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The evening world. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, January 31, 1918, Final Edition, Image 1

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This Year to Decide War's Issue, Says Wilson
WEATHER Probably Cloudy and Coldr.
"Circulation Pooka Open to All." 1
I "Circulation Hook Open to AIL" I
PEIOE TWO CENTS.
CopjritM, 1018, br Th Vtrvt rblUhta
Co. (Tim New YorU World).
NEW YORK, THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 1918. 14 PAGES
PRICE TWO CENTS.
MIT '
mm. JS1
HI gproy
"y ' 1 ' t. . . . -1... ..,
PERSHING'S TROOPS
CITIES UNDER MARTIAL LAW.
NEARLY 2,000,000 STRIKERS
IN ENTIRE SERIN EMPIRE,
Hamburg, Altona and Wandsbeck in
a State of Siege 58,000 Berlin
Women in Ranks of Strikers De
mand Peace Without Annexations.
COPENIIAQBN, Jan. 31. A state
tit alcgo has been doclarcd at Ham
burg, Altona nnd Wandsbeck, accord
ing to tho Hamburg 12cho, a HocUlUt
Bw paper.
lAltona and Wandsbeck nro In
tho Hamburg district. Altona ad
joins Hamburg. Its population
In 1800 was 161,000. It la tbo seat
of Important Industries. Wands
beck Is tbreo miles northeast of
Hamburg. In 0O Its population
won SS.00O. it has largo brewing
end distilling establishments.
Tho Berlin newspapers, with fow
exceptions, havo been published. The
statement says thero- havo been no
disturbances anywhere tn tho cmplrn.
Jfearlr 8,000,000 on Mi-Ike In
(ermnn Hmplrr.
AMSTBIIDA5I, Jan. 31 (llrltlsh
'Admiralty per Wireless Press). Tl c
utrikc bos been extended In districts
near Berlin, especially In Togcl, Aid
ershof, Spandau and Maricndorf,
Trhero 500,000 men havo quit work.
A oimllar number of -workmen are
on trlko In tho romalndcr of the
empire.
Ineludino the 700,000 reported
out In Berlin, the above Indicates
total of nearly 2,000,000 strik
ers In the German Empire,
Clergymen vainly exhorted the
(iLrllcorn In Hamburg yesterday to
ontluuo their work, says tho Cologne
Gazette. Tho workcrii proccoded to
ttio trades union headquarters and
adopted a resolution opposing the
(P&n-Gcrman Fatherland Party and
demanding Immediate peace without
annexations or Indemnities, better
labor conditions nnd Improvement of
the food supply.
A deputation waited on tho general
la command of tho district r.nd said
the strikers would not resort tn v'o
la&cc. 68,000 Women Among; tho 700,000
Htrlkrra In llrrllii.
liONDON. Jan. 31. Tho Gorman
rtrlke is stilt growing In nugnlludn,
tho Exchango Telegraph correspon
dent nt Copenhagen reports. In llor
lln 700,000 persons aro on strike, ho
reports, 68,000 of theso being women,
A great number of .Socialist leaders
havo been arrested In various Qcrmun
towns, aocordlng to this authority.
Tho fact that Berlin Is wrapped In
a thick fog has mado it linposslnle
for tho authorities to prevent tho dis
semination of pamphlets, tho reports
state,
Tho Vorwaerts, in a scathing artl-
(Continued on Second Pago.)
Announcement
The Increase In tliu price of nil tho one cent New York paper
to two cents gives the dealers un Increase of 50 over their pre
vious profits.
Notwithstanding this, there has been a disturbance In the
distribution, based, In some Instances, on a misapprehension.
Some of the dealers tear that they will he submitted to
losses through unsold copies remaining on hand during the
readjustment period.
This Is a misunderstanding, m, In common lalrncsi, the
newspapers decided to take hack all unsold copiei until the.
dealer can regulate Ills order ou iho News Companies, taking
only tho number of papers tor which ho regularly has a sale
HOLD TRENCHES AND INFLICT LOSSES
E
Wage Increases Pending Be
fore Federal Board Aver
age 40 Per Cent.
WASHINGTON; Jan. 31. Demands
for wago Increases pending before
the Railroad Wago Commission are
for an nggrcgato of iO per cent., it
was disclosed to-day. The demand
represent n total of nearly 1300,000,000
this year, or about half of tho rail
way operating Income of last year.
Bequests for moro pay are istllt
reaching tho commission. In nearly
every caso tho labor union seeks to
represent all members of the par
ticular trado whether organized or
unorganized and tho wages commis
sion Ih said to bo prepared to accept
this principle.
