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The evening world. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, December 17, 1921, Final Extra, Image 2

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EN
l;cmi
I-
trhlch followed tht civil war between
unions ten leara ago.
Llndenfeld was sent to Moscow lo
tie In wait at tlie conventions of the
Third Internationale for members o
the bomb conspiracy and other rad
Ua.lt, who ho en Id hnd fled to Kit
rope and aure to appear at the con
ferences. He was to point them out
(be aald ho did not known them by
tiamo), to United States agents In
ftunla. These agent reported back
that Llndsnfold was "double cross
ing them," scaring away men who
Seemed to the agents to be the real
criminals they wore after by joint
Ing out, men who aftorwards proved
themselves Innoi. '.
Llndenfeld was then lured to War
caw and arrested by the Polish Ouv
crnment at tho suggestion of United
titatej agents because his passports
represented him as an American
cltlscn whereas he was not. Cosffrovo
was then sent to sea him. Dr. Alton-
dorf, who was supposed to be In dor
many, apparently turned up In War
saw at about tho time Csgrvo's ar
rival.
Independently of tho Government
Investigation of tho bomb plot an un
remitting search (or clues has been
muds by the liurtts Agency, with Allen
O. fevers in charge of Its activities
among radicals. Mr. Myers said to
day ha hod heard of Llndenfeld but
had not attempted to keep track ot
his movements, knowing that Wash
ington was fully Informed regarding
him. Because William J. Burns,
founder of the agency, Is now the
Chief of the Department of Justice,
Mr, Myers said, the private agency
made It a particular point to keep
clear of Government operations, and
lie had no Information regarding tho
Xiews from Warsaw'.
Cmmcattng- o ntho narrative abovo
which Is based on knowledge, of gov
ernment aotlvltles connected with
Llndehfeld's errand abroad, a wcM In
fanned New York polloe official saldi
"It U entirely posslblo that Llndon
Tela, who Is as clever as they maki
Ai4 ment.' In the nlno years I havo
know him th.1t hnn hinn tile tmulnna.
putting things over for personal proft.
"Llndenfeld Is In thA raiddlo thlr-
ties, strikingly handsome with at
tractive manners and great plausibil
ity. Ue speaks seven languages ann
all ot thorn well, H need to llvo on
Second Avenuo near 19th StreeL
There Is no positive record here that
he ever engaged In any industrial ex
plosion plots though ho was oon
etantly under suspicion. Along Second
Avenuo and in parlor oclallst moot--
Ings which ho was fond of frequent-
Ing, he was a great prfAchor of th
('peaceful soolal revolution through
education."
Kept his membership in
"violent winq."
"Nevertheless, In km union affilia
tions whenever there was a split be
twen the radicals and the benevolent
"CjvZTlsts, ho always retained his
membership with tho violent wing.
He Invariably got himself appointed
on the picketing committee or "enter
tainment committee" of any orgavl
ration on strike again it umployers or
another union.
"Whenever there was an optor
tunlty to make money out of his
professed .beliefs, Llndenfeld was
there with his ears warring. He
mado a lot ot money out of the war.
I might havo guessed he would turn
up In the Wall Street Investigation
with some $150,000 rewards out, and
iho Government, and Burma and
other agencies on tho trail with un
limited money to spend. When ho
disappeared last summer I assumed
he had found money but I don't
l guess bo got a trip to Europe on n
United States expense, account.
"But right there is an Inconslst
,, ency which Is rather amusing. No
" anarohlst wqrks for money. He
works for the love of 'Tho Cause.'
No true anarchist would consider an
CT.t offer ot 110,000 to set a bomb. Ho
' would at ohoe become suspicious,
knowing that no such offer would be
made by one slncero member ot The
Cause' to another,"
Sherman Burns, son of William J.
Sums and now head ot the agency,
said that all of the agency's Informa
tion had a'-out Llndenfeld, or whom
he personally thotu.:t little, was turn
td over to the government when his
father went to Washington and Cos
grove was transferred to the govcrn-
ment to keeD track of the man
QEQAN KN0to8 NOTHING OF
MAN UNDER ARREST.
1 . Dcctectlve Sergt Thomas Gegan.
'' head of the Bomb Bquad who has
'. been contlnously at work on tho Wall
1 Street explosion, said to-day he knew
nothing of Wolfe Llndenfeld. If the
arrest and published oontesslon ot
. the man were made public In good
faith, ho said, he regretted tho police
: department had not been contlden
. ' tlally notified In advance so the per-
I sons named In the confession. If any
. ot them were In reach ot the New
i York police, might have been Ukm
1 Into custody before they had warn-
ins. mo uepariment uas scores ot
prospect-suspects listed.
Discrepancies from tacts In Hi
published confession were regarded
as Interesting, even though not dls
crediting It altogether. There are
few available roosting places for an
. Anarchist woman spy in "windows
overlooking Broad and Wall Btreets."
