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The evening world. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, February 06, 1922, Final Edition, Image 10

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N
IplWSIN
W GIVE THEIR VIEWS
ON PROHIBITION
jt$ k , (Continued from rage XIiid.) I
' 1
TH'E EVENING WORLD, MONDAY, PEBEUARY fl, 1922..
t
Vii'
(Wbltlon." I think much of this Ii ,
occasioned by tho fact that nearly
,vcry city has restaurants In whlcli '
people can secyrc what thoy want to I
drink -with their meals. This" natu
rally diverts from tho legitimate hotel !
.business the patronago of people who!
want drinks with meals. There Is no
question that nil legitimate hotels nrr
Jlvtiy? up to tho Prohibition Act. and
at very material loss to themselves. '
. Another largo Item of pxponne Is the :
iUSO of liquor by guests who brln tt
to their rooms, with tho resulting
damago to carpets and finnlshlnm.
,1 feel confident that every hotel
jltecper would welcome the enforeo-
ment of the Volstead Act, or Its nbo- i
lltlom
LEO P. HARLOW, Attorney. Wash-I
;irrgton, at tho Attor I think the!
Amendment is too young for a cor- I
.rect appraisal of Its effects. Thus far. I
the principal effect seems to be u
disrespect for law. Kvcrybody vio
lates It, Justifying himself by the
fact that It was put over on him and
that ho had no voice In the matter.
A highly organized and blatant mi
nority wad responsible. 1 have heard
said In Washington that the Amend
ment will finally bo nullified, that
Congress will (appropriate less and
less for its enforcement until it final
ly becomes a dead letter.
S. G. HATFIELD, Denver, Col., at
tho MoAlpin Peoplo in my section or
the country do not mind thrf present
state of affairs. I imagine, because
liquor Is so easy to get. Prohibition
lias had very little effect on business
conditions In Denver, because we
have no Industrial foreign population.
Jn cities like Pueblo the situation
might bo different.
W. A. HAYDEN, linotype machines,
Baltimore, at the McAlpin I think
that conditions In general arc much
worse now than they would have been
If Prohibition had not come. 1 do not
knorr, however, whether the business
depression itself resulted from It
CRIME HAS INCREASED AND
LABOR IS RESTLESS.
JOHN J. HAWLEY, Kansas Cfty,
Mo, at tho McAlpin' Nothing can be
said in favor of Prohibition In its re
lations to conditions In Kansas City
and throughout Missouri during the
past two years. Crimo has Increased,
now channels of corruption havo been
opened and labor Is more restless and
discontented than ever. Most signifi
cant, perhaps, is the Increase in juve
nllo delinquency. Youthful curiosity
is constantly on edgo as a result of
tho unending discussion about the
Eighteenth Amendment, and tho splco
Of danger In satlsfylnlg that curiosity
is an adventuro of the most irresist
ible appeal. Youth was formerly pro
tected from liquor evils by laws vig
orously enforced and heartily sup
ported by public opinion. Tho Eight
eenth Amendment automatically did
away with tho protective laws, but
the liquor evil remains and flourishes
in worse degree than, ever during tho
saloon regime.
HENRY M. HIDDEN, drinkino eup
manufacturer,1 Cincinpati, at the Wal
dorfBusiness In Cincinnati Is worse
than it has been In many years, and
Prohibition can foe held responsible
for much of the depression. It is a
beer drinking city, and public opinion
Is decidedly against tho present law.
Baa llquo? has been responsible for
many deaths and much Illness. The
only solution for 'tho problem is a
-beer and wine modification of the
law.
PAUL H. HUGHES. Magazine
Representative, Chicago, at the Mc
Alpin Chicago offers many moiV
.arguments against Prohibition thnn
for it. A number of prominent and
wealthy citizens recently organized
to lead a fight for modification of
the Volstead Act. Tho Eighteenth
Amendment has not had tho support
of- the public, and that has bred dls
respect for other laws. Even tho
United States mulls, formerly invio
late, arc now tho prey of desperate
criminals. Crime of all kinds has
increased: corrupt practice) arc more
widespread than ever befqre; :abor
troubles aro marked by extiemc vio
lence, and the list of drug and poison
liquor victims grows dally. What can
the Prohibitionists show?
