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The evening world. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, April 26, 1913, Final Edition, Image 1

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BORDEN DISCOVERS DAUGHTER IN BOSTON;
WOMAN WITH HER FLEES FROM ARREST
hewsre te-wlrht a aaadan easier.
W1ATM HlW I or dart eaeleat
I COITION
PRICE ONI OINT.
SULZER READS THE RIOT ACT,
11 CRUSH LEADERS WHO
OPPOSE HIS PRIMARY BILL
Knows Power of His Office and
Will Ose It Against Men Who
Refuse to Line Up With Him.
DELIVERS A CHALLENGE.
Tells County Chairman He
Will Make All Declare Them
selves Roosevelt Backs Bill.
ALBANY. April 26. Gov. Sulzer
renewed his effort to-day to bring
bout the enactment of bla "State
wide" direct primary bill. He con
ferred at noon with a number of
Democratic county chairmen at the
Eiecutlve Chamber, who were urged
IS toad their aid.
"X wmm .very Democratic) chairman
mt every Beaaoeratlc W Htm of
frsry ooaaty of the Stat," aaM Oov.
alaar, BsMwamg th msatlag f
ttoaaty Ohalrmea, "to daelae whether
ha la golag to ho with ma or whether
ha to going to ho agalaat me la trying
to carry eat the platform pl.dg.. If
ha la with me I will ho with him. If
ho to agalaat ma X am golag to ho
agalaat him, oaf he will either he a
party to driving mo oat of the party
aad oat of pahllc life or X will ho a
patty to driving him oat.
"No man fear direct primaries ex.-ept
the nan whose mentality and democracy
doean't bear the searchlight of pub-
MaMy,
WILL CRUSH ALL WHO WOULD
MAKE PARTY A HYPOCRITE.
"You have not to line up your repre
toataUvea In the U-gi' ure to past this
lionoat. Just and fair bill, or I will line
too people up against you and your
rpresentative or representative In your
own county.
X kaow th power that la hohlad
my ease. All that power ana acaaolee
watt ho aeed to eraah the maa who
weald make the Democratic party a
hypocrite aad a political liar.
"X summon every Democrat in the
Stat to come to the support of the
man they eleoted Governor. 80 far a
ha ia concerned, there will be no step
backward, no compromise between the
rial Die and InvUlble government, be
tween the executive controlled by the
people and the legislative branch con
trolled by the poHtloal boeeea.
"We maa, ao faction, ae party caa
make ma a political liar or a political
hypocrite. When S eaat he honeet In
poliUca X am going to fat oat of pollttoa.
X believe that hoaeaty ia politics will
aaooeed juat aa hoaeety In hnaineea
will anooood."
Resolution were adopted Indorsing
the (Jovernor-e bill and recommending
la passage and also calling upon the
.Senate for the immediate confirmation
of Gov. Sulaer'e nomination of John
N. Carlisle of Watortown aa State
(Vnmlaaiiinar of IllChways.
The resolution on the Primary bill
Sis opposed by James D. Bell or.
ngo and Michael J. Walah of West
ehester on the ground that it would
as an Interference with the functions
mt the Leglalature.
ROOSEVELT BACKS SULZER IN
PRIMARY BILL PIOHT.
Ocr. Sulxer and Charles N. Bulger
of Oswego were anions; thoaa who ad
vocated the resolution.
q sorgo at. Palmer, Chairman of the
Dsmooratlc State Committee, attended
the meeting
Th. riavai nar announoad ha would
act attend the hearing on hie primary
m faagora me Senate and Aaeembly Ju
diciary Committees la the Assembly
Chamber this afternoon, but said he
would toe ably represented. Among those
S the Governor invited to apeak In
behalf of the measure was Cel. Theodore
Roosevelt. The Colonel was unable to
be present but sent the Governor this
"Tour letter and telegram Just re-
eatved. Believe me, It la with meet aln-
aeaeaaS mat I and mvaalf unable to
ten 1 1 aad apeak (or the Dlreet Primary
tall, which, aa X uaderamad It eontaini
the essential features of the hill drawn
CwntoM. IMI, br
Ce. (The Haw
60 HOURS IN MINE
AMID 100 DEAD,
T
E
Almost Maddened by Horrors,
They Crawled for Miles,
Seeking Escape.
