had taken a great fancy
to Agnes, and had offered to send her to
a good school at his expense, where she
could receive advantages her parerts
found it out of their power to give her,
for they were poor and lived on a small
farm. The only school Agnes had ever
attended was the one taught in the dis
trict school-house by a iyouth cighteen
years of age. She was delighted at the
idea of going away. She was eager to
learn, and the prospect of being out of
the reach of her mother’s frequent repri
mands was very pleasant. Mrs. Denning
was the unfortunate possessor of an un
governable temper, and the members of
her small household suffered in conse
uence. But on poor little, overworked
genny her wrath fell more frequently
than on anyone else; and many a uight
did the child sob herself to sleep in her
little attic room, and wish herself back in
the poor-house. She was more unhappy
tban ever now that A¥nes was going
awag, for they were firm friends.
“If you were onl{ going too, Jenny,”’
Agnes said sorrowfully; and Jenny echoed
the wish, for she had a keen thirst for
knowledge, and read everything that
came in her way. There were tears in
her big blue eyes as she stood in the door
way this autumn morning and watched
the springwagon and its load disappear in
the dust of the country road. Mr. May
had invited his mniece and her husband
and Agnes too g 0 §o an exhibition of a cir
cus in a neighboring town. He had sug
gested that Jenny should go too, for he
was a kind-hearted old gentleman, and
liked to give pleasure, but Mrs, Denning
had said it wounld be out of the question.
Some one must stay to keep house, and
Jenny could go some other time.
Jenny thought there wasn’t much like
lihood that the ‘‘other time’’ would ever
come, but she didn’t say anything. And
after she had seen the last of the spring
wagon she went back into the kitchen and
went soberly to work washing the dishes,
trying to enjoy the prospect ofa long quiet
afternoon, undisturbed by any scolding or
fault-finding. She ma e such a clatter
with the dishes that she did not hear stefs
on the porch outside, and started violently
when a voice sounded cloge behind her.
“Folks allaway to the circus, I guess ?”’
She turned, and the big dinner plate
she was in the act of lifting from the
sink to the draining-pan, fell witha crash
to the floor, as she saw standing in the
doorway two rough looking men, dressed
in shabby, dirty clothes, and wearing di
lapidated felt hats pulled low over their
brows. She saw at once that they were
tramps of the worst Kkind.—‘“Yes,
they’re away,’’ she said, trying to speak
bravely, and wondering where Towser
could be that these men had entered
the yard unmolsted, ‘‘but I can give
you something to eat, if that’s what
you want.”” “It ain’t all we want, by a
long sight,”’ said one of the men with a
short laugh, “but it’ll do to begin with.
Set us out the best you can, and after
that we’ll go threugh the house like &
streek o’ lightning thout no help from
nobody.”’—Jenny’s heart sank. She
thought of the silver spoons in the cedar
chest up stairs. Mrs. Denning prized
them very highly, for they had belongfd
to her mother. And then there was Mr.
Denning’s watch, which he had left at
home, fearing that if he took it with him
he might lose it in the crowd at the circus.
And Mr. May’s trunk! The tramps
would be sure to break it open and find
the chain and locket he had bought to
carry home to his daughter.—Jenny felt
bewildered. She sank down in a chair,
too weak to stand.
‘‘What’s the matter ?”” asked one of the
tramps. ‘‘Come, where’s the milk and
butter, an’ the pies an’ meat? Get’em
an’ be quick about it. We ain’t got no
time to fool 'round.’”’—‘“There’s a pan of
milk down cellar, and the cold tur
key’s down there, too,”” said Jenny, ‘‘but
I can’t get 'em. I don’t believe I' could
take a step.”’—Her teeth were fairly chat
tering from fright, and she was shaking
as if with a chill. The men laughed
loudly. “See if you can put that
coffee pot on the fire, and we’ll get the
milk and turkey for ourselves. Come
along, Bill,”’ and the biggest and roughest
looking of the two seized his companion
by the arm and started towards the
cellar door. “*Oh, what shall I do?”’
moaned Jenny, as the men went clatter
ing down the stairs, swearing at the
darkress of the cellar. ‘“Where is
Towser 2’ She did not dare call the dog
and sat staring helplessly at the cellar
door, thinking how angry Mrs. Denning
would be when she came home &an
found the house robbed of all its valu
ables.
