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The evening world. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, October 10, 1887, LAST EDITION, Image 3

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I: ABOUT THE ACTORS.
WTQt NOT TIIB ONLY BOCIETI
WOMAN IN HER COMPANY,
rfceatre Spoken of for the American
Compuny Mr. Iduxtry to Take
Company to the Pacific rjlopa 3Ir.
r Uaffganl to Receive Hoyultlee on
i Mlaa Russell Still at the Standard.
HE d r m a H o nu
ft A Vnltf who make olionges and
ItytMMajprPBnperinUnJ the stage
TT0 Yet Mr. Bronson How
1 & " has sll0,ro Wb, reo
J) Jf a Iosco's suggestions in
MnEVVV ID? htm as joint author.
ajgff dncos a charactor of
Van Winkle typo. It troota of the
trance of a husband and father for
i years and the changes which ho
his domestic circle on his return,
he acts takes place at Nowport, and
toga of the Fourteenth Streot Theatre
rfven oyer to the moroiea of a lady
a pair of real ponies across the stage,
e in the true Kewport style. George
who in the past few years has beon
d with farcial comedies, will be seen
jlpho," and Mrs. Knight, who has
ed any really strong comedy part for
ill make her reappearance at the
nth Street Theatre. Tho company
o inclnde Miss Jnno Btswort, tho
r of tho chief of the deteotive deport
f tho Custom House; Miss Carrio
Charles Bowser and M. A. Kennedy,
he" will open tho season at the
nth Street Theatre,
rotty littlo town of Stamford, Conn.,
ling extremely popular among theat
tnagers. It. M. Ifooley, manager of
b Theatre, Chicago, has just pur
i residence there, whero he joins A.
, Daniel Frohman, Lester Waliack
liur Wnllack.
!,angtry has decided to toko her com
far us tho Paciflo slope, where, she
f in May. She will not adhere strictly
aughtyinceuces of " As In a Looking,
but will vary her performances with
e's Peril," ''"The Lady of Lyons,"
ygmolion and Galatea." Mrs. Lang
ends smile at Mrs. Bomord Beere's
lent tho New York production of " As
)king Glass." The English actress,
t, wanted to produce tho play here
There was little need for Mrs. Lang,
snt to attempt to moke terms with
rnard Beere. Tho London market, it
i flooded with adaptations of " As In
ng Glass." A New York manager who
I from England tho other day in
his friends that he had beon in Lon
y three days 'when six version of
had been offered him.
:orey, or at least a portion of It, is
to disappointment to-night. The
Al" company, of which William
was manager, was to have appeared
ut the company was forced to close
on Saturday night. Eeasoni Bad
l.
romes Brown Potter is not to be tha
mber of her company who can claim
timable distinction of " social stand.
L youthful Bostoneao actress, known
Meta Cragari, had been engaged by
ler. The fcdy, it is said, has mixed
b society, and is none tho worse for
other acquisition to the support of
tter is Miss Genevieve Lytton. whose
I charms havo been described .as
-not, however, because they are unin
e to tho majority.
qnatio world is presumably happy in
temptation of the gigantic tank at the
y of Music, with its accompaniment
rs, actresses and melodrama. The
I world is to be rendered equully
drring the Christmas holidays by tho
ion of tho London melodrama called
1 of Luck," a rather risky title for a
una in these nnoppreciative days. The
ows " real " races, equally real hounds
inumehunt.
te, of " Held by the Enemy " renown,
ly resolved to pay Mr. Itider Haggard
s, eaeh and every week, on the com.
luctionin this city of "She." As
ette has been realizing a comfortable
icome from the representation of
by the Enemy " in London, hi gener
not altogether remarkable. Mr. Hay.
e manager of the Baldwin and Call,
beatresin San Francisco, arrived in
yesterday to superintend, with Mr.
and Mr. Charles Frohman, the pro.
of " She " at Niblo's Garden. With
le Mr. Furst, a San Francisco orches.
er, whose music will bo used for the
l. Active work in the selection of a
lbe begun to-day. F. F. Maokay will
tie leading role. Gillette himself is
responsible for the adaptation. He
indignant at the charges whioh have
tde against him, that he has stolen
it from the Ban Francisco adaptation.
wer to the charge is unique. It is
.his : As nobody has yet seen or read
ion, it is impossible for anybody to
. it is stolen. " She " is to be very
:ely staged, which means a great
Ullian Bucsoll has not severed her
ion with tho Standard Theatre, as
is cossipers have asserted. On the
f, the autumnal charms of the actress
race the production of the London
ecra success " Dorothy." Miss Bus.