TELL OF THEIR PERILS.
One Survivor Had Written
Goodby to Children on
Leg of Overalls.
v-
PITTSBL'RQH, April Shortly aftr
midnight two men were found alive In
the Cincinnati Mine at Flnleyvllle, the
scene Wednesday noon of an exploalon
In which from 1U) to 115 men loat their
Uvea.
Suffering untold agonlea from 'he
shock of the exploalon and expoaure.
the men, Charles Crawl and Philip Leg-
ler, each thirty-six years old, were
bruughl to the surface almoat uncon
scious. That they survived the explosion and
poisonous gaaea of the mine for slaty
hours la considered miraculous
After the expert helmotmen and mine
Inspectors had left the mine late last
night J. MoVlck.rs and Clyde Gibson
of the coal company's rescue craw en
tered to search for bodies. They had
reached a point two and a half miles
from the entrance when they heard a
faint cry. investigation disclosed the two
mlnera alive in what is known aa room
10 or entry M.
They were barely conscious and had
to be dragged through the long tunnels
to the opening. -
Crawl la a widower and haa two chil
dren. Hla ttrst words when rescued
were a plea to see hla children.
When brought out a meaaage was
found scribbled In chalk on a leg of hla
overalls, reading, "Goodby, my children!
God bleaa you."
At the hospital this morning Crawl
had recovered sufficiently to tell thla
alory :
"Legler and I were eating lunch In the
room where we were found shortly after
11! 3' o'clock Wednesdsy afternoon when
we heard a dull exploalon, which aeemed
far away. Wa finished our lunch. Then
I began to gat nervous, aa 1 did not
hear the other mlnera at work, and went
to investigate. I found dead minors
lying all around, and than I knew what
the explosion we had heard aaa.
"Remembering a former experience, I
told Legler to follow me, and we crawled
Into the old workings in an effort 10 find
a way out. We had only a slice of
bread apiece and quenched our thlrat
with aulphur water from the mine floor.
We crawled and crawled, but could not
nnd any way out I gave up hope sev
eral times, but aa long aa my strength
lasted we kept crawling. Legler wanted
to lie down and die, but I urged him
on."
"In room 23, entry 10, we found an old
man and his son. They were alive, but
could not move. Ws tried to carry
them, but their weight was too great,
for we were exhausted. When we left
them my mind seemed to wander, but 1
held to Legler's hand and in soma way
wa got back to where we had atarted
from after the exploalon,"
Legler furnished a simple account of
his experiences, giving credit to Crawl
far saving hla life.
"Only tor Crawl," he aid, "X would
have given up in different times, but
he urged me on. I never expected to
see daylight again, but Ood was with
us and helped us through."
Crawl's reference to his former ex-
narlence waa to the Merianaa mine dis
aster en Nov. U, UOL when Is Uvea
ware lost la Wat expioaton crawl lost
hla riant eye.
On their trip the rescuers of the two
nan found eight more bodies, which
brings me total known dead In the
Ptalarrllle guaater ua to m.
WOMEN URVIV
" Circulation Books Open to All."
The rm MM
Trk WertdT.
NEW
STRIKE LEADER
HALTS A RIOT AS
HE IS LED TO JAIL
Quinlan Dodges Waiting De
tectives When Miss Flynn
and Tresca Are Caught.
SPEAKS TO BIG CROWD.
Followers, Who Had Threat
ened to Attack Officers, Take
It Out in Hooting Them.