“If they would only stay down cellar
until I could hunt up Towser,”’ thought
Jenny; and then suddenly a bright idea
came into herhead. The cellar-door was
a very heavy one and was fastened by a
strong iron bolt. If she could but close
it, and thus imprison the tramps. Her
shaking limbs almost refused to support
her, but she manuged to get across
the room and close the door just as the
men began the ascent of the stairs, and
as they reached the top her trembling
fingers shot the bolt into the catch. The
men, laden with the pan of milk and the
cold turkey, tried at first to kick the door
open, but failing in that, they ordered
Jenny to unbolt it at once, or they would
kill her. But, frightened as she was at
this terrible threat, the child did not obey,
and after assuring her that she would suf
fer for what she had done, the men went
stamping and swearing down the stairs
again.
“The trap! I forgot the trap!”’ thought
Jenny, fairly sick with fear, and she
dragged herself to the window to look
out.—She almost cried, so great was her
relief, when she saw on the trap door
three barrels of potatoes, which Mr.
Denning had rolled there that morning
to await removal to the cellar. She felt
sure now that the tramps could not make
their escape, for the windows to the cel
lar were very small, and had iron bars
across them. She did not think of leav
ing the house to call for help. Inthe first
place, Mls. Denning had forbidden her to
leave it even for a minute, and in the sec
ond place, she knew that the nearest
neighbors had gone to the circus. She
went back to the sink and finished the
washing of the dinner dishes, in spite of
the storming and swearing that was going
on below. Againandagainthemen trie
to break down the cellar door, but it re
sisted all their atfempts. They tried
threats, argument and persuasion on
Jenny without effect. She made no re
ply to anything they said. But she was
in constant terror that they would succeed
in breaking in the door, and her heart al
most stopped beating as she heard the
reining of their tierce blows.
Would 6 o’clock never come? She
glanced at the big kitchen clock every
few minutes, and it seemed to her as if
hands had never before moved so slowly.
She set the table, cut the bread, went to
the dairy for milk, and made the toast;
and just as the clork struck 6 she heard
the sound of wheels, and Mr. Denning’s
voice She went to the door as the wagon
stopped at the horse block. Towser
looked fagged, and very dusty, was al
ready stretched on the porch, preparing
for a nap.
“Towser followed us all the way,”
screamed Agnes, as her father lifted her
out of the wagon, “and we didn’t know
anything about it until we got there.
Then we couldn’t make him go back.
Did you miss him, Jenny ?"’ Jenny didn’t
answer. She went up to Mr. Denning
and touched him on the arm. But though
her lips moved, not a sound escaped them.
“What's the matter, child?’ asked
Mrs. Denning, sharply, wondering at
this strange pantomime. ‘Speak up. I
hope to goodness you haven’t broken
anything, but I feel sure you have.”
“Only a plate,’’ gasped Jenny, finding
her voice at last, ‘‘but, but, there are two
tramps in the cellar. Ilocked—’’ Then
suddenly the earth seemed to rise up to
meet her, and she fell senseless at Mrs,
Denning’s feet.
Mr. May carried her into the house and
laid her on a lounge, Agnes rubbed her
hands, and Mrs, Denning poured water
over her face; but it was nearly twenty
minutes before the child opened her eyes
again, Then she managed to tell her
story, and Mr. Denning went for help.
A couple of hours later the two tramps
were in the county jail. A full account
of Jenny's heroism was published in the
county paper, and for weeks every one
was talking of her. But Jenny lXidn’t
know this. She was far away from her
old home and all its unpleasant associa
tions, for Mr. May had sent her to school
~“‘Such a brave girl deserves to he some
| thing better than a kitchen drudgeall her
lite,”” he said. *T’ll give her a chance,
‘anyhow, and we’ll see what she cando.”
Mrs. Denning did not like the idea of
parting with Jenny; but she stood too
much in awe of herrich uncle to say so,
and so let the child go without Il&:rot.alst.
<‘She was a good deal of help, r all.
I see that, now she’s gone,”’ sheadmitted
to a neighbor, Who asked her if she
missed Jenny. “I'm going to the poor
house to hunt up agother, butl don’t sup
pose I'll get one as good.” ‘You cer
tainly don’t stand much chance of getting
one as brave,’’ said the neighbor.—7%e
Standard. ) B
“A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL.”
