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The state journal. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1883-1885, December 20, 1884, Image 2

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‘The State J ourpal
Published every saturday by
{HE JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
J. H. Howard, Manager. i
SATURDAY, DEC. 20, 1884
RATES OF SUBSCRIPTION.
One Year,inadvance, - - - - $1 50
e Monthe, - - et G e Ll e,
Phies Neouthay " L 0 AnBImART e e 11900 }
I)o'l;‘;ered to 'nny part of the city by carriers &i
FIFTEEN CENTS PER MONTH.
ADVERTISING.
No advertisments taken for less than fifl{
cents. Speciai rates for quarterlg, one-half
yearly or yearly advertisements. Notices for
fubuo meetlnghs, church entertainments and the
ike will be charged for half the regular rates.
When job Pflnting is given to this office no
charge will be made for local announcements.
Bills for advertising will be collected monthiy.
THE STATE JOURNAL
Has the largest circulation of any paperin the
State managed and published by colored men. It
has a eirculation in every part of the State, and is
the only %enoral newspaper devoted to the in
terest of the colored peopla of Pennsylvania.
Advertisers will find the THS STATE JOURNAL
5 '}::d meaium for reaching any partof the
Specimen copies sent free.
Address all communieations to
JOURNAL PUBLISHING CO.,
Harrisburg, Pa.
When Will It Come ?
Congressman O Harra’'s effurt to
have discrimination on Southern rail
roads prohibited by legislative enact:
ment, not enly brings him premi
nently to the front in the interest of
his people, but exposes another of the
lost opportunities of the Republicans
when in power to make perfectly se
cure the rights of the colored people
upon public carryalls. It farthermore
aroused that spirit which only sleeps
in the bosom of the average Demo
crat, deadly opposition to everything
touching the interest of the colored
man. The defeat of Mr. O’Harra’s
amendment will prove that all the
conciliatory talk of leading Southern
Democrats as to their good feeling
toward the race, was nothing but
buncombe. They want colored men
to enjoy all the rights of other men,
but they must enjoy them separately
and alone. The curse of this Nation
is and always has been its failure to
recognize the equality of men created
by ths same Creator. ~When, O
when, shall the day come in this
“land of the free and home of the
brave,” that class legislation will
cease and a man’s color be a bar to
his full enjoyment for that which
others enjoy, and for which he pays.
Slavery is dead, but race prejudice
permeates its old supporters yet.
Be Self-dependent.
‘tration upon the colored people of
this country, are met with hearty ap
proval by our esteemed contemporary,
the Philadelphia Z7%wes, which, in a
late issue speaks at length in a simi.
lar strain. The very favorable men
tion thus given us, and the article
referred to by so eminent a represen
tative of true and successful journal
ism, we do not fail .to acknowledge
and appreciate.
We have ever stood ready to
champion the cause of our people,
and give them what we deem whole
some advice, and we trust that such
a 8 has sppeared in these columns
from time to time, may eventunally
take root and bear the desired fruit.
The stand which we bave taken, we
think is the correct one, and we shall
endeavor to maintain it.
We need not be particularly anx.
ious about the new admintstration,
nor look for crumbs from that table.
No barm can result to us through the
change, all fears to the contrary not
withstanding. The fact is, we bave
depended too much in the past upon
special legislation and aid from
others, instead of throwing ourselves
upon our own resources. Judicious
assistance is beneficial,while too munch
is weakening and detrimental, having
a strong tendency to warp and fossil
ize. We can learn to do orly by
doing. Colored men must improve
and progress with the times De
velopment in all proper directions is
the need of the hour. No party,
class or creed can fail to recognize
merit; it demands attention. As
long as we clamor for position or
emoluments from the fact of heing
colored men, we shall find nothing
whatever accraing to our benefit. In
direct proportion to our efforts will
our success be. We want plenty of
useful friction. Seek to fit ourselves
to compete with others as American
citizens, as men. We are under the
protection -of the American Govern—
ment as mach 80 as any other class of
people; we bave the same rights
guaranteed us; and, no matter what
party be in the ascendancy, there is
no fear of our condition being worse.