I been engaged by Mr. Duff a long
a, but it was popularly supposed that
i cancelled the engagement. " Do
will be produced in four weeks, when
irabian Nights " will be sent through
ntry under tho management of David
son, of tho Chicago Opcru-Houso.
irhlspered in the highways and by.
at the American Opera Company will
troduoed to metropolitan audiences
aediam of a brand-new theatre. This
till in every probability be French
nger's new theatre on Broadway,
if all goes well, will be.opcncd some
February. Footllghl rjeliitUlntlon..
lanoraiiin at Fifty-uiuth street and
n avenue, where the battle of tho
r and Merrlmao has been so suocess
iged, will ba closed in a few days.
itest is worth seeing,
let religious painting by Mlhaly de
sty will be exhibited on Wednesday.
Venty.thlrd Street Tabernaole. This
entitled Christ on Calvary," and is
be a companion to "Christ before
now in the possession of Mr. Wanna
of Philadelphia.
Ada Gray, the popular actress, will
mate the lufiklf ku Lady Isabel and the
ITering Mme. Yino in " East Lynne "
I at Poole's Theatre, in Eighth street,
ay knows how to rivet tho attention
audiences, and " East Lynne " Is a
i Goldea Giant," whioh was last seen
Fifth Avenue Theatre, will ba pro.
D-night at tho Grand Opera House by
those en MtctionrtUU, Mr. and Mrs. MoKee
IUnkin. The West Siders who like thrilling
romancos will doubtless give "The Golden
Giant" a hearty reception.
Mme. Frida do Gcbelo Ashforth has been
reappointed Professor of Singing at the
American School of Opera, a position she has
successfully tilled for two year. During tho
StrakoGh.Maretzek regime, when Italian
opera was in tho hoydoy of its success, Mme.
Ashforth hud n wide reputation as a prima
donna contralto.
Miss Minnio Palmer, the diaphanous little
soubrotta, who has juBt returned from Aus.
tralia, aftor a successful season in England,
will play to-night at the Fourteenth Street
Theatres m a double bill. This inolude " Tbo
Bing and tho Kocper," a historic levtr da
redeau, and " My Sweetheart," which has ar
rived at a period when it needs little prelimi
nary explanation.
GOSSIP FROM THE STUDIOS,
I. Francis Murphy and F. K. M. Behon are
still in the country.
F. E. Church has a studio in tho Tenth
street building, but live at Bondout.
William Beard, who paints masquerading
animals, has returned from Peokskiu,
G. Carroll Beckwith is baok from Holland,
whero ho passed tho summor with Mr. Beck
with. Shattnck is still at Grantor, Goni., and
Frederick Dielman ia at East Hampton, L. I.,
studying effcats.
William E. Chase has a very hanasomo
room here In this city and drops in frequently
from his homo in Brooklyn.
Edwin H. Blashfleld, who has been in
Europe all summer, is back in hit Sherwood
studio.
Charles Melville Dewey .after studies mado
at Long Island and New Bedford, got back
to tho " Chelsea " a f ow days ago.
A new picture, by Thomas Hovenden, is in
the window of a Fifth avenue dealer. It rep
resents a buxom negress wearing dusky
smils and a dress of pink tulle. ,
It. M. Shurtlefl, the landscape artist, will
roturn this month from his cottage in the
Adirondoaks. He is on the Hanging Com
mittee at the Academy this year.
Tho Studio Building. West Tenth street, is
a painters' Bohemia. The studios aro work.
ing places, without muoh brio-a-brao, ox
tapestries, or old carved wood.
All the artists who have studios in tho
" Rembrandt " are back with the exception
oB. Swain Gifford and D. W. Tryon. Tho
former is at Nonquit, in tho neighborhood of
New Bodford, aud tho latter is at South Dart
mouth, Moss.
The artists are getting baok to their studios.
Somo linger in the mountains, or along the
coast, to catch the gorgeous autumnal tints
and the beautiful atmospherio effects of this
month. But two-thirds of them are settled
down in their city quarters, have unpacked
their coses and stretched canvases for their
exhibition pioturos.
JohnLofarge has not been away this sum.
mer, except for a day or two at Newport. He
has just completed the memorial window
which Francis Leland has put into the
Church of the Ascension, Fifth avenue and
Tenth street, in memory of his father and
mother. The subject is the " Presentation of
tha Infant Christ in the Temple," and has
been treated very satisfactorily. Lafarge has
also finlshod an immense painting for the
same church, a commission of Mrs. Bhine
lnndcr. It contains thirty-six lifo-size figures,
and has been painted1 on canvas, but will be
stretched on the wall of the church so as to
soem a mural fresco
ECHOES FROM CLUBDOM.
The dining-room and sitting-room at the
Calumet Club has been tastefully decorated
during the summer.
The Republican Club ha a hard time
trying to rival the influtnee of Bilk-stocking
partisans in the Union League.
The Home Club boa resumed Its Wednes
day dinners and musioales. Boms crack card
players are among its members.
The Manhattan Athletic Club is going to
do something in a social way this winter. A
ladies' day is looked for early in November.
There- are rumors of another row in the
Union Club. Members natter themselves
that only a small proportion of these little
occurrences ever got out."
