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The evening world. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, July 10, 1920, Latest Extra, Image 1

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ROOKLYN BLOCK
LEAGUE CHIEF ISSUE IN COX CAMPAIGN
TO-MORROW'S WEATHER Fair and Warm.
2,000,000
FIRE
RA.ZES
B
TO-NIQHT3 WEATHER Fair and Warm.
r
1111 iMPPiri: r.RF.ATFrr YArnTiNn
to Describe Cup
THie EvemSinig
VOL. LXI. NO. 21,480
HIGHLY PAID CITY OFFICIALS
GEI THE BIG SALARY RAISES
UNDER 70 PER CENT. PLAN"
Large Percentage of Political Ap
pointees and Friends of Those in
Power Among Beneficiaries at
, Expense of Poorer Paid Munici
pal -Employees.
How the higher salaried city employees In the departments of Mayor
Hylan and Comptroller Craig will benefit by the proposed flat Increase of
0 per cent. Is shown in the accompanying list. When a 20 per cent. In
crease Is granted to a $1,600 a year clerk it means an increase of only $300
& year. When a 20 per cent. Increase Is granted a $6,000 a year political
appolntco it means a salary advance of $1,200 a year.
The Legislature allowed New York City to borrow $5,000,000 with
which to Increase salaries. It Is claimed by the poorer paid employees
that the 20 per cent, ralsq decided upon should not apply equally to all
city employees Irrespective of their salaries but should be used to aid
those who most need It. It will cost over $400,000 to meet the 20 jjpr cenj.
Increases of higher salaried employees In tlie Mayor's and Comptroller's
departments alone.
It Is roughly estimated that It will cost In the neighborhood of $700,000
to pay the Hat 20 per cent, increaso to employees receiving over $3,000 In
nil city boroughs nnd county departments which will bo affected by the
$5,000,000 appropriation.
There are many city employees receiving abovo $3,000, among them
lawyers, engineers, secretaries nnd specialists, who admittedly earn their
salaries. But a very large percentage of the higher salaried beneficiaries
under the flat 20 per cent. Increase nro political appointees relatives,
friends and favorites of those In power.
Following Is a lint, by departments, of higher salaried employees who
will benefit by the flat 20 per cent, increaso:
CITY CLERK'S OFFICE
First Deputy M. J. Cruise
.Deputy city Clerk Jo'in P. Quoyle
r anmrr i ninnnp n, junvt ,otu
Ulerk Edward W. H.irt 2.830
PRESIDENT BOARD OF ALDERMEN.
ArnlKtant to President I. a Guardia, Fred Opplkafer. 45,500
Kxiimlner Prank Uowcra 4,000
Hxamlner 3,300
J-eglslntlvo Secretary William O'Connor 2,700
Private Secretary to President, Miss C. Delafleld... 2,610
DOARD OF ESTIMATE.
Secretary Joseph Haiiic J7,500
AenUtant Secret-iry James Matthews 5,000
Director P. I. Ilent 6.000
Assistant Director I'aul Lozler 4, HO
Assistant Knslnter John P. Sullivan 7,200
Assistant Engineer John A. McCaltum 5,000
Assistant Engineer Wlnfrcd H. Ilouerts 4,600
(Continued on Second Page.)
firrr Cnnndlnn Premier Sworn In.
OTTAWA, Ont., July 10 Arthur
Melghen was sworn In to-day as Prlmo
(Minister of Canada, succeeding Slr
Robert Borden. Tho entire Borden Cabi
ret resigned. The now Premier will name
ills Ministry Monday.
"UNCLE SAM of
FREEDOM RIDGE'
lOOUPLETB 1
By Margaret Prescott Montague
The Story President Wilson So Heartily Praised While
' Talking to Louis Seibold of The World Staff in
His Famous Interview of June 18th.
. Read this paragraph, taken from
me world ot
The Tresident told me that he
naturally found great pleasure in
reading, in which he it not restricted,
I asked him what works or stories
had recently impressed him most.
He said he had read three or
four good detective stories "to
balance the serious stuff." He made
most flattering reference to a story
recently printed in the Atlantic
Monthly and written by Margaret
Preseott Montague. The title of
it is "Uncle Sam of Freedom Ridge,"
Exclusively in THE
iiminnrrr Hi
Races for J
World
DAILY.
Oonj riant, 10lO. bjr The JTrru Publishing
Co. (The Mew York World).
Prwnt
Ammint of
SSlanr.
5.o6(l
3,300
Silirr.