The Bankers' Trust Building, the
United States Treasury and Assay
. Office ami the Morgan building win
dows are not regarded as poslble ob
serration posts. No woman would
' have been allowed for a moment on
Ihn scaffoldlnr around the Stock Ex
change annex excavation by the
watchmen.
Mr. Morgan was In Scotland. Even
when In New Tork he had his lunch
eons in the dining room, with his
' pari peri. Of course detra tlves satd
si "Swi '- i . n. . .
middle aged black moustached man
for Xlr, Morgan. Tho forolgn lang
uage newspapers and othora which
appeal to radicals arc not given to
recording tho movements of Mr. Mor-
Ban.
Thomas W. Lament. Dtulirhr v
ilumiw and several other partners In
the Morgan firm wcie in conference
In Mr. Morgan's own office on the
second floor directly in front of the
irvau mnui entrance or tho build
Ing when the oxploslon occurred.
They were uninjured.
Junius finenow .Mnrnn. Mr. Map.
gan'i son. st his desk in the banking
iuuiu uown was cut Sllglltiy vy
broken M. llcnry'l'. Davison was
out at th time, but William Joyce, a
young employed of tho Morgan firm,
was kllioC
Hllvcstor Cosgrove was formerly
with the Burns Detective Agenoy
hero and became a Socrot Bervtoe
agent three months ago when Burns
was made Chief of the Bureau of
investigation.
Paul Altendorf held rjanartmnt
of Justice Credentials as an agent
in .Mexico, out inese wore, later
rcvoKca. At one timo ho was turned
back when ho tried to cross from
Mexico. Ho Is a native of Polnnrt
but claimed American citizenship.
nnioii was aeniea uy me American
Government.
What Is mystifying to the New
Tork Dollco Is the failure to furnish
them immediately with the names of
mo persons juinaenrcid says were
irapncaieu wun mm, as tne Depart
ment has a lotur list of known rad I
cals with their addresses .and haunts
and might have landed valuable, pris
oners or evidence. Now tho plotters
who were at large will take to cover,
It Is feared, as a result. of the wide
spread publication that their names
havo been revealed.
Fully a score of arrests havo been
made In the Wall Street bomb case
from time to time, and in widely
scattered localities. Tho claim has
been made several times that tne
name of tho driver of tho bomb
wairon is known. All of the so-called
"Identifications" of various suspects
fell down and no ono was ever con
victed for complicity In the outrage.
There was great commotion In thn
oo ffce houses of Second Avenue to
day when Llndenfeld's story was
published. Llnde, as Llndenfeld was
known there, was a member of tho
Ith A. D. Soolallset organisation, but
was regarded with the Utmost suspi
cion by Its officers. Ho protested to
them that he was entirety opposed to
tho Communists nnd tho Loft Wing
advocates ot violence, but thoy
doubted him.
Ho cultivated tho acnualntanco of
Samuel Gompcrs, Judgo I'nnkon and
Algernon Loo on this side of his ao
tlvltles but was not cordially re
ceived. He was always suspected at
being an agent ot & "capitalistic do-
tectlvo agency" on Beoond Avenue,
whero no other explanation of his
supply of plentiful funds, without
work, was available.
About a year aro ho sot Into diffi
culties with his wife, tor whom and
bis two children, according to her
neighbors, he mado no provision when
ho disappeared.
ACTED AS ATTORNEY FOR THE
BOMB 8U8PECT.
I. M. Sackin. an attorney with of
fices In the Knickerbocker Building,
42d Street and Broadway, said to-dny
ho had acted 'as attorney for Llnden
feld from time to time since 1914. At
thnt tlmn T.lmtAhf Aid wna Alttnt ittlft
'general manager of the Tribune
Folska, for which Mr. Sackin was
counsol.
Under Llndenfeld h management the
periodical became so wcl thought o'
by Government officials that It r'
celved a license to dispense With (' -nlshlng
Kngllsh translations of ts
articles In Polish during the war.
Llndenfeld was arrested for felon
ious assault In 101. Mr. Sackin said.
bus was discharged much to his law
yer's apparent surprise. In 1020, Lin.
drnfcld wns put Into Ludlwo Street
jail on a body attachment for the
iruimuiont obtaining money, oi
though Mr. Sockln said ho was not
of counsel In that Instanoc. Lndrn-
feld lived until about a year ago At
No. Ml Bast 18th Street. Mr. Hark In
ea'd, but after leaving list wife nnd
children moved to No. 2S3 Rast 19th
Street and from hero moced to tho
Huts) Imperial.
"He called me on ma telephone in
April of this year," snld Mr. Sackin,
"uk It ; an assumed name. He said
he v s talking from tho Hotel Albert.
He wanted mo to talte up a divot ce
action for him. t did rot and I have
not heard from him s nte."
Llnde Is a very rain follow." added
Mr. Sackin. "Ho loves notoriety and
the reputation of being an adventurer.