Many of tho demands aro for much
moro than 40 pur cent. They nsk Jn
nomo cases an Incrcasn to place cor
tain trades on a parity with em
ployees of other Industries, and In
addition a flat Increase to provldo
for higher cost of living within the
last year.
. Less than halt of tho 1,800,000 rail
way omploycos nro organized. Within
tho last few weeks, howovcr, tho un
organized men havo met In groups
and sent po'ltlons to tho Hnllrosd Ad
ministration or Wugo Commission
asking dufiulto increases.
With tho aid of its statisticians
and examiners tho Wago Commis
sion expects to determine certain
rales of Increase considered Jugt for
various classes of railway labor, und
probably will scale down tho domanda
in many Instances.
Tho commission was notified to
day that representatives of the cm.
ploycrs would bo named to attend Mm
hearings of tho commission and to
give any assistance possible in check
ing up tho statements of employees.
Kffortn to compromise differences
In the Henate Interstate Commoire
Committee on the Administration
It.iilro.jd Hill wero made to-day with
votes anil polls showing a majority
of one In favor of a specific time
limit on Government operation and
for ha Ins the Interstate Commnren
Commission continue to dctermtno
rates.
50 . 00.000 MOR
N PAY DEMANDED
Y A A
IN
II. S. PUTS EMBARGO
ON GOODS TO SPAIN
BY STOPPING SHIPS
Sailings Ordered Suspended
and Guards Put on Six
Vessels Here.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31-Bccause
of certain conditions In Spain, which
the Government considers to tho nd
vantago of Germany and discrimina
tory ng.iln.it tho. United States nnd
tho Allies, tho War Trado Board to
day ceased to isnuo licenses for ex
port of merchandise to that country
and held up ships about to sail for
Spain,
Orders wero received here to-day
from Washington to hold nil steam
ers of tho Spanish Steamship Kino In
port until further notice. When tho
order reached hero tho Alphonso XII.
was ready to sail with 200 passen
gers nnd cargo for Barcelona, Spain.
There are six largo steamers of the
lino In tho harbor, 'ill of which. In
cluding tho Alphonso XII., were put
under guard.
At tho ofllcr-s of the Spanish Line,
Pier No. 8, East IUver, It was said tho
order from Washington was not in
the nature of a command to suspend
sailings, but It was admitted that
thero dhould bo no sailings until
Washington was heard from.
"Tho order may bo changed to
morrow," said one of tho ofllclals.
"Wo cancelled the sailing of thn Al
phonso XII., but that may bo changed
at any time. Wo aro in communica
tion with the capital and aro wait
ing to hear from there now."
Tho stcamors of the Spanish Line
ply between this country and Spain
nnd Cuba as well as Mexican and
Southern American ports and reach
Into tho Pacific as far ua tho Phil
ippines. WAGE BOOST FAVORED
FOR POSTOFFICE MEN
Mouse Committee Recommends
Increases of From 10 to 20 Per
Cent, for All.
WASHINGTON. Jan. .11 Wage In
creases of from 10 to 30 per cent, for
practically ill postofflco employees
were recommended to tho House to-day
by the Toatafflcr Committee. This will
affect several thousand employees nf
the New York Postofllce. The .creat
cut Increases aro glcn to carrier and
clerks.
BILL TO AUTHORIZE CITY
TO OPERATE CAR LINES
Assemblyman Takes Step at Albany
to Provide Public
Ownership.
ALHANT Jan. 31 Assemblyman
Fslgenbaum Sixth Kings. Introduced a
bill in the Assembly to-day authorizing
tho Public Service Commission. First
District to tako over and operate ths
public utilities under Us Jurisdiction.
ZEPPELIN WORKS ATTACKED,
BIG EXPLOSION INDICATES
Zt'ninH. Wednesday. Jsn SO. A
tremendom explosion, accompanied by
funfbo Hnd fallowed bv a Iiuku column
of fire, was heard In the direction of
Prletlrlchshafen this morning, says a
telegram received at St. (toll from
ltosenherir. on l.nko Constance
Thn explosion probably wuh the ro
suit of an nerlal attack on the. Zeppelin
Woiks at Krleiiiiclnliafen.
MISS RANKIN'SJjILL "LOST."
WA-IIIS'UTtiN, Jan SI - Tl llouee
Imuim m on iNuntiiilte to-dsv tabled
the Itankin H II to grant lo American
woim n marred to foreigner the right
to retain their citizenship. Thto means
too. tommltUa will-not' an..ciMt,
OUTCOME OF WAR DEPENDS 20" mm UNE SIELB)
ON ACHIEVEMENTS THIS YEAR, " 1 BY BIG GERMAN 77s BEFORE
PRESIDENT
Appeals for'Snpplies lo Enable
Men to Fight for Freedom
of Mankind.