The Lotos will stop giving the preference
to distinguished foreigners at Its dinners and
entertainments this year, and will give a few
amlablo Americans a chance.
The newest clnb is the Colombia College.
Only the Alumni and students of Columbia
ore eligible. The club-house is in East Forty
seventh street, near the college building.
The University Club boasts of the largest
average daily attendance of any club in the
city, and the spirit of college good fellowship
prevail in It as in few others.
The Lambs will resume tkelr famous
Sunday evening dinners when tho painters
and furnishers finish work. The club dining
room has been gorgeously decorated and a
ctl& has been put in the basement.
Geats With UUded Horna,
The costs with the gilded horns which
draw the children's barouches up and down
thp wido asphalt walk in the mall all day long
have often been objects of curiosity to vis
itors at Central Park. They seem to be prac
tically indefatigable, are always ready for a
trot down the smooth roadway, and to all ap
pearances aro perfectly contented and fiappy
with their lot. How long they havo been
employed in this service is a myitory,. but it
is a popular tradition among those who have
lived long years in the neighborhood that
they appeared on their present sceno of
activity when the site of the mall was first
laid out, and they have been holding the fort
ever sinco. They number eight and aro
divided into four teams. This complement
has never been varied from the very first. If
any oue of them has ever died tho fact has
been kept secret, and a new one substituted
without detection, or they are all of a uniform
black and white tint. Scientists say that
goats are tho most hardy of quadrupeds; that
they live- longer and can stand more rough
usage than any othur, and It cannot be de
nied that the history of tho golden-homed
goats on the Central Park Mall fully beCs
out the theory of tho scientists.
Very soon they will be withdrawn from
active service for the winter season, when
they will rusticate fot a time on some con
venient ledgo in the neighborhood of the
Park, surrounded by overy luxury that the
goat taste could desire in the shape of to.
nmto cans, old hoop sMrts, and the assorted
contents of old ash barxels. It Is generally
believed that these periods of recreation ac
count for the equanimity with whioh they
stand the severe and arduous duties of the
remainder of the year.
-mm-
Chumming' Pop tj ui Yftta Heetrte XVfghta.
Striped bass are beginning to run np the
East and North Itivers again. Years ago
they were plentiful in these waters, but oil
drovo them away. Lately there has not been
bo much oil In the bay, and tho fish are com
ing back. A great place to catch them is off
the Battery. Nearly every night half-a-dozen
Whitehall boats, each carrying a couple of
fishermen, bob up and down on the choppy
seas between tho Barge Offloe and Castle
Garden. Each man has a coup of hand,
lines. The flshormen haul in fair strings of
striped barn, averaging from one to three
pounds. They say the bright eleetrio lights
along the Battery sea-wall attract the fish
and hold thorn there just as menhaden
" chum " lures tho great South Bay bluufisb.
The Cerps Vellowrd by Next Beat.
ftn llmr:
An Amsrlean In Parts, believing that h was
about to die, prepared and signed th following
oaMe dtsaatoo, which was to b forwards the
moment the last breath had Uft W boayi "jUa
dead, Corpse follows by next mall boat, "
E0SB8 AND VIOLETS.
AIsiMt a XTUwer Famine Last Tsar and There
May Be This.
dtaMM U N O n E S of bright
$UK CTafl Jk i r d daffodils,
aTSvhU) rjJkraatP gladioluses and chrys-
ffiaflaVftlffizy rones, and the more
rfJffs!jrRxj th whole embedded
jpgjSKSsgjjln a mass of fern and
soft mosses form a very
striking display in the window of a florist in
upper Broadway. Although tho season for
the flower trade has hardly yet begun, busi
ness is showing some signs of awakening, and
as people are coming baok to the olty every
day, it will not be long before tha social cogs
are well oiled and in operation again, and
with this activity in fashionable life comes
prosperity to tho florist
" It la too early yet," said one of them in
conversation with an Evkhtno Wobld re
porter, " to predict with certainty tho out
come of the approaching season. Usually we
have one or two novelties, but if any aro to
come they havo not been announced yet. Of
courso roses will contlnuo to bo the popular
favorites, and of tha now varieties, and they
came out last year, are the ' American
Beauties.' They aro rod roses. We always sell
thorn with long stems for corsage and hand,
bouquets. Although they have really been in
the market for several seasons no notice
whatovor was taken of till last year. Sinco
then, however, they have been increasing in
popularity steadily. Just at present wo are
selling thorn from f 1 to $6 a dozen, acoording
to quality, and you would be surprised to
find how few come up to the highest standard
of merit.
" ' La Franoe,' a light pink rose, and very
fragrant, is also a comparatively now favorite,
but it holds its popularity well, considering
the rivalry there is in the market When it
first appeared very few people liked it,
because it always looked stale that is the
ends of tho petals bad a habit of curling.
Thls however, fat from being regarded as a
' blemish, now is looked upon as a positive
advantage. They sell now at fa to 93 a
dozen.