!6.o6o
3,960
3,168
3.396
16,600
4,800
3,960
3,240
3,168
J9.000
6,000
7.200
4,968
8.640
6,000
6,400
11,000
660
528
566
41,100
800
660
540
628
S1.C00
1,000
1,200
828
1,440
1.000
900
Canadian Itnllirara Auk 30 Per
Cent. Freight Inrrraxe.
MONTREAL, July 10. Tho Canadian
Railway Association, representing- all
lines In the Dominion, to-day applied to
the Hallway Commission for a 30 per
cent, increase In freight rates.
the Seibo'.d article published in
June 18, 1920.
an admirably told tale that made
so profound an impression on the
President as to provoke him to say,
with a deep touch of sentiment,
"That lady has written a story
which breathes of a patriotism so
pure and wholesome as to make the
other things of life seem of little
consequence. I wish that every per
son that questions the benefits to hu
manity that will be guaranteed by the
League of Nations might read it.
Don't forget to read it, Seibold."
WORLD To-Morrow
it
Circulation Books Open to All."
RIPE BUTTERMILK
OVER 2.75 LIMIT,
CHEMIST FINDS
Every Seller of This Beverage,
He Says, Is Liable Under
Prohibition Law.
WILMINGTON. DEI
( ( TKAL rlpo buttermilk" con
jr tains 3 per cent, alcohol,
Dr. Herbert Watson,
BUte Chemist, Informed Judgo
Hastings In City Court. Every
.vender of buttermilk is liable to
prosecution, Watson said.
Long before tho dry wave en
gulfed tho wholo United States,
buttermilk had becomo very
popular among tho "brass rail
brigade," much to tho astonish
ment of tho barkeepers. It was
sold at almost all bars. It was
reserved for a scientist to dis
cover the reason.
IS
LEARN OF DEATH
"Body of Mrs. Laute Not 'Em
balmed, Though Undertaker
Puts in Bill of $225.
When Mrs. Ellr.aboth Lyons of No.
706 11th Avcnuo recently went to
visit her sister, Mrs. Julia Laute, a
widow, who lived In a furnished room
at No. 244 East 53d Street, she learned
her sister had been killed by acci
dentally Inhaling Illuminating gas,
four months previous, and had been
burled In the Mount Olivet Cqmctcry
on Fob. S3 by William J. Dargeon,
undertaker, of No. 951 Amsterdam
Avonuc, without tho consent or knowl
edge of nny of tho dead woman's
relatives, ono of whom, Mrs. Eliza
beth Carrol, lives at No. 820 Third
Avenue, a distance of only three
blocks from tho houso where her
cousin had died.
Mrs. Lauto was found dead In her
room on Feib. 18. Tho police noti
fied tho Medical Examiner's office,
and after Investigation, Dr. Schwartz
pronounced tho death due to accident.
Dotectivo Donohuo of the Bureau of
Missing Persons reported Tie had
learned that the dead woman had
relatives in Now York, Including her
father, who is an Inmate of tho City
Home, but bo was unablo to locate
thom.
Among tho effects found In Mrs.
Laute's room was a book of insurance
receipts, showing that sho had made
payments up to dato on a policy of
(290. The beneficiary of tho Insur
ance was her father, IMchard Roder
ick, an inmate of tho City 'Homo,
Blackwell's island, and tho original
policy was In tho possession ot her
sister, Mrs. Lyons. However, the
Public Administrator's ofllce declared
there was no beneficiary to the estate,
and after the body had remained
(Continued on Second Pago.)
YANKEES WIN AGAIN
AT TENNIS ABROAD
Johnston and Tilden Defeat
French Team !n Doubles of
Davis Cup Meet.
LONDON, July 10. William 01. John
ston and William T. Tilden, 2d. of the
American team, to-day defeated Andre
Gobort and William 41. Laurentz of
France In the first douMM match for
the Davis Cup at Eastbourne. Tlio Amer
icans took the match In straight sets
6 --2, 6-3 and 6-2.
Throw 4nay .in,OIM n Jruelry.
New York police arc holding a nesros
for the Saratosa polUe, who asked for
the arrest of a Miss Josophlno Dames
on a grand larceny charge. Detective
.Charles Webb arrested tho woman .it
tho 125th Street Stirtloti of the New
i Vork Central last night. On the way
.to the station houso she threw away a
'packet Containing 115,000 In Jewelry,
IwhlcjS Un dsttctlvs picked u.
WOMAN
BURIED
BEFORE RELATIVES
i r
NEW 'YORK, SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1920.