Ho was a tromemioUH apender, but
In all our relations ns lawyer and
client I could never get on explana
tion of Ills apparent prosperity. Ho
said he vas the agent ot a syndlcati
of Polish newspaper -but there wa.i
no such syndicate nuln to keep aim
In the funds ho flourished."
The arrest of tne conspirators.
now said to be scattered throughout
several countries or thn world, has
been ordered, ho Indicated.
PIEL BROS. BRING SUIT
TO END ANTI-BEER LAW
Injunction Aakril to Stop Interfer
ence b Prohibition Asie,nts.
Application for an ' Injunction
agulivst the Federal authorities to pro-
vent tlicm from Interfering with the
manufacture nnd sale ot beer for
mcdlolnal purposes was filed to-day
by Plel Bros,, brewers of Kast New
York, in the U. S. District Court of
Brooklyn. Ariumont will be heard by
Judge Garvin next Wednemlny.
The defendants named aro Wallace
H. J. Collins, u. H. Attorney: Iutlnh
A. Day, State Prohibition Director,
and John T. Itafforty, Internal Itev
enue Collector.
Tho James Mvnraul Breweries al
ready brought a similar uult.
PRINCE OF WALES
NOW TIGER HUNTING
Itli Tour f Indln Ila Proven
UrattfrlnsT Scc.
DELHI. India. Dec. 17. The Prince of
Wales is enloylng the sport of tiger
hunting whllt the gutit ot Malnrajn
Sir Chandra Jung ot Nepal.
It is eattnisted that, since landing at
Bombay for his tour of India, the
wince haj ttaveled by rail approximate
ly JSOO miles. In his travels he hat
betn rreettLl by tight ruling princes.
Ajosune uit riniinv in iinmh. v f.n.1
the Hartals In AJmtre. Lucknow. Alia
habad and Btnarvs, his reception has
b)-en ot a cratlfylnc character, none or
the events on hla programme having
been abandoned or modified.
XRW YOU It SALESMAN sViriDB IN
ItBW OltlBARB
NEW OlttiKANS, Dc. lT.-nobert
nary, salesman for a Ne wTork house,
hot and killed himaelt In his iqpm at a
hotel here. Police and hots! Attaches
THE EVENING WORLD, SATURDAY, 'DtfofeWBE
MISTAKEN SIGNAL
MnOTflRAQr!
ui luxjimU ui iii unnui I, j
INJURING SEVEN! bJ
Destroyer Nearly Cut in HaH
by Panama Liner, Examina
tion at Navy Yard Shows.
MEMBER OF CREW DYING
Valor of Sailors Highly Praised
by' Passengers of Coastwise
Vessel.
The U. 8, Destroyer draham, Is In
dry dock al the, Brooklyn Navy Yard;
seven of her crew- are in the Naval
Hospital, one believed to be dying,
and the steamship Panama, of the
Panama Railroad lino, which cut a
big holo In the Graham at dusk Fri
day, 6 miles off Manasquan, N, J.,
Is tied tip at the foot ot West 27th
Street, not badly damaged.
The most generally accepted theory
as to the cause of the collision, for
which no offlolnl explanation has yet
been made publlo by tho ofTlcern or
either ship, is that signals were
either given wrong or else misinter
preted.
All accounts agree that the con
duct ot the officers and cretos on
both ships after tho accldont waa
gallant and worthy ot the best tra
ditions ot the sea and the navy.
The Injured men are:
KELLY, W, V., nineteen years old,
seaman) Jammed against deck houso
and suffered concussion of brain,
burns and posslblo fracture ot skull;
condition critical.
8MIT1L RAYMOND A., twenty-
two, fireman; bruised and cut
THOMPSON, F. W., twenty-five.
water tender; right leg Injured.
WRIGHT, J. T., nineteen, fireman;
lacerations.
ROGERS. JAMB9 B., twenty-one
seaman; lacerations.
REKD, F. A., twenty-three, sea
man; lacerations.
MBGG1BON, BENJAMIN, nineteen,
seaman; lacerations.
Kelly, who was on deck forward.
was burned by escaping steam, as
well as struck on tho head,
and It Is beloved ho wll die.
Tho ninety members of the Graham's
crew and thirty seamen being trans
fered to Charleston were taken
I aboard the Panama aod, fifty of them
yknded with tho wounded In Brooklyn
from tho Despatch. All the offtcirs
remained on tho Graham.
Jack Price, a World photographer.
came in on the Graham otter tho
crash. lie said the destroyer was cut
ntoro" than half-way through the mid
dle and would undoubtedly havo brok
en In two but for the use of a great
quantity of wire In "sewing" tho gap
ing wound together. Ho declared that
tho thirty men who stayed with thn
vessel wcro almost exhausted by their
tlforts, especially it the pumps, and
that they all wore lite belts constantly,
not knowing at what moment It might
become necessary o Jump. The men
pumped 40,000 gallons of fuel oil out
ot the destroyer to help keep her
afloat as she was being towed In.-
Capt. William n. Oakley of tho
Panama said his first report must b&
made to officers of the line, and Cant.