We can make it better. The attain
ment of better things will be onrsl
when we strive for that end throngh
earnest efforts of our own.
Tae New Orleans World's Expo
sition is open, and in its midst for the
first time in the history of the Nation
the handiwork of the colored man is
set before the eyes of the world. We
do not expect any unfair criticisms
considering the time we have had to
compete with our Anglo-saxon
broth 21 in the greatfi of mechanic
ism. / All we ask is'a fair show, and
justice. 'We have proven to the most
bitter of our enemies cur suscepta
bility to all the higher attributes of
manhood, and when they consider
that we are young, yet they must
certainly admit that we have out
stripped all races known to tbe dead
long past.
Tue coming city election promises
to be very lively. All the positions
to be filled are now cccupied by ca
pable and honest officials, and those
aspiring to the favor of the people
enter the contest at a great disadvan
tage. Nothing can be urged against
the present incumbents, and the only
office where there is likely to be a
change. is in that of City Tre:surer. }
Although Mr. Kinnard, who bas filled
the office two terms, is a gentlemanly,
efficient and honest officer, party lines
may be closely drawn, and he may
be succeeded by a Republican. Mayor
Wilson is by all means entitled to a
re election, and unless the people
have no appreciation of exceliency in
city government, he will sacceed him
self. Not one word can be urged
against Controllir Verbeke's man
agement of his office, and as he has
only filled it one term, a re-clection
} seems most fitting.
A Day to be Celebrated.
Every race or nation upon ‘earth
have had some cause for which to be
grateful, and show to God and man
their gratitude for whatever blessings
they have received. There is nothing
so sublime, nothing so grand as the
gratitude of a nation. When man has |
in the course of events had reason to
rejoice over being lifted either above
or from a condition of adverse cir
cumstances to that of prosperity. He
is condemned as an ingrate by the
world when he fails to show appre
ciation and gratitude for his advance
ment. One of the most notable fea
tures of the colored race is their re
'ligious devotion and piety, but we
are forced, notwithstanding all of
their piety and devotion, to claim that
they seem to have forgotter. that asa
race, as a people, they have as much
if not more to be grateful for than any
other class upon this continent. What
the 4th of July is to the Nation,
what the landing of the Mayflower
‘was to the Puritans, whatever those
auspicious occasions are that a nation
Ge ey et masvarane Sy AR L
rto the colored man. Throughout the
‘land the day should be commemorated
and properly celebrated. The heart
of the whole race sh:ould send forth to
heaven one universal shout of praise.
The proper recognition of this great
event in the history of the colored
man of America would bind tighter
the link which holds us together and
keep from sinking in the mire of for
getfulness those sympathetic ties
which should hold the race in a uni
versal brotherhood. Let it not be
charged that we are forgetfu! or un
grateful. Let the esame fidelity be
shown toward ourselves as we have
shown to the party which was in
power when this God given right
was really affirmed. Let a day be
et apart and consecrated to the cele
bration, of the event which gave
liberty, manhood and citizepship to
4,000,000 of human beings.
PRESS COMMENTS.
Arkansas Herald Mansion.
If the 1,000,000~ negro voters act
as men, no political party can molest
or ignore our rights as citizens with
out serious detriment to itself, and
the sooner we learn to value the worth
and power cof the ballots in our pos
session, and make known and under
stood that we propose to cast those
ballots where they will accomplish
the most good for ourselves, regard
less of party name, the sooner shall
we command and acquire the respect
of all parties. Ie who would be re
spected must first respect himself.
To be Felt.
Washington Advocate.
There are men north and south now
afliliating with the democracy, who
entertain 8 commendabe regard for
the rights of all citizens, of whatever
creed, color or condition and if the
party managers will consult their own
interests they will consent to permit
their influence to be felt in the con
duct of the next administration.