WASHINGTON, Jan? 31. "1'he
culmlnntlng crisis of tho Btrugglo has
come. Tho tchiovomonts of this y.-nr
on tho ono sldo or tho other must
dotcrmlno tho issue."
Thus Prcsldont Wilson to-day
warned tho farmers of tho couhtry
In making public an address) ho had
planned to deliver at Urb.ma, XII., Iri
dic. Tho Farmers' Confcronco Is In sea
Hon at tho University of Illinois, In
Urbana. Tho mcssago was delivered
by President James of tho University,
in tho nbscnci of Sccretnry of A griru'
tino Houston, who was to havo repit
sentcrt tho Prosldent, after it was
found tho tatter's indisposition would
mako it imposslblo for him to bo
present, Mr. Houston was prnvented
from participating by tho tlo-up In
transportation facilities.
And In facing this crisis, l.o said:
"It hua turned out thut tho forces
that light for freedom, tho freedom
of men all over ths world as well as
our own, depend upon us In an ex
traordinary and unoxpeclod degree
for sustcnanco for tho supply of tho
materials by which men aro to live,
and to light.
"And It will bo our sjory when the
war is over that wo havo supplied
theso materials und nupp"cd them
abundantly, nnd it will bo alt tho more
glory because, in supplying them, wo
havo tnudo our nuprcmo effort and
sacrifice.
"Wo aro fighting," tho President
continued, "as truly for Iho liberty
and self government of tho I'nlted
States as If tho war of our own revol
ution had to bu fought over again;
and ovcry man In every business in
tho United States must know by this
tlmo that his wholo futuro fortuno lies
in tho balance.
"Our national life, and our wholo
economic dovrlopmont will nomo un
der tho sinister lnflucnco.4 of foreign
control If wo do not win.
"Wo must win, therefore, and wo
shall win. I need not ask you to
plodgo your lives nnd fortune! with
thono of tho rest of tho Nation in tbo
uciompltuhmcnt of that groat end.
FORTUNES OF MANKIND ABOUT
TO BE DETERMINED.
"I will not appeal to you to con
tinue and renow and lncroaso wur
efforts. I do not bollovo that It Is
necessary to do so. I belluvo that
you will do It without any anpe.il
from mo, bocauso you underatar 1 as
well as I do tho noods anil opportuni
ties of this groat hour, when lb fm
tuncs of mankind everywhere accm
alraut to bo determined and when
America has tho greatest opportunity
she has over had to mako gojd tier
own freedom, and in making it good
to lend a helping hand to men strug
gling for their froodotn everywhere.
"You remember that It was f armers
from whom camo tbo llrst shots at
Lexington that Kit aflamo tho revolu
tion that mado America freo. I t. it e.
and bollovo that tho farmoi ft
America will willingly and consul' j-
ously stand by to win this war also
"Tho toll, tho Intolllgeuce, the'
foresight, tho self-sacrlflcu aJid do-1
votlon of tho farmers of Amu tea1
will, I behove, bring to a triumphant i
conclusion this gieat hist war fur thui
emancipation of men from tho ronti'd
of arbitrary Government and tho ki-
ILshnest of class legislation and ' '"i- (
tiol, and then, when the end h is ,
coino, wo may look (.uti other in
laco and bo glad tli.it wi aio Amuu
Continued on Fourth- Pago,l
HALT
TELLS FARMERS
NEW U. S. DESTROYER
DEADLY FOE OF U BOATS
Development Pronounced Most Im
portant Yet Made To He
Ready Soon.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. A new sub
murlno destroyerfound to bo tho most
cfllclonl of all tj pes has been developed
br the Navy Department, Secretary
Dvilcli told tho Houtn Naval Affairs
Committee to-diiy.
Work on thn nrw boats, which are
termed "the deadly foe of ths sub'
marine." has been started, and In a
cry few tnontln.'' Daniels promised,
"many of these new destroyers will
ferreting out the U bots."
Tho lKats will l- of fabricated steel
?)'. tee' lonr." P-nlcN sild. "and llitlr
ctilricucy lie in thn fact that they arc
counted with tho rery latest submarine
fielding dovl.-rs. some Of which are un
known to the public nnd nro capable of
developing more speed than any of the
bonts now In tho service."