W V. Amsden of the destroyer Is for
bidden by na'y regulations to discuss
the Cause except in his report to tli9
Navy Department
It wos learned, however, that the
destroyer was on her course, Boinjj
18 knots. Thn Panama was on 1'ic
destroyer's starboard bow when j'io
Is declared to have signaled a turn
to starboard. Men on the destroyer
say the Panama made almost a half
olrcle In turning. Capt. Amsden ot
the destroyer signalled full speod
astern. Thn Panama come down
dlugonally from tho rear.
"The Impaof said JSnsIgn Louis
C. Kochcmont. deck officer of-tho de
stroyer, "wag terrific Kverybody on
th bridge was thrown In a heap, and
I don't believe there was a man on
board who kept his feet The alarm
was given as usual, 'directing the
men to collision quarters. The water
tight doors wore closed. Everybody
worked as If automatically. There,
was no confusion.
"When tho Injured had ben taken
oft to the Panama, It was decided to
keep a working crew on board, fif
teen men from the deck department,
fifteen from tho engineering force.
Yolunleeis? Kverybody volunteered
and the men not needed had to bn
ordered off to tho Panama."
Tho best account obtained from the
Panama utter she. had docked to-day
was glvon by one of the passengers,
9. Whetton, No. 391 Macon street,
llrooltlyn.
"I was on the top deck, midships,
starboard," he said. "I saw the green
starboard light of tho Graham and
then heard one blast from the Pan
ama and t ran forward as we turned
to tho starboard, The Oraham
turned Into our path and we camo
together,
"The Jar was very slight. Home of
the passengers say they did not ted
It at all. The captain ordered every
body to the lifeboats and the men
helped put life preservers on the
women and children, of whom there
were forty-two. But In less than flvo
minutes we were atsuicd that we
wcro quite sate and that it was the
destroyer that needed help. A Udder.
Destroyer Rammed in Crash
And Two Members of Its Crew
BVKTK W. UK Bit HOL.C IN STAMBOAtKD EM4. U . Cd SfOtHOKKXT
was put across for wo were keeping
our bow wedgod In tho opening of
the dostroyor and tho Injured worn
brought over."
Ono of the Panama's passengers
was a newspaper woman, Mrs. Hel
ena Hill Wood. She said sho was in
her dressing room getting ready for
dinner when she heard tho sirens.
When she got to the deck sho saw the
Graham locked against the Panama.
"Tho women," sho said, "were
calmer than the men. I saw ono man
rurinlng about with a baby In his
nrms shouting, 'We nro sinking.' "
A navy aviator, whosald his name
must not bo used, was a Panamu
passenger. Ho said it was a caso of
mistaken signals, that both ships
should havo turned starboard, but
that tho Graham tried to cross the
how of the Panama.
The extent of the damage to tho
destroyer liua not been learned.
When she was floated into the dry
dock It was found that a list of 30
degrees would havo to bo' corrected
befori the water could be pumped
out, leaving her on tho blocks. This
would tako several hours.
She was hit abaft tho bridge be
tween tho first ,n. 1 second smoke
stacks nnd cut through to tho for
ward flro room. Tho gash at tho
water line la ten or twelvo feot wldo
and Is believed to dip clear down to
the kool. There Is n hnlo in the su
perstructure nlso, believed to havo
been caused by striking tho anchor
ot the Panama. This Is further indi
cated by tho fact that tho Pannma's
anchor shnft was found to be bent
TRIED TWICE TO SHOOT
POLICEMAN IN SUBWAY
Women Faint When IluilrU Fir
r.lllh Street Station.
Reginald Green, musician, twenty-
years old. of No. 2237 Seventh Avo
niic, waso-day held In $rs,i)00 bull In
YorUVlllo Court charged with Mo
lilalia assault, and in 1500 ball for
violation of tho Sullivan law. lie will
bo examined Wednesday.
His nrrest followed two attempts
on his part to shoot Patrolman Lonl-
..... -. o..Alni l' I r i . . i .. i . .n
ou tho subway platform at B9t.i
.Street and Lexington Avenuo llust
night when Lonlgnh was trying to
arrest him lor dlsordeily conduct.
The first time he levelled thi plntfl
ut Lonlgan the latter ntruak It nslldo
with his hand nnd thn bullet struck
the floor. Green fired again nnd hit
an Iron pillar. After that Lou'.giiu
drew his revolver but was afraid to
flic, ov.inir to tho crowd. Ho caught
(li ecu oil the stnlrwav and soon sub
dued him. In the excitement two
women fainted nnd there was n ucn-
nil rush for cover.
STOWAWAYS CAUGHT
ONLY TO ESCAPE AGAIN
Two ot 1n l.ocUnl In firlK -Irr,
3llasltiK on Ship.
Two hundred members of the Ital
ian steamship Palermo, of tho N'. G.
I. Unc, and twonty-flvo private de
tectives searched the vessel to-day
for two stowaways which, if they
escape the hunters will cost tho line
$1,000 uplecc.