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY, Attor
ney, President Olympic Club, San
Francisco, at the Belmont I do not
think thut Prohibition has helped
business, nnd there Is certainly Ho In
dication that It has hclcd tho 'mil
vldtial. Tho very word 'I'liihlblt' Is
obnoxious to the llbeit -loving Aim r
Ican people. The Volstead Act Iium
brought about u deplorable el nf
condition whlcli does not Improve.
Placing tho country on light wines
and lieer would solve -ilie problem.
OLIVER JOHNSTON, Wholesale
nnd Retail Shoes, Seattle, at the
Astor Prohibition hasvhc.lpcd our
scrtlon. In my opinion. The closing
of the y.nr.on has UiU&n nwny much
teinptalkm to drink, nnd tnoro work
ing men are buying homes now. I'ub-II.-;
Hentlmgnt was all against the
saloon. Now the men who come from
rtlasku the loggers and flshermuu
who formerly spent their money In
saloons invest It In something staple.
1 do not think that Prohibition has
aff'-cted buslnes ono way or the
other.
W. B. JONES, Insurance, Lexing
ton. Ky at the Martinique Ken-
turlty, di iplto Its activities of other
d.iys, is' heartily In mpathy Willi
the provisions of the Eighteenth
Amendment. Tho Sliito 1h satisfied
and prosperous under present con
ditions, nnd It is safe to sny that the
Volstead Act would lx.' telalned by n
majonlv of 100.000.
FRANK J, LEE, salesman, Spring
field, Mass., at the Commodore
Th'Tc It a good and n bad sldo to
almost everything, but I cannot see
tiow Pfohhltlon has helped buslnes
I don't think It has made the slightest
difference.
WILLIAM T. LEE, salesman,
Bridgeport, at the Commodore Or
course tho farmer has benefited in
many ways ns a result of Prohibition.
1'nrm hands nre doing bitter work.
Ask any farmer and lie will tell you
t;o. Tho mills, the factories where
numbers of men aro employed, will
tell you that they arc getting better
t.ervlcc.1
S. A. LITTLE, merchant, Dubuque,
la., at the McAlpin Prohibition has
not directly affected business In Iowa,
but It has created a general discon
tent, inlmlcnl to the friendly, har
monious way In which business Is
proverbially conducted In that State.
Dissatisfaction Is evidenced, not only
in the cities, but also In the ruial dis
tricts. Many of the lown farmers aro
of Herman descent, and beer nnd
wines have always been an adjunct
to their social .life In the hardwork
ing communlllTiT Isolated from the
plensijro of the cities. Modification
of fho present law Is favored.
MADE DRUNKARDS OF PEOPLE
WHO NEVER DRANK.
DR. W. A. LYNOTT, Bartlesville.
Okla., at the Astor I believe that
Prohibition has mnde drunkaids out
of people who never drank before.
After two years It has been found
that Prohibition docs not prohibit. 1
believe we should permit tlio manu
facture and sale of whUkey, but not
go back to tho caloon. People drink
alcohol nnd home brew nnd will con
tinue ns tony ,i they cannot get wills
key. - As u pin slcliui,, 1 think that
whiskey Is on- of the greatest stim
uliintH e ii hi- when properly used.
C. S. F. M'CREADY, cotton manu
facturers' representative, Winchester,
Ky at the Majestic Kvury year for
the pal i-lgl.i wars I luivo taken two
trips tiitoiiKh i lie South, nnd every
where Prohibit ion. first as a Hluti
! law, and thin, miller tljo Eighteenth
I Amendment, Mm had favorable ef-
feet, pai tii ul.iih on tho youth of the
section. Tin ncrlts of Prohibition
nie piU i 1 1 1 1 1 1 i the surface. The Im
provement i I lMc noted In the Houth
have been 1 years in the mnk-'
Ing. Impotl ml .it this time of bttsl-
ness depress . in is tho fact that labor
j In the Soul'. 1' is accumulated a ro
l servo against haul times, something
never iieromplr lied In nnto-Prohlbl-fion
days.
J. F. MACKLAIN, coal, Philadel
phia, at the Eiltmore I licllevo the
uoiMiigm.iu si mild have his b"':i 1
have Hii ti no i h.ingr slnco the ndvoi.t
of Prohibition The men seem to get
all lh"y nunt oi It, but unfortunately
nil they gi t is poisonous liquor. He
fore the Volste.id Act beenme a iaw,
the nun m." paid off on Satuiday.
nnd some ol tjiom remained olTVoli
Jlondny. The h'ime situation piovr.lla
i.t the piesent lime; tho only dlf
feicnre Ins in tin- fact that It takcfi
them loi.i;i i to ircover from what
tliny drill1 .