" Among the othor varieties of roses which
are popular in fact it may be said that they
aro about the only roses now oold extensively
In the market during the season are the
William Francis Bonnett, a red, fragrant rose.,
very much resembling the Jacqueminot,
which is sold at $1.60 to S3 a dozen; the
Niphetos, tho only pure whito rose in the
market, which brines the samo price; three
cream whites, the Cornelia Cook, which sells
readily at $2.60 a dozen; the Bride, at 91.60
to 92, and the Puritan, a magnificent flower
introduced last season, which sells sometimes
as high as $2 apieco, the usual price being
91.60 apiece. Then there are the old favor
ites, ' Jacks,' whioh sell up to $1.60 apleoo:
the Paul Neyron, Mme. Gabrielle Luiset and
Lady Mary Fitz Williams, all of which havo
their admirers, and are to be ranked as popu
lar flowers."
All the prices whioh havo been given thus
far are only to be regarded as tho early prices
of the season. When the demand begins to
increase, the prices of roses especially are
greatly enhanced, and it ia hard to get good
flowers without paying a good round sum
for them, usually 75 cents, or $1 apiece, as in
the case of American beauties, which aro now
the reigning; favorites.
Of other flowers the market is yet compara
tively bare. A few violets are coming in, but
they aro small in size and hard to obtain at
that They are sold now at 91.60 to 92 a
bunch. They are a favorite flower and al
ways will bo for aU occasions, though they
are now worn more for mourning than ever
before. Chrysanthemums will be in
in a few weeks. The only ones
in tho market now aro the small yel
low China varieties. The Japanese flowers
are not yet ready. They are the most showy
flowers in tho market and always command
a good sale. Heliotrope and mignonette are
used to mix in larger bouquets, and to relieve
a glare of colors or produce a conbaat, but
they are seldom worn muoh alone, fxcept it
be in very small sprigs for a boutonniere.
For weddings, white and yellow roses are gen
erally chosen for floral gifts. Yellow and
light-colored chrysanthemums, violets and
daffodils, however, are popular, and in some
cases preferred to roses. Florists say that
last season was one of the busiest in the his
tory of the trade in this city. The green,
houses near town were taxed to their utmost
to supply the demand, and at one time a
flower famine was threatened. This year a
still heavier demand is anticipated.
IBBLANiyS NATIONAL COLOR
Michael Davttt Bays that It I the Oraace of
Ulster and Not the Emerald Green.
Michael Davitt, the Irish agitator, who
knows Irish history from before the time of
Brian Bom, destroyed a fond and familiar
bolief the other day.
It is generally thought that the national
color of Ireland from time immemorial was
green. Since the time of Tom Moore
poets have sung of the banner of grean and
the emerald gem of the sea. The patriots of
'98 and '48 carried and fought under flags of
that verdant hue and there are few loyal
Irishmen who to-day would believe that the
national color or the flag of Ireland was any
other than green : much less would they be
willing to admit that It is tho hated orange,
but such is the case.
It came about in a discussion of the position
of Ulster in the fight for Home Bule, and In
the course of his remarks upon the subject
of Ireland desiring every bit of tho Island and
being unwilling to give up ono acre in the
sohemo of nationalization, Mr. Davitt said i
" Ulster displays tho national color of the
country. It is a popular fallacy that it is
green, and I presume that that is owing as
much to Tom Moore's disregard of or lack of
knowledge of his country's history in the
construction of some of his ballads as to any.
thing else. Orange was the national color of
Ireland, and it was not until about one
hundred and fifty year ago that the emerald
was first waved."
This explanation also disposes of another
popular failaoy shared by even Orangemen
themselves, and that is that the bit of orango
ribbon they occasionally display is worn in
honor of the Prince of Orange, when in fact
it is only the Irish national color, the color
of a nation that existed hundreds of years bo
fore William of Orange, which they aro
flaunting.
Scotch and UU Tee.
In the nails: Husband I promised to see a
fellow for a few moments, my dear. I ahall be
back In a minute.
Husband return within a quarter of an hoar.
Wife (tartly) lie kept jou some time. I should
think you had time to see your friend once or
twice, and I suppose he was Scotch, Judging by
your breath.
- -
THE NEW "PLANTACENET" CLUB.
John Russell Young (President) stuffed
with stories of the Orient
Marshall P. Wilder (Vice-President) scint
Ulant with saying of th London drawing
room.
John Chamberlain (no blood relation to
some) savoring of Washington secrecy.
Sam Chamberlain triumphant with air. gun
success at the Chappaqua frog pond.
James Gordon Bennett with piquant per
sonalities from Paris.
Col. Tom Ochiltree with icminlsoenoea of
Texas.
Larry Jerom redolent with rare ton mot.
Dinner, 80 cent, half bottlo wiaaiAeladtd.
Motto i "Keep It quiet"
TRACK, STREAM AND RING.
TUB FLEETWOOD TROTTING MEETS RUN AT
A L0S8 Tina YEAR.