Ten stowaways wore discovered
among the 1,148 steerago passenger
and dragged to light Just before the
Palermo, In from Genoa and Naples,
got to quarantine last evening. They
were put In the urlg all ready to be
turned over to the immigration offi
cials when tho vessel should get to
lior pier.
Rut In the night the ten broke out
of confinement and only eight were
captured this morning.
IXMtD niDDHM, TO SAH, TITUnS
DAY.
WASHINGTON. Dec. IT (Asuoclated
Presi). lord Hidden, who has bven
ervln as it liaison officer between the
llrltlsh delegation and.. American und
foreign pres representatives during the
progress of tht) Arms Confrenee. l'a
arranged lo sail irum cvv iuir iiiuib-
aay an ue steamer uiuu.
frffifliw
WALL ST. BOMB
MYSTERY CLEARED,
(Continued From First Page.)-
the only man that we know in the
world that knows nil about It."
For this reason, Mr. Hums cont'n
ued, Llndenfeld was Sent r.broad to
got tho necessary information to on
nblo the arrest of the participants In
the bdmb plot and was to havo re
ceived tho JoO.ooo 'reward for .Xhrso
disclosures. He wns described h1
Mr. Uurns ns a highly educated and
Intellectual man ot pronounced radi
cal tendencies, although he did not
himself advocate violent measures.
Ho Is about thirty-six years old tind
has a wife nnd two children now In
New York, .and Is a half-brOthor of
iosa Luxemburg. Ho went by the
name of William Llnde In this coun
try, Mr. Hums added, hnd taken out
lils first citizenship papers, and an
effort wns mado to obtain his second
papers for him before ho went
abroad. Ho Is a Polo by birth. Mr.
Burns continued, nnd his relatives
nro now In Warsaw. He, himself, was
forced to leave Russia In 1908 be
cause of his radical connections.
Mr. RurnR said that evidence hnd
been frathered by the Hums Detec-
tive Agency which checks up with
Information known to be in the hands
of Llndenfeld and that the data in
the hands of the agency had been
turned over lo the Government, whlcn
had been working on the Llndenfeld
arrest In Warsaw In so-operation
with the Polish Government and tlw
State Department through the Amer
ican Embassy there.
Mr. Rums expressed himself us
confident that the myntery of thu
Wall Street explosion would be un
ravelled ns a result of Llndenfeld's
arrest and declared that radicals of
the Communist Third Internationale
would be found us responsible for the
crime.
COSGROVE SENT OVER TO AR-
MtOI U1NUENFELD,
Paul Altendorf. who with Cos frnvn
trailed Llndenfeld and obtained In
formation from him as to the ex
plosion, was said by tho Bureau of
Investigation chief to be a Burns
Agency man who had ben sent
abroad flint upon information sup
plied uy iinaeniem, but nad been
unnblo to make sufficient progress
himself, so that Llndenfeld had been
nrnt over to gather the details neces
sary for a roundup or the suspects,
Upon Llndenfeld's failure to report,
he added. Cosgrove was sent over to
nrrest him.
CoBgrove s cabled renoit to the de
partment had rot ben received
when Mr. Burns left Washington ut
I o'clock for New York. Arrange
ments have been made with tho
tate Department to transmit It to
the Justice Dop.trtmont Immediately
upon Its receipt, and its contents
will bo communicated to him In New
Tork. :
1,826 RIOTERS KILLED
IN INDIA SINCE AUGUST
."i,l74 Molilalia Captured and 14,241
Snrrenderr.d, OHlclallr neported.
DEL.1II, India, Deo. 1$ (Associated
Press). Official announcement was
made to-day that since the outbreak of
disturbances in Malabar last ' August
1.826 Moplahs have been killed. 1,600
wounded nd 5.474. captured. The an
nouncement added that 14,241 have sur
rendered voluntarily.
MW A.XI1 WTFi: UK A.I) Kit Oil GAS.
Jacob Franklin, forty-four years old,
and his wife, Beasie, aged forty-two.
were found doad In bed to-day In their
room In the flat at No. 440 Grand Stroat,
which thftv oocunleri with their man-tad
ilkusrhter, (limle Moscowltt. Franklin's
vest nnd neclttie were tinnsinir on n gas
tt. Ihu rnrk nf which wan hnlf ulwll.
It waa apparent that In so disposing of
ltrt of his clothing he had tumxd on
the gas. The police report the case as
n accident.
rmMlt
HUGHES
SUGGESTS
5-5-3-1.
FRANCE AND ITALY
French Delegate Asks Tine
Secrecy Ban on Naval
Committee' Be Lifted.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 17. Hecre- j
tary Hughes has told tho French j
that a ratio of 5-3-3-1.7-1.7 woufd,
be considered adequate for France.
This would give France and Italy
a capital ship tonnage of around
198.000, as computed to a replace-
ment tonnage of 325.000 for America,
and Great Britain and of S2j.O0O for
Japan.