Elisabeth Gurley Flynn. Tatrick Quin
lan and Carlos Tresca, who, with Will
iam D. Haywood, Frederick Koetlgen
and Adolph l.eealg, were Indicted yes
terday In Passaic County, N. J., for
their activity In connection with the
Paterson allk strike, were arrested to
day In Paterson Miss Flynn and Treeca
as they slighted fro man Erie train and
Quinlan a few momenta later In Hel
vetia Hall, where he waa addressing
:,000 strikers.
Leaaig waa arrested and bailed out
last nlghmt, and Koetlgen, who la not
a leader ol the Industrial Workers of
the World, has not been molested. He
Uvea in Paterson and ran be arretted
at any time.
The arrest of Quinlan waa made by
Detectives Jowott, Carney and Kadcllffe
under circumstances which teated the
nerve of the detectlvea to the utmost,
and whloh threatened for a moment to
cause a riot In which the three police
men might have fared 111 among -.000
Infuriated atrlkers. Quinlan waa on the
atage of Helvetia Hall, loudly attacking
tiie police because of the arreata of Mlaa
Flynn and Tresca and proclaiming the
Injustice of the indictments, when the
detectlvea entered the place.
THREE POLICEMEN NOT RECOG
NIZED AT FIRST.
They puahed through the packed hall,
almoat unnoticed and certainly unieoog-
nlxed, until they reached the atage.
Close together the three advanced on
Quinlan, whose speech wsa halted as
he turned to meet them, and one of
them, touching him on the arm, told
him ha was under arrest on a bench
warrant Issued yesterday by Judge
Kir Inert of the Court of Common Pleas.
Quinlan greeted the detectives with a
smile, but, though they had spoken In
low voices, those nearest In the audience
realised that their leader had been ar
rested, and aa the news dashed back
through the auditorium the crowd waa
on ita feet at once.
"Stop 'era. Don't let 'em out. lies-
cue Quinlan," were some of the cries
which rose throughout the hall, and
(Continued on Second Page.)
Baseball Games To-Day
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
AT BROOKLYN.
GIANTS
000000. 1
IROOKLYN
0 0 0 1 2 0
AT BOSTON.
PHILADELPHIA
1 2 3 0 4
BOSTON
0 0 0 0 0
AT PITTSBURGH.
CHICAGO
0 2 0 0 0 0
PITTSBURGH
0 0 0 0 0 2
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
AT NEW YORK.
BOSTON
2 0 0 1
MEW YORK
10 0 0
AT PHILADELPHIA.
WASHINGTON
010000
PHILADELPHIA
0 0 0 1 0 0
FOR RACING AND BASEBALL SEE
PAGE r.
YORK, SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 1913.
Three Leaders in
Who Are
4-l J.Jvt.,.4lMi... .i. t
D9
agrwgmwl
jCAPLO TBtSCA,
JJjJM)
11
OF
Blaze Set on Railroad Near
London and Suffragette
Papers Left at Scene.
LONDON, April M. A militant luffra-
gette "arson squad set fire to an
empty train standing on a siding of
the Southwestern Hallway at Tedding
ton on the Thames, just outalde of Lon
don, early, to-day. Little damage waa
done, however, and no arrests were
made.
Quantitlea of oil and other combust
ibles, suffrage literature and post-cards
addressed to members of the House of
Commons were found In the car where
the fire had been started.
While the police of Scotland Tard were
Investigating the burning of the train.
poaalbly the moat important trial ot mil
itants, next to that or Mrs. Emmeline
Pankhurst, waa begun In Bow Street
Police Court. Miaa Annie Kenney, chief
elde to hire. Pankhurst: "Oaneral" Mrs.
Flora Drummond and George Lanatury.
most prominent "male suffragette" and
ex-Merrtber of Parliament, were ar
raigned, under an ancient statute,
charged with disturbing the peace.