Parts of the new destroyers are be
ing mado at auto factories. Tho boats
will ho assembled at plants along the
seashore. Dnuleli eald.
SENATORS TO ACT SOON
ON WILSON PEACE AIMS
Foreign Relations Committee to
Meet Following Oil for In
dorsement by Owen.
WASHINGTON. Jan. 31 Aftei Sena
lor Owen hnd Introdueed a resolution to
put tho Senate on reeunl In support of
President Wilson's fourteen principles
for world pencu nnd Hen'itor llurnh had
Introduced nnothur to record tho Sen
ntev position, ('hnlrtiim Ktone of thn
Korelgn ItehitlniiH Conunltti e announced
that the commute,) would hooii meet to
ngren on a composlti. draft o fthii Sen
ate's viewK.
ALL STOCK PRICES SOAR
IN UNEXPECTED BOOM
lixpeciation of Harly Peace and
Wilson's Address Id Farmers
Stimulate Market.
ritlmulaled by expectations of ejirlv
peace, and particularly by President
H'llion's address to fsrrnerx. stock mar
Vet prices middenly shot ahcud this aft
ernoon and iyelnpel Into mi unex
lici ted lioom. Tho rinsing whs a bull riot,
with such heavy trading that the ticker
was fifteen minutes behind In final iuu
Utlotis. Nearly every stock on the list was
III ed nut of Its d'prese on of tho past
month. General Motors led tho list
with the Urgc.1t Jump of fifteen
polnti., this evtreniM being cnu-ed liy
rounding up nf p. dilutive nhnrla who
had been selling fre.ly of Ute
I'nlted titate Meet ro"c nearly fiv
points to 'H. General IJIeetrio n-ored
a ten-point advan e. Tho scnerHl
iiverano rf was to to thre" points for
.nailing rallroidn and Indu'trUls.
$2,000,000,000 EXPENDED
ON NAVY, DANIELS REVEALS
L'xplainint,' Req.ict lor ?looo,.
ooo, hct.ret.iry Warn if He ivy
Outlay to Come.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31 Appear
ing before the House Navul Commit
ti n to-duy to explain his request fur
il&.uuo.uoo irir for thn navy, Hcore
tarv )an!oln revealed that nearly ..
0OO.O0n.O0U has been poured Into the
mival establishment of the l.'n.ied
SUitiH for ptoseiuiion of tho war.
prepaid for further heavy cjinndi.
tuieti . .
GERMAN RAID
UU Milk. MUUI1ULU
Fourteen Tons of Bombs
Dropped in Reprisal, Says
Berlin War Office.
I'AIHB. Jan. 31. Twenty persons
j wero killed and nfty wounded In last
night's air raid, It is announced
olllclally.
Paris citizens accepted tho raid
calmly. Profiting by londnn's experi
ences, they remained Indoors during
tho bomb dropping and cannonading,
Tho attack was madn spectacular
by tho use of star shells by tlio de
fenders, which revealed ncorcs of
Kronch machlnra rapidly climbing to
high altitudes, as well ns tho attack
ing forces.
Ono of tho German machines was
brought down and tho occupants
madn prisoners.
.Onn .e'rentfh iui.:hh t wa (.'rvtjl to
land In tho city on account ot en
glnn trouble. Its pilot and gunnor
wcrs Injured.
Prcsldont Polncarn vlultecl the
wounded victims to-day.
"Tho enemy mnchlnos," tho atato
mcnt says, "bombed Purls suburt's
and thou various polnta in tho city,
principally on the light b-uk ot thu
Seine.
"Thero were numofous victims, vs
pcclally women and children.
"Two hospitals wmo struck."
Merlin ronrlreii Tnita of
nonilia Were llroppcd.
TIKRLIN, .Ian. 31 (via London).
"As u reprisal," says tho official
stntomont Issued to-day by tho Wnr
Office, "wo dropped fourteen tons tit
bombi on Paris."
"On Christmas Hvo nnd during
January, dosplto our warning, tho
enomy was engaged In bombing opjn
Gnrmi.n towns," wild tl.o ntatement.
"Thanks to our defensn tho loss
and damogo wero slight."
Tho statement adds that tho raid
on tho French capital wtm tho first
systomatlc attack from tho air.
TONS OF BOMBS DROPPED
ON GERMANS BY BRITISH
LONDON, Jan Jl An official
statement on aerial operations Issued
by tho Hrltlah War Offlco reads:
"Homblng ntlacks wero carried out
Tuosday vigorously against ammu
nition dumps nnd airdromes all day
long, whtlo low-fljl.ig maohlnoa en
gaged tho enemy's troops with ma
chlno gun flro.