The Naval Committee of Fif
teen of the Arms Conference resumed
consideration to-day of the French
and Italian naval ratio p rot em. M.
Parraut, head of the French delega
tion. Intimated that Franco would seek
to have the secrecy ban ot the corn. '
mlttce lifted In order that a correct
view of the position taken by her dele I
gallon on naval strength might bo
given to the public The only knowl
edge of the French ten-ship plan thus
far has come from British sources and
wan mado known prior to the com
mittee's action in adopting the socrccy
rule.
Marshal Foch's report of the very
f-lcndly feeling sbown toward him by
the American pcoplo everywhere will,
It Is believed, have a bCArlng in final
determination of tho French Govern
ment to shape Its course In naval mat
ters along the same lines as Great
Britain, the United States and Japan
hnve agreed to do In the throe-power
naval understanding.
Before adjournment' to-day the
French delegation head gave a for
mal presentation of tho French point
of view on naval reducatlon, which
will be amplified at Monday's session.
Chairman Hughes, speaking after M.
ftirraut, wns understood to have
understood to have taken a moderate
view and spoke appreciatively at one
point of tho part played by Franco
in the World War.
STORY OF SOLVING
TOLD BY AGENTS
(Continued Krom First Page.)
tlon In icgaid to the Wall Street ox
ploslon, he would receive a large
share ot the rewards offered for the
arrest or the plotters, without risk to
hlmsolf.
Throughout these operations by the
American secret service man Polish
operatives shadowed Llndenfeld, ' and
the pole claim that, while Llndenfeld ;
was pretending to play Into Cosgrove's
hands, he was Pt tho same time "double-crossing"
the Americans.
Cluoa developed while trailing Lln
denfeld led the Polioh acnts to arrest
,i number ot Communists who aro
nlk'gcd to bo .spies working against the J
inurests or j-oiano. uevcrai women
im Involved in this alleged espionage
plot.
Tno confession, as desorlbcd by tho
American agents, terms the prema
ture explosion "a mechanical mis
take," tor which the bomb makers
are blamed, Lindcntcld estimating
thut tho bomb exploded from ten tu
Ufteen minutes before- tho intended
time. Tho plottors also accuse the
driver of tho wagon which brought
tho bomb to Wall Strebt of having
cred in not leaving tho wagon nearer
the Morgan office,
Cosgrove and Altendorf estimate
that L'.ndenfeld'a confession covers
moro than ten thousand words, nnd
assert that the details tit in with the
mass of other information in their
possession.
Further portions of the confession
referred to by Cosgrove show that
Llndenfeld knew of the plans for moro.
than a week prior to tho explosion,
but denies any actual part In the
boinbtng preparations. He gives New
Vork addresses of various Individuals
Involved In the plot, most of whom
havo slnco left the country, and also
gives a New York nddress whero the
Communists are alleged to have paid
over the cash to the plotters.
NUN STRUCK BY AUTO
DIES IN AMBULANCE
Slater Aqnlnaa Step In l'ath of Car
t Uroartrrny nnd Oltli Street.
Sister Aquinas of St. Andrew's, on
West 45th Street, was struck at C4th
Street and Broadway at 10.30 o'clock
to-day by an automobile driven by
Malcolm B. nattray of No. 2682
Broadway, chauffeur for B. ABche of
No. 226 West 97th Street. She died
In on ambulance which was taking
her to ltoosevelt Hospital.
Hattray had stopped at a signal of
Policeman Bencs and when he started
again Sister Aquinas, stepped off the
curb In front of hit) car. Magistrate
Levlne held Ilattray In S1.000 ball on
a technical charge of homicide,
o
juvnou oiubx nrrrs i,uoacy
'FltOSI mrtOTiinn.
The will of Davd O'Brien, filed for
probate to-day, leaves an estate of 133,
S.00. One-fourth is willed to John P.
O'Brien. Bound Brook1. N. J., and one
fourth to Justice Morgan J. O'Brien ot
New Tork. brothers ot the deceased
man. who died Dec. 2. The remainder
is to be divided among relatives.
KC ICIAJX KliAlt ACCUSED OF
TII11KE DBATfll.
ATtDMORE. Osla., Oec. 17 The Ku
Klux Klan was accused ot being' In
volved In the death of Joe Carroll, John
i. . . , ,i,i,.HH i . bm.i r. n clnt.
Ardmore pollctman, whose bullet-riddled
bodies were found near Wilson, It, a
statement Issued to-day by Assistant
County Attornty Uodges.
" "flit
7 RATIO FOR
WEEKS URGES DRAFT FOR ALL
IN NEXT WAR AS WAY TO STOP
PROFITEERING AND HIGH PAY
Secretary Declares He Would Assign Every
Man Between 18 and 60 to Set Task and
Use Money and Manufactures.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Dec. K.
Secretary of War Weeks is ,lh favor
of tho-mobilisation of men, rrioney
and manufactories under a conscrip
tion law 1 nthe event of. future war.