How True.
Louisville, Kentucky, Bulletin,
The colored men who have barber
shops exclusively for white persons
stand in the way of progress. How
can colored people expeet to attain
their civil rights if some slavish col
ored men make discriminations in the
business. The caste barber shop must
go. Mr. Colored-only white-man
shaving-barber must go.
A very interesting revival is being
held at Wesley A. M. E. Church.
Several persons are seeking religion.
The services are ably conducted by
Rev. Daniels, the pastor.
A MORTIFIED MASHER.
How a Little Man Punished a Street-car
» Ruffian,
In a Twenty-third Street car in New
York on a recent Sunday evening a gen
tleman of about forty years, of slight but
wiry build, was seated between two la
dies, an((l);)&)posite them was a young and
rather good looking girl, well but plainly
dressed, and of modest, self-possessed
manner. She evidently belonged to the
working class. As the car went eastward
across Fourth avenue & man of stalwart
physique and rather dissipated face
swung through the car, deposited his
fare in the box and sat down deliberately
alongside of the girl. She concealed a
look which was of partial recognition,
coupled with annoyance, and turned her
' face towards the window, with every ap
pearance of being nervous and ill at ease.
' The newcomer, who wore & high hat, a
) light overcoat, a silver-topped stick and
~was entirely at his ease, allowed his elbow
to rest over the arm of the girl. She
moved along a foot or so in the seat, and
he calmly followed her. This sort of
thing went on until they were both up in
the corner of the car. ! e
The gentleman escorting thetwo ladies l
watched the performance with nervous
anxie(:gr, and at every fresh annoyance
offered the girl opposite the blood would
slowl{ mount to his face and then recede.
Finally he drew off his gloves, his hands
trembling violently, but he folded the
gloves and placed them quietly in his
pocket. His two companions evidently
understood his feelings, and one put her
hand affectionately on his arm.
“I think,”’ she said, ‘‘Alfred, that we
had better walk the rest of the way. It
is very close in here and I would rather
be in the air.”’
She half rose in her seat, but he did
not move. He was still glaring at the big
man across the car, who returned his
look once in a while with the most tran
quil indifterence imaginable. Meanwhile
the working girl, who had apparently
been baving quite as much excitement as
the little man opposite her, rose to change
her seat. As she did so the man beside
her took her géntly by the arm and pulled
her down into the seat again. Thereupon
the little man sprang to his feet, doubled
up his fist, pointed his finger at the man
across the car, and said slowly and with
great decision: ‘“You infernal scoundrel,
it yeu don’'tmove away from that lady I'll
throw you out of the car.”
The words were delivered in rather a
singular manner, bat there was no doubt
about the earnestness of the man who
uttered them. The big man simply
swiled, and deliberately turned around
and dropped his hand on the girl’s arm
again. What followed occupied a very
short space of time. The white-faced
‘and wiry man pounced upon his bigger
rival asa hawk does upon a chicken.
There was no attempt at hitting or claw- |
ing. He jumped athis throat and twined
both of his hands into the breast of
the man’s coat. Then there was an
instant’s struggle and the big masher
lay flat on his back, with his
head out against the platform and against
the dashboard, and his long legs stretch
ing into the car. Before he could get up
the little man has tossed his cane and hat
out into the street. lis face was work
ing into extraordinary grimances sufi
cient to alarm a Colessus. And as the
man lay on the floor and looked up atit
the conviction seemed to enter his soul
that he had had enough. He scrambled
awkwardly to his feet and stood ift the
door in some doubt whether to tackle
his assailant or not, while the assailant
said in the same sing-song and falsetto
volce: .
“If you come in this car again I wil
‘strugg;e,'and the man jumped off and
left his assailant in full possession. Two
of the buttons had been ripped off of the
fallant’s coat in the scrimmage, and the
ittle man picked them up, presented one
to the girl and put the cther in his pocket
with the remark: ‘“These will do for sou
venirs.”’