Carter Will Be Taventlcatrd by the Natlenal
Aemrlallea ef Amateur Athlete Dlacv.
Ion Over Mnrphr' Itrtnstatement Cnpl.
Coeke Hpeah Strongly About McAntlCs
eipartan Harrier Competitions.
fNLY 91,800 lost; wo
can stand that," said a
member of the New
York Driving Club,
referring to the finan
cial result of Its three
trotting meetings that
have taken plaoe at
Fleetwood this. year.
An explanation of this
loss, given by an ex
pert, 1 that the meet
ings were not run
properly. " To mako
trotting a suocess
you must mako the
trottora gambling ma
chines," he remarkod,
" and to do this heat races must be done
away with, and as trotting race were de
vised to improve Uie roadsters, unless some
way of testing stamina and endurance be
sides trotting heats Is invented trotting in
Now York and vicinity will oon go to tha
bow-wows. Trotting races meet with more
success In othor porta of tho country because
the peoplo aren't like the nervous, tearing
Gothamites, and familiar with fast winnings
and losings through tho bookmakers."
Tho investigation of the charges of pro
fessionalism against E. O. Carter, the English
American champion runner, will be com
menced at a meeting of the National Associa
tion of Amateur Athlete at the Grand Union
Hotel to-morrow evening. The Secretary of
the Manhattan Athletlo Club wan onco very
sure he had convincing proof of tho 6-mile
flyer's guilt Carter and his friends are
equally confident now of his acquittal. The
explanation Carter has mado of his Indiscre
tion three years ago Is considered by such
good judges a the New York Athletlo Club's
committeo perfectly satisfactory. Should
Carter bo found guilty by machinations of a
olub which deories him on the Hour-grapes
principle there will be somo rare complica
tions iii athletics. All Carter's English vic
tories last summer will bo declared void, and
tho medals will have to bo handed down one
man ; Skillman's 6-milo mn will be the best
made by an amateur on American soil, and
the Manhattan instead of the Now York Ath
letic Olub will rejoice for a "points" vic
tory at tho championships.
The Spartan Harriers.who have moved into
their now house at No. Ill East Twenty-ninth
street, propose to have a lot of cross-country
runs from there this autumn. This club will
also givo amateur boxing competitions this
winter, as it did last year. The first ono, for
120-pound 8 stone I pounds men will con
flict with the Manhnttan Athletlo Club's Sat
urday night sparring entertainment, as It has
been unwittingly set down for Deo. 3.
I
The Union Bowing Club's new and ele
gant boat-house, whioh has been located on
the Westchester side of the Harlem, half-way
between the New York Athletio Club's floats
and the Madison avenue bridge, will be for
mally opened on Saturday. The building Is
101x38 feet and fitted up with bath and other
luxuries. As most of the members also be
long to the Spartan Harriers, there will be
plenty of sport In it this winter.
Tho set-to between Mr. W. E. Tucker, of
Philadelphia, and Mr. J. S. Aborn, of the
Narragansett Boat Club, of Providenoe, B.
I., over the reinstatement of M. F. Murphy,
of the City Point Bowing Club, of
Boston, was on a most important issue to
amateurs. The report of the committee for
looking into the Murphy case, of whioh Mr.
Aborn was a member, was read and accepted,
as was a letter from the City Point Club.
The committee was discharged. Mr. Tucker,
who had voted "'no " and expressed himself
strongly on the reinstatement of his own
fcllow-citlzen, McCusker, of Philadelphia,
canio out strongly against letting in any more
" black sheep." Chairman H. W. Garfield,
of tho famous Mutual Bowing Olub. of
Albany; Mr. Peterson, of the New York
Athletlo Club, and Mr. Aborn took the
affirmative. Murphy had admitted that he
raced for 9100 in 1881 and had before that
contosted at picnic regattas for $6 and 910
prizes, but he voluntarily informed his club
of It and said if he could not qualify
as an amateur he should withdraw from mem.
bership. Tho City Point Olub said that they
were anxious to purge their ranks of any ele
ment distasteful to the ;ssoclation ana had
?otten rid of a number o' professionals bo
ons entering Its ranks, but that Murphy had
shown himself worthy of membership and
that a number of its best men would stand
or fall with him." Mr. Tucker went into
amateur definitions and purposes very fully,
said that such men as the City Point Bowing
Club, as McCusker, of Philadelphia, were the
vory men to bo kept out of the amateur ranks
or (hero soon would bo no " unwhitewashed
amateurs." Mr. Aborn very clevorly put Mr.
Tucker In a position he was extremely anxious
to get out of that of trying to make amateur
oarsmen a class distinguished socially, as in
England, where no mechanic can be anything
but a professional. Murphy was reinstated
by a ballot of 6 to 2.