Such a course, the War Secretary
declared In an address last night at
the second annual reunion of the War
Industries Board, would, preclude
profiteering and slacker lists.
"I would conscript every person In
tho United States from eighteen to
sixty years of age, should a future
war prevail," said iMr. Weeks, ' ''and
would say: 'You are to do thus and
so, because you can do that Jitter
than anything else. You .can fight.
I
Masked Rescue Squad Stops
Chlorine Clouds in Nassau
Street Building.
A chlorine tank laid down a gas
barrage around the Vanderbllt Build
ing, No. 132 Nassau Street, nt 9
o'clock this morning and sent llm
hundreds of orcupnnts into severo
and exhausting fits of coughing.
The offending tank, which burst
from some unknown cause, wa3 In tho
offlco In room 320 occupied by A. M.
Mathcson and the Lester Slsler Com
pany, manufacturers of woldlng ap
paratus. No one was In the office at
the time. According to tho firemen,
the fumes from the liquid chlorine
would have meant death to any ono
near tho tank.
Stenographers In neighboring of
fices .were so badly affected by tho
fumes they wero unable to take dic
tation. At 9.45, as Iho odor grew worse, a
call was sent In for Engine No. 32
and Truck No. to. Capt. .Jlreck ot
No. 32 was nearly overcome when
lio attempted to approach the gas
filled room and' Battalion Chief Pat
rick Walsh called for the Rescue
Squad. The members of the squad
protected by gas masks, soon brought i
relief to the office btilMlng. j
Robort Malnzor, an honorary 1
Deputy Fire Chief, was passing tho !
building in his automobile on tho !
way to his offlco In Wall Street when
a man dashed out crying "explosion!
bomb!" Mr. Maimer jumped out of
his car nnd followed tho gas trail to
Its source. He broke down the door
but was driven back by the fumes.
He groped his way to the street and
went home.
Th" rescuo squad found the sixty,
pound gas tank in a small cardboard
box ready to be shipped to Manila.
The box was carried to tho corner,
where tho crowds at Nassau and
Beekman Street were driven half a
block awa.
Tho rescuo squad responded to the
call so qulokly a small automobile
attempting to get out of tho way ran
into a store window on Varlck Street.
340,260 NEGROES MOVE
NORTH IN LAST DECADE
Ceniai' llurrau GIvfts Total Who
Have Jtlaratcd Since 1010,
WASHINGTON. Dec. 17. The total
number of negroes reported as born In
Southern Spates and living in the North
and West had increased from 440.BS4 In
1)13 -to 710,794 in ltO, the Census Bu
reau announced to-day In a special re
port on negro migration based on re
turns of the last census.
The southern boundaries of New
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio. Indiana, Illi
nois. Missouri and Kansas Were lkrn
as th dividing line between the NOrtli
and South' for the purposes of the re
port. Denies lie Ordered Miner lo Work.
8PIUNOFIEL.D, til., Dec. 17, Asso
ciated Tress) Striking miners of tho
Colorado Fuel A Iron Company have
not been ordered back to work and the
United Mine Workers Ot America aiu
"rendering all possible aid In opposing
i eduction of their wagsV' International
President John U Iwis declared hare
tliN mr"l"g.
WHITE CHRISTMAS
AND COLD SNAP, IS
HOLIDAY FORECAST
Weather Bureau Predicts Fait of
Snow Extending Well Over
a Week.
WASHINGTON, Dec 17.
A white Christmas was fore
cast to-day for the northern half
of tho United States, east ot the
Mlsslsslvpl.
Cold weather will prevail all
next week and snow will fall during
the last half, extending well into
the following week, the Weather
Bureau stated.
Colder weather .was forecast tor
the rest of the country. . .
AS
ANK BURSTS
SENDING
HUNDREDS
INTO COUGHING FITS
or you can seivo In some other ca
pacity a cup.iclt for which you are
best suited.' "
Secretary Week described the draft
law of the World War' as "a very
great 'pice? of legislation ....
carried on almost perfectly."
Conscription of all men between
eighteen and sixty years of age, he
added, would keep down prices during
war, reduce profiteering to a mlnl-
mum and prevent wagen from rcach-P
lug untold heights. Had such a
c'oirso been followed in tho last war,"
ho continued:
"We would have nvoidod difficulties
through 'Which we aro now. going and
Wltil Which wo aro not through yet,"
CHINA .TO PURCHASE
SHANTUNG RAILWAY
Japan Consents to Transfer and
Payments Will Be by
Instalments.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 17. Japan has
accepted China's proposal concerning
the "method" by which sho Is to be
paid for surrendering tho Shantung
KnlhSuy. Sho still refuses cash pay
ment, but sho doe not Insist upon
payment by a Japanese loan, and she
agrees, always sub. ct to Toklo'a ap
proval ,to accept payment on tho In
stalment' plan.