ANNOUNCE A GRAND OPENING OPF THE LARGEST AND BEST
SELECTED STOCK OF
that have ever been offered in Harrisburg, at prices which will meet the wants of everybody. At this Popular
Store you can buy 2 beautiful present from five cents to fifty dollars, consisting of
DOLLS, TOYS, MAJOLICA WARE, ALBUMS, SCRAP BOOKS, BOOKS FOR CHILDREN,
BOOKS FOR EVERYBODY, GAMES, CUPS AND SAUCERS,
TERRA COTTA WARE, CLOCKS, PICTURE FRAMES,
BANKS, MIRRORS, WRITING P’APER, ETC,
While our other departments, consisting of
HANDKERCHIEFS, SCARFS, BOWS, GLOVES, UMBRELLAS, SKIRTS,
CLOAKS, DRESS GOODS, SILKS, ETC.,
will be found complete with goods suitable for glfts. Our stock is entirely new and full of
Come- early in the day and eeason to avoid the immense crowd that visit our store during the
Holidays.
DIVES, POMEROY & STEWART,
334 MARKET STREET.
The leaves in Capitol Park are
being burnt.
J. H. Early, of the Executive De
partment, leaves to day for Washing
ton, D. C., on business.
On Sunday, December 21st inst,
the Elder Street Presbyterian church
will have interesting exercises. The
Wesley and Bethel church choirs
will be in attendance during the day.
All are invited.
"The members of Select Council,
who gave their individual notes for
the pay of the policemen’s back
salary, deserve the highest commen
dation. The police will ever feel
grateful to Messrs. Ewing, Fritchey,
Forney and others.
A Leap Year Marriage
Charley Saunders, a young man
well known in this city, who has
been living in Pottsville for several
months, has taken unto himself
(though ratber unwillingly) a com
panion, with whom he will endeavor
to sail over the sea of life smoothly.
Charlie embarked last week upon
his indefinite voyage. May he ever
be happy.
Notice
The manager of the Keystone
Roller Rink will give a grand Mas
que Ball at Keystone Hall Decem
ber 24, 1884. Skating from 7 till 12
o'clock. Grand march at 10 o’clock
sharp. Admission to skates and ball
50 cents.
WHY DO THE PEOPLE
GO THE
1
Weill's Drug Store?
Because it is the BEST plaae to get pre
scriptions filled. Also, for
Pure Drugs, Chemicals, Patent Med
icines, Choice Perfumeries, Toilet
Articles, &e.
Diamond Corn Care, .
Little Giant Vegetable Pills,
Balsamic Cough Syrup
and Sweedish Bitters
are meoling with large sales, Try them.
CAUSTIC SODA
for boiling Soap, SIX cents a pound.
DON'T FORGET
A~ Our prices are to suit the times. “G 8
W. .M. L. WEILLS,
The Reliable Druggist,
332 BROAD STREET,
HARRISBURG, PA.
CHRISTMAS! CHRISTMAS!
@ iriaey, .
Holiday Swestmeats
2. - 23.ACON S,
MARKET STREET.
s
Selected Greceeries
817 N. THIRD STREET,
Special selections of Staple Gro
ceries for the Holidays. Nuts, Rai.
sing, Evaporated Fruits and Choice
Canned Goods. 1
H. LUTZ.
HOWARD D, DIETRICE,
Medicines,
Umo g 57,
D. L. JAUSS &CO.,
COAL & WOOD.
Telephone Connections with all parts of the
Oity. Orders promptly delivered.
Race and Nagle Streets.
C.A.BOAS.
DIAMONDS,
WATCHES,
JEWELRY
SILVERWARE,
No. 7 Market Square,
Harrishurg, Pa.
MATHER'S
MILLINERY
HOUSE,
Cor. Secénd and Walnut Sts.
> 9
Shisler's Grocery
2d and Walnut sts,
Dealers in
1 1 i 1 1
Fin ocrien,rvisons sod Pl
Families supplied in guantities at
wholesale rates. None bat striotly
pure goeds sold. The world famous
Pillsbury Minneapolis Flour, Paxton
and Steelton Mills Flour, Farinaceous
Goods and all kinds of Food Pro
dacts. Your patronage solicted.
Telephone commun:cation.
Keystone Roller Rink,
Open Zvery Evening Exoept Saturday,
Afternoon Session 2 to 5.
GENERAL ADMISSION, 15C.
USE OF SKATES, 10C.