Mlaa Kenney and "Uen." Drummond
brought bagwage with them to court, In
dicating that they expected to be sent
to Jail. Bis months' Imprisonment la the
maximum penaltythat can be Imposed
on them under the King Edward III.
law, charging them with Inciting others
to crime by violent apeeches. They were
apeclflcally accuaed of Instigating the re
cent Inflammatory epeernea in Aioert
Hall.
Attorney A H. Bodkin, appearing for
the Director of Public Prosecutions, ex
plained that It waa ua a preventive
meaaure that the proceedings acre In
altuted. The lurfragettes had not log
anything, he explained, for which the
Government could aak aevere P"nah
menl, but It waa dealred to prevent them
from doing anything dangerous, and to
thla end had Invoked a statute cen
turies old. Special reference was ma le
to the Inflammatory apnerhes of mis
Kenney by Attorney Bodkin, who laid
stress on these alleKed utterances u
the suffragette:
"No woman ought to go about with
out a hammer in tier pocket"
"She ought never to gu out without
touching at least one pillar box.''
TIIK WOHI.lt IBAYML III hl.ti ,
ArcsdS. Pulitwr w.ni, Builliog. Uiu !;,
Htm. N. V Cuf, II- let' -' ' MMnalloui ,11 ,j
OsastwUs. Hsrujiidi. I'eotril auj loulii Aniu-au
HtesmMilii imts. ni l rv.iw for iwxgas ol
1 mtH eeVrt '"' V''UMM "waaus
inonu oniun
MILITANTS
BURN A TRAIN
the Silk Strike at Paterson
Indicted for "Preaching Anarchy"
: i.tiUlj........ i
ELIZABETH C. FLYNN
eM
SULZER SIGNS
WHICH WILL
$25,000,000 INTEREST
Increases Rate to All Corpora
tions Holding Greater Part of
$100,000,000 Securities
Outstanding.
Bond expert are amasod at the
action ot Oov. Sulzer In signing the
Frawley bill regularly Introduced at
three scasloM of the Legislature and
repeatedly blocked by Oov. Dlx
which practically prescnta to holders
of State bonds 00 lea than $26,000,
000. The law la In the Interest of a syn
dicate holding large blocks of New Tork
State bonde
It Is charged also that the law will
strlks a vital blow at the credit of
New York City and other municipalities
of the Mate, and directly affect their
future ability to borrow money for mu
nicipal entvrprlaes.
Announcement that the Governor had
algned the bill was a bombshell to the
city's bond experts. It passed the As
sembly only two or three nays ago, an
they thought the
Govern., 1 would take'
more time In conaldertng It before af
ftxlng Ita signature.
The law, n effect, Increases the an
nual Internal upon the lion n ,. s. 1 ou t -standing
State bonds, urlglnally laa led
aa 4 per cents, to II per Cat It pro
vides thai this Increased rate shall bn
paid by the Htatr only In lieu of or as
part payment of the fiam-hihe tax paid
to the State by Insurance companies,
trust companies ami savlngn iianks.
In other words. It Is provide! thai
State bonds whlan will nay hut I per
cent, annually in 'rawest to ordlmry
holders will l Worth !' per cent, when
they are In the possession of Insurance
companies, savings hanks and trial
Companies.
Practically all the 4 pi MBt out
atandltig bond of the Slate, aggregating
,.,. ss. have sitll sOBM fifty vears
to run, and thla InortaM of a hall P9
cent, brings the astounding total of
tV.-,,iBj,iaj to be taken from the State
treasury In the next fifty eirx, and
without benefit to trie tux -navels.
Trust complines, Iviugl lunks jiui
insurants companies iU ak those
" Circulation Books Open to AIL"
12
..... . . i i -. . . I .- .... v.
a
EamB
WM. P. HACyWOOD
BOND LAW
COST STATE
bond at once and the syndicate bald
ing them will proSt tremendously.
Under the existing lawa the State can
not legally ,ell Its bonds at leas than
par; neither can It pay more thaa 4
per cent. In annual Interest. This In
ability to dlaposs of bonds at less than
par I the argument which haa been
advanced In behalf of the scheme.