As tentatively agreed upon, tho chief
points lu ths railway settlement aro
these:
1. China Is to rclmburso Japan In
return for Japan's surrender of her
demand for "Joint control."
2. The sum which China pays Is
53,000,000 gold marks, plus an allow
nnco for Japan's improvements since
Germany's day, minus an allowance-'
for deterioration.
3. This sum is to bo paid in annual
instalments. China lias proposed to
pay thu whole sum In two or three,
years; Japan wants payment spread
out over a much longer period, it Is
this point which tho two delegation,!
are now debating.
4. Within nlno months after an
agreement Japan is to turn over the
railway to tho Chinese Government.
E. Japan Is to retain no measure ot
"control," nnd what "financial inter
est" she retains Is to disappear with
the payment ot China's last Instal
ment. GIANTS SWAP FOUR
TO GET SHINNERS
Casli Consideration, Too, in Deal
for Great Outfielder of
Indianapolis.
Secretary James Tlerney of the
Giants to-day announced a trade by
which the Giants will obtain Out
fielder Ralph Shlnners of tho India
napolis club. In exchange the Giants
are swapping Outfielders Eddie
Brown and Vernon Spencer and two
players who havo not yet been named.
There la also a cash consideration
entering Into the deal the amount'.of
which has not been Indicated.
Shlnners will probably fight It out
for the regular berth loft vacant 'by
Georgo Uurns with Cunningham, He
Is twenty-one years old. six feet -In
height, weighing 190 pounds. Last
season he stole more bases. It is said.
than any player In any league. In
tho last throe games- ot tho season
he walloped flvo homers. He origi
nally came from .Milwaukee. ,
Tho Advisory Council of Organized
Baseball went Into session at the
Commodore to-day, Judge Kenesaw
Mountain Landis presiding.
FUNERAL. DIRECTORS.
r.11 fVo,t.. K20S
a Complete Fuaeral Serrlet
M an atmosphere ot rrflnemea
JTu Htttous ma mm."
PRANK V rA.MPRF.LI.
"THE FUNERAL CHURCH" tab
Broadway at 66th St.
DIED .
ETERS On D6c. 18, 11121, at her lata
realdenco, 2210 Qulmby ar., Dront,
TIlKItESA M. PETBRH (neo Towers),
beloved wife of Charles Peters, sister of
Mamie V., lla.rry t!fh Towers, and Mrs,
Julia Bannon. ,
Funeral on Monday at 9.45 A, M. from
her slater's reeldunce, 111 E. 230th St.,
Woodlawu Ilelrhts, thenco to the
Church of Our Lndy of Mercy, Vordham
Itoad and Marion av. Solemn high ra
qiitem mnu at 10.30. Interment Calvary
Cometeiy. Automobile cortecu
LOST. FOUND AND REWARDS.
TOSTFITTED BAG,
Uoira eniu cofer, ailrtr (lit moootlnu, mxwkad
M I. t ! IVkTi iwvani will t ild nmn r
iMnt rltUtW do quetlon ufctd. Vhon
HtUfTnwm 4Tuui tor nir nora
r..'t " i.t". .t m'l i 'J " j..- '
ni i iiiuiiiui niiuiimiii iius. vciuill,
Turkish back; Motrl IVtuyirni. I tew An I
JvOO If rfturnnl lo twWnt mioafer UotW I
'rnnlTiTl No quwtlorm jukal.
Notice to Advertisers
Dlrplij adrrnlilni ripe ropr and rtltfcu ortffffs
for fllhtr Jkt awk dr Merolni Wolti or Tba
l.Xnloi Weill U icctlita fur 4 P. u. b dir
trrcediBt publlntlon no le mitt'td only n
rc bim ptruut ud lu ordtf of recflpt tt Tbe
World Offl'f. Coot ccMtlnlnc rniiitlnit to be
oini tr Tbt Wind unit be ncelnd lr 1 r. M.
Dttplit Kjmttimi t)ft cepj for the Supplt
cntnt Srtlooi of The Standi? World mutt be
retired bj I ?. U Thunder prrocdlnt publlci
tton tod xeltttf must bt rtoclrcd by 1 T. M.
Kridlr. four rontilntll foirirlcif to be utde
fcj The Woild mutt be renlnd br Thuridtr noon.
Sundir Miln Fhnt ropt. trpe ropr Mcb. hii
not turn notlrtd bj P. M. Frldr, 'md eu
mvlni ropj which tin not betn mld la the
fiubliritloa office br 1 P If, Frldtr. tad poiltlre
inerrllon ordrri not rrrelrrd b S P. M- rrldi;,
trill bt onlmd t rondlttoai rtulrt. rlildlr in
tht ordrr of ltteit reotlpt end potlilre rtluie
erdtr.
DltptiT mor or ordin reltiHd liter thin as
Ptortdtd abort, alt. rimltrnt ul not etna to
era (Uicouati of tnj chtrtoter, contract or octets
WW
TUB WO
i
ami
3HrUMudlsiUip,'s'

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