The girl said the man had annoyed her
for several nights in succession, but she
was sure_he would never trouble her
again. The little man gave her a courtly
bow as he left the car, and it was notice
able that he trod the floor with a tip
toed grace and haughty mien that be
longs by rightsto conquerors.
WHY DO THE PEOPLE
GO THE
2119
Weill’s Drug Store?
Because it is the BEST plaae to get pre
scriptions filled. Also, for
Pure Drugs, Chemieals, Patent Med
icines, Choice Perfumeries, Toilet
Articles, &e. ;
Diamond Corn Cure, _
Little Giant Vegetable Pills,
Balsamic Cough Syrup
and Sweedish Bitters
are meoting with large sales. Try them.
CAUSTIC SODA
for boiling Soap, SIX cents a pound.
DON'T FORGET
&%~ Our prices are to suit the times, ‘fl
W, M. L. WEILLS,
The Reliable Druggist,
332 BROAD STREET,
HARRISBURG, PA:
CHRISTMAS! CHRISTMAS!
PP
Holiday Swestmeats
D. BACOINS,
MARKET STREET.
Selected Groceries
817 N. THIRD STREET,
Special selections of Siaple Gro
ceries for the Holidays. Nuts, Rai
sins, Evaporated Fruits and Choice
Canned Goods.
H. LUTZ.
HOWARD D, DIETRICH,
DRUG S
Medicines,
__THIRD AWD HERR STS,
M. 3, MITCRELL & (0,
[;[l M {Lykena Talley aad
Bard White Auh.
CORD and
KINDLING
WOOD
WM. E. HUGHES,
Subaplkll Motk Whisks,
Brandies, Wines, Gins and Whiskies,
510 MARKET STREET,
WINTER STYLES
TRIMMED HATS, -
TRIMMED BONETS.
Largest assortment in the city
at the lowest prices.
A large lot of
LADIES’ COATS, DOLMANS and
NEWMARKETS at cost to
close them out before the
Holidays.
JENNING'S BAZAR,
Cor. Second and Walnut Sts.
HERMAN J. WOLL,
CIOARS, PIPES ead TOBABCD.
e
1884 WALL PAPER 1885
H. L. HERSHEY.
A fall Jine of New and Cheap
WALL PAPER AND WINDOW SHADES,
received daily at
No. 3 N. MARKET SQUARE.
Also Agent for Dauphin County, for
Immitation Stained Glass,
— FOR —
Private Dwelings and Churches,
H. L. HERSHEY,
NEW STORE,
336 MARKET STREET 336
The Largest and Best assortment of
BOOTS, SHOES and RUBBERS
in the city.
Ladies’ and Children's Shoes a
" specialty.
Will not be undersold.
Remember the place.
J. H. DeHAVEN,
336 Market Street 336
BAVARIAN AND BOHEMIAN
BEER,
Robert Smith's India Pale Ale,
Yuengling & Sons Potts
ville Porter.
Telephone oo::;c;;ions. Orders
promptly filled.
GF.O. X. BACON,
26 Grace avenue, Harrisburg, Pa.
PALL AND WINTER GOODS,
J. NEIDIC,
Announces to his customers and the
public that he has opened a full
line of FALL and %INTER
GOODS for
LADIES GENTS and CHILDREN.
Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery
and a fall line of
CORSETS, RIBBONS, GERMAN
TOWN WOOL, ZEPHYRS,
SAXONY AND STOCK
ING YARN
and everythin% belonging to a first
class Notion Store. 1
You are cordially invited to call.
: J. NEIDIG,
COR. 34 AND HERR STREETS,
Harrisburg, Pa.
Subscribe for The State
Journal. Show it to your
neighbor.
DAL STOCE- OF DOl CLOTES
PALL STOCK O GARPETS AND OLL CLOTES!