WHOLE RON OF DWELLINGS,
FACTORY AND LUMBER YARD
GO UP IN BROOKLYN BLAZE
Saloon and- Lunchroom Also
E)estroyed in Fire That
Causes $2,000,000 Loss
FIVE PERSONS INJURED
Many Barely Saved from
Tenements Shipyard Em
ployees Save Big Plant
In threo-quartcrs of an hour to
day $2,000,000 wo. h of homes, ware
houses and lumber was "burned In tho
block of Third Avenue, Brooklyn, be
tween 27th and 28th Streets. Only
the direction of tho wind and per
sistent rccklcsg flame fighting liy
city firemen, and employees of tho
James f?hevan nnd Sons Shlriynrtfs
prevonted (lie spread of the blaze to
tho nhlpbulldlng plant with u. loss of
mlllloiiH of dollars more.
FJro started In the lumber sheds of
the TV. A. Starr Lumber Company,
igalnst which $750,000 worth of
pruco lumber was piled. When
Policeman James Murphy of the
Fourth Avenuo station first saw the
smoke und sparks the spruce was al
ready (burning, nnd by the time the
rirnnen arrived it made a giant bon
fire, sending streamers of crackling
'lames 100 feet In the air.
A stiff breeze was blowing from
the waterfront and Murphy, weeing
tho immedlnto danger to tho row of
nine 'two-story frame tenements
along Third Avenue, hastened to give
warning to tho dwellers there of
their peril. Tho houses wero barely
emptied, other policemen Jolnlngwlth
Murphy in hustling tho occupants to
the street nnd making suro that no
children or sick persons were left
behind, before the fire was swooping
over them. All were destroyed.
Tho Uaysido Sash and Blind fac
tory, a half million dollar plant, was
n the sweep of tho blazo a moment
later. Thcro were only threo portons
In tho building and they got out
safely.
A saloon nnd lunch room In a two
story building In which the proptietor,
George Daniels, lived with his family,
withstood the heat oven less than did
the frame buildings when the blast
was at Its height.
Deputy Chief O'Hara sent In four
tlarms as soon as he arrived, making
ve In all and blocking tho surround
ing streets with fire apparatus. The
workmen In tho Shcwan yards were
mustered in flro fighting formation
almost as soon as tho city firemen
arrived and their hose and chemical
engins and their new flroboat helped
save the big plant.
Robert J. Wngler, a fireman of
Tuck No. 230, -was struck and knocked
down by a blazing plank, flying Ilko a
burning shaving from the lumber
yard, and was badly burned about the
body and arms. Ho was attended by
a surgeon from the Methodist Epis
copal Hospital.
Mrs. M. Kogel was also treated for
shock and hysteria after -sho Was
helped out of her home at No. 802
Third Avenue, Just beforo t crumpled.
Firemen William Itudloff and Fred
erick Schllch of Engine No. 27) nnd
Mlchncl Nolan of Truck No. 12J were
slightly Injured by 'burns and cuts
about tho Winds nnd feet. Joseph
Vltell nf No. 132 30th Street, a work
man In the Shewnn plant had hlo
hands badly mashed.
Hy noon. Assistant Chief Martin,
who xtnrlod from Flro Headquarters
In Manhattan on the fourth alarm,
said the flames were under control
and would not get across tho street,
out of tho tttrned block, und could
not get Into the shipyard unless the
wind made an unlikely change. The
tiro wiut expected ty burn funhours.
EX-SOLDIER READY
10 DIE FOR KILLING
WIFE AND TRAMP
Wanderer Admits Double Mur
der in Fake Hold-Up Was
to Get Woman's Estate.
(JIIIOAGO. July 10. Formal charges
of murder wero prepared to-day by
State's Attorney .Maolay Hoyno to be
preferred against t,'url Wsuidcrcr,
former'anny' fconveunti iwhO-c6hf68sdd"
last night to the killing of his wife
nnd a tramp. ,
Tho motive for tho murders was
first given by Wanderer as a desire
to go back to the army, free from
marital tics. It ,Was later revealed,
according to tho police, that he wished
to Inherit her estate and did not in
tend to rob her.
In his confession, the police said,
Wanderer declared that ho bad delib
erately shot to death his Ihrlda of ,1
few months In the hallway ot his
homo and that ho also hnd shot un
unwitting victim of his planning, a
mun, unarmed, whom ho enticed there
so ho could kill him and then accuse
him of having tried to rob him and
his wife, who In two months would
have Income a mother.
Tho unidentified man used toy Wan
derer to poso as a robber and then
sluln was partly identified as William
Noeth, who In 1911 or 1912 was em
ployed by the Gentry Uroa.' Circus
whllo In 'South Heml, Ind.