Mr. Garfield explained to Tmc Evxirnta
Would man. who met him at tho New York
Athletia Club boat-house yesterday, that oars
men who violated the rules five or ten years
ago and havo been idle ever since, are not tho
kind of people to lower the tone of amateur
aquatic if reinstated now. One good home
example is that of Harry Zwinger, better
known as Harry Force, who pnee made a
prizo-ring essay against Jack Dempsoy. no
was reinstated last spring, contested in the
Harlem regatta on Memorial Day unsue.
cesefully and has since enjoyed himself on
his yacht. An Investigating committee can
generally find out if a disbarred member
wants to join the ranks again for a fraudulent
purpose Mr. Tucker oelievoa in the old
saying, " Burn me onco, burn me twice."
Oapt. Cooke, of the Boston Folic JVnoi.
writes The Kvenimo Wobld as follows : " If
the MoAullffe party meant fieht In six week,
a they bargained, why eould they object to
renewing the original articles? We were
betting them f 2,600 to 92.000, after being
oheatod out of $1,000 by bod faith, and then
they wouldn't go on. The outcome will be a
Boston benefit to Carney probably a pri
vote one Carney's deiwrinrH for home In
aliout two weeks, and then each party will
got their money back from Hulliviui Jatlio
stakeholder.
The New York Athletie Club's final out
door games, for the Bell, Oelrichs and other
medals, will be held on the Mott Haven
grounds on Saturday afternoon. Tho Man
hattan Athletia Olub will hold it final mem
bers' game the same afternoon.
Embarraaolne ler Meaner
lVm I do Mbfy,
flhe was going to get married, and old Uooney
went round to congratulate tho family. The
luatcr.famtllas was a nice old lady, hut a tittle
Khakr In her conversation.
' We mean tu hare a ursnd wedding," she said,
"Just to show the neighbor what w can do,
jou know. Nearly all the arrangement are com
pleted. wt:b th exception of my daughter'
trousers. "
Old htooMy did not properly recover until a
bad cot safely oat of the boas. Tasolt 14?, ef
course, meant to say uomeau.
iiHT
WEEKLY OR MONTHLY PAYMENTS.
The Zargcst Credit House in the World.
a happy noAirt
FURNITURE AND CARPETS.
CLOTHING,
FIT AND PRICE .GUARANTEED.
SIXJELS9
SATINS,
DRESS GOODS
AMD A QBNBBAI, IJMK OF DttT AND FANCT GOODS.
LADIES' PLUSH SACftDES.
Ar$MWEiWWcW5&?kJgDa AND " MA""! 81XK
STORKS OPKN BTKRY WRDNEHOAT AND SATURDAY EVENING DNTII. 0.3O P.M
TtKaUtMBBU THAT WE ARE T'JgROT AND ONLY REUAnUJCRBDW
T. KELLY
263 6TH AVE.,
102, 104 AND 106 WEST I7TH ST.
TAKE ELEVATOR FOR DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS.
WATCHES.
Thro ro nowb.ra to bo found inch a varUlr and Urg.
rtn.kor L.dlr'nd(j.nt'Wcl ml Hilrar W.tchM to
ait .T.ri body1, pan.. Tbtts or. th. watcaet wo n&ko
oipocUUufj
SOLID SILVER BUNTUta WATOBCSL OKNUINB
A.mrloui laowawiU, Klta oi Woltbuni kej.
ider, a.
Solid bilvcb ntnrruta watoiirs, oenuihk
mndw, 110.
Solid gold nnrrrnto watches, stkm.
wlodor. AraorlMo aonmat, Elfin or W&ltbom.
coom cbtuil and oncrarodi guttloaaaX $35.
LADIK8' SOLID OOLD IIUNTINO WATCriES.
atmwt&drl Am.riean movmtni, $30.
T Antics' SOLID OOLD UUNTLNO WATOUltS,
BOTH BOIJD OlLYBn inUJTNWO .OASE
wubM.S4.
ABBAimrUL IMPORTED SOLID OOLD 8TB M
winding Waloh, nnuM tiouou, !&.
AOBHUTtf H X. BOWABD OO. W ATOIL WIT II
hut;, aolld 14-oaiot a oaoM, 6.
WE OrVB A WRITTnit OUARANTKB WITH
f.rr wat.b for tbroo roan. If not aa r.pros.nt.4
moncr will bo r.rand.d.
IJINK8T OKADKS OF KLY.BAOKS, SPLIT BKO.
' ondt aud r.poAtln walrnrot a ma watrbai with
Landtomeljr oroamentrd oatoa and .tndJoJ wltb g touln.
rii.Binntf., far la'tlcs and gontlrmen, at ball (u. pneo
iharged otfowoero.
A SOLID OOLD aTOP-WATOU. WITH MINUTE
chronograph, boar? ll-earal oaao, frjr an. niuro
mint and aocoralo ttmor, t-u.
SOLID OOLD WBDOIHO RIHOS, 1 1 and lit oaiaU,
a loootaltr.
CASPERFELD & CLEVELAND,
144 BOWERY 144.
OPBIt BVKWIWOo UMTILS1 8ATDBDAY. 10 P. M.