LAURENCE MILLS, publisher,
Washington D. C. at the Biltmoie
Pmhlbltlon his been wonderfully suc
cessful In t "ays. It has piovided
n safe me.ms lor the underworld to
inako fortiuiis by bootlegging nnr" has
niiide It impossible for tho working
man Jn pet lieer nnd wines. Ilt u
really the only ono who hns'iiuffered,
for t vet one ilse HceniR U lie ablo to
get what lie wants at cxborbitanl
prices. In fuel, drinking lias now
lieociiie a fa'l
PEOPLE IN IOWA FAVOR LIGHT
WINES AND BEER.
H. B. MULLEN, motor supplies,
Sioux City, Iowa, at the Commodore
1 do not beMive that Prohibition has
done us any harm, and nt a lecent
meotlnn or the Chamber of Coin
murce representatives it was up.1
veisally decided that It had done us
some good Most, people in the sec
tion, huwcM'i, Invar the ttalo of beer
and light allies.
WALTER I. PAGE, American
Smeltinn and Refining Co., Omana.
Neb., nt tho Waldorf Conditions in
tho Went are diifcient from those in
the I'ast. New York, particularly,
has many visiting plenstfro seekers.
In the West, tho well-to-do have
private stocks, not yet depleted. Th"
closing of the saloon was the greatest
boon that the laboier could have re
ceived! Families formerly came to us
asking for money with which to exist
loiter the head ot the family bad either
speni ins wngts or i.cen ioddcii oi
them. To-day these families aic sav
ing money. I! it the laboring dims,
linrtlculnily the foreign element,
usauusama
How do you judge shoes?
Most people don't. They judge prices. But
that is like the tail wagging the dog, instea'd
of the dog wagging the tail. There's much
more to a shoe than the price. There's
leather, of course. There's workmanship,
certainly. There's style. And there's fitting.
It would take years to learn to judge
leather and good workmanship expertly.
You've got to depend upon the reputation
of the maker of the shoes for those things.
You are the judge of style or pattern. When
it comes to a shoe-fitting, it's important to
accept the advice of one who knows..
The makers of Walk-Over Shoes know
what that service means to you; That's
why you can't buy Walk-Over Shoes at
Tom, Dick and Harry's shoe store. Only
Walk-Over Stores have Walk-Over Shoes.
New York City Stores
510 Fifth Araiur, between 43d and 43d Sts.
1 79 Broadnay, ntar Corllandt St. 1432 Uroadway at 40tli St. 252 W. 1 25th St.
1173-75 Broadway, near 28th St. 1825 Broadway, near 30th St. 622 W. lllit St,
ISO Bowery at Broome St.
Brooklyn tlronx 5S7 Melroie Avenue, near H9th St.
13S5 Broadway, near Gatei Ave Yonken, N. Y. 7 N- Broadway
J6S-7 Fultpn St . opp. Hanover Place I'llerion, N. J. HI Market St.
S406 Fifth Avenue Poughkeeptie. N. Y. 297 Main St. i.
Complete line ol Phoenix and Van Raalte Hosiery
misses Its lieer. I think that, taking
nil classes Into consldeiatlon, thcltj Is
u pietty geneial leellng for the modi
fication of the present law.
CHARLES PETER, Mining Expert,
Bait Lake City, at tho Astor Prohi
bition Ims m a sensi Improved condi
tions in tin smaller mining camps In
the West, in the larger, hownvor, tho
men llnd ways and means of satisfying-
then craving tor liquor, and as
they can't get what they want, they
get moonshine nnd other leverages
unfit fur use. The effect hns been very
bad; they hecome sick, wild nnd un
ruly, and conditions urc much worse
than befoie Prohibition. Personally,
I favor lestiictlon. not. Prohibition,
and would llltn to see modifying legis
lation. I believe that better condi
tions wood come wiih a return of beer
and light wines, both of -which are
helpful bovrages. Tb conditions of
which I speak do not obtain only In
tho West, but also in the mining sec
tions of the East, where tho general
unrest or laboring men Is directly
traceable to Prohibition.