"Wo shall go beforo tho Grand Jury
and nsk Wanderer's Indictment on a
chargo of murdor," State's Attorney.
Hoyno said. "It Is one of the most
cold-blooded and rovotttng crimes In
Chicago's history. Wo shall ask an
Immediate trial and I ho rope."
WANT TO BE HANGED, SLAYER
&AY8 NOW.
"I iwnnt to be bunged," Wanderer
commented. "I hope to Join her In
death. I wonder If she will forglvo
me. Well, I loved heV too much to
let another man get her. Hut I
dldnt wnnt her myself."
Wanderer said that he did not
wish to desert his wife and Join tho
urmy, but wished to bo "free."
He was moved from the cell he oc
cupied In the Detention Home yester
day to the death cell, from which sev
eral murderers havo gono to their
fate.
"I Ilko the cell nil right, but I can't
rest on theuo boards," he declared.
"Oet my blankets from my old cell.''
This was done.
Ho continued: "I certainly will sleep
much better now. I feel better with
that off my chest. I had bad drenms,
und the picture of the hallway with
my wife lying there enmo back once
In a while. I feel Ilko a new man, nnd
I'm ready to kick off whenever they
want to tnko me."
One of the anomalies of the caso
which misled th pollen for weeks was
the romanco of the couple and their
apparently happy married life. Wan
dcrer, who had never smoked, chewed,
drank or Indulged in slang, had but
one love uffjii' the one with Kuth
Johnson, who l.rcame his wife at the I
conclusion of n war romance. I
"She was the only girl I ever klsvd."
he told the police. He took her to
J church every Sunday. They married
after the ex-LIutnant returned from
i Vrmce.
"Circulation Boolca Open
Entrrnt aa Seeond-Clsaa Matter
rott Oltlce, New York. J, v.
WIFE MURDERED
IN FAKE HOLDUP
AND HER SLAYER
t-tMtMt-t-t-t-t-f-TTMt.tfMTii?wtitriTrTlrTf--T-T t
TO SAVE HER LIFE
Chicago Surgeon Averts Am
putation of His Mate's Leg
by Heroic Operation.
CHICAOO, July 10. Orlando V.
Scott, one of Chicago's best known
surgeons, who as a Captain In th
Medical Corps of tho American Army
operated on llrjuld fire coses on tho
French battlefields, to-day performed
ono of tho most umazlng operations
In surgical annals by slicing twelve
Inches of skin from his own leg and
transplanting It to that of his wife
to save her from disfigurement.
Dr. nnd Mrs. Scott aro recovering
from the double operation, although
Dr. Scott will bear tho scurs through
life.
From his own thigh Dr. Scott sliced
the strips of skin which ho grafted
onto his wife's foot und unklo while
anothnr physician attended to his
wounds, llo took no unaeBthetlo
not even a local onn and ho made
the bitter sacrifice without wincing,
his principal concern bolng for hh
wife, whom ho consoled during the
operation with soothing words,
Mrs. Scott's Injuries wero the re
sult of un uutomobllu accident. Her
right leg was broken In five places
nnd tho skin wns stripped from it In
long gashos.
Holding his wife's unconscious
form in ono arm tho surgeon sped
to tho hospital, whore he culled on
Dr. Ira Itoberts to operate. The pa
tient, however, regained conscious-
WOllI.p IIMTAIIIUNT.
8tdil fti la air. tuiunin. Jui to. IltOs
Cornrd hrrf ma new cabbigc. SOci uliaun Mltd
Earn KAiiiMtr tf"-" M
PARES HISlKIN,
GRAFTS IT ON WIFE
to AH."
PRICE TWO CENTS
IN OHKATCn XEW YORK
COX TO APPEAL
FOR RATIFICATION OF TREATY;
REGARDS LODGE AS A BIGOT
t
Will Start Tour of the Nation in
California and Visit Every State
Favors Two Clarifying Reser
vations to the League Covenant.
By George Buchanan Fife.
(Spiolal Staff Correspondent of Th Evsnlng World.)
DAYTON, July 10. As Gov. Cox has already made official an
nouncement of his intention to undertake a campaign of speech-making'
which shall take him to every State in the Union he an reach between
August and November, as distinguished from the rocking-chair-on-the-'
front-porch campaign to be staged simultaneously at Marion, it may be
stated that the Governor has made deliberate choice of the chief issues
upon which ht will base tils campaign.