"Bight hostile machines wero
downod In air lighting and four wero
driven down out of control. An ob
servation balloon was downed in
flames. Three of our machines are
missing.
"During the night of Monday-Tuen.
day six tons of bombs woru dropped
on onemy billots, railway stations,
trains and alrdromos. All tho llrlt
lsh machines loturnnd safely,
WILSON "SITTING TIGHT."
"float Sound. i One ( n Otrraet
It," lie Wlrrx l.nv, I ot.
r'OI.IJMIII et, . Jan 31 -Gov Jnini.
M fox to-d eenl the following tel
egram to Pr-'ldrnl Wilson.
"Just sit tight Hi the boat The re
action now i "fieri ting will over
whelm those wh'ine pnlli'.( linn in
gulfed their paliiotlam"
President Wilion sent the following
leply:
"Tliank ou li.nitily for the m,.,.
sage. on oiu I'f uif I .shall
light, foi th,. Ii mi i i sound un I n.
budy eun o ei i n '
minor, tnur (ii;itn.
TAthrr Juhn't M.riielno clv4 sUsfiitb
(ov-tltt culO and srlc Alt.
CHARGE OF
U. S. Soldiers Hold Ground Firmly
and Inflict Many Casualties; Two
Killed, Four Wounded, in Latest
Clash One Taken Prisoner.
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMIES IN FRANCE, Wednesday, 'Jan,
30 (Dy the Associated Press). The American army's position In a cer
tain sector of the French front was raided by the Germans during a heavy,
tog shortly after daylight this morning.
The attack was preceded by a violent artillery barrage.
Two Americans were killed and four were wounded.
One American is missing and Is believed to have been captured U
the eneiiv I '
Casualties have been occurring almost daily among the American
ticops in this sector for several days. It is now permitted to disclose that
the recent casualties given out from Washington occurred In this sector.
These deaths were caused by shell fire, mostly shrapnel.
BATTLE FOLLOWS NIGHT OF QUIET.
Last night was fairly quiet throughout the American sector. The
tsual number of shells came over, doing no damage, and there were the
customary outburst of machine gun fire from both sides at points where
the opposing lines arc nearest.
At daybreak this morning the heavy fog which had been enveloping
the whole position and the country for miles around for several days
became still thicker, blotting out all except the nearest enemy positions.
At 7 o'clock three muffled reports sounded through the fog. There were
three whistles followed quickly by three shell-bursts. The projectiles
exploded on three sides of an American listening post just outside tho
wire, within 45 feet of an enemy listening post.
"Then hell broke loose," said one of the men there. For fifteen
fi.intites the enemy broke hundreds of high explosive 77s around the
post and the surrounding ground, cutting off the men there. Twoof
them were killed in the first few minutes. i
Another man who was at the post told the correspondent later, at
I c was lying on a col in a field hospital, that he saw four Germans ap
proaching out of the fog as the barrage lifted. He brought his automatic
rifle into play and saw two of the Germans fall. He kept ou firing until
shell splinters hit him in the head and arm.
"The last I remember, in the time before I reached the hospital," said
another wounded man, "is seeing something moving through the fog.
I determined to get some Germans and put my rifle to my shoulder,
but never pulled the trigger. Tliere was a deafening explosion behind
me. Frozen earth, ice, stones and shell splinters came my way."
GROUND PLOUGHED UP DY SHELLS.
Inspection of the scene of the raid showed that the ground was
ploughed up by the explosion of shells.
One of the men wounded was hit by a sniper's bullet. He fell In a
trench filled with water and almost drowned before lie was rescued by
his captain. Several of the wounded had been listed as accidental wound,
irgs. These were mostly wounds on the hands.
It is certain that the enemy casualties from the American cannon
and machine gun fire has been as great or greater than ours.
The dead were buried within the sound and range of the guns. One
man was blown to pieces by a shell in a regimental headquarters town as
he was following his Lionel into a dugout.
For military reasons it has been inadvisable to scinl earlier or other
lll'Ulli.
GERMAN RAID PREVENTED
BY AMERICAN BARRAGE FIRE
WITH Till. Willi. PS AitM.th l.l e . on.p sli Wednesday
IN KII.VNi i: I. m 31 it i l I i . r .rn. ug. ' sill an in re an General
A nuii k o.irrnge tint pr il.iul pie-
vetiied the enemy several ila ago
luuv catryioa out; tho raid jvhlch
THE INFANTRY
i i-d.i W i ,i c no w iy of know,
ing ths enemj's casualties as th re
sult of our oheillua but it octu

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