Oar new stock is now ready for you to see. 'The patterns are very
very choice and prices sarprisingly low.
Velvets, Body Brussels, Tapestry Brussels, Ingrain and Rag
Carpets, Rugs, Door Mats, Druggets, Stair Rods, Carpet
Lining, &c., all at the Lowest possible CASH prices and all
‘good guarantesd to he as represented.
B 3 5
MARKET STREET, AT THE RIVER BRIDGE,
HARRISBURG, PA.
Lok for our RED BANNER across the street.
Get the exact measure of rooms and we will cut carpets, ete., to fit.
BALANCE OF STRAW MATTING AT COST.
J B. FIRST,
NO. § SOUTH THIRD STREET HARRIBURS. -
REAL ESTATE AND BUSINESS AGENT.
COLLECTIONS MADE AND PAID PROMPTLY.
[ have propertics for sale in apy part of the city; also, rame in Steelton.
GEORGE H. SOURBIER,
And Dealer in
FiNE FPURNITURE.
334, 336 and 338 Brog@__S_treet, Harrisburg. Pa.
g Black Cloth Caskets for $63, trimmed as desired.
No extra charge for Black or White Hearse.
D. C. BURNITE'S
G;IOA.'IIG‘-I%TFTHRMX;REEPIEIRI ART’
Execates PPhotographs in the most artistic style and finish. Crayons,
Boudoirs, Panels, Cabinets and Cards. Life-Size Crayon Portraits
a Specialty.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
Neely & Numbers,
UNDERTAKERS, CABINET MAKERS
AND FURNITURE DEALERS,
213 N. SECOND ST. Branch Store, 1103 Ridge Road.
HARRISBURG, PA. J. Feight, Manager.
bt Goonge's Drup Sham
PURE nn@;:_n@smcns
fure Spices Ground on Bis Own Mills,
GERMAN DRUGS and HOUSEHOLD
REMEDIES A SPECIALTY.
George's Swedishfixire of Long Life
is a sure cure for Malaria, Liver Com
plaint, Dpspepsia and Headache.
1306 NORTH THIRD STREET,
HARRISBURG, PA.
SES THES!
19, 85,50 CTS. A QUART!
Do Cove or Salf Watar Opans by the Banme]
Warner’s,
Corner State and Spruce Streets
0. W, GROSS & S,
Druggists
Puy 00, Puit, O & B
Artists’ Materials i
Best Prices.
Prescriptions a Specialty.
sa¥ Hlectric Night Bell.
ATATE CAPITAL PLOTR MILLS,
The Choicest Family Flour
Made.
Sold to dealersin quantities from one
barrel upwards. Every Grocery
should have it. Every fam
ily should buy it.
J. E. MACHLIN,
Proprietor,
HERR STRELT, NEAR ELDER.
Drunkeness, or the Liquor Habit, can be
cured by administering Dr. Haies’
Golden Specific.
It can be given in a cup of coffee or tea with
out the knowledge of ghe person taking i
effecting a speedy and permanent cure,whether
the patient i 8 a moderate drinker or an aleohoilc
wreck. Thousands of drunkards have been
made temperate men who have taken the
Golden Specific in their coffee without their
knowledge,andto-day believe they quit drinking
of theirown free wiil. No harmful effects result
from its administration. Cures guaranteed.
Circulars and testimonials sent free.
Address, GoLpeN Speciric Co.,
183 Race St., Cincinnati, O.
LINGOLN CEMETERY,
Special notice, at this season of the
year, is called to Lincoln Cemeteay.
As a resting place for the dead isa
necessity, the sooner one is procured
the better, and now is the best time
to procure your lots, at reasonable
prices. The ground is being well
improved, consequently raising the
value of the lots. Moreover the lots
can be improved at this season at but
small cost.
All persons, irrespective of de
nomination. ¢in purchase lots in the
Cemetery. ILots can be purchased
for §B, 810, $l5 and $2O.
INTERMENTS IN LOTS.