, r-..Tiiese.are. Ratification ,oiJhUaguevoftIpns.and the treaty-of ,
Peace. These he believes to be the real Issues In the struggle, far
transcending Prohibition, Woman Suffrage, labor and everything else,
for he believes that ratification of the league will forever prevent a
rcp:lition of the recent gigantic clash of nations, to which he says most of
the problems which are now vexing America are due.
H. C. L. HITS BETTING
AND COMMISSION
OF 5 P. C. IS ASKED
itakehofders 'More Than Double
Charge for Wagers On Elections
and Sporting Events.
BUTTOHS. boware! That old
octupuB, tho H. C. I, will
throw another tentacle
around you If you don't watch
out.
Persons with sporting proclivi
ties who Intend 'to back up their
opinion on Mho outcome of tho
election or tljo yacht raco must
not forget that they aro living
In a hectlo period. Kven betting
commissioners who occupy such
positions only as a side lino to
their regular business havo more
than doubled their chargo for
handling Wets.
Until recently a person could
place a wager of nny big sport
ing proposition and pay 2 per
cent, to the utakoholder. Hut the
cost of butting has now shot up
in about tho same proportion its
tho cost of food, fuel and cloth
ing, in other words, ISO per cent.
Owing apparently to tho
greater danger of Infection from
ha ml ling money, or some other
reason not mode entirely clear,
hotting commissioners havo de
cided they must charge a com
mission of 6 por cent, for hand
ling Ibots.
ness Just as she was about to be
placed under the anaesthetic.
"No, no," she cried, "Not a
stranger, I want you to perform the
operation."
It Is not customary for a surgeon
to opcrutc upon those near nnd dear
to him. Dr. Kcott was In no con
dition to work. The accident had
been a shock to his nerves, imme
diately, however, he composed him
self and set the leg.
Mrs. Scott was on a fair way to
rocovory, however, when complica
tions set in. Gangrene formed and
n skln-grafling operation was decided
on.
Dr. Scott removed n sharp razor
from his kit, bured his right leg and
began to chip off the little bits of
hkin, which ho turned from tlmo to
time and placed on the bure wound
I of his wife.
I.IO One dollar nnd 'ten rwilfc l.tO.
tin Ineludml, rou can tho irralxt how
. "H .... vr Mown. glKUruLO
'Aiaitsrcuua Tasilr. Jtan.
UTEST
M A EXTRA
T1I1IER
ZX3EW1IEKK
10 NATION
Dut whllo he favors a ratification
which will In no wise rob the prin
ciples of the league of their force. In
cluding tho tempest-raising Artlcto
X. ho Is willing to accept two reser
vations. He favors these. It Is well
understood, in behalf of thois who
may fear the Integrity of this coun
try Is Involved In a ratification ot tho
League of Nations In its present
form.
HA8 TWO SUGGESTIONS AS TO
LEAGUE RESERVATIONS.
The two reservations Oov. Cox is
ready to accept aro these:
Ons A reservation which will
dliptl tho booty which hat
frightened tome peopU into b
Having that, th leagu will be
ooms an offtnslv alliance In
stead of one to end all conflict.
Gov. Cox wants to have th
Unltad States becom a signa
tory to th league with th 'elar
understanding that th nation
mak th compact to prtrv
peac and making It posslbt for
the Unitad States to. withdraw
',n oaia other nations act in bad
faith or contrary to this under
standing. Two A reservation whloh
(hall state unequivocally that, as
party to th Uagu, th Gov
ernment of th United State can t
go no further than its Constl- .
tutlon psrmlts, and that th
powar and right to declare war
art vested solely In Congrats.
The aovornor Is convinced that if
the people can be assured of the In
clusion of two such reservations,
there will bo no difficulty whatever In
winning them over to a belief in the
supreme advisability of such a loague
among the nations of the world. It
Is his opinion, according to the same
trustworthy authority which ex
plained to-day his views upon the,
league, that had It not been for Sen
ators Dorah and Johnson, who
threatened to lead a bolt It Senator
Lodge assumed a conciliatory atti
tude, tho league would have been rat
ified In the Senate. This was pre
vented, he believes, by much less
than a one-third minority, with
Uorah and Johnson as tho real fac
tors. Sono one who Is very close to
tho Governor said to-day:
"Cox looks on Senator Lodg'
subsequent attitude as a subordi
nation of th civilization of th
world to the wdfar of th Re
publican Party. Leadership of
th opposition was, as h It,
prompted by political bigotry, '
ertattd to embarrass President
Wilson and prolongtd wjth th
Ids of con(ulng',th publloimfnd
1
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