But the law covers all the outatandlng
bond issues of the State as well as those
authorised for the future, and makes It
possible for the original purchasers to
get rid of thfir holdings as well as for
ths State to dispose at future securities
and carry 011 its various branches of
Inaprovement.
Under the Improved conditlona far
these bends, the pries oa a IL00O bond
will be raised from ten to twelve and a
half per cent. Ths enchancement in
market varus of ths 1100,000,000 outatand
lng will be from 110,000,00 to lu.too.oee.
It ia contended this Is a clear gift by
the State to the holders of these bonds.
In ths futurs privets purohaaers of
State securities, while regarding
themselves aa competitive bidders
really will be brought Into oompetllloa
with corporations, who will gain a half
of 1 per cent, more than the private
bidders.
An Interesting sidelight on the whole
situation la revealed by the amount
franchise, taxes at present paid by the
Bavlnge banks, trust companies and In
suiance companies of the state th
, tax upon which the Increased Intereat
Is to be ci edited when they are the
holders of State securities.
in round tlgurea the trust companies
pav I-'. ."'' the ineurance eompamaa
ll. ssiissi. and the savings banka nearly
l,inu,au. Thin total of tf.(WU,'j0O shows
the udvuntuge calculated to accrue to
the favored Interests through
the
ownership of the State bonds.
t'lty BOwd exerta are eape.lgUy
arouaed against the measuie because
(hy coni. n I It will directly affect the
city' credit and aevarely hamper the
futute bar sowing ability ol Nsw York
and Vri OthOf municipality in the
State. Wlthuut the oppor tunity of of
feung am h induc ements to the big
bond hoMvr... the cities in little hope
to 1 STOP Is with the Slate in the sale
of bonds to the biggest buyers.
PORT Of W.W VOHh
IIIMIVKK
Cfltie
llrcee.B U1A1
KaLCIS All-ills Vut'cru
'"rpoul
I.rewsrr.
Ilsiuleirg
InaWaci
tuffijl
ls)i"
u.lmmajci
S SS1 ctuitcinlic.
PAOE8
FIND BORDEN HEIRESS
IN BACK BAY MANSION
IN HYSTERICAL STATE
Millionaire's Daughter Is Nervous
Wreck When Recovered From
Two Women With Whom
She Is Said to Have Fled.
FATHER WON'T PROSECUTE;
WILL PUT HER IN CONVENT
Mrs. White Disappears, Fearing Ar
rest, When the Girl's Hiding
Place Is Revealed.
ispecml to The von tag Worm.)
BOSTON, April 26. RaiTiona 3ordsn, wMptrur hystericaily sftd
with her childish face marked by heavy Uoes of ntrvous exhaustion, ?
folded in the arms of her father, Gail Border a few minutes after J
o'clock this aftetnoon.
When she was found in a fashionable Back Bay home, she was
in the company of her two former school mates, Gladys and Violet
Sheldon, the nieces of Mrs. Lillian J.
the hue and cry of the chase through four States, which had continued
every minute since Ramona was spirited from a Pomptun Hills, N. J.,
sanitarium, Wednesday, was not in the house when the father, attended
by detectives, entered.
wilson off to sea I
FOR A REST IP;
BACK TO-MORROW
Only Youngest Daughter and
One Aide With HimCuts
Out Presidential Salute.
WAaUXNOTON. April
Wilson lsft th White Heae early -day
and boarded th. Oovernnteat racist
Hytnti for a trip down th Potomac to
the Virginia Cap and bach. H ex
pected to be away until eome lime to
morrow. Secretary Tumulty prescribed
the trip aa a relaxation aad want Dr.
Cery Orayaon, naval aide at the White
House, to ee that th President did
absolutely no work.