MM AND DMMAKTRS1
SCHOOL OF CUTTING,
133 EAST 8TH ST NEAR BROADWAY.
BTXNBf O CMMM TOBaDAY an miDAY at
To'eJooV, AU bnnobM laugh kr litUil nwlbod.
AQ BKOOBB
DUCAL, riKUNHWICK GOT. BOND.
Tk no bond. ouarca la a loan, Iho Interest
of w Icb U paid out It premlam liireo flgaea
yoarlr. Bverv bond U onUUod lo
TIIRBB DRAWINGS AJ1NTJAIXT,
nnfll each nnd everr band fa redeemed, with a
arrr or amnllrr premium. Everr bond JHUrJT
draw one of ibo folluwlns premium., a.tbera
are nu II I. AN KM i
Premium. Kelrh.maru. Rrlcu.inark.
ii .8iB - 'M
1 at l.ftOO liooo
2 at A.OOO - 18UOO
1 . &8ri8 Z H
4 .88 ffi
a at V'a - T.iii
a at IHO l.USO
at lv'3 - 3o
7,01U at 111) 087.100
Toaribrr 7,700 PltK.il I U.1IJ", ameanllu la
IMIO, 1115 It 1. 1 1 ll.(lArirK. the next redemp.
Ilwu lukrn place uu llyn
FIRST Oyaf NOVEMBER,
anil every baud bought of u. on or before tbo
latef .NoTtuir. UNTIL 0 I. M.. to on tilled
Ibe whole preablum that aiar bedravrntfaereaa
n dale. J
I.liT I fills aAid laelaolne S will ..ear. ne of
luea bo-adarer the next drawlr;, Balaaaa
payable lamonthly laalalmoato.
I- or ord.rA, circular, or any ainT aoieraaao
tlon addraa.
IHTEnhUTIOHAL BANKING GO.,
IOO Fulton at,, ror.er Dreadway,
."Sew York t'lty.
IMTArir.IMIIlSn IN 187.
rTho above Govern at on t bo a do aro aol ia
bo.rompnrod with aa Latlar what.ooTCr,
:;."i'iAetfeyti.V.vr.? a.
. - r,y m
. BEAIiKBTATB. K&fl
omWiioreBBBoo,sa H
TTntSDAY, OCT. 11. jjfl
at 1 o'olock. on pronuaia, jSiaB
IEW. UTREOHT, I
AND Alt BXOBIXBST DYfBLLOtO. ' aal
BATH BEACH, L X Ji
BIXTRRNTIT AND HKNTKIrNTH AT!- CSlM
lnUiarUlag.noarth.OMDatahOonTeV gai
a4oojj8to tarda fan x'Hlggai
HEW UiflEGIll STATION. M
KEATS DISTRICT SCHOOL AWD KPISOOAlA ' H
cmiKUlC AND IS MINUTES VltOM BAT: S&tBal
.. FREk MUURsJoNT' Vv'jggH
KSBdlAalaMHilwa, -fl
. KKOIMKNT BAND. Sggawai
.. ANTUIJ ANll TRlNTniljflpANY; HaBmQ
UapaaMsaaaaaoonadiatAatloittno4os. ' 'jjHH
THURSDAY, OCT. 18, IBBflgl
BROOKLYN RtAI?E? tA Jt BXOHAFfrBV (bBBbI
N. B03 Fnltea St., Braafalsa.t IH
TWO GREAT ESTATE SUSS' M
OT BUOOKLTN PBOrBWrT, ' oH
AS FOLLOWai aBBai
ESTATE OF IEIER ROSEHBERB, DKD. 3H
SPLENDID BUSINESS PflOPERlT. M
Boa. 48 and U YnHon at.-4-ttory and Imaaiat awjatl J'lflH
Building aAyanln Lon Ialaad Bank, Iron, timi, cajad. asal
atorof, grand bnatnoaa itand. 4gggoi
No. 10S Wathlngton ra.. batwoaa rnspos art Ttttl fg
ata. a-itory Attto and Baaamnit llouo. 4flgggal
ELTATE OF BLISITA BLOOMEB, DECT), aH
No, 119 LafajetU an., oornar of Oarlton aya. tiji ggggg.
tory building, dm atoro on ground floor, sppar para 'Cgol
aaad for (bnroh. and d waHlo apartmaota abora. ' 'vagai
No. 147 Lafaratta ar.., adjoining aboro-Tno Saa laal
ptaoM togatbar an, with oourtyard, IQxM foaa, art St. llggggggl
location la the flnaat In th olty for a anlondld arortawab' 'Agggggj
booaa. ihgggg.