AdUltE.oenescnsssesiessasssasrassacescesee §3 00
Children...c.cceu..ceverranansianaonsorieee 100
INTERMENTS IN SINGLE SECTION.
LT T GRS ORRORRRE
R et anvoine & 00
Any information can be had of the
gecretary, J. P. SCOTT, 605 South
street.
BUSINESS CARDS.
H. LUTZ,
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. A
seleet assortmen: of Canned Goods, Fruits,
Nats, &c¢., 807 North Third Street.
P.K.SPRENKEL,
MILLINERY GOODS,
Entire New Stock, all the novelties
of the season at low prices.
OPERA HOUSE.
THAT

TORTTT.ARD'S CLIMAX
PLUG TOBACCO
with Red Tin Tag; Rose Leaf Fine Cut Cheow
ing : Navy Clippings, and Black, Brown and
Yellow SNUFFS are the best and cheapest,
quality considered ?
Eppley’s old Stand
Guarantzed SILKS
& Specialty.
By Sick CASMERES
IR
W. H,K LYTER,
state Cavital Light House.
Y
H. FRALEY, .
Cor. Third & Cumberland Sts
I have removed my store to the
above location, where I have one of
the finest rooms in the city, and
filled with a large and selected stock
of goods in my line, such as
LAMPS, LAMP FIXTURES AND
OILS, also QUEENSWARE,
GLASSWARE, TOILET
AND FANCY GOODS. .
It will pay you to call and see our
new store and new goods. Our
prices are low and within the reach
of all. Come and see.
H. FRALEY.
Harrisburg Colored Church
and Society Directory.
Elder Street Presbyterian Church—Services at
10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath school at 1:36. Lecture
and prayer meeting on Wednesday evening at
8 o’cloek. Thomas Miler, Superintendent,
Lawrence Miller, Pastor.
Wesley Unton Church, corner South street and
Tanners avenue—Pastor, Rey. Z. T. Pearsall.
Services at 10:30 ¥nd 7:30 every Sunday. Sun
day school at 1:30. Jos. B. Popel, Superintend
ent.
Bethel M. E. Chureh, Short street—Pastor, Rev,
Amos Wilson. Services at 10:30 and 7:30 every
Sunday. Sagbathsehool 1:30. Richard Snaively,
Superintendent.
Second Ba%lat. Chureh, Eleventh street near
Market—Pastor, Rev. Beverly Jones. Ser
vices t!vegv Sunday at 10:30:114’ 7:30. Sabbath
school 1:30. Robert Carrington, Superintend.-
ent.
Free Will Baptist Church, corner William and
Colderstreets—Pastor, Rev. Frazer, Services
every Sunda&' at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath
scl:ool 1:30. illiam Burrows, Superintend
ent.
Union A. M. E. Church, Tanners avenue—Pas
tor, Rev. Z. Johnson. Services every Sunday
at 10:30 and 7:30. Sunday scheol 2P, M.
Wesley Mission, Marion street near Oolder—
Pastor, Rev. Phoenix, Serviees every Sab
bath at 10:30 and 7:30. Sabbath school 1:30
Mr. Solbert, Superintendent.
SOCIETIES.
Brotherly Love Lodge 896, G. U. 0., of O. F.;
nall in South street; regular meeting every
Monday n%ht.
Chozen Friends Lodge, Masonic hall, Odd Fel.
lows building, South street regular meeting
every alternate Thursday night.
Golden Chain Council Hall, South Street,
Fran:lln Hall; regular meeting every Tuesday
n
(‘g)d Samaritan Couneil, hall East State street;
nfinur meeting every Tueod&u ht.
ousehold of Ruth Hall, Odd S'ellowa Hall
slon:tl't strect; regular meeting every Tuesday
night,
Paxton Lodge, No. 18, A, Y. M., meets every
Monday evening, ;t.fil‘mklm Hall, South st.,
Harrisburg,

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