Th President has been working wa
der pressure lately, th Japan ques
tion in California, the tariff problem
and th Mexican situation having oc
cupied hla mind, aa well as troublesoms
question of appointments.
Mrs. Wilson had soma engagement
for th day, ao the President wa ac
companied only by hla youngest daugh
ter. Miss II lea n or No correspondents
accompanied him, but the yacht waa to
keep in touch with the Navy Yard by
wireless.
In accordance with the President's
daalre (or a quiet and unostentatious
departure the customary
salute waa
1 not fired
Aa the dylph weighed anchor
promptly
at 10 o'clock the American
dag on
the White House wa lowered
for the lirat time since March 1
The President took along some mag
sine but no official papr or Utters
It wa aid that the yacht might make
. f..w stop en route o that the Presi
dent could take a walk along th shore
tu-inorrow, but no plans bad been mage
to ths time of .ailing.
4,200 SCOTCH EMIGRANTS.
OWHtWW, Scotland, April ht-Ovar
1 4.2UU emigrants, a record of departure in
one day from Clyd. sailed to-day for
I . . -I ua I.. nt -un.a. ssw
1 v ,nv ...w.w Hi.sc vshsiis, nw
Grampian carried l.cKU, the Saturnine
1 1 4i gad U CalUeraia UU
gPtTtON.
PRICE ONE CENT.
White. Mrs. White, frittfened by
Th woman had fled the ctty yesterday.
an ner nieces said. It was said la
half of Mr Bordon that, hsvlag hi
daughter safs in his possession, be had
advaa up all notion of prosecuting the.
who ware raponbi 1
anno.
Borden aad hi daughter have
le the home ef friends and there will
remain tw-atght. The overjoyed father
ha not decided what hla neat mwve
wlU he. though It l probaMe ha will
return to New York to-morrow.
FAT MM IS, WORN OUT V LONG
SIArVCH.
No worn with anxletv era the aHa.
t
reeeed father that whan th fwt actives
r private ageaoy announoad bs hla
their discovery mt Jtamoaa'a hiding
place he did not go Immediately bs
meet hie daughter. He amid ha weal I
have to "pull himself togwther before
he could undergo the Joyful ordaal of
a reunion.
Juat where Mrs Whit has Sad ha
not been announced. If H to knew to
Mr. Borneo. Hla determlnattoa not to
push prosecution agatnst th psrsoaa a
hold reeponstbls for th practical awl
napping of hie daughter ha ironed all
Intereat In Mr. White's mimiasal
froni hla mind.
O. C. Kyle, who doscrtbe hansel f a
hiaaaia manager dor Mr. Bordssa aad
who ecnempanted htm an hi trip to
Boston, early to-day gave out a ta to
rn. rH. when It was kaowa Ramona had
been found, wherein he described haw
the father get on the trail of the miss
ing girt and her conaadoa. Hs said:
"latat night Mr. Borden got a re
liable tip that hla daughter waa with
two women at the Hotel Veadome aad
detectlvea surrounded It The detective
agency wired to Mr. Hiwtisa end hs
wired back. Hold aartlia till 1 cam.
Don't arrest u trie so they stt.mpt to
laava'
"lis waa atartog at the Manhattar.
Hotel and Juat managed to catch th
midnight train for Boston. Hs waa per
feotly sure oa th way over that h 1
would get hi daughter the first thing
upon hla arrival hare, but the njienag
merrt at ths Vendoro denied his daugh
ter and th women were there, gubae
tmentky report of her true hiding place
oame to aim."
Throughout has night a number eg
deteottvo had kept watch upon th
private bouse of a Mend a Mr. Whit,
where the fugMves had taken refuge
after their arrival from New lUvaa.
It was feared Mr. Whit planned ta
tah Rasnona Bordon with bar a a
ailing to-day for riant.
Mr. Bordon will bring his
back to New York as soon SB as ha
gotten h.r out ef the hang where m
detectives save located her asm her
a,.' ' . "-

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