No. Dj Booth Elliot plaoa. batwoan Iatayetat art 9 ggH
Kalb aroa. SX-rtory Bronvfltoa Roan rtlaBat .DaB
loaatioB. Vasssal
No. 20gVfyekoffat., near Bond at-atoey and Baa JfaaH
mant Briok Bona., with 1st. llgggal
No. 83)4 Donglaaa at., near Smith W-8-ory a4; -?3H
Baaamont Brlok Roaaa, with lot. . BB
No. 1003 Doan at., soar Badfoed aa.-&tory Uo9' -"'i'iH
Baaamant BrmrnBtono llooao. 30x4a lot 119. gl
rtni 111 TlfT an 1 tin Ttiilli g al . TTnilil 1 gh.fl '-'1-9
and Baaamant Fratno IXoiiaaa and lota, agggj
No. 1T1 Montroae ara.. Boar Orahan tin, llamilX 'flggggj
Baaamant Donbla Briok Tonamant, 32x40x181 nTaivTt "tggggj
ranting property. jjgcal
Map. roady at AnMonoer. effloaa ggggi
wxsYH&mi ' Jm
UK kALU AfK RRoesiiTir, M
AUCTION SALE 1
OX '3bbI
369 Elegant Lots a M
OB TUB i .Bwal
KIODOLAHN. VVVUK.OPVFARH. Lm
batwoen propartlaa of Pater TfyokogandP. T.Bataiau' , iHaH
aaaaM I 'wwgaYJ
a tob; KianTEKBTH ytasb. "VsB
TIUl 9EBwawal
Greatest Booming LocUt7 H
In Brooklyn. JH
HNpOF OBBATv'KffiwHTB. iK
Tko oompT.tlon of tap Blraud. m; whUhAa waul Mflai
aoonb. running. wUldooU tto&uraa, Ytnewlaaa flggal
mn to the property, (rgai
Do sot oUaa thU aoldoq oppottutby vtflH
TO SECUUK TUEWB LOYELiT LOTS. H
PropartyUattaatodea WrekoB. DKa. . Wita I i'tawal
laa and Ore.ua ana., Kim, Stoexbolm. Blannpna, EtlsM 4joftal
rod and Harmon U., and Is anrroaadad onall aUasb tsTal
tmlldlnga. ' 9g
ROYAL RHODE ISLAND CUHBAKE 9
by 'VTeaka, aadar tha eolloanl tact, at Coafti
BRUXIANT fllCSIUB BSD KBeUUaft3J SM
A. D. roha. Loader. '"WM
of the AneUonoar, or of O an7oVw!gnCin3R gaffj
Broadway and ltant in., Brooklyn B.D. YrSggoi
BATDBDAT.'OOT. M. gj
GREAT AUCTION SAEli - J
NEWBURG, N. Y. 1
TnUBSDAY. OOT.n. ftawai
' at 1 o'clock, on ynnloia. 4 '"'mWm
FLUSHING, L .. 1
EMMENSE SALE. . Jfl
WALTER BOWHE HOMESTEAD FARI, WM
400 ACRES, 1H
Sabdlrldad Into T lamu. aa fnllowoi . 9gai
Barn. Naaaber 1-Hrcadway autd ASmrim&0 fTaH
11faVrVNaber 4-B.yolrt. ave. yi WlwWaa . JjM
tone RiadT JIA and l&i-lOOO "- mmTm&mU
Farm NarAber O-Ranlda . atr WUtow "taBai
Monaltfad,7aandnl-IOUOaeraa. mM,u
Farm Number il-Vhlletone and VTtUtWr 9D
Feint Ue.d,l aud (Ul.lOOO.acraa IfM
Farm Number T-.'riurray. Itifcfrirl.nJ .JH
I'uiut Itond nud llayaida are., Q3 and fiatU iPI
lOOOacrra. S(I
ThUUtlMSnaatprapattyta , Sm
Qnaua Ooonty. It la attnaUdln U
tULAGE OF FLUSHU, I
andttUtohornmptorayaoMbf ordafottk ',1
SUPREME COURT, fl
In partition, nnder direct! n of Wll
ltd wards. lhl, e.a KeJere.. ,1
John B. Fnroano. eaq., FUlnllffa AtWratr. 19
.11 np. and particular. In a few day a. 'JM
Thnrday, Nov. 3, KM
at 1 a'clock, oa th. nr.au., wm
FLUSHING. L. I.. 1
OUltaTaAl.KOririlA.AOMfcOlS,
r.UfeteS5w4 J
KdwrJr4.lTaWBi?,pfT. $
So'Bb-erTy'.u'.V.'w hi'z'SMltATSi I
llrwaklya. "
AlONnAY.NOV.14. Jj
at 13 o'clock. In th. , . 1J
BBOOKLTN IlKAL KaTAT U BXPHANOB, vSaai
ana evi.vos htt, OU00IU4YN, 'TfOm
OrMtadJouraodaala, !Bal
byordaref uu JHar
oKAYwSoi JIoi'IItt; . . &CM
Krtardlfwotloaef UauyB. Baada, oaa affafaa. JI
W XotV. and 893 If bUob tClfctooilj, ( 'j

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