17 N. THGIRD STREET.
When you want first-class Grocer
ies at the vary lowest prices, go to
the City Grocery. Remember the
Coffee und Tess you get tnere are
strictjy pure. There Coffees are fresh
roasted daily, having a oapaci? of
roasting threee thousand pounds a
day. Their stock of Nuts, Fruits,
&c., is the largest in the city. Goods
promptly delivered. Orders sent by
mail or telephone will have prompt
attention.
J. C. HARLACKER,
Proprietor.
Bargains
HOLIDAT, 6000,
3 S g
SCOTRMERERY & DIETRICE
Susscrie and pay for the Jour-
NAL, i
ALL oIFKINDS
MUSICAL
[NaTRUMENTS,
PIANOS.
ORGANS.
Sheet Music and Musical
Merchandise,
HOLIDAY GOODS,
Musical Toys, Boxes, Towers
Games, Tops, Magic Lant
erns, Steroscopes and
Views, ]Efl:c.
Fing tatioary aad Pancy Goods,
CHEAP AT
J, I, EURTENEHARE & SO,
1807 N. Third Street,
HARRISBURG, PA.
WM. H. HOUTZ,
Merchant
Tailor
CLOTHIER,
310 Broad St., Harrishurg, Pa.
$4.00
and $4.75 and $5.25
COA L.
LEWIS GASTROCK,
Briggs St., near P. R. R.
HILL & MOSS,
GrooerydProvision Store
122 Adams St., Steelton, Pa.
J. H. SANTO,
Dealer In best quality
COAL!
For Family Use
Pricss, $5.25, $4.75 and $4.00.
H tT Rt"’l:r (:}[ 'fi‘! alit
onest quantity, bood qu
BR(;lAD a.mslr COWD(JI:IN. .
6. A, AUGHINBAUGH,
JEWELER,
Cor, Third and Market Sts.,
HARRISBURG, PA,
The largest and finest stock of
Waiches, Diamonds,
Jewelry, Silverware
and Fancy Goods
inthe City,
g
The Lowest Prices.
FLEMING.
BOOKS AND STATIONERY
Holiday Gifts, Diaries for 1885,
New Books, Children’s Books,
Pocket BBooks,
32 N. THIRD STREET.
Appropriate and Usefull
HOLIDAY GIRTS
EINSTEIN’S,
223 MARKET STREET.
LADIES’
BUTTON BOOTS, - 8135
LADIES’
KID BUTTON BOOTS, SL7S
LADIES’
WALKING SHOES, 98 CTS.
MISSES’
SCHOOL SHOES, - 8125
CHILDREN’S
Dress Shoes Very Cheap and
Durable.
ok — AT —
MEILY'S
N4&216 MARKET ST
CHRISTMAS AT
BOWMAN & (00,
326 MARKET STREET.
PORULAR DRY €6OOS and NOTION HOUSE.
——A FULL LINE OF——
FALL AND WINTER GOODS.
Dress Goods, Blankets, Flannels, Velvets, Velveteens, Silks,
Ladies’ Merino Underwear, Misses’ Underwear, Shawls,
Ladies’ Cloaks, Misses' Cloaks, Kid Gloves, Hosiery,
Trimmings, Black Cashmeres, Cloth Dress Goods
IN NEW SHADES.
BOWMAN & CO.
FALL and WINTER
CLOTHING.
Everything
signs
i GOLDSMITH'’S
‘ MAMMOTET
ONE - PRIGE GLOTHING HOUSE.
329 MARKET STREET. 329
A perfect palace. The Largest
and Handsomest Store Room in
the city.
MEN'S, YOUTHS BOYS’ and
CHILDREN’S CLOTHING.
ol sioatien 008 ullien by 5 sopkiebis odops o lomen o
329 MARKET STREET 329
LOW PRICES.
sbirts aad Under Wear
H.R.ZEIL'S
410 (:;:rl;:zuh:brm.
FOR MEN,
WOMEN AND CRILDREN.
You ask yourself how far will thia
week's wages go toward shoeing
my family; be oconvinced
what you can save on
By going to the largest
BOOT AND SHOE HOUSE.
G.W. MEILY,
N4&216 MARKETST
New of the HLatest de
in CLOTHING.
FASHION BAZAR,
1204 North Third Street,
(Opposite Frank J. Hess’ Store.)
MRS. ANNA 6. LOWE,
dsughter of the late
MR. AND MRS, THEO, FENN,
has removed to this city and opened
a first class
MILLINERY, FANCY GOODS
and NOTIONS STORE
To which she cordislly invites the
publie.

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