G. W. PLATT, stocks and bonds
Cincinnati, at the Commodore Pro
hibition lias caused absolutely no Im
provement In business. In fact, it
has disturbed conditions very mater
ially. The liquor problem Is still ono
which must he worked out.
LAW HAS WORKED FOR BUSI
NESS DEPRESSION.
R. E. REED, General Contractor,
Charlestown, W. Vs., at the Mc
Alpin Mi-onshino has always been a
problem with us. Now the traffic Is
more active than ever, and drinking
certainly has not decreased. Jails
r.ro crowded in the State, nnd thoro Is
a very strong .sentiment in favor of
beer and wine. Prohibition has
w.orkcd for business depression, Tax
payers are disgusted at seeing money
spent for enforcement without re
sults. J. S. ROBINSON, fruit distributor,
Spokane, Wash., at the Astor I-think
labor in our section Is tar better oft
under Prohibition, which went Into
effect in the State boforo tho 18th
Amendment. There is more money
In tho banks, and conditions are bet
ter In general. Tho gennral fentlraent
In Spokane la against the return of
liquor.
SILAS W. ROQER8, Attorney
Little Roek, Ark., at the Astor I
think the conditions under tho open
saloon wcie better than thoso of to
day, when dope and "white mul"
exist, but I think that In time condi
tions will Improve, nnd that then pro
hibition will bo n good thing. Arkan-
fias was bono dry before national po
ilbltlon. Then business wus better
peoplo paid their bills more promptly,
and conditions among retailers became
excellent. Hut under national proH
bitlon "whlto mule" hns been preval
ent, nnd all kinds arc being manu
factured. Many who never drank bo
frrc do Urinlc "whlto mule" now, al
though I think that tho workers can
not afford It, nnd sales nro for tho
most part to men with money, vrho
will soon bo afraid to uso It. ,
PLENTY OF LIQUOR; LAW CAN'T
' BE MADE EFFECTIVE.
ALBERT H. SHIPMAN, retired
business man, Palm Beach, at ths
Biltmore I have Just travelled to New
York ftom Arizona, and on tho trains
For the Dinner
of To-Day
the seasoning of the
.soup, salnd, gravy, fis.li,
ron.st and vegetable is'
the all-important factor.
MADE IN U. S. A.
At Croccrs end Delicatessen Stores
t. Pritchard, 3Z7 Spring St., N. I.
In fact, in tiny mooting1 place It l
tho unanimous opinion that liquor li
obtalnuble anywhohi If one. ha thit
price. With that condition prevailing
me law cunnot bo ofrectlvo. Tho oniy
benefit which hns qomo from It no fur
as I can neo In to real citato owners)
whose proporty formerly lnoludod
aloon apaco. Such apace Is now
rented to drug storos or cigar stores,
and has In eomo cases been divide)
Into two or three shops The owne.
accordingly, has no more Complaloti
about his property. Whllo I belle v
that prohibition would be a good-,thlng
If It were really effective, and that
liquors and saloons should be abol
ished, I think that tho present law is I
too drastic and that tho question
should bo loft to tho communities
themselves for Bettlomont.
J. W. WF.AT. Trnnn. hi. I.. at tha
Commodore Whateves good hus
como rrom tho Prohibition act has
boon offsot by deaths und lawbroaklng.
Everybody carrlea It! nvnrvlwvtv linn tt
In his home; overyono Is Invited to'
drink from floskg, although liquor
tannoi oe rjougnt in restaurants or
hotels. '
A. R. SHIRLEY, manufacturer of
yapor.tsd milk, St. Louis, at the
MoAlpin There is no evidenco of
lessened liquor consumption in ft .
Louis. It Is q little harder to get, poo
In quality, and . costs $30 a gallcr
Crlrtio has increased, labor Is morjj,
restless than before, and tho condi-
tlon of the poor has not boon bettered '
Nobody wants a return of the saloon
era, but thero lb a growing: demaivt
for modification of the present laU,
tho drnstlc measures ot which defeat
lts'purpose.
E. F. SOULE, Portland, Me., at the
Astor National Prohibition has no
more prohibited 'In tho Htato of Maine
than has Stato Prohibition In the
many years that wo have had It. But -I
do believe that It Is a benefit for th
community to havo no saloons lu
which the youth can , bo easily,
tempted.
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NOW ON
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1922
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Almamiac
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ARMAMENT CONFERENCE.
1920 CENSUS IN DETAIL.
CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS.
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